Department of the Army Pamphlet 690-47

Civilian Personnel

DA CIVILIAN EMPLOYEE DEPLOYMENT GUIDE

Headquarters of the Army

Washington, DC

1 November 1995

This Department of the Army Pamphlet-

Includes information mandated by Department of Defense Directive 1404.10, Emergency Essential (EE) DOD U.S. Citizen Employees; Department of Defense Directive 1400.31, DoD Civilian Work Force Contingency and Emergency Planning and Execution; Department of Defense Instruction 1400.32, DoD Civilian Work Force Contingency and Emergency Planning Guidelines and Procedures; and Army Regulation 690-11.

Contains information on Army civilian deployment policy and procedures.

Proponent and Exception Authority. The proponent of this pamphlet is the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) (ASA (M&RA)). The ASA (M&RA) has the authority to approve exceptions to this pamphlet that are consistent with controlling laws and regulation. The ASA (M&RA) may delegate the approval authority in writing to a Division chief within the proponent agency who holds the grade of colonel or the civilian equivalent.

CIVILIAN DEPLOYMENT PROCEDURES/GUIDANCE

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Introduction

Authority to Deploy

Emergency Essential Designation

Command and Control

Legal Assistance

Family Assistance

Temporary Duty (TDY) Orders

Individual Readiness Processing and Departure Point

Civilian Identification Card/Tags

Medical Screening/Processing

Chemical Defensive Equipment Issue and Training

Weapons and Training

Clothing and Equipment Issue

Weight/Luggage Limitations

Deployment Packet

Passport/Visas

Customs Processing - Entrance and Exit Requirements

Living Under Field Conditions

Status of Forces Agreements (SOFA)

Uniform Code of Military Justice

Special Training Requirements

Geneva Convention, Prisoner of War Status, Combatant/Noncombatant Status

Pay (Direct Deposit)

Salaries

Maximum Salary Limitation (Pay Cap)

Overtime

Compensatory Time

Leave Accumulation

Foreign Post Differential

Danger Pay

Tour of Duty/Hours of Work

On-Call Duty

Job Security

Medical Care and Federal Employee's Compensation Act Benefits

Life Insurance

Casualty Status

Casualty Affairs

HIV Testing

Redeployment Procedures

Appendix A. Civilian Individual Readiness Processing (IRP) Qualification Criteria

Page 1, Page 2, Page 3

Appendix B. Deployment Criteria

Page 1, Page 2

Appendix C. Civilian Organizational Clothing and Individual Equipment (OCIE) and Chemical Defense Equipment (CDE)

Page 1, Page 2

Appendix D. Family Deployment Criteria

Page 1, Page 2, Page 3, Page 4

Introduction

Historically, civilians have played an important role in the conduct of U.S. military operations. More recently, Army civilians have established themselves as an integral and vital part of America's Army team. With distinction, they perform critical duties in virtually every functional facet of Combat Support and Combat Service Support, both at home and abroad. Serving beside their deployed uniformed compatriots they also provide the critical skills necessary to assure the availability of essential combat systems and weaponry; thereby maximizing the fighting capability of the combat soldier and success of the Army wartime and emergency mission.

This information has been prepared to inform Army civilian employees, management officials, and the Field Commanders of policies and procedures that affect civilian deployment issues. The following information is applicable to deployments in CONUS, OCONUS, and in support of military exercises. The basis of this pamphlet is "DOD Directive 1404.10, Emergency Essential (EE) DOD U.S. Citizen Employees and AR 690-11, Planning for Use and Management of Civilian Personnel in Support of Military Contingency Operations". This information is accurate as of the current date, but is subject to change based on evolving Department of Defense directives, policies, and procedures. This information will be updated on a periodic basis as required.

We welcome your recommendations, comments and questions. Please address them to Headquarters, Department of the Army, ATTN: SAMR-CPP, OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, MANPOWER AND RESERVE AFFAIRS, 200 Stovall Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22332-0300.

Telephone: DSN 221-9974, COMM 703-325-9974. FAX 703-325-3524.

Contents

Authority to Deploy

When the need for a particular civilian skill arises, civilian employees who possess the required skills and have been pre-identified for possible deployment (e.g. those serving in Emergency Essential positions or who otherwise volunteer for the particular assignment) will be assigned such duties before other employees. This policy does not, however, require the Army to conduct an exhaustive search for qualified volunteers when the need exists to quickly fill a requirement.

Army and DOD policy vests management with the authority to direct and assign civilian employees to perform duties necessary to accomplish the DOD mission. Such assignment may be required on a voluntarily or involuntarily or on an unexpected basis and may require civilian employees to perform combat support or other crisis essential functions. Army policy is to minimize the number of employees who must be involuntarily deployed, and Army is committed to providing all personnel who are sent to perform combat support or other crisis essential functions with proper training, equipment and protection. Management, however, may take appropriate administrative action, including separation from the federal service, if a civilian employee refuses to perform such functions until relieved by appropriate authority. Employees may be directed to perform these functions regardless of whether they have been pre-identified as emergency essential, have signed the emergency essential agreement, or had previously agreed to perform such functions.

REFERENCES:

a. 5 USC 7106

b. DOD Directive 1404.10, Emergency Essential (EE) DOD U.S. Citizen Civilian Employees, April 10,1992

c. AR 690-11, Planning for Use and Management of Civilian Personnel in Support of Military Contingency Operations

d. DA PAM 690-39, Family Assistance Handbook for Emergency Essential Personnel and Family Members, 1 February 1987.

e. DA Message #38, 4 January 1991, DAPE-CPP, Subject: Desert Shield Personnel Policy Message No. 38, Guidelines for Assignment, Utilization and Protection of Army

Civilians in Southwest Asia

f. Army Mobilization Operations, Planning and Execution System (AMOPES)

NOTE: These are basic references which are applicable to each topic contained in this guide. Additional references may also be identified.

