Army Regulation 190-12

11 March 2013

Effective date: 11 April 2013

UNCLASSIFIED

Military Police

Military Working Dogs



SUMMARY of CHANGE

AR 190-12
Military Working Dogs

This major revision, dated 11 March 2013

* Changes the title of the regulation from Military Working Dog Program to Military Working Dogs (cover).

* Delineates the qualifications and responsibilities for military working dog program managers, kennel masters, plans noncommissioned officers, and military working dog handlers (para 1-5).

* Updates national stock numbers for military working dogs (para 2-2 b ).

* Removes requirement for one vehicle per two military working dogs (formerly para 6-1 b ).

* Provides module information for the Working Dog Management System (para C-2).

* Adjusts specialized search dog certification percentage (para E-8 f ).

* Makes administrative changes (throughout).



Chapter 1
General

1-1. Purpose

This regulation prescribes responsibilities, policies, and procedures for the direction, management, and control of the Army Military Working Dog (MWD) Program. It explains how MWD teams are used in garrison and combat support missions including area security; movement and mobility support operations; law and order; and force protection, including narcotic, human, landmine, firearm, ammunition and explosive detection. This regulation is to be used with Air Force Instruction (AFI) 31-121/Naval Operational Instruction (OPNAVINST) 5585.2C/Marine Corps Order (MCO) 10570.1B, Department of the Army Pamphlet (DA Pam) 190-12 , and Army Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures (ATTP) 3-39.34 .

1-2. References

Required and related publications and prescribed and referenced forms are listed in appendix A .

1-3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms

Abbreviations and special terms used in this regulation are explained in the glossary .

1-4. Responsibilities

a. Provost Marshal General. The PMG is responsible for the Army MWD program. The PMG will

(1) Develop policies, standards, and procedures for the management, care, training, and employment of Army MWDs.

(2) Serve as a voting member of the Joint Services Military Working Dog Committee.

(3) Serve as the Army central point of contact for any matter pertaining to MWDs, including coordination with or between Department of the Army (DA) and the Department of Defense (DOD) executive agent for MWD (U.S. Air Force Security Forces Directorate); other military Services; federal, state, and local authorities concerning the training and utilization of MWD teams.

(4) Monitor development of training requirements and equipment for MWDs and their handlers, and ensure that training meets Army combat support, law and order, and force protection mission needs in coordination with the U.S. Army Military Police School (USAMPS), as well as assured mobility mission needs in coordination with the U.S. Army Engineer School (USAES).

(5) Review requests from Army commands (ACOMs), Army service component commands (ASCCs), and direct reporting units (DRUs) for changes to modification table of organization and equipment (MTOE) and/or table of distribution and allowances (TDA) authorizations for existing MWD programs or for new MWD programs.

(6) Review and coordinate force requirements for MWD teams with appropriate Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA) staff elements, specifically to coordinate for approval of MTOE/TDA requirements and authorizations from the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7 ( DCS, G-3/5/7 ).

(7) Ensure that the training of MWDs and handlers is conducted in coordination with U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) schools.

(8) Review and approve all MWD certification authorities.

(9) Compile data submitted by the ACOMs/ASCCs/DRUs, and prepare reports.

(10) Conduct force protection assessments of installation and MWD programs biannually to ensure

(a) Proper training of MWDs and handlers.

(b) Proper management of MWD and handlers.

(c) Sustained and adequate logistical support.

(d) Proper maintenance of MWD authorizations to support mission requirements.

b. Commanding General, U.S. Army Human Resource Command. The CG, HRC will

(1) Administer and supervise all military personnel management aspects of the MWD program.

(2) Coordinate course training personnel requirements and assignment of MWD handlers to authorized positions.

(3) Develop policy, along with USAMPS, for career management of Army MWD handlers.

c. Commanding General, U.S. Army Installation Management Command. The CG, IMCOM will

(1) Provide all procurement and supply functions.

(2) Assist in development and procurement of equipment for MWD training in conjunction with the Maneuver Support Center of Excellence and USAMPS.

(3) Provide sustainment restoration modernization funds for kennel and office maintenance.

d. Commanding General, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The CG, USACE will develop designs for MWD kennel facilities in coordination with the Office of the Provost Marshall General (OPMG), USAMPS, IMCOM, Maneuver Support Center of Excellence, and the Surgeon General.

e. The Surgeon General. The Surgeon General will

(1) Assist in the development of design criteria for MWD kennel facilities in coordination with OPMG, USAMPS, USACE, and IMCOM.

(2) Provide complete veterinary health care services for MWDs, including medical evaluation of MWD's fitness for duty.

(3) Provide professional guidance to commanders and training to handlers for animal health husbandry, including care, first aid, chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high yield explosives protective measures for animals, feeding, kennel design, and sanitation.

f. Commanding General, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command. The CG, TRADOC will

(1) Assign a lead TRADOC school to formulate concepts, doctrine, organizational structure, materiel objectives, and requirements to employ Army MWD. The responsible organization will serve as the TRADOC clearing house for the vetting of all of the following:

(a) Development of Army training standards and procedures for Army MWDs, handlers, and supervisory personnel conducted by the 341st Training Readiness Squadron (TRS), the Air Education Training Command, and the Mine Detection Dog Course conducted at Fort Leonard Wood, MO.

(b) Assignment of a sufficient number of instructors to meet annual Army training requirements at Lackland Air Force Base (AFB), TX and the Mine Detection Dog Course.

(c) Development of MWD concepts and those actions necessary to implement concepts (doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership, personnel, facilities).

(d) Development of employment doctrine for the Army MWD for combat support, law enforcement, and authorized civil support missions.

(e) Development of Army MWD training equipment requirements in coordination with the 341st TRS, the Air Education Training Command and the Mine Detection Dog Course.

(2) Evaluate MWD information (directives, ideas, concepts, requests for assistance) that flow to Headquarters, TRADOC from many sources, including HQDA, other Services, other commands, and individuals.

(3) Require Army functional branches with MWD to provide the following:

(a) Develop training assistance teams of appropriately trained and experienced MWD handlers, kennel masters, MWD plans noncommissioned officers (NCOs) and/or MWD trainers to provide training assistance to commands whose requests for training assistance have been approved by USAMPS and OPMG.

(b) Provide training and doctrine support in developing MWD procedures and measures.

(c) Designate a representative (minimum O-4 (major) or civilian equivalent) to the Army and DOD Joint MWD working groups.

g. Commanding General, Tank-automotive and Armaments Command Life Cycle Management Command. The CG, TACOM Life Cycle Management Command will

(1) Serve as commodity manager of Army MWD.

(2) Compile military standard requisitioning and issue procedures (MILSTRIP) data submitted by MWD program managers and product managers.

(3) Prepare the Army MWD worldwide asset report.

h. Program Executive Office Ammunition. The Program Executive Office Ammunition will

(1) Incorporate the U.S. Army MWD program into the acquisition process, per Vice Chief of Staff of the Army approved Capabilities Development for Rapid Transition Initiative, May 2008.

(2) Manage the MWD equipment program with the roles of program life cycle management delegated to the office of the program manager for close combat support systems.

i. Commanders of Army commands, Army service component commands, and direct reporting units. Commanders, ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs will

(1) Appoint a qualified NCO or DA civilian as the ACOM/ASCC/DRU MWD program manager (PM).

(2) Include requirements and authorizations for MWDs in applicable documents per AR 71-32 .

(3) Budget for MWD operational requirements and MWD program support not provided by the DCS, G-4 and DCS, G-8 .

(4) Supervise subordinate units, installations, or activities to ensure effective management of MWD programs and utilization of MWD team assets.

(5) Monitor the certification program to ensure the proficiency of MWD teams.

(6) Notify OPMG and the affected proponent school of all certification, recertification, or decertification actions by electronic message.

(7) Request appointment of certification officials through TRADOC school MWD functional managers to OPMG for approval.

(8) Compile data submitted from subordinate commands, prepare MWD reports according to appendix C , and maintain a current and up-to-date database on MWDs.

j. Commanders of installations, activities, and units. Commanders of installations, activities, and units will

(1) Initiate MWD programs based upon the evaluation of the threat, current and future missions, and ACOMs/ASCCs/DRUs guidance.

(2) Support the MWD program, in accordance with policies outlined in this regulation and procedures outlined in doctrinal texts pertaining to MWD ( DA Pam 190-12 and ATTP 3-39.34 .)

(3) Initiate and submit MWD program administrative reports, in accordance with appendix C or maintain current and updated information on MWDs.

(4) Notify commanders of ACOMs, ASCCs, or DRUs (through senior commander) of any failure or inability to comply with this regulation.

(5) Ensure additional skill identifier (ASI) population and local reassignments are communicated in a timely manner to MWD program managers to allow for proper planning and management.

1-5. Qualifications and responsibilities of military working dog personnel

The U.S. Air Force serves as the single Service manager for the DOD MWD Program and is responsible for procurement, materiel management, and initial training of MWDs and handlers. Mine detection dogs are considered DOD-owned MWDs, under the direct operational control of the U.S. Army Engineer Center and School at Fort Leonard Wood, MO. The 341st TRS is the sole DOD agency authorized to procure MWDs. Any exception to this policy must be vetted through the DOD MWD PM. The terms and references outlined in this regulation will pertain to units of any functional branch of the Army utilizing MWDs.

a. Military working dog program manager. An NCO (E-8) or civilian equivalent who exercises operational supervisory responsibilities over the assigned ACOM/ASCC/DRU MWD program.

(1) The MWD PM will possess the following qualifications:

(a) Four or more years experience as a kennel master with a minimum of successful rating in all areas of their non commissioned officer evaluation report.

(b) Four or more years experience as an MWD handler on a patrol explosives detector dog (PEDD), patrol drug detector dog (PDDD), specialized search dog (SSD) or mine detection dog (MDD).

(c) Be a graduate of the Kennel Masters Course.

(d) Possess experience as an MWD, SSD, or MDD handler.

(2) The MWD PM will carry out the following responsibilities:

(a) Conduct, if authorized by OPMG, MWD patrol and detector certifications for PEDD, explosive detector dog (EDD), PDDD, narcotic detector dog (NDD), patrol dog, SSD, and MDD (following training and certification for each respective MWD).

(b) Requisition personnel and MWDs.

(c) Provide supplemental policy and guidelines for the ACOMs/ASCCs/DRUs following approval from OPMG.

(d) Forecast and manage annual operational budgets.

(e) Support the Office of the Secretary of Defense and/or the U.S. Secret Service (USSS) on reimbursable/non reimbursable bases, in accordance with Section 3056, United States Code (USC), Title 18 (18 USC 3056) and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and Department of State missions, as requested by the OPMG.

(f) Serve as ACOM/ASCC/DRU provost marshal's advisor for the employment of MWDs in contingency operations, antiterrorism/force protection (AT/FP) support, and homeland defense.

(g) Conduct annual kennel inspections.

(h) Manage and coordinate MWD deployments.

b. Kennel master. The kennel master and/or detachment noncommissioned officer in charge (NCOIC) is the NCOIC or civilian equivalent of the MWD section and exercises direct supervisory responsibility over the unit program. Kennel master duties are the equivalent of a platoon sergeant's duties when nine or more handlers and MWDs are assigned and the equivalent of a squad leader's duties when eight or fewer handlers and MWDs are assigned.

(1) Qualifications. The kennel master will possess the following qualifications:

(a) Be a qualified dog handler having successfully completed the training prescribed by this regulation and have at least six years successful performance as a MWD handler.

(b) Be a graduate of the MWD Kennel Masters Course, 341st TRS, Lackland AFB, TX.

(c) Be an E-6 or civilian GS-0083-08 or above.

(2) Duties. Kennel masters will carry out the following responsibilities:

(a) Monitor all training to ensure MWD teams are ready for validation and annual certifications, as well as worldwide deployments that support various operational missions.

(b) Conduct quarterly validations.

(c) Advise the commander on the employment of MWD teams.

(d) Ensure after action reports are completed for each team providing support for combat operations.

(e) Ensure that MWD sustainment training is conducted.

(f) Prepare for MWD program manager inspections and veterinary inspections (see chaps 5 and 6).

(g) Coordinate and plan the unit' s mission-essential task list (METL).

(h) Supervise the execution and tracking of the deployment plan.

(i) Ensure that deployed Soldiers' issues are resolved.

(j) Forecast annual operational budgets to MWD PMs.

(k) Assist the MWD PM with requisition of personnel and equipment.

(l) Manage the daily maintenance and upkeep of kennel facilities.

(m) Monitor all MWDs' health and welfare.

(n) Submit monthly asset report to ACOM program manager by the 5th of each month.

(o) Manage procurements and accounts for explosive and narcotics training aids.

(p) Advise installation and unit force protection and antiterrorism officers on the use of MWDs.

(q) Coordinate MWD support for USSS, CBP, and DOD protective services, units, combat support operations, U.S. Army Recruiting Command, and other civilian agencies.

c. Plans noncommissioned officer in charge.

(1) The MWD plans NCOIC is part of the kennel master team and performs the duties of the maneuver mobility support operations and training NCO, when the kennel is larger than eight MWD teams.

(2) The MWD plans NCOIC will carry out the following responsibilities:

(a) Coordinate and plan the unit's METL.

(b) Supervise the execution and tracking of the deployment plan.

(c) Track the movement of MWD teams, while they are deployed.

(d) Ensure that deployed Soldiers' issues are resolved.

(e) Act as the kennel master when the kennel master is absent.

(f) Conduct quarterly validations, possibly, in the presence of the kennel master.

(g) Prepare short- and long-term training outlines and risk assessments.

(h) Validate and supervise sustainment training.

(i) Ensure MWD probable cause folder/records are properly filled out by assigned handlers in accordance with paragraph 6-3 c of this regulation.

(j) Assist the preparation of deploying MWD teams.

(k) Ensure coordination for MWD team support for USSS, CBP, combat support operations, U.S. Army Recruiting Command, and other civilian agencies, is completed.

d. Senior military working dog handler. The senior MWD handler may be assigned duties that are similar to a squad leader. In addition to regular MWD responsibilities, a senior MWD handler is responsible for

(1) Ensuring training for annual certification is conducted.

(2) Ensuring the MWD teams are ready for deployment.

(3) Ensuring sustainment training is conducted.

(4) Supervising and reviewing subordinate handlers' MWD training records.

(5) Ensuring validation of all assigned MWDs is conducted.

e. All handlers. MWD handlers provide the daily care and grooming for their assigned MWD. They ensure that sustainment skills are maintained in their assigned MWD. The handler and MWD perform operations according to the MWD specialty. Handlers will possess the following basic qualifications:

(1) Be a volunteer and exhibit a high degree of affection for the MWD.

(2) Be medically qualified in accordance with AR 40-501 and pass a U.S. Army Crime Records Center name check prior to selection

(3) Be interviewed by the kennel master or unit commander to determine maturity as a Soldier and competence in military occupational specialty (MOS) skills, if the kennel master is not available.

(4) May be military or DOD civilian (currently military police (MP)), engineer, and other branches of the Army).

(5) Should not be selected or recruited directly out of primary MOS producing schools. (Must demonstrate competence and practical application of primary MOS prior to selection in order to work with an additional specialized skill set.)

(6) Handlers may be required to conduct Secret Service missions, health and welfare inspections.

f. Initial training. Handlers must receive initial training or certification from the 341st TRS or the Combat Engineer MDD Handler Course. On-the job training for the purpose of qualifying military or civilian personnel as dog handlers is prohibited.

g. Responsibilities. The MWD handlers will carry out the following responsibilities:

(1) Groom their assigned MWD daily.

(2) Maintain MWD kennels daily.

(3) Perform physical conditioning training with assigned MWD.

(4) Perform additional kennel duties as assigned.

(5) Provide mission briefs to senior leadership highlighting the dog's capabilities.

(6) Meet mandatory training requirements as depicted in chapters 3 and 5 and of this regulation.

(7) Maintain appropriate training records as depicted in appendix B of this regulation.

(8) Enforce kennel standards in accordance with unit standard operating procedures (SOPs).

h. Duties. The DOD civilian MWD handler's duties will be identified within the position description and will be a part of performance evaluation. No new positions will be created solely for the performance of a MWD program. Duty descriptions and civilian grades are based on the Office of Personnel Management Classification Standards, GS-083.

i. Department of the Army certification authority. An NCO (E-8 or E-7) or civilian equivalent who is responsible for conducting certifications per this regulation to ensure the readiness of all MWD teams.

(1) Appointment as a certification authority will be for a specific period of time not to exceed one year. Authority may be withdrawn at any time by the OPMG.

(2) Certification authorities will possess the following basic qualifications:

(a) Be an MWD PM/kennel master with two years experience in either position or have served for three years as an instructor with the 341st TRS, Lackland AFB, TX or MDD Handler Course.

(b) Must serve in a current authorized Z6 billet.

(c) Successfully operated at the program manager/kennel master level.

(d) Possess at least six years experience as a dual-purpose (patrol/detection), SSD, or MDD handler.

(e) Be a graduate of the MWD Kennel Masters/Trainer Course.

(f) Be recommended by an MWD PM.

(g) Exceptions will be approved by OPMG.

j. Requesting certification authority status.

(1) Requests must be submitted through USAMPS for concurrence and onward to OPMG for approval by the DA MWD PM.

(2) Applications will be updated and resubmitted annually to ensure the best qualified individuals are selected and retained.

(3) Kennel master applications (for those who meet the minimum criteria) should be submitted through their unit commanders, MWD PMs, and USAMPS to Office of the Provost Marshal General (OPMG) (DAPM-MPO), 2800 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-2800. The application must describe the applicant's MWD program experience, knowledge, and qualifications. A thorough justification statement, including compensating qualifications, must be included, if a waiver for any of the listed criteria is requested. Certification appointments will be based upon certification and recertification requirements for the respective ACOM, ASCC, or DRU.

k. Certification authorities. Certification authorities will carry out the following responsibilities:

(1) Will not certify or recertify dogs or handlers under their direct control or supervision. This restriction includes battalion and brigade level MWD managers.

(2) Will decertify MWD teams that fail to meet proficiency standards. Commanders or kennel masters may request a visit from a certification authority, if they question a team's reliability. Certification authorities are the only personnel who can decertify MWD teams.