Contents

Emergency Essential Designation

An Emergency Essential (EE) employee is a civilian employee who occupies an EE position and has signed a "DOD Civilian Employee Overseas Emergency-Essential Position Agreement" (DD Form 2365).

An EE position is a civilian position located overseas or one that would be transferred overseas during a crisis situation. The position is required to ensure the success of combat operations or to support combat essential systems subsequent to mobilization or an evacuation order. The position cannot be converted to a military position because it requires uninterrupted performance to provide immediate and continuing support for combat operations or support maintenance and repair of combat essential systems.

Due to unforeseen circumstances or the exigencies of a particular crisis, it may become necessary to identify positions as EE that have not been previously identified as such. These positions may be located in the overseas area or they may be positions to which an employee in the United States would be sent on temporary duty to the location of the crisis or other such emergency.

The deploying civilian will be requested to execute an EE agreement. If the employee declines to sign the agreement, but possesses special skills and expertise, which in management's view renders it necessary to send that employee on the assignment without signing the agreement, the employee may be directed on involuntary temporary duty to the location where the employee's skills are required.

All civilian employees deploying to combat operations/crisis situations are considered EE regardless of volunteer status or the signing of the EE position agreement. The employee will be in an EE status for the duration of the assignment.

REFERENCES: Basic

Contents

Command and Control

Command and control relationships often change to meet the needs of particular deployments. Therefore, what may be the appropriate command and control structure during peacetime or at the employee's normal place of work, may need to be changed during a crisis situation or a temporary duty assignment.

During a crisis situation or deployment, civilian employees are under the direct command and control of the on-site supervisory chain. Therefore, the on-site supervisory chain will perform the normal supervisory functions; for example, those related to performance evaluations, task assignments and instructions, and initiating and effecting recognition and disciplinary actions.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. Army Regulation 690-700, Chapter 751

Contents

Legal Assistance

Legal assistance relating to matters of deployment is available to Army civilians notified of deployment and their families.

Legal assistance will be available for the period of deployment and is limited to matters related to deployment as determined by the on-site supervising attorney. These services normally include such things as preparation of wills and powers of attorney, and basic income tax assistance.

Additionally, legal assistance is authorized for employees and family members for a reasonable period, as determined by the on-site supervising attorney, after the employee returns from deployment to close out ongoing legal assistance matters that arose before or during the deployment.

REFERENCE:

a. Basic

b. Army Regulation (AR) 27-3, Legal Assistance Program, 30 September 1992

Contents

Family Assistance

Few other professions present the challenge to family life as does being part of national defense. Challenges such as separations, travel, duty in remote and often dangerous locations, and the diminished ability to choose where you are going to live are a part of daily lives in a military organization. This is true not only for soldiers, but for many civilians as well. Research and recent experiences have shown that Army readiness is enhanced when soldiers and civilians ensure their families are prepared to meet diverse situations. Today a partnership exists between the Army and Army families. As soldiers and civilians better prepare their families to function independently in peace and war, they become more confident and train faster, perform better and are ready and able to give full attention to the mission. Army research indicates spouses and families who are satisfied with the Army way of life play a more significant role in development and performance of quality employees in the Army.

Civilian employees bear primary responsibility for family and personal affairs readiness. However, their family members need to keep informed concerning key organization information, benefits, programs, etc. Family members need to support the programs, services, and activities designed to maintain and/or enhance the quality of life and well-being of all members of the Total Army Family.

The Army Family Team Building (AFTB) program enhances Army readiness through training the Total Army family. This program incorporates existing training with newly developed training focusing on the Total Army Family --soldier (active and reserve component), DA civilian, retiree, and family members. AFTB provides training to military, civilians, and their family members that is designed to enhance their family readiness. DA civilians and their family members are encouraged to participate in this training.

Another source of information and assistance is the Family Support Group (FSG). This group is an organization of family members, volunteers, and Total Army personnel belonging to a unit/organization. The FSG is a command-sponsored activity to enable people within the unit/organization to help one another. FSGs create a unique atmosphere of mutual concern and care among organizational families. The FSG also forms a vital link with the home station commander and family assistance centers during deployments to answer family member questions and assist in meeting their needs. FSGs normally consist of the family members of a unit/organization, but can include extended family members (grandparents, aunts, etc.) and others interested in the welfare of the unit (fiancees, retirees, etc). Participation in a FSG should be strongly encouraged, but cannot be mandated. When family members understand the needs and benefits of a FSG, they are more willing to become involved in one.

The goal of family assistance is to provide support services to eligible family members at, or near their home town or home installation. These services will normally include:

Predeployment

Assist in establishing support groups

Orientations which outline available assistance

Assist single parent and dual deploying families in preparing family care plans

Coordinate with local and state human services assistance agencies

Identify families with major problems which require special assistance

Deployment

Provide family assistance

Assist casualty assistance officers in providing support to survivors

Assist families in relocating

Provide support to waiting families

Serve as sponsor for families with special needs

Keep commanders abreast of major problems

Post Deployment

Establish groups to deal with reunification problems

Emergency-Essential civilians and those who may be called on to deploy in support of a military contingency or emergency should use a family checklist to assist in helping their family focus on issues that may arise after the employee has departed and also helps prepare the employee for deployment. A family checklist

recommended by Army Community Services is at Appendix D.

As a condition of employment, single parents or families where both parents are emergency-essential civilians, are required to prepare a family care plan. This plan will be equivalent to that required of the military located in the same geographical area (AR 690-11).

REFERENCE:

a. Basic

b. Army Regulation (AR) 608-1, Army Community Service Program

Contents

TDY Orders

Civilian employees deploying to support military operations will need travel orders prepared in accordance with Chapter 3, Part D, of the Joint Travel Regulations (JTR), Volume II. The orders should be prepared as follows.

1. In the remarks section, Item 16, the following statements must be included (without the quotation marks) for all employees:

"Actual expense allowance authorized while on TDY site". (No per diem is authorized for civilians when living under field conditions while in support of military operations; however, they will be reimbursed for actual subsistence expense, if any, while under field conditions.)

"Authorized to carry Government issued weapon when permitted by Field Commander"

"Medical care is authorized in accordance with AR 40-3, para 4-29(A) 8 for civilians in a TDY status"

"Overtime (or Compensatory Time) authorized at TDY site as required by the Field Commander"

"PX privileges are authorized"

Additional authorizations such as "Rental car authorized at authorized layover locations" are optional and are determined by the home station which issues the TDY order.

2. The itinerary, item 11, should route the individual through the designated Conus Replacement Center (CRC) or other designated central processing site, where deployability will be verified, accountability established and onward transportation coordinated. It should also show all authorized layovers enroute to and from TDY location whenever possible. Mark an "X" in the block labeled "Variation Authorized" in case conditions warrant deviation enroute to and from the TDY location. Army policy authorizes advances for TDY expenses provided the estimated reimbursable "cash" expenses exceed $50.00. Advances are limited to a 45-day period and are limited to meals and incidental expenses covered by the per diem rate or actual subsistence expense allowance and other authorized expenses that cannot be paid by charge card.

3. Civilian employees are expected to use the Government contractor-issued charge card to cover travel expenses. If conditions precluded the use of the charge card or a Government contractor-issued charge card was not offered the employee, an additional advance not to exceed 80 percent of the additional estimated cash expenses is authorized. This exception to the advance limitation is not available to employees who elected not to receive the Government contractor-issued charge card when offered by their command or whose Government contractor-issued charge card has been suspended or revoked because of delinquent payments. Per diem is authorized while enroute to and from the TDY site; however, if both lodging and meals are provided by the Government without fee, the per diem is limited to $2.00 per day in CONUS and $3.50 per day in OCONUS. If there is a charge for the use of Government quarters or Government provided meals, the preceding per diem rates will be increased by the actual fees in lieu of the maximum per diem rates shown in Appendices A and E of the JTR.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. Department of Defense Civilian Personnel Joint Travel Regulations (JTR), Volume 2, 1 September 1976, As Amended

c. Army Regulation (AR) 37-106, Financial Administration, Finance and Accounting for Installations Travel and Transportation Allowances, 31 January 1990

Contents

Individual Readiness Processing (IRP) and Departure Points

Upon activation of a CONUS Replacement Center (CRC) all civilians deploying as individuals will be required to deploy through that center.

Civilians deploying with units will usually process with the unit.

The home station/installation or sponsoring activity is responsible for completion of the Individual Readiness Processing (IRP) of its personnel. In the early stages of an operation it may be necessary that they deploy directly from their home station or other designated geographical location (CRC or other central processing center if CRC is not activated). The deployment of civilians through a central processing center or CRC is required to ensure that the individual meets all deployability criteria, is ready to deploy and to ensure accountability.

Processing procedures/requirements for military and civilian members of the Total Force are very similar and for that reason, a processing checklist is being designed to accommodate both military and civilian processing. However, until the new form is prescribed for use, the Civilian IRP Qualification Checklist at Appendix A should be utilized IAW instructions in Army Mobilization Operations Planning and Execution System (AMOPES) (S).

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. Army Regulation 600-8-111, Replacement Operations

c. Army Regulation 600-8-101, In- and Out- and Mobilization Processing

d. Field Manual 12-6, Personnel Doctrine

Contents

Civilian Identification Cards/Tags

The DA Form 1602 (Civilian Identification Card) is a standard ID Card used by DA civilian employees and other civilians who regularly require official identification in connection with the business of the Army, both in continental United States (CONUS) and overseas (OCONUS).

All deploying civilians and those designated as emergency essential who may deploy must have a valid DA Form 1602 in their possession. The ID card will be completed in accordance with instructions contained in Chapter 8, AR 600-8-14.

The home installation also must issue each deploying civilian a Geneva Convention Card, DD Form 489, to document that they are authorized to accompany the armed forces. This affords them the protections of the Hague and Geneva Conventions and Prisoner of War status if captured.

All deploying civilians will also be issued identification tags utilizing instructions contained in Chapter 11 of AR 600-8-14.

REFERENCE:

a. Basic

b. Army Regulation 600-8-14, Identification Cards, Tags and Badges

c. Department of Defense Instruction 1000.1, Identity Cards Required by the Geneva Conventions

Contents

Medical Screening/Processing

The physical requirements for deploying individuals will be based on the functional requirements of the job to be performed in the theater and any other requirements specified by the in-theater commander. The individual must be physically fit to perform assigned duties, The ability to meet the requirements will be determined by a government administered physical examination at the home station prior to deployment.

Emphasis of the physical will be placed on diagnosing cardiovascular, pulmonary, orthopedic, neurologic, endocrine, dermatologic, psychological, visual, and auditory conditions which may preclude performing the related functional requirements.

All deploying individuals will be required to take any immunizations or medications that might be required for deployment to the theater of operations.

All deploying individuals will also be administered a dental panorex and DNA sampling (where available) for identification purposes.

Individuals requiring vision corrective lenses (glasses or contact lenses), will be required to have a government administered eye examination and will be issued optical inserts for the protective mask.

Individuals should deploy with a minimum 90 day supply of any required medications to preclude any adverse impact of pharmaceutical shortages in the theater of operations. Part of the screening process will be to assess both the amount of medications being taken and its suitability in the theater environment.

Deployed civilian employees are entitled to in-theater full medical care, including pharmacy support, equivalent to that given active duty military.