(3) Will ensure that recertification problem sets are designed to challenge the team to ensure awareness and growth and/or maturity of the team.

(4) Will present each authorized training aid at least once during a certification evaluation.

(5) Will stop the certification, once the numbers of aids and mandatory areas have been successfully completed.

(6) Will only certify those teams where the handler has demonstrated the ability to understand his dog and where the team is capable of performing its specialty functions and meeting the following standards:

(a) Does the dog know odor? Is the handler able to identify when the dog is working odor?

(b) Does the dog give a final response that the handler recognizes?

(c) Does the handler demonstrate the ability to work the area effectively?

(d) Does the handler give a competent commander's brief outlining the capabilities of his/her assigned MWD?

(7) Will submit letters of certification outcome to DAMP-MPO within 30 days of certification completion. Certification authorities should address the outcome and if a failure occurred, include a brief description of why the team failed and recommended solutions that may assist the kennel master in sustainment training.

Chapter 2
Authorizations and/or Requisitions for Military Working Dogs

2-1. Authorizations

a. Authorizations for MWD teams are based upon mission analysis from commanders that request MWD teams. Commanders must review and analyze the physical security and types of crimes experienced at the installation to determine requirements and justification for the use of MWD teams. Unit commanders with MTOE should also review and analyze combat support missions and requirements that can be reasonably supported by employment of MWD teams (see DA Pam 190-12 and ATTP 3-39.34 ).

b. The MTOE or TDA requirements are determined through coordination with and approval from HQDA, Force Management, and DCS, G-1 based on the Total Army Analysis Process. Distribution of authorized and/or resourced requirements will be determined by Force Management G-1 through coordination with OPMG.

c. Permanent kennel facilities will be complete and available for use prior to the arrival of MWDs at the unit, installation, or activity. During contingency operations abroad, kennel facilities or veterinarian-approved temporary facilities will be completed within one year. The ACOM/ASCC/DRU should provide guidance on temporary kennel requirements, when permanent kennel facilities are not available for deployments.

d. Requests for MWD authorizations will be submitted to the respective commanders of ACOMs, ASCCs, or DRUs per AR 71-32 . The request will include

(1) The results of the security and crime analysis and/or the combat support mission analysis in accordance with ATTP 3-39.34 .

(2) A justification for the types of MWD teams requested (for example, SSD, MDD, PDDD, and/or PEDD).

(3) Handlers will be drawn from existing command personnel resources (no new manpower).

(4) A corresponding request for equipment changes to authorization in MTOE and/or TDA.

e. The ACOM, ASCC, and/or DRU commander will review submissions from their subordinate organizations to ensure that requests for MWD authorization are valid and justified and that personnel and facilities are available to support the request.

f. Existing MWD programs will be reviewed at least annually by ACOM/ASCC/DRU program managers to ensure that MWD assets are properly used and that justification of assets remain valid. When MWD team assets are reduced or increased, appropriate changes to both personnel and equipment authorizations of MTOE and/or TDA will be processed per AR 71-32 .

g. The MWDs are obtained as a result of a logistical transaction.

h. A new MWD may be requisitioned, based on the following conditions:

(1) Authorized vacancy.

(2) New authorization or approved addition to force structure (MTOE and TDA).

(3) Health of the MWD and or sudden and significant degradation of performance in the MWD (see disposition instructions by Army Veterinary Corps Officers).

(4) Sudden death or euthanasia of MWD.

(5) Dog issued by Lackland AFB fails to meet certification standards.

i. Excess MWDs which are defined as follows:

(1) An unassigned MWD which requires additional coordination with the 341st TRS.

(2) Dual purpose MWDs that are no longer capable of dual certification.

j. MWDs identified for adoption are dogs that have been deemed excess through the 341st TRS disposition process.

k. Requisition requirements must be identified as early as possible. It is not necessary to wait until an MWD dies or becomes incapacitated to requisition a replacement.

2-2. Requisition procedures for military working dogs

a. Requisitions for MWDs should be submitted, when manpower spaces for handlers are authorized.

b. MWDs initially trained for the Army are listed below

(1) Untrained, national stock number (NSN) 8820-00-935-6677.

(2) Drug detection dog/small, NSN 8820-00-243-7542.

(3) Patrol/narcotics detection dog; line item number (LIN) S33800.

(4) Patrol/narcotics detection dog, NSN 8820-00-243-7542.

(5) Patrol/explosives detection dog, LIN S33742; NSN 8820-00-188-3880.

(6) Narcotic detection dog, NSN 8820-00-243-7542.

(7) Explosive detection dog, NSN 8820-00-188-3880.

(8) Mine detection dog, LIN Z01815; NSN 8820-01-535-4047.

(9) Specialized search dogs, LIN Z01816; NSN 8820-01-526-4588.

(10) Patrol dogs, LIN G33690; NSN 8820-00-435-9005.

(11) Combat tracker dog (CTD), NSN 8820-01-535-4048.

c. The MWDs are requisitioned per AR 700-81 .

d. Units, installations, or activities will send requisitions in MILSTRIP format to their local property book officer. Requisitions normally are filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Documentation should include the following:

(1) Written verification that the dogs requested are authorized by MTOE and/or TDA.

(2) Authorization document number.

(3) Copy of death certificate.

(4) Medical documentation signed by the attending veterinarian. Any certificate received and signed by anyone other than the attending veterinarian is unacceptable.

(5) Copy of approved adoption paperwork.

(6) Copy of DOD approved disposition packet.

e. The property book officer identifies valid requisitions and forwards the requests to the ACOM/ASCC/DRU for new or replacement MWDs.

f. The ACOM/ASCC/DRU will submit all requisitions with endorsement to the Commander, ACOM for review and approval. The ACOM will forward a copy of the MILSTRIP to OPMG.

g. After approving requisition requests, TACOM will forward all requisitions to Headquarters, Air Force Operations, Lackland Air Force Base, TX 78236.

h. All requests for MWDs that are not properly documented as described above will be returned without action to the requesting ACOM/ASCC/DRU.

2-3. Disposition procedures

a. Disposition packets are used to determine further usefulness of the dog for DOD purposes. DOD has final authority and/or final determination of disposition packets, including circumstances such as

(1) MWD diagnosed by a veterinarian as having a medical condition that will result in decertification or euthanasia within 12 months.

(2) MWD diagnosed by a veterinarian as having a medical condition that is expected to result in death or permanent disability.

(3) MWDs unable to withstand the rigors of a year-long deployment.

(4) MDDs and SSDs unable to meet Army standards for certification.

(5) PEDDs or PNDDs unable to meet Army standards for dual certification.

(6) MWDs that are overly aggressive.

(7) MWDs under the age of eight years old but are ineffective.

b. Accountable unit commanders will provide disposition packets through their respective veterinarian, chain of command, and program manager to the MWD Adoption/Disposition Coordinator at the 341st TRS, Lackland AFB, TX for disposition review.

c. When an MWD undergoes euthanasia, dies, or is adopted (see app D of this regulation), commanders of ASCCs and/or DRUs will notify Commander, TACOM (AMSTA-LC-CP-S) Army Support Office, 700 Robins Avenue, P.O. Box 57997, Philadelphia, PA 19111-7997 and OPMG.

2-4. Excess military working dogs

a. The 341st TRS/combatant commander defines excess dogs as dogs who are no longer useful to the DOD. The disposition results document will provide the following guidance: return to 341st TRS, adopt, transfer to law enforcement, or euthanize.

b. The ACOM/ASCC/DRU will report excess dogs to OPMG.

c. The 341st TRS will not retrain excess dogs which have become ineffective.

d. Once the unit receives documentation declaring the MWD as excess, the unit will remove the MWD from the property book.

e. Any MWD declared excess should be removed from the working dog kennels within 30 days of being declared excess.

Chapter 3
Training of Military Working Dog Teams

3-1. Initial training

All MWDs, except MDDs, receive initial training with the 341st TRS at Lackland AFB, TX. (Initial training of the MDD is delegated to the USAES and remains a MWD program covered by this regulation.)

3-2. Certification of military working dog teams

a. Certification is the process used to formally evaluate and identify MWD teams that demonstrate reliability and maturity as a team. All certifications are valid for one year (see appendix E for detailed certification standards).

b. All MWD teams must have successfully completed a certification prior to employment.

c. All authorized MWDs must receive their initial certification within six months of assignment as a team.

d. The PEDD, SSD and PDDD team should conduct a minimum of 30 consecutive working days of sustainment training, prior to their initial certification.

e. Certification standards are designed to ensure MWD teams meet or continue to meet minimum standards for MWD proficiency (see app E for certification standards for each type of MWD).

f. Certification procedures will incorporate

(1) Use of each odor twice.

(2) Use of all gear necessary for operational requirements.

(3) Searches in areas that mirror the areas the team is expected to search during a real operation or mission.

(4) Planting of explosive training aids and narcotic training aids in separate search areas.

(5) Use a minimum of five different training areas for PEDD, PDDD and SSD certification. Training areas must present a realistic environment to the MWD team (contingency as well as garrison). An example includes vehicles (20 or more), barracks (occupied), a theatre, luggage (30 or more), a warehouse, community buildings, and open areas.

(a) Use one blank problem (no training aids).

(b) Demonstrate the ability to conduct a prolonged search of 30 minutes or greater in a search area with limited visibility.

(6) Newly assigned or fully capable MWD handlers that have failed to certify within six months at an installation due to extenuating circumstances should have the MWD reassigned.

(7) Failure to certify with another MWD should be considered cause for removal from the program.

(8) All certification, recertification, or decertification actions will be reported to OPMG by electronic message.

3-3. Recertification of military working dog teams

a. Because all teams are certified prior to a deployment, there should not be a need for intra-theater recertification in combat zones. However, recertification may be conducted, if required.

b. All recertifications must follow the same procedures as the initial certification.

c. Recertification conditions must include occupied buildings, vehicle groupings, and luggage (PEDD, PDDD, and SSD only).

d. Recertification will be required under the following conditions:

(1) The MWD is assigned to another handler.

(2) The handler and MWD have been separated or have not conducted sustainment training for 35 or more consecutive days.

(3) Teams that failed to meet the appropriate percentage rates for two or more consecutive months or failed to meet training hour requirements for two consecutive months.

(4) The PEDD, SSD, and MDD must maintain the minimum detection standard of 95 percent for explosives detection with no more than a 10 percent false response rate.

(5) The PDDD must maintain the minimum detection standard of 90 percent for narcotics detection with no more than a 10 percent false response rate during certification.

(6) Uncertified teams will not be used in any official patrol or detection capacity.

(7) Teams that fail a recertification should be given a full 30 working days of sustainment training before being reconsidered for certification; the brigade commander with training readiness authority over MWD teams should submit a waiver requesting certification prior to 30 days. The waiver request must be submitted to ACOM PM highlighting the remedial training.

3-4. Training aids

a. Units hosting a certification are responsible for storage, safety, and accountability of all training aids on their installation, in accordance with DA Pam 190-12 (see appendix E for additional details regarding training aids for each type of MWD).

b. Each installation authorized an explosive detector dog (EDD) is authorized one canine explosive scent kit (CESK). Kennels that have 12 or more assigned EDD are authorized two CESKs provided they have the proper storage capability. Kennels that need more than two CESKs must submit a request to OPMG highlighting the requirement and storage capacity.

3-5. Individual training (sustainment training)

a. Sustainment training is mandatory for all MWD teams in garrison and during deployment. The trade off is the adjustment between training and utilization. Without positive reinforcement for performing a task correctly, the MWD will lose interest in performing the task, and the skill will deteriorate rapidly. However, deployed teams may not always be able to maintain sustainment training, due to a high operational tempo. The minimum sustainment training standards for all MWDs are as follows (where training time equals MWD-in-the-harness work):

(1) Dual-purpose MWDs will conduct a minimum of eight training hours per week; four hours will be dedicated to concentrating on patrol dog skills and four hours must be dedicated to enhancing detection skills.

(2) Single purpose MWDs will conduct a minimum of four hours of detection to achieve and maintain the 95 percent find rate for EDDs and 90 percent for NDDs, with an additional two hours per week focused on enhancing obedience skills.

b. The MWD handlers will maintain training records on DA Forms 3992 and 2807 , approved by OPMG.

c. Appendix B of this regulation has additional guidance for the approved forms.

d. Unit commander will verify and sign individual training records.

e. All MWD handlers will maintain a probable cause folder ( ATTP 3-39.34 outlines the requirement and contents for a probable cause folder). All MWD handlers will maintain a training and utilization folder that highlights the specialty of their MWD.

f. On-the-job training is prohibited.

3-6. Validation

Unit level validation is a training tool for the kennel master (KM) or plans NCOIC to verify the quality and effectiveness of an assigned MWD team. The intent of validation is to identify any specific weakness that requires corrective training. Once identified, the kennel manager or plans NCOIC should develop a training plan with the handler that will focus on eliminating the identified weakness. If no weakness has been noted, then the KM or plans NCOIC should develop a training plan with the handler that will prepare the team to meet day to day challenges or a pending deployment

a. Validation will be conducted quarterly to verify the patrol and detection accuracy rates that were recorded on DA Form 2807 (Military Working Dog Training and Utilization Record) or DA Form 3992 (Narcotics or Explosives Detector Dog Training and Utilization Record) during sustainment training.

b. Validation will be given to any MWD whose demonstrated performance appears to significantly differ from training performance records (DA Form 2807 or DA Form 3992).

c. Validation will be conducted for each type of MWD as follows:

(1) PEDD, SSD, and PDDD. A minimum of 18 trials will be performed over a five to seven day period. Training aids will be used in five different search areas. However, the focus for SSDs should be off-leash capabilities.

(2) MDD. MDD will conduct a minimum of seven trials and will be performed over a five to seven day period.

d. Validation results will be recorded and maintained in the MWD training records. This written record will be signed by the same commander that verified sustainment training for the MWD team. (In the case of permanent change of station of the commander, the new commander may sign the training record).

e. All MWD teams must undergo validation within 14 days of attending certification.

3-7. Theater validations

a. Teams that arrive into a combat zone are given 30 days to acclimate to the environment and train on those explosives or narcotics unique to that area.

b. Training should be focused on tactics, techniques and procedures used in the current area of operations.

c. All teams should be validated on current tactics, techniques, and procedures and explosives, prior to being employed in a hostile environment.

3-8. Training assistance team

Commanders may encounter a training problem that is beyond the scope of the command's ability to resolve. Commanders may request training assistance through the appropriate ACOM/ASCC/DRU to USAMPS and OPMG. The request will-

a. Describe the problem.

b. Describe the measures which have been taken to resolve the problem.

c. Contain a thorough justification of the need for training assistance and verification that the requesting command will provide temporary duty funding for the training assistance team and pay for all training costs.

d. Once approved by the appropriate ACOM/ASCC/DRU, USAMPS and OPMG, requests will be forwarded to the 341st TRS, Lackland AFB, TX (Evaluations) for assignment of a training assistance team.

e. ACOMs/ASCCs/DRUs may be able to send training NCOs, KMs and/or soldiers on temporary duty to Lackland AFB, TX to be attached to the MWD training section to learn training techniques being employed by the 341st TRS. During this time, Soldiers should be able to learn new techniques to apply to MWD teams and return and train other Army MWD teams on the new techniques (train the trainer). Units should coordinate closely with the 341st TRS and D Company, 701st Military Police Battalion for approval. Requesting units are responsible for funding.

Chapter 4
Management and Utilization of Military Working Dog Teams

4-1. General management and utilization requirements

a. All MWDs and handlers should be assigned as teams and change duty stations as teams, if possible. Dogs and handlers assigned together as teams will be employed and deployed together as teams. Assignment stabilization of MWD handlers from assigned assets are subject to policies as directed by Commander, HRC.

b. Commanders will assign one qualified handler to every MWD on hand. Assignments will be consistent with the policy of "one dog, one handler."

c. Military Police canine teams will be included on the installation patrol distribution plan.

d. All dogs will be assigned a handler; those without handlers should be immediately reported to OPMG.

e. All dogs are afforded four weeks of acclimation and training when deployed to an operational theater or new assignment, prior to use on missions. Teams must demonstrate proficiency on the unique explosives to that area and demonstrate search capabilities in the new environment prior to completing this acclimatization and training period.

f. Modifications to MWD patrol vehicles will be made to allow the dog to roam freely in the compartment of a sport utility vehicle with the windows rolled partially down for ventilation. The MWD should not be able to inadvertently attack someone close to the vehicle. While riding in a tactical vehicle, the dog should be either kenneled or placed in a sit position between the handler's legs facing the assigned handler. The handler must ensure safety measures are based on the dog's temperament, while in close proximity of others.

g. MWDs are not authorized to be transported in privately owned vehicles.

h. Reassignment of unassigned dogs (no handler) to another ACOM/ASCC/DRU will be coordinated by OPMG. Kennel masters or plans NCOICs will be required to conduct sustainment training on unassigned dogs within their sections, until an assigned handler is received. The sustainment training should be limited to one training session per week, in accordance with the dog's capability (see chap 3 of this regulation). If a movement occurs, the gaining unit needs to notify the logistics branch at the 341st TRS, Lackland AFB, TX.

i. A MWD will not be left unattended during employment.

j. MWDs will be employed at least 24 hours per week in support of law enforcement and force protection, once certified as a team (employment may include training exercises, which would be an addition to mandated training outlined in chapter 3 of this regulation).

k. Commanders of installations with MWD teams will consult with their staff judge advocate to determine legal requirements for, and local restrictions on, using MWDs.

l. Visits to MWD kennels or training sites without an official purpose are prohibited. However, canine demonstrations are encouraged and are a good forum to build community relations and demonstrate the program's capabilities. Personnel are prohibited from explaining the MWD's limitations and known weaknesses.

m. The MWD handlers will not be assigned additional duties that interfere with their MWD handler responsibilities. This stipulation is not meant to prohibit training activities such as field training exercises, required unit training, or physical training. This prohibition is to restrict those duties that detract from the training time and employment requirements to maintain the MWD's proficiency.

n. Temporary duty and permanent change of station travel orders involving movement of a MWD team will include instructions that authorize use of civilian veterinary facilities and services at government expense, if military veterinary facilities and services are not available. In addition, travel variance may be authorized, because traveling with a live animal is dependent upon factors such as weather, travel routes, packaging of the aircraft, and surface temperatures.

o. Any person who voluntarily resigns before initial training is completed or is removed for cause because of an incident where mistreatment or death of a MWD was substantiated is permanently barred from future dog handler courses. (Removal for cause includes, but is not be limited to, reasonable suspicion that the Soldier committed a violation of the Uniform Code of Military Justice; violation of federal, state or local law; repetitive safety violations.)

p. Inquiries regarding the sale or donation of MWDs to DOD and inquiries concerning MWD qualification and characteristics should be referred to the 341st TRS, Lackland Air Force Base, TX 78236.

q. Narcotics detection dogs will not be trained on drug substances (for example, phencyclidine) that present a health and safety threat to the dog without advance written approval through appropriate ACOM/ASCC/DRU command channels to OPMG. Such requests are highly discouraged and will be granted on a very limited, case-by-case situation.

r. Narcotics detection dogs will not be trained to detect any explosives. Explosives detection dogs will not be trained to detect narcotics.

s. There are a number of authorized dual certification MWDs such as, PEDDs, PNDDs, SSDs and MDDs. The PEDDs and PNDDs no longer capable of achieving dual certification may be used as a single purpose asset. Until a MILSTRIP has been submitted and filled, this type of single purpose MWD is considered excess.

4-2. Identifying and assigning military working dog handler

Success of the MWD program depends upon local commander support for Soldiers desiring to become MWD handlers. Interested Soldiers that meet the qualifications outlined in chapter 1 of this regulation should submit a DA Form 4187 (Personnel Action) through their chain of command for assignment to initial training and follow-on assignment as a MWD handler. Unit commanders should identify and assign qualified candidates from assigned personnel, consistent with the standards of grade authorization.

4-3. Preparation of military working dogs for overseas movement

a. All MWDs will be given a physical examination and be accompanied by a health certificate and rabies vaccination certificates within 10 days of shipment to the port of embarkation. If a military veterinarian is not available, a civilian veterinarian under the provisions of AR 40-3 and AR 40-905 may give this examination. The MWDs will be evaluated to be reasonably sure that the MWD will be able to complete its assignment with minimal medical difficulty.

b. The handler or an assigned military escort (handler qualified) will carry a complete copy of the medical and training records.

c. All dogs will be evaluated to determine if the dog will be able to withstand the rigors of travel and a projected useful life of one year or more. Dogs that fail to meet this standard need to have veterinary documentation to assist in the replacement process.

4-4. Additional skill identifier management for military working dog handlers

a. Retention of any MWD handler ASI is based on active assignment and participation in the MWD program. Mandatory utilization requirements of ASI trained handler personnel are specified in AR 614-200 or DA Pam 611-21 .

b. Awarded ASIs will be reported per AR 614-200 to ensure proper assignment, utilization, and career management of MWD handlers. The ASI, job title, and standards of grade authorization are based on DA Pam 611-21.

c. The MWD handler's ASI may be awarded to personnel only after formal training and certification. If DOD civilian guards or police are used as Army dog handlers, they must attend the MWD training course at the 341st TRS.

d. Individuals in the grade of E-6 and below who have been away from the MWD program for four years or longer may retain their ASI, but they must be evaluated by the commander and kennel master before re-entering the MWD program by submitting a waiver request (signed by the commander) to: Personnel Proponency Office (ATSJ-P (MWD Career Manager)), 401 Manscen Loop, Suite 2060, Fort Leonard Wood, MO 65473. A waiver request to USAMPS will also be submitted on individuals projected to be assigned as a kennel master or plans NCOIC by the unit commander. E-6s and E-7s without the MWD Trainer/Kennel Masters Course will attend the 341st TRS training, prior to being assigned as a kennel master/plans NCOIC.

e. The ASI will be removed for the following reasons:

(1) Approved DA Form 4187 through the chain of command to HRC.

(2) If reassigned to another position, reclassification of existing position to remove duties associated with the MWD program, or removal from employment based on reason for removal and commander determination.

(3) Limitation of individuals due to a permanent profile which restricts them from performing any handler functions. If the handler does not voluntarily request the withdrawal, the request may be command directed. Appropriate documentation must be submitted for a permanent withdrawal.

4-5. Potential uses for military working dogs

a. The MWD has exceptional potential in the combat support role. The MWD is trained in many skills which can make a difference between the success or failure of many combat missions.

b. The MWD can be trained to respond consistently to certain sensory stimuli (sights, odors, or scents) and alert the handler. Most MWDs receive additional training in advanced skills such as an explosive detection, narcotics detection, ammunition and weapons detection, and mine detection. Tracking is a difficult skill for a MWD to learn and not every dog is capable of accepting this training, but it is still a useful combat skill for MWD handlers. All of these skills, when used correctly, can contribute to maneuver and mobility support operations and area security operations, such as cordon and search and other combat operations. The MWD can be used to detect an ambush, find explosives placed by insurgents, or track and capture fleeing personnel.

c. The MWD teams are force multipliers. To ensure combat readiness, MWD teams will participate in field training and deployment exercises with combat arms forces to the extent possible. Employment suggestions are described in ATTP 3-39.34 . Some examples of potential employment are as follows:

(1) Cache searches.

(2) Force protection sweeps.

(3) Building sweeps.

(4) Entry control points and access control points.

(5) Open area searches.

(6) Cordon and search.

(7) Customs inspections.

(8) Route clearance.

(9) Perimeter security.

4-6. Use of contract working dogs

The use of a contract working dog service should be avoided and used only if no other means are available to accomplish the mission. The following standards must be applied when contracting for working dog services:

a. Contract statement of work will require MWDs or MWD teams to be certified per the requirements of this regulation. Contracts will be reviewed by OPMG with coordination and approval by OPMG.

b. Although contractor-provided working dogs must meet or exceed the standards of this regulation, they will not be classified as or referred to as MWDs, until they have been purchased and tattooed with a DOD-provided number.

c. Additional information regarding the use of contract working dogs is also highlighted in ATTP 3-39.34 .

d. Prior to requesting contractor proposals for bid, coordinate with the regional veterinary command or medical detachment commander to determine whether DOD veterinary support is authorized and available. If authorized and available, ensure contract includes provisions for contractor reimbursements for all veterinary care. If DOD veterinary support is not authorized or available, the contract will stipulate all veterinary care and associated costs is the contractor's responsibility.

e. Dogs provided by contractor or concession normally are not eligible for military veterinary services. There is an exception for contractor animals supporting a contingency operation in a theater of operations where military veterinary assets are already available.

f. Military veterinarians may provide emergency procedures to prevent undue suffering or to save the life or limb of contract working dogs, on a reimbursable basis, and as time and resources permit, before referral of such cases to a civilian practitioner for follow-up care.

g. If applicable and included in the provision of the contract, non-emergency veterinary services may be provided to contracted animals in the theater of operations, on a reimbursable and space available basis, within the capabilities of the deployed veterinary unit.

h. Contract handlers must attend and graduate from a formal training program course. Teams will be certified by a DA certification authority (no on the job training). Mine detection dog contract handlers will be certified by a USAES MDD certification authority, as approved by OPMG. In accordance with IMAS 09.42.7, sometimes a surge is required to support the combatant commanders. Contingency teams are defined as leased dogs with military handlers. These actions will be in accordance with AFI 23-126 . All dogs will be processed through the veterinary corps.

4-7. Use of force with military working dog

a. Use of MWDs will be in accordance with the provisions of this regulation and the use of force policy set forth in AR 190-14 .

b. The MWD use of force (release of a patrol dog to apprehend a suspect) is a greater measure of force than the use of an MP club, but less than deadly force, because a patrol dog is trained to terminate an attack on its handler's voice command. A MWD may be used to prevent escape, but the dog should not be released, if a lesser measure of force would accomplish the apprehension.

c. A challenge or order to halt will be given, before a MWD is released to attack. Dog handlers are not equipped with an MP club, and because of the requirement to control their dog, normally, they will not be able to employ any unarmed defense techniques. Therefore, a warning to the suspect about the possibility of a MWD attack (in self-defense, in defense of the dog handler, or on order of the handler) should be announced as soon as possible in any encounter. Handlers in an outside continental United States (OCONUS) assignment must learn to give the warning in the host nation language.

d. Commanders, provost marshals, or security officers using MWDs will establish clear policies and procedures governing the release of dogs per this regulation and AR 190-14. Commanders will ensure that all affected personnel are thoroughly familiar with these policies and procedures. Policies and procedures developed by commanders should fully recognize the potential danger of bodily injury to a suspect, if a MWD is released. Nothing in this regulation should be interpreted to preclude reasonable efforts to use all lesser means of force.

e. Patrol dogs should be used cautiously in confrontational situations, since their presence could aggravate a situation. The Army's use of force policy applies as much to confrontation situations as it does to any other type of situation. A patrol dog handler who is confronted (for example, in a club, or housing area) should avoid entering a building or closed area alone with the patrol dog. In these specific cases, handlers should take special care to follow the use of force rules and should use the minimum necessary force to withdraw safely from a confrontational situation, then immediately report the incident to his or her supervisor.

f. Restrictions on MWD use of force include

(1) MWDs and contract working dogs will not be used to harass, intimidate, threaten, or coerce a detainee for interrogation purposes.

(2) The MWD team will not be used for crowd control or direct confrontation with demonstrators, unless the responsible commander determines this use is absolutely necessary. When used for crowd control or direct confrontation, dogs will be kept on a short leash to minimize the danger to innocent people. Dogs will not be released into a crowd. Civil disturbance contingency plans will include specific criteria for use of MWD teams that are consistent with this regulation, AR 190-14 , and DA Pam 190-12 .

4-8. Use of patrol dog

a. A MWD that is no longer capable of dual certification in both patrol and explosives or narcotics can still be employed as a patrol dog. To fully utilize the patrol dog's potential, commanders should consider the following:

b. Patrol dogs should be employed in all areas. Patrol dogs must be used during both day and night. Public visibility increases the patrol dog team's ability to deter theft, burglary, and vandalism.

c. The patrol dog's superior detection ability is especially useful at night or during periods of limited visibility. Patrol dogs can detect a fleeing person that a human cannot detect and if necessary pursue, attack, and hold the fleeing person when the handler has probable cause to believe that a serious offense has been committed. Except in extraordinary circumstances, apprehensions for minor offenses will be accomplished without releasing the dog.

d. Patrol dogs and their handlers can present a strong crime deterrent or detection capability when used in parking lots, around billets and housing areas, and as walking patrols when conducting building security checks. Around schools, patrol dogs can be used to deter vandals, child molesters, exhibitionists, and illegal drug activities. Patrol dogs can also provide enhanced security for communications facilities and command posts.

e. When patrol dogs and handlers are used to form mobile patrols, the handler can work safely with or without a partner. Mobility significantly increases the patrol dog team's coverage potential and makes it possible for the team to perform more functions during a duty shift. The dog will ride with the handler inside the vehicle, while the vehicle is in operation. Some minor vehicle modifications are necessary to provide the dog with a stable platform. The platform allows the patrol dog to see and to be seen and to be able to react to any situation in which the handler is threatened or needs the patrol dog. One example could be a crating system that can be purchased and installed with little or no vehicle modification. All vehicles must meet the following specifications:

(1) The MWD must be accessible to the handler, while seated in the vehicle.

(2) The MWD should be visible from the outside by the public.

(3) The MWD should have 360 degree visibility to the outside.

(4) MWDs are not authorized to patrol in the rear of an open air pickup truck.

f. Mobile patrols are most effective when employing the ride awhile-walk awhile method. Mobile patrols provide an increased security and enforcement potential for alarm responses, funds escorts, group confrontations, and security of distinguished visitors.

g. Patrol dog handlers will be armed with a pistol. Sling carried weapons, such as rifles or shotguns, are appropriate for certain missions, even though they hamper the movement of the handler and increase the difficulty of controlling the dog.

4-9. Use of patrol drug and/or contraband detection dog

The PDDD is trained to detect concealed narcotics. The PDDD will not be trained to detect any explosives. The following principles will be followed when using NDD teams:

a. Criminal investigators will assist the narcotics or contraband detector dog team, whenever appropriate. Obtaining search authorization and collecting evidence are examples of functions with which investigators can assist. Investigators and other law enforcement personnel should work with the detector team as frequently as possible to become familiar with the dog's response and allow the dog to become accustomed to them. However, only the handler will determine when the dog has responded.

b. Criminal Investigation Command agents, Military Police investigators, or a drug suppression team point of contact will regularly brief handlers on the scope of the drug abuse problem. They will be trained to develop a comprehensive knowledge of the law of search and seizure, search techniques, and the legal procedural requirements for custody of evidence or contraband, in addition to their normal training.

c. The PDDD can be used to conduct inspections in accordance with the Military Rule of Evidence 313. While detection dogs may be used to sniff the air surrounding a person, dogs will not be used to search an individual's person for the purpose of determining the exact location of concealed contraband.

d. Kennel masters and plans NCOICs should develop a relationship with the local staff judge advocate office to ensure MWD personnel stay proficient on current Army search and seizure policies..

4-10. Use of patrol explosives detection dogs

One of the most effective countermeasures to the increasing use of explosives by terrorists and criminals is the deterrent value and the detection capability of the PEDD team. The PEDDs are trained to detect the odor and presence of explosives and to enhance the commander's ability to protect facilities and resouces, prevent crime, and provide law enforcement services. The PEDD teams can be employed in combat and/or AT/FP operations worldwide. The task force commander, the MWD PM, kennel master, detachment NCOIC, and plans NCO, and military police planners should consider the use of PEDD teams during combat support operations in the areas listed below-

a. Internment and resettlement operations.

b. Postal operations.

c. Checkpoints and roadblocks.

d. Cordon and search operations.

e. AT/FP operations.

4-11. Suspicious and/or unattended package responses

a. The mission of PEDD teams is to "find" possible explosives, not to determine what is in a suspicious package once found. If an EDD alerts during a search, the handler immediately ceases searching and notifies appropriate personnel. EDD teams should continue to search the area up to and beyond the suspicious package for secondary devices.

b. Bomb threats.

c. High-risk personnel search.

d. Access control points.

e. Health and welfare inspections.

f. Aircraft and luggage searches.

g. ATTP 3-39.34 provides additional information to the task force commander, the provost marshal, and the planners on how to employ the PEDD. Explosives detection is a critical function in protecting life and property.

h. The PEDDs will not be trained to detect narcotics or other non-explosive contraband. Training to detect explosive substances other than those the dog was trained to detect at the 341st TRS must be approved in advance by OPMG. An official request for such additional training will be submitted through the kennel's respective ACOM/ASCC/DRU MWD program manager to USAMPS.

i. The PEDDs may be used for inspections in the same manner described for PNDDs.

j. AR 525-13 highlights the need to use PEDDs during different threat conditions.

4-12. Explosives detection dogs

Only certified Military Police explosive detection dog teams will be used to support the following:

a. Title 10 USC 375 and 18 USC 1385 authorize installation commanders, in coordination with the local staff judge advocate (SJA) office, to provide explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) service in support of civil authorities. Once approved by the SJA office, the explosives detection dog may be used to provide assistance to civil authorities.

b. DA is not required to provide the services of Army EDD teams to assist non-DOD or civil agencies. However, installation commanders may honor requests for assistance from Federal agencies or civil authorities for such services upon determination that such assistance is lawful, and required in the interest of public safety.

c. Installation commanders will adhere to the following guidelines in responding to non-DOD requests for assistance for EDD teams:

(1) Request for assistance should be from civilian governmental, police, fire, or disaster officials. EDD support will not be provided to private individuals, unless requested by federal agencies or civil authorities.

(2) Requesting agencies or civil authorities must agree, as a condition for the performance of EDD team services, to the provisions outlined in DD Form 1926 (Explosive Ordnance Disposal Civil Support Release and Reimbursement Agreement). The DD Form 1926 may be executed for a period of time, not to exceed one year, for a defined geographical area or jurisdiction or prior to providing EDD team service in response to a request for assistance. In emergency situations, the form may be executed after the provision of dog team services, if the requesting official is informed of the responsibilities and liabilities contained therein and agrees verbally.

d. Army requirements for detector dog teams will have priority for their employment, followed by other federal agencies and civil authorities, in that order.

e. The EDD handler will not be separated from his dog under any circumstances, when providing service to federal or civil authorities. The handler must have exclusive control of his search effort and complete access to the search area.

f. When providing assistance to Federal or civil authorities, EDD handlers will be unarmed and will not wear any distinguishing MP accessories (badge, brassard, lanyard, handcuffs, MP club, distinctive web and/or leather gear, and so forth). Handlers will perform the sole task of working their dogs and will not participate in any other activity to assist civil authorities.

g. Only the dog team's searching and detecting capabilities will be utilized, when providing assistance to civil authorities. Use of the dog team to track and search a building or area for, and/or detect, pursue, and hold, an intruder or offender suspect is prohibited.

h. Representatives of the requesting agency with appropriate authority will accompany the EDD team at all times when it is working. Should the EDD respond, the handler will so advise the accompanying representative and withdraw to a safe distance.

i. Requesting agencies will be advised that the Army cannot accept responsibility for establishing or maintaining a chain of custody for possible use in court, nor engage in other activities to enforce the law in connection with this service.

4-13. Explosive detection dog support for very important person

The U.S. Air Force has been designated to serve as the primary service point of contact for all very important person (VIP) missions received from the Office of the Secretary of Defense, USSS, or Department of State.

a. All mission taskings should be issued by the VIP coordination officer who, under authority from the Secretary of Defense, shall task and coordinate all missions performed by DOD EDD law enforcement (MP) team personnel, regardless of service affiliation.

b. The primary consideration in the service tasking process will be the use of the "closest available unit" concept which has proven cost effective and operationally efficient.

c. The length of each mission can vary from a few hours to several days.

d. The USSS support missions require participating personnel to display a high degree of discretion in their personal appearance. A clothing allowance will be provided to purchase appropriate attire based on the mission and climate, so that EDD team personnel may blend. Clothing may consist of

(1) A number of conservative business suits (preferably dark in color).