Each deploying civilian will also be required to undergo a physical examination upon redeployment to identify and document any medical problems that might be connected with the deployment. These redeployment physical examinations may be completed either prior to theater departure, or at the CONUS processing point or at the home installation.

Medical screening will include completion of the DA Form 8007, Individual Medical History, and the DA Form 4036-R, Medical and Dental Preparation for Overseas Movement. A completed copy of these forms will be included in the individual's Deployment Packet.

Contents

Chemical Defensive Equipment Issue and Training

The in-theater commander will determine the requirement for equipping and training civilian personnel with Chemical Defensive Equipment (CDE).

Training and equipment will be theater specific and dependent upon the threat and the nature of the duties. The employee's home station will provide familiarization training in the use of the equipment. A listing of recommended CDE to be issued deploying civilians is included in Appendix C.

The standard requirement for civilian CDE training is taken from the Soldiers Manual of Common Tasks as follows:

Protect Against NBC Attack

031-503-1004 Put on, wear, remove, and store your M17-series protective mask with hood. pg 424

031-503-1005 Maintain your M17-series protective mask with hood. pg 434

031-503-1007 Decontaminate your skin and personal equipment. pg 477

031-503-1015 Put on and wear your MOPP gear. pg 490

031-503-1019 Recognize and react to chemical or biological hazard. pg 499

031-503-1006 Drink from canteen while wearing MOPP-4. pg 620

031-503-1008 Use the latrine while wearing MOPP-4. pg 636

Give First Aid

081-831-1008 Give first aid for heat injuries pg 709

081-831-1030 Administer nerve agent antidote to self (self-aid). pg 649

081-831-1031 Administer first aid to a nerve agent casualty (buddy-aid). pg 654

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. Soldiers Manual of Common Tasks, STP 21-1-SMCT, Skill Level 1, Oct 90

Contents

Weapons and Training

Under certain conditions Army civilians may be issued sidearms for their personal self defense, subject to military regulations regarding training in proper use and safe handling of firearms. Acceptance of a sidearm is voluntary by the emergency-essential civilian.

Authority to carry sidearms is also contingent upon the approval and guidance of the supported Combatant/MACOM Commander. The Army Component Commander must make the decision early in the operation as to whether or not civilians may be armed.

Only government issued sidearms/ammunition are authorized. Familiarization training will be conducted IAW FM 23-35.

The installation is responsible for complete SRP processing (within their capability), to include weapons familiarization training and weapons issue. If the installation does not have the capability, then the CRC or designated central processing center is responsible for providing the training and issuing the sidearm.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. FM 23-35

Contents

Clothing and Equipment Issue

Organization Clothing and Individual Equipment (OCIE) will be issued to emergency-essential personnel and other civilians who may be deployed in support of military operations.

If required, civilian employees will be provided protective clothing and equipment, including some Nuclear, Biological, Chemical (NBC) defensive equipment. This equipment will be issued only as necessary to perform assigned duties during hostilities, conditions of war, or other crisis situations. The protective mask and chemical protective clothing to include training sets will be issued to civilian emergency essential or deploying personnel.

Kevlar Helmets, load bearing equipment, and chemical defensive equipment will be worn in a tactical environment in accordance with supported unit procedures.

Maintenance and accountability of EE clothing and equipment is the responsibility of the employee to whom the items were issued.

Items of personal clothing and personal care are the responsibility of the individual. Civilian employees should bring work clothing required by their particular job.

Appendix C is a list of Organizational Clothing and Individual Equipment (OCIE) that should be available for issue. The actual determination of items to be issued and quantities will be based on the specific circumstances of deployment, and will be determined by the theater Army Component Commander.

AR 700-84, (paragraph 3-7) specifies the procedure for obtaining camouflage uniforms, footwear and insignia for Department of Army Civilians who are required to wear Army clothing and footwear during field exercises or while accompanying the force in support of contingency operations. They are authorized to purchase such items from the Army Military Clothing Sales Stores (AMCSSs). Proper identification along with the Commander's statement listing clothing items required and quantities requested will be presented to AMCSS at time of sale. "Insignia, for civilians" as shown in AR 670-1 (Para 29-10), will be attached and worn on the camouflage uniform. Insignia will be obtained through normal supply channels. AR 700-84, (paragraph 3-7) states that Commanders may authorize OMA funds for purchase of the Army camouflage uniform, undershirts, footwear, and other uniform related items. Name tapes, name plates, and insignia will be furnished and attached at Government expense.

Special instructions for wearing of Individual Battle Dress

Uniform (BDU) items of equipment and protective clothing by

civilians are contained in AR 670-1, Wear and Appearance of the

Military Uniform. Civilians authorized to wear this

clothing/equipment are expected to adhere to these instructions.

Civilians are authorized to wear the black baseball cap with BDUs, to be purchased with installation funds. This headgear must also be worn IAW AR 670-1, Wear and Appearance of the Military Uniform.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. AR 670-1

c. AR 700-84

Contents

Weight/Luggage Limitations

Restrictions on luggage size, weight and number of pieces which are allowed when deploying in support of contingency operations will depend on the operation and the type of transportation to be utilized. In most deployments of non-unit related personnel, contract commercial air will be utilized for transportation of these individuals to the theater of operations. In this case, the normal restrictions which apply to commercial airlines will be in effect. Generally these consist of:

Weight restrictions of 150 to 250 lbs of baggage

No more than 2 pieces of checked baggage

No more than 1 piece of baggage to be carried on the aircraft in addition of Chemical Defense Equipment (if required in the theater)

In cases where an individual must accompany equipment which cannot be taken aboard passenger aircraft, arrangements must be made in advance with the Aerial Port of Embarkation.

Specific luggage/weight requirements will be announced by HQ DA message as the requirement to deploy individuals and units unfolds.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

Contents

Deployment Packet

A deployment packet will be provided by the individual's home station/installation civilian personnel office or employer.

Upon completion of the required documents identified below, a copy will be retained in the CPO file/employer file and a copy forwarded with the individual to the central processing center or CONUS Replacement Center (CRC) if activated. The designated central processing center or CRC will validate the completion of the requirements and provide the individual with a copy to take to the personnel support activity in the theater of operations.

If any processing is completed at the central processing center/CRC or in the theater of operations, a copy will be provided to the home station CPO/employer.

1. Personal Data Sheet (Non-DA civilians) ACPERS Abbreviated Record/Printout (DA Civilians)

2. Civilian Individual Readiness Processing (IRP) Qualification Checklist

3. Copy of TDY Orders

4. DD Form 93, Record of Emergency Data

Upon deployment, the 1st card copy is mailed by the servicing CPO/employer to CDR, PERSCOM, ATTN: TAPC-PEC. The 2nd copy is retained in the individual's personnel file; 3rd copy is placed in employee's deployment packet.

5. DA Form 8007, Individual Medical History

6. DA Form 4036-R, Medical and Dental Preparation for Overseas Movement.

7. DA Form 3645 (Organization Clothing and Individual Equipment Record)

8. Panographic Xray (Panorex) and/or DNA record (when available). Only one copy of Panorex will be made and it will be included in the copy of the deployment packet which is maintained at the home station CPO/employer.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. AR 600-8-101

Contents

Passports/Visas

Employees deployed overseas in support of military operations will be required to carry a passport at all times when traveling. In addition to the red "No Fee" passport received by filing DD Form 1056, (Authorization to Apply for a "No-Fee" Passport and/or Request for Visa) civilians may be authorized reimbursement for the standard blue passport for use in passing through countries not friendly to the United States. This determination will be made on a case by case basis and is contingent on the area and circumstances of deployment.

Normally, charges for passports/visas are reimbursed; however, reimbursement of fees or charges for legal services required by local laws are not reimbursable. Reimbursement of authorized costs in obtaining the blue passport are made by filing SF 1034, Public Voucher for Purchases and Services Other than Personal.

Emergency Essential employees will maintain current red and blue passports at all times.

Requirements for visas will be determined by the country of deployment/travel and obtained from their embassies prior to deployment.

Application for passports/visas will be submitted at the employee's home station and passport must be in the individual's possession upon arrival at a CRC or Aerial/Sea Port of Embarkation.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. DOD Joint Travel Regulations (JTR), Volume 2

Contents

Customs Processing Entrance and Exit Requirements

Civilian employees entering and exiting a country will be subject to the customs processing procedures established for that country. The entrance and exit requirements are country specific and will be covered during processing for deployment. Returning civilians are also subject to re-entry requirements of the United States.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

Contents

Living Under Field Conditions

During major deployments, most individuals will be living under field conditions. Living under field conditions is much different from normal civilian life. There will be general lack of privacy and little opportunity for recreation during non-duty hours. Housing will often consist of tents or hastily constructed buildings. Food will be prepackaged rations or served in a military dining facility, which means that special diets may not be accommodated in some circumstances. Showers, if available, may be communal, otherwise bathing may be from a bucket or helmet. There will be limited opportunities to phone home and mail deliveries may be delayed. Laundry services may also be severely limited. The organized practice of religion may be restricted to services and assistance provided by the military chaplain.

The on-site commander may impose special rules, policies, directives, and orders based on mission necessity, safety, and unit cohesion. These restrictions need only be considered reasonable in the circumstance of the deployment to be enforceable.

The host nation may also impose special laws and rules. The specific customs, traditions, and restrictions of the host nation will be addressed in the pre-deployment briefing and compliance is required.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

Contents

Status of Forces Agreements (SOFA)

SOFAs are negotiated relationships between two countries wherein the host nation accords certain rights and responsibilities to members of U.S. Forces and accompanying civilians.

Many violations of host nation laws are also violations of U.S. law as well. SOFAs generally provide that punitive or other actions can be taken under appropriate U.S. military or civilian law, rule or regulation rather than the host nation law. A Foreign Criminal Jurisdiction arrangement will be negotiated if the host nation will not agree to grant U.S. personnel some form of immunity. An agreement of this nature will provide jurisdictional protections and procedural safeguards for U.S. personnel. However, the host nation may still retain the right to prosecute U.S. personnel for offenses that are either exclusive violations of host nation law or those over which the host nation has primary concurrent jurisdiction.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. Department of the Army Operational Law Handbook, The Judge Advocate General School

Contents

Uniform Code of Military Justice

Military criminal law is defined by the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). Military criminal law is similar to civilian law in the United States. For example, most offenses which are crimes under civilian law are also crimes under military law; on the other hand, some offenses are peculiar to military law (i.e., absence without leave or violation of a lawful order). Those individuals who come under the jurisdiction of the UCMJ are limited by the status of the individual at the time the military crime was committed. Therefore, active duty soldiers are subject to the UCMJ at all times, on and off post; reserve component soldiers are subject to military law when in federal service; and civilians may be subject to military law when serving with or accompanying an armed force "in time of war". The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled "in time of war" to mean a congressionally declared war, and not contingency operations such as Southwest Asia, Somalia or Haiti.

Civilian employees are subject to the normal administrative disciplinary procedures. Civilian employees are subject to the "chain of command", and disciplinary procedures are the responsibility of the on-site supervisor. In cases requiring suspension or dismissal, the discipline may be administered at the home station.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. Uniform code of Military Justice

c. DA Message, DAJA-CL, 081900Z Feb 91, Subject: Time of War Under UCMJ and MCM

Contents

Special Training Requirements

All deploying civilian personnel will receive training in the areas of the Weapons Familiarization, Geneva Conventions, Code of Conduct, Uniform Code of Military Justice, Rules of Engagement, Health and Sanitation, First Aid, Customs and Courtesies for the area of deployment, Legal Assistance, and Status of Forces Agreement (if applicable). Training on other issues/topics (i.e., military driver's license) will be provided as dictated by the specific circumstances of the deployment.