(2) Casual clothing (collared, pull over type shirts, slacks) may be required in a number of situations such as golfing events and other less formal functions. The wearing of blue jeans and t-shirts is unauthorized, while on official duty.

e. The USSS and State Department personnel will issue identification, pins, and vehicle placards upon arrival at a mission site.

f. In all cases, the assigned MWD will be checked at the airline ticket counter as excess baggage. MWD should not accompany the handler in the passenger compartment. However, there may be circumstances, such as an airline imposed weather embargo, when the airline prohibits the MWD from traveling in the cargo compartment. If a team is allowed to travel in the passenger compartment of a commercial aircraft the dog will be muzzled the entire flight to ensure passenger safety. When outside of the crate, in and around airports, the MWD will be muzzled and not allowed to be in close proximity of the traveling public.

4-14. Use of the specialized search dog

a. Specialized search dogs are initially trained as a team (dog and handler) by the 341st TRS at Lackland AFB, TX. The SSD teams receive training that prepares them to conduct off-leash search operations to detect firearms, ammunition, and explosives.

b. When combined with a handler's ability to interpret the dog's response and to judge its significance, the dog and handler team can provide a commander with the ability to search for firearms, ammunition, and explosives in

(1) Buildings (occupied, unoccupied, or derelict).

(2) Vehicles (cars, trucks, trains, ships, boats, aircraft).

(3) Route clearance (roads, tracks, railroad tracks).

(4) Open areas (fields, woods, hedgerows, embankments, islands).

(5) Caches (long-term, transits, short term, devices).

(6) VIP venues.

(7) Internment and resettlement operations.

(8) Postal operations (law enforcement).

(9) Checkpoints and roadblocks (also includes helicopter landing zones).

(10) Cordon and search operations.

(11) AT/FP operations.

(12) Suspicious and/or unattended packages.

(13) Bomb threats.

(14) Access control points.

(15) High-risk areas.

c. The SSD's mission is to support combat search operations and authorized civil support operations by detecting firearms, ammunition, and explosives from a safe distance (off-leash) from personnel outside the base of operations. The SSD's training and superior sense of smell enables it to detect a wide variety of manufactured and improvised explosive devices.

d. Two methods of searching are called free search and systematic search. A free search is working a loose search pattern with minimal control. The systematic search concentrates on specific areas to ensure the area is 100 percent searched.

e. There are three search types used by the SSD. The rummage search is done quickly and very loosely in large areas. A low-risk search is a little tighter than a rummage search but still uses the free search method. A low-risk search is used in a cordon and search operation. Finally, the high-risk search is a methodical search based upon a given intelligence.

f. All SSD teams are required to complete an in-theater validation prior to beginning military operations. This validation should be conducted by a supervisor of handlers trained in the MWD specialty being validated. The SSD teams will have a minimum of four weeks train up in the theater of operation and conduct a validation using local training aids.

4-15. Use of mine detection dog

To fully maximize value from the services of trained MDD teams, it is essential to have a sound understanding of their capabilities, limitations, and conditions for employment. An MDD must be considered an additional, specialized detection tool and should only be used after an analysis of the situation, climatic conditions, and terrain. The value of the MDD lies in its enhanced sense of smell. The natural scenting capability of certain breeds, combined with the handler's ability to interpret the MDD's response when employed, provides the commander with a useful tool for detection of landmines, unexploded ordnance and other casualty producing devices.

a. MDD teams are comprised of a trained handler and a trained MDD. A handler attends a 20-week MDD course, located at Fort Leonard Wood, MO. Upon graduation, a handler is fully acquainted with the MDD's aptitudes, moods, and behaviors under a variety of environmental conditions and is able to advise commanders on how the MDD team can support the mission requirement, and how the MDD team can best be employed.

b. The primary mission of a MDD team is to support infantry, combat engineer, and Army force units in tactical operations against hostile forces by detecting and warning of land mines, unexploded ordnance, and other casualty producing devices. MDD teams are a valuable asset that can be deployed worldwide in support of offensive, defensive, stability, and authorized civil support missions (such as range clearance). MDD teams are capable of performing area clearance, delineation of minefield boundaries, route clearance, clearance verification (including the proofing of cleared areas behind manual or mechanical mine clearance), railway clearance, minefield extraction, creation of safe lanes for clearance start points, and search pockets of land that are unreachable by mechanical clearance devices.

c. The general capabilities of a trained MDD are outlined in ATTP 3-39.34 .

d. The natural scenting capability of certain breeds, combined with the handler's ability to interpret MDD responses, provides commanders with a useful tool for the detection of land mines by providing

(1) Sight pictures of the emplacement of all types of mines.

(2) Delineation of minefields and their boundaries.

(3) Route clearance (culverts, roads, tracks and railways).

(4) Casualty and vehicle extraction.

(5) Safe lanes for clearance start points.

(6) Assistance in the detection of mines missed by other mechanical mine detection devices and clearance assets and/or confirmation of their finds.

e. All MDD teams are required to complete an in-theater validation, prior to beginning military operations. This validation should be conducted by the detachment NCO with assistance from the MDD team leader. The MDD teams will have a minimum of four weeks train up in the theater of operation which includes validation using local training aids. The in-theater minefield training requirement is a field that has aged for a minimum of two months. The validation process provides the in-theater commanders with the reliability and confidence MDD teams meet required operational detection standards.

4-16. Use of tracker dog

a. A tracker dog team gives the unit commander an additional ability to track individuals or groups in all environments without having visual or electronic contact.

b. The tracker dog is capable of following human scent in order to

(1) Track the quarry (enemy) from human scent to reestablish contact.

(2) Track survivors and/or escapees of ambush by friendly forces.

(3) Track fleeing enemy attacker and/or ambush and/or mortar and/or rocket and/or sniper.

(4) Track back from improvised explosive devices and/or mine layer.

(5) Track escaped prisoners.

(6) Track lost or missing patrols.

(7) Track downed pilots.

(8) Identify a specific individual in a group.

Chapter 5
Kennel Facilities and Care of Dogs

5-1. Kennel facilities

a. Security measures, such as lighting, barriers, and structural integrity can be provided, merely, by including them in the design and construction of the kennel facility. Standards for construction and operations of kennel facilities will be in accordance with AR 190-13 , AR 190-5 , ATTP 3-39.34 , and DA Pam 190-12 or coordinated with the Chief of Engineers, as standards vary from region to region. New construction must be coordinated with the Assistant Chief of Staff of IMCOM (for funding), the supporting veterinary activity, the physical security personnel, safety, the kennel master, and USACE.

b. Kennel facilities will not be used to house or care for any animals other than DOD-procured MWDs.

5-2. Risk analysis

a. To provide the most realistic and cost-effective protection for the MWDs and kennel facility, commanders must appreciate the importance and analyze the significance of the threats to these assets due to theft, sabotage, or damage. A proper analysis of these risks will determine the minimum level of protection needed to adequately safeguard these resources.

b. A risk analysis will be accomplished every two years for the kennel and surrounding area.

c. Recommended that a physical security inspection is done every year and copy of the findings be maintained on file for at least two years.

d. The principles of risk analysis ( DA Pam 190-51 ) apply to the determination of measures which must be taken to protect the kennels and dogs from criminal activity.

5-3. Warning signs

a. To gain the maximum psychological advantage of MWDs and to protect the innocent or unwary trespasser, signs identifying MWDs' presence will be installed at installation entrances and on primary access roads to installations where MWDs are used. Signs should contain the following words: "Caution- this area is patrolled by Military Working Dogs.

b. Warning signs will be posted on the exterior fencing and buildings of the MWD kennel and exercise area. Signs should contain the following words: "DANGER- OFF LIMITS-MILITARY WORKING DOG AREA."

c. Personnel approaching the installation or the kennel should be able to see and read the warning signs under normal daylight conditions from a distance of 50 meters.

d. A warning sign stating "DANGER MILITARY WORKING DOG-DO NOT TAMPER WITH ANIMAL," will be attached to all shipping crates used for MWDs. In addition, shipping crates must be labeled on the top and one or more sides with the words "LIVE ANIMAL."

e. When not permanently marked, patrol vehicles will have removable warning signs stating "CAUTION-MILITARY WORKING DOGS" placed on the sides (and rear, when appropriate) of any vehicle used to transport MWDs.

f. Outside continental United States kennel facilities' warning signs need to also be in host nation language.

g. Personnel approaching a vehicle or shipping crate being used to transport a MWD should be able to see and read the warning signs under normal daylight conditions from a distance of 10 meters.

5-4. Care and grooming

The dog handler is trained to care for a MWD. The handler is responsible for the dog's daily care and grooing, including cleaning the dog kennel and running and feeding the dog daily as prescribed by the attending veterinarian and DA Pam 190-12 .

5-5. Diet and weight management

a. Standard dog food is available for requisition from the General Services Administration (GSA) contract NSN 8710-01-415-6950; non-medicated, NSN 8710-00-144-6834; dog food, dry, NSN 8710-00-268-8203; and dog food, canned, NSN 8710-00-268-8205.

b. MWDs will be fed a standard diet that conforms to the specifications regarding metabolizable energy, digestibility, nutritional characteristics, and formulation, as determined by the U.S. Army Veterinary Service and the Director, Department of Defense Military Working Dog Veterinary Service.

c. Special diets may be procured and fed to individual dogs when the veterinarian determines that other than the standard diet is required. The owning units are responsible for purchasing special diets following prescription by their attending veterinarian.

d. An ideal weight range (5 pound range) for each MWD will be established by an Army Veterinary Corps officer. Dogs will be fed accordingly to maintain weight within a designated range. MWDs will be weighed monthly and the weight recorded appropriately in the medical record.

5-6. Veterinary care

a. All MWDs should be seen by an Army veterinarian (or civilian veterinarian, in an emergency or when authorized by an attending Army veterinarian), whenever the handler or kennel master detects any signs of illness or injury. This includes any changes in hearing, elimination habits, behavior, or other more obvious signs of illness or injury.

b. The kennel master should coordinate with the veterinarian for the routine, semiannual examination of all MWDs ( AR 40-905 ).

c. All personnel assigned to kennels will receive annual training. A new handler will receive initial training by the Veterinary Corp officer or his/her representative as referenced in AR 40-905.

5-7. Military working dog conditioning program

a. As with human athletes, it is clear that properly conditioned dogs perform better, acclimate more rapidly, better endure more intense environmental and operational stressors, and better resist heat stress and other injuries than poorly conditioned dogs.

b. Kenneled dogs, with minimal physical work demands, can lose conditioning over a period as short as 2 to 3 weeks, and should be the primary target group for additional conditioning.

c. Kennel masters and training NCOs are encouraged to contact supporting veterinary personnel for the most up-to-date training packet.

Chapter 6
Administration

6-1. Inspections

Commanders, provost marshals, or a designated representative will conduct monthly inspections of handlers, MWD training, team utilization, team proficiency, equipment, and kennel facilities. The commanders/detachment commanders will ensure that inspections comply with this regulation. Both DA Pam 190-12 and ATTP 3-39.34 contain guidelines that will be helpful in this inspection.

a. Ensure garrison commanders are aware of and approve the use of installation facilities for MWD training per DA Pam 190-12 .

b. The inspection must ensure that there are two complete sets of dog equipment for every dog assigned to that installation. There must be one complete bite and/or attack suit on hand and a number of attack sleeves to conduct proficiency training. In addition, the commanders must coordinate with installation Directorate of Logistics to obtain vehicles for the kennel section to perform daily law enforcement functions according to the patrol distribution plan. The vehicle types should be non-tactical, sport utility style vehicles that can safely transport a MWD. There is a requirement for one pickup truck for every kennel to transport explosives to and from training areas. The explosive transport truck should not be used to move MWDs. Transportation of the class 1 canine explosive scent kit or its contents, are required to transport in accordance with Title 49, Code of Federal Regulation (49 CFR), Defense Travel Regulation (DTR) 4500.9-R or applicable country hazardous material transportation requirements. Refer to DA Pam 190-12 .

c. Although the focus of the kennel inspection may vary from month to month, all aspects of the MWD program will be inspected quarterly. A signed written record of the provost marshal's and/or commander's monthly inspection will be prepared and corrective action identified. Subsequent inspections will ensure that corrective action has been taken. The written record of the inspection will be maintained for at least one year after the date of the inspection.

d. The attending Veterinary Corps officer will conduct a sanitary inspection of each MWD facility at least quarterly to ensure compliance with health and welfare requirements of AR 40-905 and other regulatory guidance. A copy of the inspection report will be provided to the kennel master. The kennel master will forward inspection reports with major deficiencies to the ACOM/ACSS program manager.

e. The ACOM/ACSS/DRU MWD program manager will conduct annual inspections of the installation MWD program. This inspection will be kept on file for a minimum of two years after the inspection date. Corrective action will be taken and forwarded to the ACOM/ACSS/DRU MWD program manager within 60 days.

6-2. Monthly MWD status information report

a. Installation commanders will provide data containing the number of authorized and on hand MWDs by type, name, tattoo number, and whelp date to their ACOM. Installation commanders will submit the information in accordance with AR 700-81 and in coordination with ACOM instructions.

b. The ACOMs will consolidate data from subordinate commands and submit the information to Office of the Provost Marshal General (DAPM-MPO), 2800 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-2800.

c. The ACOMs will compile subordinate command data and provide the information to OPMG, by the 15th of each month. The ACOM requirements should be based on projected MWD gains (newly authorized asset) or losses (transfer, health problems, age and so forth).

6-3. Records

a. When a dog is procured, the 341st TRS initiates a permanent administrative record file and a permanent veterinary health record. Together, the administrative record and the health record constitute the permanent record file.

b. The record file will accompany the dog on every permanent transfer and will be kept current by the kennel personnel to which the dog is assigned. Permanent veterinary records will not be removed from the veterinary clinic at the assigned installation. The handler will make copies of these records and hand carry them on deployments. The permanent MWD training records will be maintained and secured at the kennel facility for the assignment or the life of the dog. The handlers will not remove permanent training records from the facility.

c. Probable cause folders will be created for each MWD team performing detection duties. The contents of these folders will consist of, but are not limited to, a copy of the current month and the previous 90 days of patrol ( DA Form 2807 ), detector dog training records ( DA Form 3992 ), a copy of the MWD team patrol and/or detection certification, decertification, or recertification documents, a copy of the MWD service record ( DD Form 1834 (Military Working Dog Service Record)), and any items considered pertinent to the dog team's capabilities for the purpose of establishing probable cause. Probable cause folders will be taken with the MWD team on deployments, certifications, VIP missions, and to court. Upon completion, the current month's MWD training records will be removed from the probable cause folder, copied, and placed in the permanent file; the copy will then be placed in the probable cause folder.

d. Upon the death of the dog or adoption of the dog, the dog's permanent record file will be forwarded to Military Dog Records, Lackland Air Force Base, TX 78236 ( AR 700-81 contains additional instructions).

e. The administrative records listed in this regulation will be maintained. Detailed instructions are provided in appendix B for completing the listed DA Forms (see DA Pam 190-12 for detailed information on training and utilization requirements).

f. DD Form 1834 is completed and issued by the 341st TRS, with initial assignment of the dog after training; form is upgraded with each new handler assigned to the dog.

g. DA Form 2807 (see app B for instruction on completing this form).

h. DA Form 3992 (see app B for instruction on completing this form).

i. Descriptions of medical records used for MWDs are contained in AR 40-905 . Only veterinarian personnel are authorized to make or direct entries in a MWD's medical record. Medical records may be kept at the office of the attending veterinarian or at the kennel facility with the administrative records, as specified by the attending Army veterinarian.

6-4. Accountability of military working dogs

The ACOM/ACSS/DRU will assign MWDs to local installations or units. Upon arrival to the installation, MWDs will be placed on the unit property book by NSN, name, whelp date, and tattoo number, and hand-receipted to the kennel master per provisions of DA Pam 710-2-1 . Kennel masters will sub-hand-receipt MWDs and equipment to individual handlers. If a MWD team is transferred as a team, handler orders will include NSN, name and tattoo number of the dog. DA Form 3161 (Request for Issue or Turn-In) will be used for the lateral transfer of the MWD to the gaining command per DA Pam 710-2-1.

6-5. Shipping crates

a. All dogs will be transported in large, extra large, or giant airline approved shipping crates. The shipping crate and other equipment will be transferred with the dog, when the dog or the MWD team is reassigned.

b. Army procured metal crates will be stenciled with "U.S. Army" and a serial number identical to the dog's tattoo number. Units are authorized one crate per dog on hand. The Army metal shipping crates will be placed on the unit property book by NSN and serial number and hand-receipted to the kennel master per the provisions of DA Pam 710-2-1 . DA Form 3161 will be used to accomplish the lateral transfer of the crate between units. Shipping crates for dogs which have died will be retained for use with the replacement dog. The replacement dog will have a new tattoo number, so the crate should be re-stenciled with the new number. Also, annotate the new number in the unit property book.

c. The MWDs received from the 341st TRS normally will be shipped in Air Force shipping crates. These shipping crates are the property of the 341st TRS and are not included with the procurement of the dog. Air Force crates received or borrowed from the 341st TRS will be returned to the 341st TRS within 10 days after the shipment. The commander, Aviation and Missile Command, will notify ACOM/ASCC/DRUs of changes to this procedure. (For example, plans are being made to charge the cost of a shipping crate to the procurement price of the dog. Then, the crate will be Army property and treated as such upon receipt).

Appendix A
References

The Official Army Publications Web Sites.

Publication Section I
Required Publications

AR 71-32. Force Development and Documentation-Consolidated Policies (Cited in paras 1-4i(2) , 2-1d , and 2-1f .)

AR 190-5. Motor Vehicle Traffic Supervision (Cited in para 5-1a .)

AR 190-14. Carrying of Firearms and Use of Force for Law Enforcement and Security Duties (Cited in paras 4-7a , 4-7d , 4-7f(2) .)

AR 614-200. Enlisted Assignments and Utilization Management (Cited in paras 4-4a , 4-4b .)

AR 700-81. DOD Military Working Dog Program (Cited in paras 2-2c , 6-2a , and 6-3d .)

DA Pam 190-12. Military Working Dog Program (Cited in paras 1-1 , 1-4j(2) , 2-1a , 3-5a , 4-7f(2) , 5-1a , 5-4 , 6-1 , 6-1a , 6-1b , 6-3e .)

DA Pam 611-21. Military Occupational Classification and Structure (Cited in paras 4-4a , 4-4b .)