The home installation is responsible for providing or coordinating training for personnel identified for deployment.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

Contents

Geneva Convention, Prisoner of War Status, Combatant/Non-Combatant Status

The 1907 Hague Convention and the 1949 Geneva Convention are rules that were developed by the international community to govern the law of warfare. These agreements have evolved into principles that are now recognized as part of international law.

Under both the Hague and Geneva Conventions, combatants and non-combatants are entitled to be protected as Prisoners of War(POW) if captured. These protections are accorded to those who are persons accompanying the armed forces without actually being members thereof provided they have received authorization from the armed forces which they accompany, and have been provided with an identity card, most notably the Geneva Convention Card (DD Form 489). Since the issuance of an identity card is significant, all civilians accompanying the armed forces must be issued a Geneva Convention Card prior to deployment.

The treatment accorded to POWs depends on each POW's particular status or rank. The higher the status or rank, the greater the benefits afforded to that POW.

Civilians who take part in hostilities may be regarded as combatants and are subject to attack and/or injury incidental to an attack on military objectives. Taking part in hostilities has not been clearly defined in the law of war, but generally is not regarded as limited to civilians who engage in actual fighting. Since civilians augment the Army in areas in which technical expertise is not available or is in short supply, they, in effect, become substitutes for military personnel who would be combatants.

It is not a violation of the law of war for an Emergency Essential employee to wear a U.S. issued uniform or to carry a U.S. issued weapon for personal self-defense while accompanying a military force.

Capture of an Emergency Essential employee by an opposing force while wearing a uniform or carrying a weapon does not deprive a civilian employee accompanying a military force of any Geneva Convention protections.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. Geneva Convention (1949)

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Pay (Direct Deposit)

In order to ensure continuation of pay while detailed to support military operations in the field, DA policy requires civilian employees to join a direct deposit/electronic funds transfer (DD/EFT) program at their home installation before deployment. Once under DD/EFT the employee must remain in the program. All Emergency Essential employees are required to join a DD/EFT program as a condition of their employment.

Any errors by the Government resulting in charges by a financial institution will be reimbursed by the Defense Finance and Accounting Service Center servicing the employee. Letters of explanation will be sent to the recipients of any dishonored checks explaining that the dishonored check was the result of Government error, not an error on the part of the individual.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. Defense Finance and Accounting Memorandum (DFAS-IN-SAC-B), 5 August 1992, Subject: Implementation Guidance for Direct Deposit of Pay in the Department of Defense

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Salaries

Salaries are not tax free while on deployment. Likewise, salary deductions do not change while on deployment.

If a civilian employee is in a "missing" status, his/her pay and allowances continue. "Missing" status is defined as missing in action; interned in a foreign country; captured; beleaguered; or besieged by a hostile force; or detained in a foreign country against his/her will.

Civilian employees will be entitled to receive the same pay and allowances to which they were entitled at the time they are declared missing, and to which they would become entitled thereafter (i.e., within grade increases).

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

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Maximum Salary Limitations (Pay Cap)

During crisis operations, the maximum salary limitation which normally limits a GS/GM employee's pay (basic pay + premium pay) for the pay period to the maximum biweekly rate for a GS-15, may be waived. However, the employee would still be subject to the annual maximum rate for level I of the Executive Service (Title 5, U.S.C. Sec 5307 applies).

The decision to waive the pay cap is made by the Office of Personnel Management, based upon a request from Army and/or DOD.

Danger pay and Foreign Post Differential are not subject to the premium pay cap, but cannot exceed 25 percent of the employee's basic pay.

The pay cap does not apply to wage grade employees.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. AR 37-105, Financial Administration, Finance and Accounting for Installations: Civilian Pay Procedures, 4 May 1987

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Overtime

GS employees whose basic rates of pay do not exceed that of a GS-10. step 1, will be paid at a rate of one and one-half times their basic hourly pay rate for each hour of work authorized and approved over the normal 8 hour day or 40 hour week.

Employees whose rate exceeds that of a GS-10, Step 1, will be paid at the rate of one and one-half times the basic hourly rate of a GS-10, Step 1.

Since it may not be possible to approve exact overtime hours in advance, the employee's travel orders should have this statement in the remarks column: "Overtime authorized at TDY site as required by the Field Commander. Time and attendance reports should sent to (name and address)." The field commander should submit to the employee's home installation a DA Form 5172-R or local authorization form (with a copy of the travel orders) documenting the actual premium hours worked by each employee for each day of the pay period as soon as possible after the premium hours are worked.

Generally, employees must receive compensation for all hours scheduled and worked. Under certain conditions GS/GM employees who are exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act (FSLA) (designated by an "E" in the FLSA code block on their Leave and Earnings Statement) may be granted compensatory time in lieu of overtime. Wage grade employees cannot be granted compensatory time because they are required to be paid overtime at the rate of one and one-half times the employee's basic hourly rate.

REMINDER -- total overtime plus base pay cannot exceed the pay cap discussed separately in this guide under Maximum Salary Limitations (Pay Cap). Also, employees on an oncall status do not earn overtime unless actually called to duty and are only paid on the basis of hours actually worked.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. AR 37-105, Financial Administration, Finance and Accounting for Installations: Civilian Pay Procedures, 4 May 1987

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Compensatory Time

Overtime in excess of the established theater administrative workweek when under field conditions may be considered occasional or irregular for payroll purposes. This allows GS/GM employees who are exempt from the FLSA (designated by an "E" in the FSLA code block on their leave and earnings statement) to be granted compensatory time for a part of overtime in lieu of overtime pay.