ATTP 3-39.34. Military Working Dogs (Cited in paras 1-1 , 1-4j(2) , 2-1a , 2-1d(1) , 3-6h , 4-5c , 4-6c , 4-11g , 4-15c , 5-1a , 6-1 .)

Publication Section II
Related Publications

A related publication is a source of additional information. The reader does not have to read it to understand this publication.

AR 11-2. Managers' Internal Control Program

AR 25-30. The Army Publishing Program

AR 40-3. Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Care

AR 40-501. Standards of Medical Fitness

AR 40-905. Veterinary Health Services

AR 190-11. Physical Security of Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives

AR 190-13. The Army Physical Security Program

AR 190-51. Security of Unclassified Army Property

AR 195-5. Evidence Procedures

AR 525-13. Antiterrorism

DA Pam 190-51. Risk Analysis for Army Property

DA Pam 710-2-1. Using Unit Supply System (Manual Procedures)

AFJI 23-126. Department of Defense Military Working Dog Program

AFI 131-121/OPNAVINST 5585.2C/MCO 10570.1B. Military Working Dog Program

21 CFR 1301.74(c). Other security controls for non-practitioners

21 CFR 1308.11. Schedule I

49 CFR. Transportation

49 CFR 177. Carriage by Public Highway

DODM 5100.76. Physical Security of Sensitive Conventional Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives

DTR 4500.9-R. Defense Travel Regulation

IMAS 09.42. Operational testing of mine detection dogs and handlers

IMAS 09.42.7. Operation testing of mine detection dogs and handlers: site preparation

JP 1-02. Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

STD 872-90-00. Standard Details for Chain-Link Security Fences and Farm Style Fences

TM 5-807-10. Signage

10 USC 375. Restriction on direct participation by military personnel

10 USC 2583. Military animals: transfer and adoption

18 USC 1385. Use of Army and Air Force posse comitatus

21 USC 812. Schedules of controlled substances

Publication Section III
Prescribed Forms

Unless otherwise indicated, DA forms are available on the APD Web site ( http://www.apd.army.mil ); DD forms are available on the OSD Web site ( http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/infomgt/forms/formsprogram.htm ).

DA Form 2807. Military Working Dog Training and Utilization Record (Prescribed in para 6-2c .)

DA Form 3992. Narcotics or Explosives Detector Dog Training and Utilization Record (Prescribed in para 6-2c .)

DD Form 1834. Military Working Dog Service Record (Prescribed in para 6-2f .)

Publication Section IV
Referenced Forms

Unless otherwise indicated, DA forms are available on the APD Web site ( http://www.apd.army.mil/ ); DD forms are available on the OSD Web site ( http://www.dtic.mmil/whs/directives/infomgt/forms/formsprogram.htm/ ); DEA forms are available on the DEA, Office of Diversion Control, Web site ( http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/index.html/ ); SF forms are available from the GSA Web site ( http://www.gsa.gov/portal/forms/type/SF/ ).

DA Form 11-2. Internal Control Evaluation Certification

DA Form 2028. Recommended Changes to Publications and Blanks Forms

DA Form 3161. Request for Issue or Turn-in

DA Form 4187. Personnel Action

DA Form 7281. Command Oriented Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives Security Screening and Evaluation Record

DD Form 1829. Record of Military Dog Physical Examination

DD Form 1926. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Civil Support Release and Reimbursement Agreement

DD Form 2875. System Authorization Access Request

SF Form 600. Medical Record - Chronological Record of Medical Care (available at http://www.gsa.gov/portal/forms/type/SF .)

DEA Form 106. Report of Theft or Loss of Controlled Substances

DEA Form 222. DEA Official Order Form for Schedule I and II Controlled Substances

DEA Form 223. Controlled Substances Registration Certificate

Appendix B
Instructions for Completing DA Forms

B-1. DA Form 2807

a. Training. This section of the form provides complete training information on all of the training tasks which must be accomplished for a patrol dog to maintain proficiency. It is not necessary to train on all of the controlled aggression tasks during the same day.

(1) Lines 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10 lists required training tasks. Entries may be made in minutes or hours for the amount of time spent training on specific tasks during a particular day of the month. However, the monthly total for each specific task will be in hours and entered in the far right hand column titled "Total Hours."

(2) Line 4 is an evaluation of that day's training on controlled aggression tasks stating whether the dog's performance was satisfactory or unsatisfactory. An "S" will be used for satisfactory performance and a "U" will be used for unsatisfactory performance. All unsatisfactory performance annotations will have an explanation for the deficiency and corrective action taken recorded on the reverse side of the form and continuation sheets, if necessary. The entries on lines 4a through 4e are the amount of time spent training on each of the controlled aggression tasks.

(3) Line 8 is to be used for the amount of time spent conducting scout or patrol training. Lines 8a through 8c are used to record the distance between the MWD team and the decoy being detected. The method of making time entries will be the same as that outlined in paragraph B-1a(1) above.

(4) Handler or trainer evaluation of the dog's daily training rating will be entered on line 11 of the training section. An "S "will be used for satisfactory performance and a "U "will be used for unsatisfactory performance.

b. Utilization. The utilization section provides a daily record of the time spent performing MP duties in the three general categories of combat support operations, law enforcement patrol, and security patrol.

(1) The combat support operations category may be used to record time spent performing MP missions, actual or training, in support of combat units. Such operations include field training exercises, command post exercises, mobilization exercises, and other activities related to the tactical and strategic missions of the Army.

(2) Entries on line 4 provide a daily rating of the performance of the MWD while performing MP duties ("S" is for satisfactory, "U" is for unsatisfactory). All unsatisfactory performance annotations will have an explanation for the deficiency and corrective action taken recorded on the reverse side of the form and continuation sheets, if necessary.

(3) When training is conducted during the period of time reported as utilization, the amount of time spent training may also be reported in the training section. However, when time is "double-counted" a notation should be made on the reverse of the form explaining the double-time entry. In this way, it will be possible to differentiate between training time, training time while on duty, and duty (utilization) time.

(4) The total monthly utilization hours are recorded in the last column titled "Total Hours."

c. Daily feeding. This section makes it possible to record the quantity of food fed daily to the dog for as many as two feedings each day.

(1) The type of food being used should be recorded in the first column on line 1.

(2) If the second daily feeding is a different type of food, or if the veterinarian changes the diet of the dog during the month, the second or new type of food is recorded on line 2. Line 2 may also be used to indicate the type and amount of food used daily for dogs on a food reward system.

(3) The quantity of food the dog consumed per day will be annotated in the corresponding date columns.

(4) The last column, titled "Wt of Dog," is used to record a semimonthly weight for the dog. The weight checks need not always occur on the middle and last day of each month, but should occur on approximately the same days each month. There is sufficient room under the headings "Date " and "Lbs " to record both the date when the dog is weighed and the weight in pounds.

B-2. DA Form 3992

a. Training. This section of the form is used for recording all training of the detector dog team in the detection skill. Three of the most common detection areas- buildings, containers, and vehicles, are listed, with one blank space for detection training in other areas. Examples of other areas may include mail inspection, search of open areas, non-contact search of persons, inspection of luggage, inspection of household goods and hold baggage, or any other areas considered significant or unique to the command to which the dog team is assigned. Although some of the examples may be included under one of the three prelisted categories, these (or others) may be listed separately. Additional forms may be used when there is a necessity to conduct more than four types of detection training. The preprinted categories on additional forms may be crossed through and all four blocks used.

(1) The top block of each training category is divided into two blocks. The top block is used to record the number of training aids planted for that day's detection training. The bottom block is used to record the number of training aids found by the detector dog by a proper response.

(2) Search time is the total amount of time devoted to detection training in each training category for that day. Detection training is the start time to the finish time of each training problem.

(3) The monthly totals in the last column titled "Total Hours" are obtained by adding the daily time entries in each training category and entering the result.

b. Utilization. All operational detection missions are recorded in the utilization section. As in the training section, three of the most common detection tasks are already listed. However, any detection missions that are significant should be listed separately to give an accurate record of the types of detection missions for which the detector dog team is used. Additional forms may be used whenever there are more than four types of significant detection missions being performed by the team. When additional forms are used, all four blocks may be used simply by crossing through the preprinted categories and entering the appropriate additional categories. There are two blocks under each date for each utilization category.

(1) The top block is for recording the number of times a substance is found that the dog has been trained to detect.

(2) The bottom block is for recording the total search or inspection time for the detection mission.

(3) The last column is the sum of the daily times and gives a record of the total amount of time spent performing the detection missions for that month.

(4) If desired, the number of finds for the month can also be totaled and entered in the last column.

c. Detection dog search data. This section is used by the handler to record all relevant information about the productivity and success of each detection mission.

(1) The time and date entries are self-explanatory. They provide a quick reference for when the detector dog team has performed detection missions.

(2) The location may be a building number, a unit designation, map grid coordinates, and/or any other information that helps to identify where the detection mission was performed.

(3) The military police report number is the number assigned to the case to account for the custody and disposition of the substances found. The substance is the identification of the material found by a common name, such as heroin, marijuana, dynamite, or detonating cord.

(4) Quantity is a measure of the amount of substance found. Weight, volume, overall dimensions, length, or any other appropriate measure may be found.

(5) The remarks section may be used for adding any other relevant information about the substance found. This would include field or laboratory verification of the type of substance, EOD evaluation of an explosive device or explosive substance as live or inert, or the presence of other hazardous material in or around the substance found, such as razor blades, trip wires, or poisons. Record any information which may be applicable or useful to other detection dog teams. Use additional sheets if needed. The greater the amount of information shared among detection dog handlers, the more successful the detection dog program will become.

d. Detection dog proficiency. A correct response occurs when the dog detects the substance, responds with a proper response, and the training aid is found where the dog has responded. A false response is when the dog responds as if it has detected the substance (the training aid), but no training aid can be found where the dog has responded. A missed response is when the dog fails to detect and respond with a proper response to the presence of a training aid.

(1) The detection dog's proficiency is computed monthly by adding the total number of correct responses, "a" for the month, and adding the total number of false and/or missed responses, "b " for the month. The two numbers "a "(for total correct responses) and "b "(for total false and/or missed responses) are used in the following formula to obtain the detection dog's sustainment rating: (a) (a+b) x100 = sustainment rating.

(2) For example, during the month the detection dog made 93 correct responses on training aids. The dog also has four false and three missed responses on training aids. Applying these two numbers (a=93 and b=7) to the formula, the following is obtained: (93)(93+7)x100 = 93 percent.

(3) The computation above shows the dog is working at a 93 percent sustainment rate. This rate is above the minimum standard of a narcotics detection dog (90 percent), but below the minimum standard for an EDD (95 percent).

(4) The narcotics detection dog handler should continue training to maintain, and possibly increase the dog's sustainment. The EDD handler needs to identify the causes of the dog's substandard performance and immediately begin corrective training to bring the detection dog up to and over the minimum 95 percent detection sustainment standard. Responses on actual substances during actual searches are not included in this computation. Search data cannot be included because it is impossible to determine the number of false or missed responses during an actual search.

Appendix C
Working Dog Management System

C-1. Scope

The intent of this appendix is to furnish information that may be useful in planning an MWD program or adding MWD teams to an existing program. The guidelines and "yardsticks" contained in this appendix are not meant to be "absolutes" for utilizations, training, or maintenance. The following paragraphs do, however, give general guidance and information that should be considered when planning a program. Paragraphs C-2 and C-4 and contain performance standards that may be useful in determining the number and type of MWD teams needed. The user of this regulation will find all of the following information useful for writing authorization documentation statements, as well as for planning the local MWD program.

C-2. Purpose

a. The Working Dog Management System is the system of record for the Army MWD program. This application was developed to reach a worldwide customer base and is Web based operating on a framework permitting worldwide access via the Internet and local area networks. The system provides a critical function by enabling Army program managers to have a comprehensive view of the operational readiness of all MWDs and the handlers across the Army's MWD program. Handlers, kennel masters, and program managers can perform data entry, reporting, and ad hoc querying.

b. The system can be accessed at https://wdms.lackland.af.mil/WDMS_Army/logon/logon.cfm/ and is common access card enabled for worldwide use. For new users, they will need to submit a DD Form 2875 (System Authorization Access Request) to OPMG requesting access to the system.

(1) The DA PM module is for the DA PM to access ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs MWD programs allowing them to get a snapshot in time of each command/kennels and provide oversight on requisitions, MWD management, handler management, team management, detection management, mission management, facility, and MTOE structure and reports.

(2) The tactical explosive detector dog module is only for the DA PM's access and personnel from the Capabilities Integration Division.

(3) The command module is for the battalion/brigade commanders, commanders, provost marshals and sergeant majors of their units allowing them to see a snapshot in time of their command/kennels. This dashboard displays all the information necessary to update the unit status report. Commanders, provost marshals, and detachment commanders are responsible for conducting a monthly inspection of handlers, MWDs, training, team utilization, team proficiency, equipment, and kennel facilities.

(4) The program manager module is specifically set up for the individual ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs PMs allowing them to get a snapshot in time of their command/kennels and provide oversight on requisitions, MWD management, handler management, team management, detection management, mission management, facility, MTOE structure and reports. This desk top also provides all the information necessary to update the unit status report.

(5) The kennel master module is used by kennel masters and plans NCOs, allowing them to add requisitions, perform MWD management, handler management, team management, detection management, misison management, facility management, MTOE structure assignments and reports. This essentially covers everything a kennel master and plans NCO need to do for the day-to-day operation of their assigned kennel.

(6) The handler module is used by individual handlers to manage their MWD team(s). Once an MWD team is created by the kennel master, handlers can record daily team training and utilization data, view mission assignments, and complete required reports.

c. The Working Dog Management System is the only system authorized and is mandated for usage by all MWD personnel operating in the program.

C-3. Clarification of specific terms

a. Utilization includes all missions (law enforcement, security, and combat support), whether patrolling, detecting drugs or explosives, or other functions (in combination) performed when handler and dog are being employed together as a team.

b. Training includes all training activities to maintain, improve, regain, or develop dog skills such as patrolling, scouting, tracking, detection of persons, and detection of drugs or explosives.

c. Maintenance includes all activities related to care, grooming, health, and sanitation of the dog, including medical treatment, recuperative time, sickness, and so forth. Down time for medical reasons is the basis for under utilization or under training.

d. Trade-off is the adjustment between training and utilization necessary to reinforce basic skills or to add new skills. For example, four hours per week may be adequate to maintain detector dog proficiency or to train in new skills. Additional training may be justified at times and training hours increased accordingly. This increase in training time should be accompanied by an equivalent reduction in utilization time. However, training hours should not be increased merely as a substitute for lack of utilization.

C-4. Patrol dog yardsticks in peacetime (law enforcement and/or security)

a. The start point for patrol dog posts (motorized or walking) is as follows:

(1) One per 24 hours of anticipated utilization.

(2) A multiplier of 1.2 (add-on).

b. Factors influencing commitment or justification rationale include:

(1) Installation population (military, civilian, dependent and contractor).

(2) Geographic area served (square miles).

(3) Crime rates where presence of dog teams could reasonably be expected to have impact (for example, parking lot larcenies, vandalism, prowlers, house break-ins, schools and/or commercial activity break-ins, rapes and/or assaults in areas used as short cuts, intrusion detection system (IDS) responses).

c. Risk assessment (using AR 190-51 ) which takes into account-

(1) Type of activities and resources on the installation needing protection and the value of same (monetary and intrinsic).

(2) The vulnerability of resources.

(3) The effect of loss of resources on the Army's wartime capability.

(4) Type of installation access control (for example, closed, open, time-controlled).

(5) Crime rates in the local area.

d. Amending the local tables of distribution and allowances and/or modification of table of organization and equipment for peacetime by adding appropriate dog handler ASIs to the existing structure is the easiest way to start (or add to) a MWD program. A "plus up" of TDA/TOE is the most difficult way to begin a program and should be the last resort.

C-5. Narcotic detection yardsticks in peacetime (law enforcement and/or security)

a. Considerations listed in previous sections still apply, with additional considerations outlined below because of the additional skill of narcotics detection having been added. The start point for additional consideration in justifying NDD teams may be any combination of the following:

b. One authorization per each population of 5,000 supported.

c. One per 24 hours projected detector utilization.

d. A multiplier of 1.2 (add-on).

e. Factors for consideration, which influence commitment or justification rationale, include installation population composition (military, family members, civilian, median age, and so forth).

f. Crime rates associated with drug abuse, including use, possession, sale and/or trafficking (general measure is one dog team per 100 use and/or possession cases annually).

g. Crime rates associated with drug abuse.

h. Level of self-admitted drug use based on survey data.

i. Risk assessment based on DA Pam 190-51 that considers the availability of narcotics by type, cost, and geographic proximity to drug trafficking centers.

C-6. Explosives detection yardsticks in peacetime (law enforcement and/or security)

a. Considerations listed in previous sections still apply, with additional considerations outlined below because of the additional skill of explosives detection having been added. The start point for additional considerations in justifying explosives detector dog teams is as follows:

(1) One authorization per each population of 5,000 supported.

(2) A multiplier of 1.2 (add-on).

b. Factors for consideration which influence commitment or justification rationale include-

(1) Number of bomb threats annually.

(2) Number of actual bombs and/or explosive devices found, and number of actual explosions.

c. Risk assessment on the following:

(1) Resources needing protection and their value.

(2) Vulnerability of resources.

(3) Impact of the loss of a resource on the Army's wartime capability.

(4) Threat posed (geography, political significance, and so forth).

(5) Probability of overt and/or covert attack using explosives.

d. Demographics, for example, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (survey of explosives incidents and the area being identified as a problem area).

e. Lack of availability or lengthy response time of explosive dogs from other Federal and other/State agencies in the area (for example, Federal Aviation Administration, local police, and so forth).

C-7. Patrol, narcotic detection, explosives detection yardsticks, or considerations for the wartime combat support role

Basic patrol dog utilization in combat is contained in ATTP 3-39.34. In addition, consideration must be given to

a. Support of operation plans which may further justify dogs.

b. Size, mission, and type of combat (or combat support, combat service support) organization.

c. Mission of units being supported.

C-8. Additional wartime consideration

An additional wartime consideration for patrol dogs, dual trained as narcotic detectors, would be whether supported operation plans require OCONUS deployment. The narcotics detection capability can be used during deployments to either location. This capability may also prove useful around ports of embarkation and/or debarkation, especially at seaports. Additional wartime consideration for PEDDs, MDDs, and SSDs would be whether or not teams are supporting required deployments. Justification can be found in any of the following areas (not meant to be all inclusive):

a. Terrorism threat.

b. Insurgent threat.

c. Key facility security.

d. Route clearance.

e. Cache search.

f. Mine field clearance.

g. Casualty evacuation.

Appendix D
The Robby Law and disposition instructions for a military working dog

D-1. Adoption of military working dog (The Robby Law)

On 27 September 2000, a Maryland congressman introduced a bill, H.R. 5314 (10 USC 2583) aimed at revising DOD policy to allow adoption of all military dogs, including attack dogs like Robby. The Robby Law reads as follows:



Figure D-1. The Robby Law (10 USC 2583)


D-2. Disposition packet

a. A disposition package must be submitted from the unit commander to the 341st TRS, 1239 Knight Street, Lackland Air Force Base, TX 78236-5631. Army packages must be submitted through their ACOM/ACSS with an information copy provided to their Service MWD program manager. Additional information can be accessed on the 341st TRS Web site at http://www.dodmwd.lackland.af.mil or phone commercial (210) 671-3125 or Defense Service Network 473-3125.

b. Packages must contain a letter requesting disposition instruction by identifying the apparent cause of failure and a summary of retraining efforts or the medical problem. Include the following as attachments to the request letter:

(1) Training documentation.

(2) Training records from start of training issue to present.

(3) Last six months of training records (only MWD can be used as a training aid or if disposition is due to training issue.

(4) Copies of medical documentation.

(5) Veterinarian's letter to unit commander.

(6) Consultation and/or referral form from veterinarian (medical problems only).

(7) Master problem list.

(8) Most recent DD Form 1829 (Record of Military Dog Physical Examination).

(9) Relevant Standard Form (SF) 600s (Medical Record - Chronological Record of Medical Care), including last three pages.

(10) Relevant radiology or diagnostic report.

(11) Bite-muzzle video clip (for formerly patrol trained dogs), if deemed suitable for adoption by unit commander. To expedite the disposition process, send a copy of the video clip or compact disk directly to the disposition coordinator.

(12) Single purpose detection dogs that have never been a patrol dog do not need a bite-muzzle video.

D-3. Possible Disposition Board outcomes

a. Excess. The unit commander can legally begin the process of removing the MWD from his or her inventory by whichever means he or she deems appropriate within his or her legal right.

b. Review. Review adoption suitability checklist.

c. Eligible for adoption. The 341st TRS must review the bite- muzzle video. Once the dog is adopted, the kennel master must send a copy of the indemnity agreement to the disposition coordinator.

d. DD Form 1834. The original DD Form 1834 must have the final disposition box annotated, and it must be sent to the disposition coordinator.

e. Transfer to law enforcement. Only if medically eligible.

f. Euthanasia. (after consultation with 341st TRS Veterinary Service).

g. Reason for euthanasia. Kennel masters must provide a reason for recommending a dog for euthanasia.

h. Not excess. Disposition Board deems MWD should not be removed from inventory; in other words, should stay on duty.

i. Training aid. Authorization to return MWD to 341st TRS for possible use in student training.

Appendix E
Certification

MWD certification, recertification, and subsequent decertification may be required anytime the kennel master or certification authority or immediate commander in the chain of command has reason to doubt the team's reliability. Certification is the process used to formally evaluate and identify MWD teams that demonstrate reliability and maturity as a team. All certifications are valid for one year after fulfilling certification standards. Recertification is an annual requirement for all MWD teams that have already received initial certification. All recertifications should follow the same procedures as the initial certification.

E-1. Patrol dog certification for dual trained detection dogs

a. The use of obedience commands demonstrates the level of communication and understanding that exists between a handler and his dog.

b. On command from the handler, the patrol dog must execute the commands of SIT, DOWN, HEEL, and STAY. The dog must execute the commands correctly when the dog is located at the handler's side and when the handler is positioned at a distance of 50 feet with no more than one correction per five commands. The commands can either be hand gesture commands or verbal commands. The commands STAY and HEEL are rated critical. The commands SIT and DOWN are rated semi-critical.

c. While off-leash, the patrol dog will maintain a proper heel position while the handler starts, stops, changes speed, changes direction, and executes facing movements. Movements the MWD team must be able to perform include forward march, rear march, column left, column right, and halt. These and other marching movements are rated semi-critical.

d. Recall will consist of calling the dog from a distance of 50 feet and stopping the dog at a distance of 25 feet with a SIT or DOWN command. The dog will then be called to heel position with a voice command. Recall is rated semi-critical.

e. The patrol dog must negotiate the obedience/obstacle course (semi-critical) at a marching pace off-leash by command of its handler. When off-leash, the patrol dog will maintain the heel position while the patrol dog handler walks the dog through the course. Random stops will be made between obstacles, and some obstacles will be passed to ensure that the dog is responding to the handler's direction and not simply "running the course." There will be no more than two corrections per command when conducting the obedience course.

E-2. Six phases of aggression

DA appointed certification authorities should vary the sequence of events to ensure the handler's control over the dog.

a. False run (critical). While off-leash, when commanded to STAY, the MWD must remain in the heel, sit, or down position, and not attack when a person approaches the MWD team.

b. False run into a bite (critical). When commanded to STAY, the MWD must remain in the heel, sit, or down position, off-leash, and attack only on the command of GET HIM. The MWD must complete the attack, bite and hold the decoy, hold with a full mouth bite for at least 10 to 15 seconds, and release on the command OUT. Only one verbal correction is authorized, and the MWD must release the bite on the second command of OUT. The MWD must return to its handler when commanded to HEEL.

c. Search and attack (critical). When commanded to STAY, the MWD must remain in the heel, down, or sit position while the handler searches a decoy off-leash. The search will consist of patting down both arms, both legs, and the torso of the decoy. During the search, the MWD must attack the decoy without command if the decoy tries to escape or attacks the handler. The MWD must complete the attack, bite and hold the decoy, and release on the command OUT. Only one verbal correction is authorized, and the MWD must release the bite on the second command of OUT. The MWD must return to its handler when commanded to HEEL. After the search, the handler moves to a position about 2 feet to the right and 10 feet to the rear of the decoy, so that the decoy is positioned between the dog and the handler. The handler faces the dog and commands the dog to HEEL. The dog must respond to the command without attacking the decoy.

d. Search and call by (critical). When commanded to STAY, the MWD must remain in the heel, sit, or down position, and remain in a controlled position while the handler searches a decoy off-leash. The search will consist of patting down both arms, both legs, and the torso of the decoy. After the search, the handler moves to a position about 2 feet to the right and 10 feet to the rear of the decoy, so that the decoy is positioned between the dog and the handler. The handler faces the dog and commands the dog to HEEL. The dog must respond to the command without attacking the decoy. The MWD is secured on-leash.

e. Standoff (critical). When commanded to STAY, the MWD must remain in the heel, down, or sit position, while off-leash. Only one command of GET HIM will be given. The correct response for this task is the dog will cease pursuit of a decoy on the command OUT, and then on command of HEEL, the dog will return to the heel position. Only one verbal correction is authorized and the MWD must stop pursuit on the second command of OUT. The MWD must respond to the command without biting the decoy.

f. Escort (semi-critical). When commanded to HEEL, the MWD team must escort the decoy for at least 20 yards. The MWD must stay in the heel position, on-leash, and must not attack the decoy.

E-3. Out and guard

DA appointed certification authorities should vary the sequence of events to ensure the handler's control over the dog.

a. Field interview (critical). When commanded to STAY, the MWD must remain in the heel, sit, or down position, on or off-leash, and must not attack when a person approaches the MWD team.

b. Field interview into an attack (critical). The MWD is placed on guard, on-leash, and attack only on the command of GET HIM. On the command of GET HIM, the MWD will be released off-leash. The MWD must complete the attack, bite and hold the decoy, hold with a full mouth bite for at least 10 to 15 seconds, and release on the command OUT. Only one verbal correction is authorized, and the MWD must release the bite on the second command of OUT. Once the MWD releases the bite, the MWD must maintain the guard position, focused on the decoy, after releasing the bite.

c. Search (critical). When commanded to STAY, the MWD must remain in the sit or down position, and remain in a controlled position, while the handler re-positions the decoy approximately 10 feet from the MWD. The search will consist of patting down both arms, both legs, and the torso of the decoy. After the search, the handler positions himself behind the decoy and commands the MWD to HEEL. The MWD must respond to the command without attacking the decoy.

d. Standoff (critical). The MWD is placed on guard, on-leash, and attacks only on the command GET HIM. On the command of GET HIM, the MWD will be released off-leash. The correct response for this task is for the MWD to cease pursuit of the decoy on the command OUT, and then either sit, down, or stand without biting the decoy. Only one verbal correction is authorized, and the MWD must stop pursuit on the second command of OUT. The MWD must respond to the command without attacking the decoy.

e. Escort (critical). With the MWD off-leash, the MWD team must escort the decoy for at least 20 yards. The MWD must complete the escort without biting the decoy.

f. Building search (critical). The MWD will find a decoy inside any structure, and show the handler where the decoy is located. This task can be done either on- or off-leash, but the MWD must indicate a recognizable response. A false response not recognized by the handler constitutes a failure.

g. Gunfire (critical). The MWD will not be adversely affected by gunfire, either when the handler or another person, is firing. Gunfire will not be a command for the dog to attack. The MWD will attack only on command. An MWD should remain calm, under control, and attentive to the handler under gunfire. Excessive anxiety/ fear or aggressive behavior towards the handler will result in automatic failure. The MWD will hold its position, while its handler or another person is firing a weapon

h. Scouting or patrolling (critical). The MWD will be able to find people by scent, sight, or sound. Proficiency in scouting or patrolling requires the ability to detect and respond to the scent of decoys that are hiding upwind at least 100 yards but not more than 200 yards, and follow the scents to the decoys' locations. The MWD will pursue and attack only on command.

E-4. Narcotics detection dog certification standard

The certification standard for a PDDD and NDD is a 90 percent detection rate with no more that 10 percent false response rate.

a. The locations used during a certification evaluation must vary. These locations should include office buildings, barracks, clubs, vehicles, aircraft, and warehouses with the primary emphasis on realistic scenarios.

b. All training aids will be hidden from view of the MWD team and training aids will sit in place for a minimum of 30 minutes prior to the MWD being evaluated. Training aids should vary in depth and amounts for each problem. One area of the evaluation should be a blank problem with limited lighting.

c. All training aids will be hidden from floor level to a reasonable height (no more than 10 feet) to ensure the handler can distinguish air currents and detect the dog's change in behavior.

E-5. Narcotics detection dog training aids

a. Units, installations, and activities located within the States or territories of the United States will apply to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for registration.

b. DEA Form 223 (Controlled Substances Registration Certificate) will be used to authorize applicants or registration certificates.

c. Registration is valid for one year and must be renewed annually.

d. Possession or use of narcotics training aids by units not in possession of a current and valid DEA Form 222 (DEA Official Order Form for Schedule I and II Controlled Substances) is prohibited.

e. Registration and procurement instructions are provided in DA Pam 190-12 .

f. Overseas units will not register with the DEA. Commands/units OCONUS must register only with AFMES/FORTOX/MWD, Armed Forces Medical Examiner System, Division of Forensic Toxicology, Military Working Dog Laboratory in Dover, Delaware. Procurement and use of narcotics or contraband training aids in overseas areas will be coordinated with appropriate host governments. Overseas ASCCs will establish procedures for procuring and using narcotics or contraband training aids consistent with the requirements of this regulation, AR 195-5 , and DA Pam 190-12 .

g. Units, installations, and activities which have been authorized to procure and use narcotics or contraband training aids (DEA registration or appropriate overseas command approval) are authorized to procure up to 116 grams of marijuana (7360), 20 grams of hashish (7370), 14 grams of heroin (9200), 17 grams of cocaine (9041), 20 grams of methamphetamine (1105), and 6 grams of methylenedioxy methamphetamine (MDMA) (ecstasy) (7405). The maximum quantities of controlled substances authorized to be stored at any one time is 300 grams of marijuana, 30 grams of hashish, 30 grams of heroin, and 30 grams of cocaine, 20 grams of methamphetamine, 6 grams of MDMA ( DA Pam 190-12 ).

h. Hashish and methamphetamine will not be provided as part of the standard training kit. Requests to train drug detector dogs to alert on hashish and methamphetamine must be justified and based on problems in the local community or base. All justifications for hashish and methamphetamine must be approved through respective ACOM/ASSC/DRU program manager. Reasonable quantity limits will be established for other controlled substances (for example, amphetamines, barbiturates, and so forth) when these are available and are used for training.

i. All narcotics or contraband training aids will be accounted for using a daily issue and/or return log to record daily transactions involving the drug training aids. This log should be kept in a bound log book, such as NSN 7530-00-286-8363, or equivalent. The use of the log book and its relationship to other DEA forms can be found in DA Pam 190-12 and AFMES/FORTOX/MWD Drug Training Aid Accountability Guide.

j. Checks for accountability of all narcotics training aids will be conducted monthly by a disinterested person in the grade of E-7 or higher. The same person cannot conduct inventory in two consecutive months.

k. Synthetic drugs (for example, pseudoheroin or pseudo cocaine) will not be used for training of narcotics or contraband detector dogs.

l. Although training aids are packaged to prevent loss of their contents, there may be a slight variation in weight due to handling and the conditions under which the aids are stored and used. The following tolerances have been established as a guideline to be used in weighing training aids for daily issue and periodic inventories:

(1) cocaine all weights 0.2 grams.

(2) heroin all weights 0.2 grams.

(3) MDMA all weights 0.2 grams.

(4) hashish all weights 0.5 grams.

(5) methamphetamine all weights 0.2 grams.

(6) marijuana 20 grams can have a tolerance of 2.0.

m. Narcotic training aids that are 10 grams can have a tolerance of 1.0 grams, 5 grams can have a tolerance of 0.5 grams and 3 grams can have a tolerance of 0.2 grams. AFMES/FORTOX/MWD will report immediately to OPMG and notify the appropriate DEA Field Division or Resident Office, in writing, of any theft or significant loss within one business day of discovery of the theft or loss. DEA Form 106 (Report of Theft or Loss of Controlled Substances) will be used. All thefts and significant losses must be reported whether or not the controlled substances are recovered and/or the responsible parties are identified and action taken against them (21 CFR 1301.74(c)).

n. Commanders, provost marshals, or security officers will appoint, in writing, a custodian and an alternate custodian. Prior to appointment, the custodian and alternate custodian must have a favorable U.S. Army Crime Records Center name check. The custodians will be responsible for the procurement, storage, security, accountability, and control of narcotics or contraband training aids per this regulation and DA Pam 190-12 . Further, all MP personnel authorized to use narcotics or contraband training aids will be designated in writing by the provost marshal and/or the Director, Emergency Services.

E-6. Explosive detection dog certification

The certification standard for a PEDD and EDD is a 95 percent detection rate with no more than a 10 percent false response rate.

a. The locations used during a certification evaluation must vary. These locations should include office buildings, barracks, clubs, vehicles, aircraft, and warehouses with the primary emphasis of conducting realistic scenarios.

b. Explosive training aids will be hidden from view of the MWD team, and training aids will sit in place for a minimum of 30 minutes prior to the MWD being evaluated. Training aids should vary in depth and amounts for each problem. One area of the evaluation should be a blank problem with limited lighting.

c. All explosives will be hidden from floor level to a reasonable height (no more than 10 feet) to ensure the handler can distinguish air currents and detect the dog's change in behavior.

E-7. Explosive detection dog training aids

a. The effectiveness of explosive detector dogs depends on continual reinforcement of the detection skill through realistic proficiency training.

b. Commanders, provost marshals and/or security officers will appoint, in writing, an explosive training aid custodian and alternate custodian. Personnel selected as the custodian and alternate custodian will complete DA Form 7281 (Command Oriented Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives (AAE) Security Screening and Evolution Record) in accordance with AR 190-11 and be cleared by a favorable U.S. Army Crime Records Center name check before being appointed. The custodians will be responsible for the procurement, storage, security, accountability, and control of explosives training aids per this regulation and DA Pam 190-12 . Further, all personnel authorized to use explosives training aids will be designated, in writing, by the provost marshal and/or Director, Emergency Services.

c. Checks for the accountability of all explosives training aids will be conducted monthly by a disinterested person in the grade of E-7 or above (see DA Pam 190-12 for accountability instructions). The same person cannot conduct the inventory in two consecutive months.

d. All personnel associated with EDD training will receive formal annual training by EOD or safety personnel in the safe storage, transportation, and handling of each type of explosive used as training aids before conducting or participating in proficiency training.

e. Commander will ensure safety training for using explosives training aids is available before seeking authorizations for EDDs and handlers.

f. Training aids by types of explosives are given a federal stock number and issued through the munitions supply systems.

g. Explosives should be packaged by type required and by size needed.

h. Training aids can be centrally procured and distributed.

i. The central procurement agency can either buy the explosives properly packaged, or package them before distribution to units. The types and quantities of explosives authorized for use in training are specified in DA Pam 190-12 . The ACOM/ASCC/DRU commanders, with OPMG concurrence, may authorize additional explosives training aids, when the use of other explosives substances is identified and such use merits development of a detection capability.

j. Canine explosive components for scent kits can be requisitioned through local supply channels, and the storage box can be ordered using this NSN 8410-01-194-8044. Individual replacement items can be ordered using the following NSNs:

(1) Charge, Demo, Block M112 (quantity 3) NSN M023- 1375-01-389-3854 Charge Demo.

(2) Trinitrotoluene (TNT) NSN M032-1375-00-935-6139 Block 1-pound sticks (quantity 3) Replacement item for M031 one-half pound.

(3) Cord, Detonating (5feet lengths) (quantity 6) NSN M456-1375-00-180-9356.

(4) Water Gel 1 pound sticks (quantity 6) No shelf life when used in Scent Kit MY77 1375-01-180-5779.

(5) Smokeless Powder (1 pound can) (quantity 2) NSN MY57 1376-00-772-1370.