Since pay is a home station responsibility, the employees will have up to 13 pay periods after that in which the compensatory time was earned to take the time off. After that, the compensatory time will be paid at the overtime rate in effect at the time worked.

Wage grade employees are not eligible for compensatory time because they must be paid at the overtime rate of one and one-half times their basic hourly rate.

Compensatory time is subject to the same constraints/limitations of the pay cap.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. AR 37-105, Financial Administration, Finance and Accounting for Installations: Civilian Pay Procedures, 4 May 1987

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Leave Accumulation

Any annual leave in excess of the maximum permissible carry over is automatically forfeited at the end of the leave year.

Annual leave forfeited during a combat or crisis situation which has been determined by appropriate authority to constitute an exigency of the public business may be temporarily restored. However, the employee must file for carry over.

Normally, the employee has up to two years to use restored annual leave.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. AR 690-990-2, Book 630, Subchapter 53, Annual Leave

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Foreign Post Differential

Employees assigned to work in foreign areas where the environmental conditions either differ substantially from CONUS conditions or warrant added compensation as a recruiting and retention incentive are eligible for Foreign Post Differential (FPD) after being stationed in the area in excess of 41 days.

FPD is exempt from the pay cap and is paid as a percentage of the basic pay rate not to exceed 25% of the basic pay.

The Department of State determines areas entitled to receive FPD and the FPD rate for the area. The Department of State also determines the length of time the rate is in effect. Different areas in the same country can have different rates.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. AR 37-105, Financial Administration, Finance and Accounting for Installations: Civilian Pay Procedures, 4 May 1987

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Danger Pay

Civilian employees serving at or assigned to foreign areas designated for danger pay by the Secretary of State, because of civil insurrection, civil war, terrorism or wartime conditions which threaten physical harm or imminent danger to the health or well being of a majority of employees stationed or detailed to that area, will receive a danger pay allowance (DPA).

The allowance will be a percentage of the employee's basic compensation at the rates of 15, 20, or 25 percent as determined by the Secretary of State. This allowance is in addition to any foreign post differential prescribed for the area but in lieu of any special incentive differential authorized the post prior to its designation as a danger pay area.

The foreign post differential may be reduced by any part attributable to political violence. The combined danger pay and post differential must be at least 5 percent above the previous combined post differential and special incentive differential at the post, if any, in effect at the post prior to its designation as a danger pay area.

The DPA commences for employees already in the area on the date of the area's designation for danger. For employees later assigned or detailed to the area, DPA commences upon arrival in the area. For employees returning to the post after a temporary absence it commences on the date of return.

DPA will terminate with the close of business on the date the Secretary of State removes the danger pay designation for the area or on the day the employee leaves the post for any reason for an area not designated for the DPA.

DPA is not subject to the pay cap discussed separately in this guide. DPA is not part of the basic compensation for computation of within-grade step increases; however, for wage grade employees it is part of the employee's basic rate of pay for the computation of overtime, holiday, Sunday premium pay, retirement, Federal Employee's Group Life Insurance, Federal income Tax, Federal Insurance Compensation Act, or MEDICARE, state and city, or local tax deductions.

REMINDER--The DPA paid to Federal civilian employees should not be confused with the Imminent Danger Pay (IDP) paid to the military. The IDP is triggered by different circumstances and is not controlled by the Secretary of State.

REFERENCES:

a. Department of State Standardized Regulation 404, Chapter 650, Danger Pay Allowance, 6 August 1986

b. AR 37-105, Financial Administration, Finance and Accounting for Installations: Civilian Pay Procedures, 4 May 1987

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Tour of Duty/Hours of Work

"Tour of Duty" and "Hours of Work", as used by this guide, are synonymous terms meaning the hours of a day (a daily tour) and the days of an administrative workweek (a weekly tour of duty) that constitute an employee's regularly scheduled administrative workweek.

The Administrative workweek constitutes the regularly scheduled hours for which a deployed employee must receive basic and premium pay. Under some conditions, hours worked beyond the administrative workweek may be considered to be irregular and occasional, and compensatory time may be authorized in lieu of overtime/premium pay.

The authority for establishing and changing the tours of duty for civilian employees is delegated to the in-theater commander or his representative. The duration of the duty is dependent upon the particular operation and will be established by the in-theater commander.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. 5 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 610.102(h)

c. AR 690-990-2, Book 610. Hours of Duty

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On-Call Duty

During crisis situations, the nature of the work may make it necessary to have employees "on-call" because of emergencies or administrative requirements that might occur outside the established work hours. On-site commanders may designate employees to be available for such a call during off-duty times. Designation of employees for this purpose will follow these guidelines:

--There should be a definite possibility that the services of the designated employee might be required.

--On-call duties required of the employees will be brought to the attention of all employees concerned.

--If more than one employee could be used for on-call service, the designation should be made on a rotating basis.

--On-call duty should not unduly restrict movement.

The designation of employees to be "on-call" or in an "alert" posture will not, in itself, serve as a basis for additional compensation (i.e., overtime or compensatory time). If an employee is called in, the employee must be compensated for a minimum of two hours.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. 5 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 610.102(h)

c. AR 690-990-2, Book 610. Hours of Duty

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Job Security

Upon satisfactory completion of the employee's initial TDY tour and any approved extension thereto, the employee normally will be returned to the position of record held at the time the TDY began.

If the position of record is abolished, downgraded, identified with a transfer of function, etc., while the employee is on TDY, the employee will be treated as if he/she had not left the position. Deployment will neither exempt the employee from competing with others in the competitive area for continued employment nor deny him/her any rights or entitlements.

If deployed employees are identified for separation, change to lower grade, transfer of function, etc., the action will not be delayed due to deployment except as authorized by reduction in force regulations. Continuation of the deployment will be negotiated with the employee's new supervisor if appropriate.