(6) Dynamite 40 percent Nitroglycerin (quantity 6) Shelf life of 18 months NSN M587 1375-00-096-3095.

(7) Dynamite 75 percent Ammonium Nitrate (quantity 6) Shelf Life of 18 months NSN MN85 1375-01-494-9223.

(8) Sodium and Potassium Chlorates will be used to certify explosive detector dogs per DA Pam 190-12 .

k. Explosives training aids will be issued only to those persons who have received the explosives safety training prescribed in subparagraph d , above. All personnel who are authorized to handle explosives training aids will be designated, in writing, by the activity or installation provost marshal, security officer, or MP unit commander after successful completion of training conducted by EOD personnel.

l. Explosives training aids will be transported only in government vehicles which have been certified as safe for explosives transportation by explosives safety personnel.

m. The use of pseudo or simulated explosive substances is unauthorized.

n. Validation is time for the team to become accustomed to its current environment and introduce new explosives unique to that country. It should not be considered a certification.

o. The acclimatization period with validation should be conducted within four weeks of a team's arrival. The training time will be used to introduce the team to the various types of explosive substances that are unique to the area as well as teach the handler new techniques, tactics and procedures used in the current theater of operation. All teams must successfully complete validation of the new explosives introduced before they are considered operational.

E-8. Specialized search dog team recertification

This establishes the conditions, handler knowledge, areas, odors, and types of searches and systems used to establish the certification process for the SSD teams for the U.S. Army.

a. The use of obedience commands demonstrate the level of communication and understanding that exists between a handler and his or her dog.

b. On command from the handler, the SSD dog must execute the commands of SIT, DOWN, HEEL, and STAY. The dog must execute the commands correctly when the dog is located at the handler's side and when the handler is positioned at a distance of 50 feet with no more than one correction per five commands. The commands can either be hand gesture commands or verbal commands. The commands STAY and HEEL are rated critical. The commands SIT and DOWN are rated semi-critical.

c. While off-leash, the SSD will maintain a proper heel position while the handler starts, stops, changes speed, changes direction, and executes facing movements. Movements that the dog team must be able to perform include forward march, rear march, column left, column right, and halt. These and other marching movements are rated semi-critical.

d. Recall will consist of calling the dog from a distance of 50 feet and stopping the dog at a distance of 25 feet with a SIT or DOWN command. The dog will then be called to HEEL position with a voice command. Recall is rated semi-critical.

e. The SSD dog must negotiate the obedience/obstacle course (semi-critical) at a marching pace, off-leash, by command of its handler. When off-leash, the SSD dog will maintain the heel position while the SSD dog handler walks the dog through the course. Random stops will be made between obstacles, and some obstacles will be passed to ensure that the dog is responding to the handler's direction and not simply "running the course." There will be no more than two corrections per command while conducting the obedience course.

f. The SSD teams will be evaluated in every area with a minimum of one high-risk search conducted for certification. One area will have multiple training aids to demonstrate the fact that the dog is not distracted and capable of continuing the search after finding the first aid. The team is allowed one false response during the certification with 95 percent proficiency. All dogs should sit when at the source of a known odor; however, some situations prevent the dog from physically being able to give a final response. In the case where a dog fails to respond, the handler must identify the definitive change of behavior and point out the area to the evaluator. However, all training must emphasize the sit position on odor. The minimum number of plants is seven for the SSD certification.

g. The certification authority will determine what areas will be used during certification; at a minimum, each area must be used once and some areas may also be used more than once, based upon the scenario. The areas and types are listed below-

(1) Route (urban and rural). Includes railways, trails, and road ways.

(2) Area (urban/rural/venue). There is a distinct difference between rural and urban open areas and each has unique characteristics.

(3) Building (occupied, unoccupied, derelict). The search will begin in multilevel buildings at the floor and the occupants will be moved to the floor or areas that have been searched.

(4) Vehicles (static and/or access control point (ACP)). Static vehicles are searched off-leash. The ACP vehicle searches should be done on-leash for the safety of the dog.

h. The types of searches used by the SSD team are free search and systematic search. Free search is working the dog on a loose search pattern, letting the dog search on its own with minimal control, except to keep the dog in sight and keep it working. Systematic search concentrates on specific areas or points of interest to ensure the area is completely searched. The handler directs the dog to these points and may present certain items, if they feel the dog did not adequately search it.

i. The following systems and definitions will be used in the scenarios given for certification:

(1) The rummage search should be done as rapidly as possible.

(2) The low-risk search, more thorough than a rummage search, incorporates free search and then systematic search to cover the area.

(3) The high risk search is a very thorough and methodical search of an area which is based on the intelligence given for that specific scenario.

j. One of the key points of certification for the SSD team is the majority of searches will be completed off-leash, with the exception of ACP vehicle searches. The handler must ensure that all areas are searched completely and must notify the evaluator if an area cannot be searched due to safety or inability of the dog. If a handler fails to completely search an area, the team fails the exercise and must be retested in that area. The dog is not discouraged from urinating or defecating in the search area unless it is indoors. The handler must be able to brief the capabilities, limitations, and security procedures to take if the team comes under contact or has an indication during the certification to the person in charge of the search.

k. A train-up period with validation must be conducted within four weeks of a team's arrival into a theater of operations. The training time will be used to introduce the team to the various types of explosive substances that are unique to the area. In addition to training, the time allows the team to become acclimatized to the environment. After some train-up time, all teams must successfully complete validation of the new explosives introduced, before they are considered operational.

E-9. Specialized search dog training aids

A variety of explosive training aids are needed to maintain proficiency.

a. Many different explosive compounds are in use today, and the explosives used in homemade bombs may range from common household materials to the most sophisticated military or commercial compounds. Nearly all explosives have certain identifiable elements that are found in at least one of the explosives used for training aids. The SSDs trained to detect these explosives can also detect most other explosives. The handler must develop an understanding of what odors the SSD is able to detect (for example, the explosives substance rather than containers, wrappings, tapes, or other material which may be present). The following types of explosives are authorized for training SSD teams:

(1) Commercial dynamite.

(2) Gelatin.

(3) Ammonium nitrate (AN).

(4) Military dynamite.

(5) Water gel (TOVEX).

(6) TNT

(7) Smokeless powder.

(8) Composition 4 plastic explosive (C4).

(9) British plastic explosive number 4 (PE4).

(10) Semtex H.

(11) AN mixed with sugar (ANS).

(12) Detonating cord.

(13) Artillery rounds.

(14) Mortar rounds.

(15) Small arms ammunition.

(16) Potassium chlorate.

(17) Sodium chlorate.

(18) Weapons.

b. All of the explosives and associated items listed should be available to the SSD team to use for training. Each of these items should be used to maintain the SSD's proficiency at 95 percent or better on each of the items. The general rule is to use any type of firearm, ammunition, or explosive varying the amount and type from day to day. The handler must develop in depth knowledge of what type of explosives is being used and how these explosives are constructed in devices.

E-10. Mine detection dog certification

a. Team certification, validation, and testing are to ensure the proficiency of each individual dog team. The MDD will conduct a formal certification process that consists of searching for both buried and surface laid landmines in these scenarios- area search, route search, and minefield extraction. With the exception of combat specific test scenarios, all testing will be conducted in accordance with current International Mine Action Standards (IMAS) 09.42, Operational testing of mine detection dogs and handlers. The engineer commander will submit certification authority requests for OPMG approval.

b. The minimum certification standard of detection for MDD is zero misses with no more than two false responses, and the dog must indicate within a one meter radius of the test items' exact location.

c. The MDD team must demonstrate the ability to detect the presence of a mine and indicate the presence of both old (buried at least three months) and freshly laid mines (buried two hours prior to certification by the certifying authority) on which it has been trained and give a positive response to the handler.

d. The MDD must be able to successfully search a minimum of 400 square meters using the echelon technique for area clearance, without showing signs of fatigue or loss in concentration.

e. The MDD team must be able to clear a minimum of 400 square meters using the route clearance method and must also be able to clear a one meter safe distance on the shoulders of the route technique without showing signs of fatigue or loss in concentration.

f. The MDD team must search a minimum of a 1-meter by 75-meter area using the minefield extraction technique, without showing signs of fatigue or loss in concentration.

g. The MDD team must conduct one combat tactical scenario, based on the known threat area over the previous six months (for example, detecting the buried landmine in front of a culvert improvised explosive device placed to disable EOD or other response personnel).

h. Obedience demonstrates the dog's ability to react immediately to commands from its handler and is evaluated during the MDD certification. On command from the handler, the dog must execute the commands and movements required for a MDD. The team must be fully obedient to the following commands: HEEL, SIT, STAY, COME, LEAVE, SEEK, TOUCH, BACK, and AWAY. These commands must be executed when the dog is located at the handler' s side-HEEL, SIT, STAY. The team is also required to conduct the same commands at a distance of 10 feet. Only one physical correction per four commands is allowed. The command STAY is rated critical; the commands SIT and HEEL are rated semi-critical.

i. The handler's performance will also be assessed during the certification process. The certification authority will judge the handler's ability to interpret his/her dog's performance in all the above conditions. The certification authority will check the handler for safe operating procedures in accordance with unit SOPs. These procedures include use of search pattern, utilization of wind direction, environmental conditions, and assessment of MWD behavior. The handler will have to maintain safe distances between elements and remain in safe areas at all times. The handler must remain in safe areas during breaks, rewards dog in safe areas, alerts all to MWD indication, and conveys location to manual clearance personnel.

j. A team failing to pass a test will not be re-tested immediately, but it will be given a 90-day retraining period before re-testing. Decertification standards will apply to the dog team. If a handler and a dog have passed the certification process as a team, no other handler can handle the dog under the same certification. Certification of a MDD and handler is valid for one year (12 months) and is immediately nullified when

(1) The yearly certification has elapsed.

(2) A new handler is assigned to the dog.

(3) The handler and dog have been separated or have not conducted training for 35 or more consecutive days for any reason.

(4) The dog and handler team fails to maintain the detection standards listed above.

(5) The dog fails to give a positive response consistently.

(6) The dog does not work under control of the handler.

(7) After prolonged injury and/or sickness of the dog or handler (35 or more consecutive days).

(8) Failure to maintain a 95 percent training proficiency after a 35 consecutive day period.

k. When a dog team's proficiency training has been interrupted for 35 or more consecutive days for any reason, a full recertification of the team by a certification authority is required. If a team fails to pass the test, they will be retested after 90 days of retraining. If the team fails to pass the second test, the team will be retested the final time after an additional 90 days. If the team fails the third and final test, they cannot be expected to detect mines or explosive hazards consistently and should not be allowed to retest or deploy. After the third failure, the team will be re-evaluated for possible re-teaming of the dog and the handler.

l. Upon completion of the certification process, the team is required to test once a week and revalidate every three months, in accordance with engineer MDD program manager polices.

m. Decertified MDD teams will not be used in any official capacity encompassing detection utilization. The team must be exempt from all duties that may interfere with the proficiency training requirements, and will be authorized to be recertified only after retraining has been completed and a validation has been conducted prior to recertification.

n. Recertification may be required any time the Counter Explosive Hazard Center Director, Mine Detection Dog Course NCOIC, certification authority, or immediate commander has reason to doubt the team's reliability.

o. The MDD team will be required to complete an in-theater validation prior to beginning military operations. The in-theater validation team should consist of a NCOIC, an officer in charge, or a qualified MWD handler not affiliated with the unit. The MDD teams will have a minimum of four weeks of in- theater train-up that will also include the validation, to enable the teams to train on explosives and mines that are unique to that country. It also gives the teams the opportunity to adapt to environmental conditions. The in-theater training minefield requirement is a field that has been aged for a minimum of two months. The validation process provides the in-theater commanders with the reliability and confidence the dog teams meet required operational detection standards.

E-11. Mine detection dog training aids

a. Procurement of explosive training aids for the MDDs is the responsibility of the U.S. Army Forces Command MWD PM and the operational MDD unit commander. The TRADOC MWD PM, the Director of Training, USAES, and the MDD course manager share responsibility for the procurement of the explosive training aids for the MDD training course.

b. As physical security plays a key role in the accountability of buried landmines, inventory of the mines and explosives will be the responsibility of the primary and alternate custodians and their assigned physical security manager. This includes emplaced and non-emplaced landmines and explosives. Inventory procedures will be accordance with the installation policies, safety, and range control office policies and appropriate Army regulations. At a minimum, a monthly on-hand inventory will be conducted on all mines and explosives not emplaced in the minefield. All buried mines in the minefield will be inventoried monthly by utilizing a mine detector, Global Positioning System locator, and a minefield emplacement diagram which verifies the exact location and the type of mine. See installation policy/SOP.

c. A 100 percent hands-on inventory will be conducted every time there is a change of primary custodian.

d. The monthly inventory will be conducted by a disinterested person in the grade of E-7 or higher who is appointed, in writing, by the unit commander. Inspection personnel will not conduct an inspection in two consecutive months.

E-12. Combat tracker dogs

Combat tracker dogs (CTD) are trained to track single or multiple quarries over varied terrain.

a. These dogs work on foot and require a security team. They can-

(1) Locate enemy personnel from a known location, such as an improvised explosive device trigger point, sniper hide site, and so forth.

(2) Locate missing, lost, or captured friendly personnel.

(3) Because this dog tracks human scent, time is a factor. Scent dissipates or becomes contaminated over time; the CTD should be on scene as soon as possible and should only be requested when mission requires it.

b. Employment considerations for CTDs-

(1) Ability to track on hard and soft surfaces.

(2) Rapid deployment.

(3) Good starting points.

(4) Reasonably strong scents.

c. CTD can be used to locate the enemy but does not typically engage him.

d. Advantages of the CTD-

(1) Greater speed and efficiency than human tracker.

(2) Ability to track in the absence of visible signs.

(3) Diminishes the ability of enemy personnel to run and hide.

(4) Psychological deterrent.

e. Disadvantages of the CTD-

(1) One handler, one dog need security support to operate effectively.

(2) Scent trails are difficult to follow in heavily populated areas.

(3) Wind and rain can dissipate human scent.

(4) Extreme heat can diminish the dog's effectiveness.

E-13. Certification standards for the combat tracker dog

DA certification authorities will conduct CTD certification.

a. The minimum standard is one trial conducted in a rural area at a distance of 1600 meters. One quarry must have at least two right turns.

b. The team must be able to conduct hot scent identification on a track at least one hour old.

c. A new track will be laid for every team requiring certification.

d. On-leash obedience is evaluated through commands of SIT, STAY, DOWN, AND HEEL.

e. During obedience evaluation, the handler will fire five rounds. The CTD must not show aggression or submission.

Appendix F
Internal Control Evaluation Checklist

F-1. Function

The function covered by this checklist is the Army Military Working Dog Program.

F-2. Purpose

The purpose of this checklist is to assist assessable unit managers and internal control administrators in evaluating the key management controls outlined below. It is not intended to cover all controls.

F-3. Instructions

Answers must be based on the actual testing of key management controls (that is, document analysis, direct observation, sampling, simulation, other). Answers that indicate deficiencies must be explained and corrective action indicated in the supporting documentation. These key management controls must be formally evaluated at least once every five years. Certification that this evaluation has been conducted must be accomplished on DA Form 11-2 (Internal Control Evaluation Certification Statement).

F-4. Test questions

a. Are authorizations for MWD teams based upon mission analysis from the commander who requests the MWD teams?

b. Are ACOM MWD programs reviewed at least annually to ensure that MWD assets are properly used and current justification remains valid?

c. Have disposition packets been submitted on dogs identified as excess to the DOD?

d. Are all narcotics or contraband training aids accounted for using the daily issue and/or return log that records daily transactions?

e. Has the commander or provost marshal/security officer appointed a primary custodian and alternate drug custodian in writing?

f. Has the commander or provost marshal/Director, Emergency Services appointed a primary custodian and an alternate explosive training aid custodian in writing?

g. Are all certification, recertification, or decertification actions reported to OPMG by electronic message with AHRC-EPB-M and Aviation and Missile Command (AMSTR-MFSC) as recipients?

h. Are commanders, provost marshal/Director, Emergency Services and detachment commanders conducting monthly inspections of handlers, MWDs, training, team utilization, team proficiency, equipment, and kennel facilities?

i. Upon the death or adoption of a MWD, is the dog's permanent record file forwarded to Military Dog Records, Lackland Air Force Base, TX 78236?

j. Are all MWDs employed at least 24 hours per week once they are certified as a team (employment may include training exercises, which would be in addition to mandated training outlined in chapter 3 of this regulation)?

k. Has a risk analysis been accomplished every two years for the kennel and surrounding area?

F-5. Supersession

No previous management control evaluation checklist exists for this program.

F-6. Comments

Help to make this a better tool for evaluating management controls. Submit comments to- HQDA, Office of the Provost Marshal General (DAPM-MPD-LE), 2800 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-2800.

Glossary

Section I

Abbreviations

AA&E

arms, ammunition, and explosives

ACOM

Army command

ACP

access control point

AFB

Air Force base

AFI

Air Force Instruction

AR

Army regulation

ASCC

Army service component command

ASI

additional skill identifier

AT/FP

antiterrorism/force protection

ATTP

Army Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures

CCI

controlled cryptographic item

CFR

Code of Federal Regulations

CG

commanding general

DA

Department of the Army

DA Pam

Department of the Army pamphlet

DCS

Deputy Chief of Staff

DEA

Drug Enforcement Administration

DOD

Department of Defense

DODM

Department of Defense Manual

DRU

direct reporting unit

EDD

explosives detector dog

EOD

explosive ordnance disposal

GSA

General Services Administration

HQDA

Headquarters, Department of the Army

HRC

U.S. Army Human Resources Command

IDS

intrusion detection system

IMCOM

U.S. Army Installation Management Command

JP

Joint Publication

LIN

line item number

MCO

Marine Corps Order

METL

mission-essential task list

MILSTRIP

military standard requisitioning and issue procedures

MOS

military occupational specialty

MP

military police

MTOE

modified table of organization and equipment

MWD

military working dog

NCO

noncommissioned officer

NCOIC

noncommissioned officer in charge

NDD

narcotic detector dog

NSN

national stock number

OCONUS

outside the continental United States

OPMG

Office of the Provost Marshal General

OPNAVINST

Naval Operational Instruction

PM

program manager

PMG

provost marshal general

SF

standard form

TACOM

U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Command

TDA

tables of distribution and allowances

TNT

trinitrotoluene

TRADOC

U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

USACE

U.S. Army Corps of Engineering

USAES

U.S. Army Engineer School

USAMPS

U.S. Army Military Police School

USC

United States Code

USSS

U.S. Secret Service

VIP

very important person

Section II

Terms

Access (when pertaining to a restricted area or controlled crytographic item)

Personnel movement within a restricted area that allows the chance for visual observation of, or physical proximity to, either classified or protected materiel. It is also the ability and opportunity to obtain detailed knowledge of a controlled cryptographic item (CCI) through uncontrolled physical possession. External viewing or escorted proximity to CCI does not constitute access.