REFERENCE:

a. Basic

b. Chapter 351, Code of Federal Regulations

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Medical Care and Federal Employee's Compensation Act Benefits

All permanent employees with regularly scheduled tours of duty are eligible for coverage under the Federal Employee Health Benefits (FEHB) Program. These employees are also automatically covered by the Federal Employee's Compensation Act (FECA) (Workman's Compensation).

The FEHB helps protect employees and family members from the expenses of illness and accident. Employees must register for FEHB during regularly designated "open seasons" and cannot initiate coverage because of detail to another area.

Employees will be permitted to select another health plan if they are currently insured under a Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) arrangement and one or all of their family members are moving out of the HMO serviced area. Employees under HMOs should consider electing a fee for service plan if their family will be moving outside the HMO serviced area during the period of deployment. In either case employees are encouraged to continue medical coverage for their families.

Civilian employees who sustain injury or death while deployed may receive benefits provided by the FECA. Civilian employees who sustain a traumatic injury in the performance of duty must notify the on-site supervisor as soon as possible, but not later than 30 days from the date of the injury. If the employee is incapacitated, this action may be taken by someone acting on his/her behalf.

Civilian employees who require treatment for disease or injury sustained during the deployment will be provided care at no cost to the employee under the DOD Military Health Services System. The care provided will be equivalent to that received by active duty military personnel.

If a redeployed civilian employee suspects that an injury or illness is related to the deployment or occupation, the employee should follow the procedures and regulations established by the installation's Civilian Personnel Office and the Department of Labor.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. Title 5, United States Code, Chapter 89

c. Federal Employees' Compensation Act (FECA), 5 U.S.C. 8101

d. AR 40-3

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Life Insurance

Federal civilian employees are eligible for coverage under the Federal Employees Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) program.

Death benefits (under basic and all forms of optional coverage) are payable regardless of cause of death. The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) has confirmed that civilians who are deployed with the military to combat support roles during times of crises are not "in actual combat" and are entitled to accidental death and dismemberment benefits under FEGLI in the event of death. Similarly, civilians carrying sidearms for personal protection are not "in actual combat".

Employees should review the following forms prior to deployment as appropriate:

Designation of Beneficiary, CSRS; SF 2808.

Designation of Beneficiary, FERS; SF 3102.

Designation of Beneficiary, FEGLI; SF 2823.

Designation of Beneficiary, Unpaid Compensation of Deceased Employee, SF 1152.

Designation of Beneficiary, Federal Retirement Thrift Savings Plan, TSP 3.

Designation of Beneficiary, Lump Sum Benefits, SF 2802.

Designation of Beneficiary, Unpaid Annuity, SF 3102.

Employees should obtain a copy of the FEGLI booklet entitled Description and Enrollment in the FEGLI Program. The booklet is available in local CPOs.

Employees who desire to obtain or increase FEGLI optional insurance should consult their servicing CPO to determine eligibility and evidence of insurability.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. RI 76-21, Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance

c. OPM Memorandum, 13 Jul 93, Subject: Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance Accidental Death and Dismemberment (AD&D) Coverage

d. PERSCOM Memorandum, 11 Mar 93, TAPC-CPF-O, Waiver of FEGLI War Clause

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Casualty Status

A casualty is defined as any person who is lost to the organization by reason of having been declared dead, wounded, injured, diseased, interned, captured, retained, missing in action, beleaguered (an organized element which has been surrounded by hostile force for the purpose of compelling it to surrender), or detained.

Notification of next of kin will be initiated by the proper authorities as detailed in this guide.

Civilian employees killed in the line of duty are entitled to many of the same benefits as military casualties. Mortuary benefits for eligible employees include: search, recovery, and identification of remains; disposition of remains; removal and preparation of remains; casket; clothing; cremation (if requested); and transportation of remains to permanent duty station or other designated location.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. AR 600-8-1, Casualties and Mortuary Affairs

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Casualty Affairs

Next of kin (NOK) notification will be made in the event an employee dies, is missing, or unable to express his or her desires after becoming ill. The notification will be handled promptly in an appropriate, dignified and understanding manner by the Casualty Area Command.

After official notification by the Casualty Area Command, local commanders may contact the NOK for expressions of condolence and offers of assistance.

Casualty Assistance Officers will be appointed by the Civilian Personnel Officer nearest the NOK to provide assistance to the NOK and explain their benefits and entitlements.

The local Army Community Service is also available to provide assistance to the NOK and eligible family members.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. AR 600-8-1, Casualties and Mortuary Affairs

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HIV Testing

Chapter 6, Section III of AR 600-100, Identification, Surveillance, and Administration of Personnel Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), prohibits mandatory HIV testing of civilian employees (unless specified in the DoD Foreign Service Clearance Guide and/or a Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA)).

DA policy (DA DCSPER/ OTJAG decision) is that in those isolated situations when a requirement exists for mandatory HIV screening, and the test is positive, a civilian can be deployed in support of a contingency operation as long as the host country is notified and the individual is able to perform assigned duties.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. AR 600-100

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Redeployment Procedures

Upon completion of the military operation, or other authorized release, most employees will return to their original home installation. All employees should redeploy through the processing center from which they deployed.

In addition to normal administrative and individual readiness processing requirements discussed throughout this guide, the return processing will also include a thorough medical screening, a debriefing, and return of equipment where appropriate.

The amount of time spent at the return processing center will be kept to the absolute minimum required to complete the necessary administrative procedures.

Civilians will be included in all Welcome Home or other special recognition ceremonies at all levels.

REFERENCES:

a. Basic

b. AR 600-8-101, Personnel Processing (In and Out and Mobilization)

c. FM 12-6, Personnel Doctrine

d. FM 100-17, Mobilization, Deployment, Redeployment and Demobilization

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