Ammunition

A device charged with explosives, propellants, pyrotechnics, initiating composition, riot control agents, chemical herbicides, smoke and flame, for use in connection with defense or offense, including demolition. Excluded from this definition are devices charged with chemical agents defined in Joint Publication (JP) 1-02 and nuclear or biological materiel. Ammunition includes cartridges, projectiles, including missile rounds, grenades, mines, and pyrotechnics together with bullets, shot and their necessary primers, propellants, fuses, and detonators individually or having a unit of issue, container, or package weight of 100 pounds or less. Blank, inert training ammunition and caliber .22 ammunition are excluded.

Antiterrorism

Defensive measure used to reduce the vulnerability of individuals and property to terrorist acts, to include limited response and containment by military forces.

Arms

A weapon included in AR 190-11 , appendix B, that will or is designated to expel a projectile or flame by the action of the explosive, and the frame or receiver of any such weapon.

Asset

Any resource requiring protection.

Badge

A security credential that is worn on the possessor's outer garment and validates (his or her) authority for access to a restricted area.

Certification

The process whereby a patrol or detector MWD's and handler's proficiency is verified to be in compliance with minimum training standards.

Closed circuit (CCTV)

Television that serves a number of different functions, one of which is physical security. As it pertains to the field of physical security, CCTV is used to augment, not replace, existing IDS or security patrols. It is not used as a primary sensor, but rather as a means of assessing alarms. CCTV also may be used as a surveillance means, but if used in this way, it will augment, not replace, existing IDS.

Combating terrorism

Actions, including antiterrorism and counterterrorism, taken to oppose terrorism throughout the entire threat spectrum.

Commercial-type vehicle

A vehicle designed to meet civilian requirements, and used without major modifications, for routine purposes in connection with the transportation of supplies, personnel, or equipment.

Compensatory measures exception

This is a deviation in which the standards are not being met, but the DOD component OPMG concerned determines it is appropriate, because of physical factors and operational requirements. Compensatory measures are normally required.

Constant surveillance

Constant unobstructed observance of items or an area to prevent unauthorized access. Continuous surveillance may be maintained by dedicated guards, other on-duty personnel, or intrusion detection systems and those enhanced by closed circuit television.

Controlled area

See restricted area.

Controlled medical substance

A drug or other substance, or its immediate precursor, listed in current schedules of 21 USC 812 in medical facilities for the purpose of military treatment, therapy, or research. Categories listed in this section are narcotics, amphetamines, barbiturates, and hallucinogens.

Counterterrorism

Offensive measures taken to prevent, deter, and respond to terrorism.

Crime analysis

The process used to determine the essential features of a criminal act. It is a mandatory part of any crime prevention program.

Crime prevention

The anticipation, recognition, and appraisal of a crime risk, and initiation of some action to remove or reduce it. Crime prevention is a direct crime control method that applies to before-the-fact efforts to reduce criminal opportunity, protect potential human victims, and prevent property loss.

Crime prevention inspection

An on-site evaluation of the crime prevention program of a unit, section, office, or other facility.

Crime risk management

The development of systematic approaches to reduce crime risks.

Defense Transportation System

Consists of military controlled terminal facilities, Military Airlift Command controlled airlift, Military Sealift Command controlled or arranged sealift, and Government controlled air or land transportation (Department of Defense Manual (DODM) 5100.76).

Double-locker container

A steel container of not less than 26 gauge which is secured by an approved locking device and which encases an inner container that also is equipped with an approved locking device. Cabinet, medicine, combination with narcotic locker, NSN 6530-00-702-9240, or equivalent, meets requirements for a double-locked container.

Dromedary

A freight box carried on and securely fastened to the chassis of the tractor or on a flat-bed trailer. The dromedary is demountable by the use of a forklift truck, is protected by a ply-metal shield, and is equipped with doors on each side that may be locked with seals or padlocks. All explosive items carried in the dromedary must be compatible and in compliance with 49 CFR 177 (reference host nations regulations; DODM 5100.76 ).

Entry control (when pertaining to a restricted area)

Security actions, procedures, equipment, and techniques, employed within restricted areas to ensure that persons who are present in the areas at any time have authority and official reason for being there.

Equivalent Protection Exception.

This is a deviation in which non standards conditions exists, but the totality of protection afforded is equivalent to or better than that provided under standard criteria.

Escorted personnel (when pertaining to a restricted area)

Those persons authorized access to a restricted areas who are escorted at all times by a designated person.

Exception

An approved permanent exclusion from specific requirements of this regulation. Exceptions will be based on a case-by-case determination and involve unique circumstances which make conformance to security standards impossible or highly impractical. An exception can also be an approved permanent deviation from the provisions of this regulation. There are 2 types of exceptions (see Compensatory Measures Exception and Equivalent Protection Exception).

Exclusion area

See restricted area.

Explosives

Any chemical compound, mixture or device, the primary or common purpose of which is to function by explosion. The term includes, but is not limited to, individual landmines, demolition charges, blocks of explosives (dynamite, trinitrotoluene (TNT), C-4, and other high yield explosives), and other explosives consisting of 10 pounds or more; for example, gunpowder or nitro guanidine.

Facility

Any single building,project,or site.

Force Protection

Security program developed to protect Soldiers, civilian employees, and Family members, facilities and equipment, in all locations and situations. This is accomplished through the planned integration of combating terrorism, physical security, operations security, protective services and law enforcement operations, all supported by foreign intelligence, counterintelligence and other security programs.

Handler

Someone who has been qualified by training and certification to care for, train, and employ a MWD.

Handling

Controlled physical possession without access.

High-risk personnel

Personnel who, by their grade, assignment, value, location, or specific threat, are more likely to be attractive or accessible terrorist targets.

Installations

Such real properties as reserve centers, depots, arsenals, ammunition plants (both contractor- and Government-operated, hospitals, terminals, and other special mission facilities, as well as those used primarily by troops (see also JP 1-02).

Intrusion detection system (IDS)

The combination of electronic components, including sensors, control units, transmission lines, and monitoring units integrated to be capable of detecting one or more types of intrusion into the area protected by the system and reporting directly to an alarm monitoring station. The IDS will be an approved DOD standardized system, such as the Joint Service Interior Intrusion Detection System or ACOM/ASCC/DRU-approved commercial equipment.

Kennel facilities

The buildings, the kennels, the runs, and the exercise and training areas which are used to house, care for, and train MWDs.

Key and lock control system

A system of identifying both locks and their locations and personnel in possession of keys and/or combinations.

Keying

The process of establishing a sequence of random binary digits used to initially set up and periodically change permutations in cryptographic equipment for purpose of encrypting or decrypting electronic signals, for controlling transmission security processes, or for producing other keys.

Limited area

See restricted area.

Locked container

A container or room of substantial construction secured with an approved locking device. For pharmacy operating stocks, lockable automated counting systems meet requirements for a locker container.

Locking devices

Padlocks, military specifications MIL-P-43607 (High Security Padlock); shrouded shackle, NSN 5340-01-217-5068 or horizontal sliding bolt, NSN 5340-00-799-8248) or MIL-P-43951 (medium security padlock; regular shackle, NSN 5340-00-799-8016).Padlocks, Commercial Item Description A-A-1927 (low security padlock) having a hardened steel shackle and body; NSN 5340-00-158-3807 (with chain), NSN 5340-00-158-3805 (without chain).GSA-approved changeable 3-position padlock, Federal Specification FF-P-110.High security hasps. Military Specifications MIL-H-43905 or MIL-H-29181A. Hasps and staples for low-security padlocks which are of heavy pattern steel, securely fastened to the structure with smooth-headed bolts, rivets, or welding to prevent removal.

Locks

Locks should be considered as delay devices only, not as positive bars to unauthorized entry, since any lock can be defeated by expert manipulation or force. Certain locks, such as high or medium security padlocks, provide excellent protection when used in conjunction with a high security hasp. Hasps installed for protection of arms, ammunition and explosives (AA&E) will provide protection comparable to that given by the lock used. Determination of "comparable protection" will be addressed to the DOD Lock Program Technical Manager, Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, Code L56, 560 Center Drive, Port Hueneme, CA 93043-4328. The NAPEC high security shrouded hasp (MIL-H-29181A) is approved for use with the high security padlock to secure all categories of AA&E. The hasp has a cover that protects the lock from cutting or hammer tools and inclement weather. It should be used to secure Category I and II AA&E storage facilities. When replacement of a hasp on Category III, IV, or uncategorized AA&E is necessary, this hasp should also be used. The Natick high security hasp (MIL-H-43905) is a high security hasp that also is approved for protection of Category III and IV AA&E when used with an approved high security padlock. Hasp, pin-type, locking "T" is a hasp that was authorized previously to secure ammunition storage magazines. Magazines were secured using the installed locking bar in conjunction with a "T" pin and high security padlock. The locking "T" hasp does not provide adequate security for sensitive AA&E. It must be replaced with a high security hasp to enhance security. It will not be used to secure Category I and II ammunition storage facilities. Another lock is the cable seal lock. Once locked, any force exerted to separate the lock-point from the lock-body strengthens the connection. Such locks are not approved for use in securing storage facilities containing AA&E. The same restriction applies to d below. A complementary device to locks is the No. 5 American Wire Gauge wire twist. This is a U-shaped wire place in the hasp along with the shackle and twisted tightly in place. Another device is a wire cable of a thickness equivalent to or larger than No. 5 wire. This is placed through the hasp, a metal sleeve slipped over it, and crimped into place. Built-in combination locks, meeting Underwriters Laboratories Standard 768, Group 1 (NSN 5340-01-375-7593) are approved for use on GSA-approved Class 5 vault doors and GSA-approved Class 5 weapons containers storing unclassified material and unclassified AA&E.

LOGAIR

Long-term contract airlift service within the continental United States for the movement of cargo in support of the logistics system of the military Services (primarily the Army and Air Force) and Defense agencies. ( DODM 5100.76 ).

Major disruption on installations

Acts, threats, or attempts to commit such acts as kidnapping, extortion, bombings, hijackings, ambushing, major weapons thefts, arson, assassination, and hostage taking on a military installation. These acts have the potential for widespread publicity require special response, tactics, and management.

Medically sensitive items

Standard and nonstandard medical items designated by medical commanders to be sufficiently sensitive to warrant a stringent degree of physical security and accountability in storage. Included within this definition are all items subject to misappropriation and/or misuse such as needles and syringes.

Military Traffic Expediting (MTX)

A service providing for movement from origin to destination in the shortest time possible for specifically identified rail shipments, and which is required for the shipment of firearms and other sensitive shipments. This service uses electrical communications between members of the Association of American Railroad, is available for either single line haul or joint line movements, and provided progress reports as required ( DODM 5100.76 ).

Military van (MILVAN)

Military-owned demountable container, conforming to U.S. and international standards, operated in a centrally controlled fleet for movement of military cargo ( DODM 5100.76 ).

Military working dog (MWD)

MWDs are required by the using DOD component for a specific purpose, mission, or combat capability. MWDs are trained to perform the following functions; patrol, patrol and narcotic/contraband, and patrol and explosive/contraband detector, mine detection, specialized search dogs and any other DOD recognized capability that is used to save lives.

Military working dog team (MWD)

Is a team (both dog and handler) trained by DOD/Executive Agent and has an appropriately qualified, assigned handler.

Mission essential and vulnerable areas

Facilities or activities within the installation that, by virtue of their function, are evaluated by the commander as vital to the successful accomplishment of the installation's State National Guard, or MUSARC mission. This includes areas nonessential to the installation's/facility's operational mission but which, by nature of the activity, are considered vulnerable to theft, trespass, damage, or other criminal activity.

Motor vehicle

A self-propelled, boosted, or towed conveyance used to transport a burden on land. This includes all Army wheeled and track vehicles, trailers, and semi-trailers, but not railroad locomotives and rolling stock.

Note C controlled medical items

Sets, kits, and outfits containing one or more component

Note Q controlled medical item

All standard drug items identified as Note Q in the Federal Supply Catalog, Nonstandard Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Schedule III, IV, V Controlled Substances.

Note R controlled medical items

All items identified as Note R in the Federal Supply Catalog, Nonstandard DEA Schedule II Controlled Substances.

One MWD-one handler

The concept that each MWD will have only one handler. Personnel shortages may necessitate assigning a handler responsibility for more than one MWD. However, two or more handlers cannot handle the same MWD.

Open post

Installations or activities that do not qualify as closed or limited access posts. Access to the installation or activity is not controlled during or after normal duty hours.

Padlocks (High security padlocks)

Military Specification MIL-P-43607, shrouded shackle with clevis and chain, NSN 5340-01-2 17-5068 or NSN 5340-00-188-1560; horizontal sliding bolt with clevis and chain, NSN 5340-00-799-8248. Medium security padlocks: Military Specification MIL-P-43951, open shackle with clevis and chain, NSN 5340-00-799-8016. Authorized for continued use to secure Categories III and IV AA&E only until stocks are depleted or replaced. Low security padlocks: Commercial Item Description A-A-1927, hardened steel shackle and case, without chain: NSN 5340-00-158-3805; with chain: NSN 5340-00-158-3807. (Any questions regarding the above specifications will be addressed to the DOD Lock Program Technical Manager, Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, Code C66, 560 Center Drive, Port Hueneme, CA 93043-4328 (DSN 551-1567 or -1212).

Perimeter fence

Fences for the security of unclassified, non-sensitive items that meet the requirements of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Drawing Code STD 872-90-00 Series. The minimum height will be 6 feet. Use of North Atlantic Treaty Organization Standard Design Fencing is also authorized.

Perimeter wall

Any wall over 6 feet tall which delineates a boundary and serves as a barrier to personnel and/or vehicles. These walls may be constructed of reinforced concrete, masonry, or stone.

Physical protective measures

Physical security measures used to counter risk factors that usually do not change over a period of time such as mission impact, cost, volume, and critically of resources and vulnerabilities. The measures are usually permanent and involve expenditure of funds.

Physical security equipment

That part of the Army security system, based on threat analysis, concerned with procedures and physical measures designed to safeguard personnel, property, and operations; to prevent unauthorized access to equipment, facilities, material and information; and to protect against espionage, terrorism, sabotage, damage, misuse, and theft. Operations security and security targeted against traditional criminal activity are not included.

Physical Security Inspection

A formal, recorded assessment of physical procedures and measures implemented by a unit or activity to protect its assets.

Physical security measures

Physical systems, devices, personnel, animals and procedures employed to protect security interests from possible threats and include, but are not limited to security guards; MWDs; lights and physical barriers; explosive and bomb detection equipment; protective vests and similar equipment; badge systems; electronic entry control systems and access control devices; security containers; locking devices; electronic intrusion detection systems; standardized command, control, and display subsystems; radio frequency data links used for physical security; security lighting; delay devices; artificial intelligence (robotics); and assessment and/or surveillance systems to include closed-circuit television. Depending on the circumstances of the particular situation, security specialists may have an interest in other items of equipment such as armored sedans.

Physical security plan

A comprehensive written plan providing proper and economical use of personnel, land, and equipment to prevent or minimize loss or damage from theft, misuse, espionage, sabotage, and other criminal or disruptive measures.

Physical security procedures

The application of physical measures to reduce vulnerability to the threat; integration of physical security into contingency, mobilization, and wartime plans; the testing of physical security procedures an measures during the exercise of these plans; the testing of physical security procedures and measures during the exercise of these plans; the interface of installation operations security, crime prevention, and physical security programs to protect against the traditional criminal; training or guards at sensitive or other storage sites in tactical defense against response to attempted penetrations; and creating physical security awareness.

Physical security program

The interrelationship of various components that complement each other to produce a comprehensive approach to security matters. These components include, as a minimum, the physical security plan; physical security inspections and surveys; participation in combating terrorism committees and fusion cells; and a continuing assessment of the installation's physical security posture.

Physical security resource plan

Plan developed by the physical security officer that identifies physical security needs and shows proposed programmed procurement of those needs.

Physical security survey

A formal, recorded assessment of the installation physical security program.

Physical security system architecture

A system ensuring that IDS components designed by the various services are compatible when used together. The Air Force is responsible for systems architecture.

Pilferable assets

Any asset which can be stolen and which does not fall under the other asset categories discussed in the publication.

Pilferable coded items

Items with a code indicating that the material has a ready resale value or civilian application and therefore, is especially subject to theft.

Portable

Capable of being carried in the hand or on the person. As a general rule, a single item weighing less than 100 pounds (45.34 kilograms) is considered portable.

Program manager, military working dog (MWD program manager)

The name given to the senior manager of MWD teams within the headquarters of each ACOM, ASCC, and DRU.

QUICKTRANS

Long-term contract airlift service within continental United States for the movement of cargo in support of the logistic system for the military Services (primarily the Navy and Marine Corps) and Defense agencies ( DODM 5100.76 ).

Required operational capability

A requirements document that the combat developer prepares with input from the training developer in coordination with the material developer, logistician, and manpower and personnel planner. The required operational capability is a concise statement of the minimum essential operational, random access measures, technical personnel and manpower, training, safety, health, human factors engineering, logistical, and cost information to start full scale development or procurement of a material system.

Restricted area

Any area to which entry is subject to special restrictions or control for security reasons or to safeguard property or material. This does not include those designated areas over which aircraft flight is restricted. Restricted areas may be of different types. The type depends on the nature and varying degree of importance, from a security standpoint, of the security interest or other matter contained therein

Exclusion area

A restricted area containing a security interest or other matter of such nature that access to the area constitutes, for all practical purposes, access to such security interests or matter; or a security interest or other matter of such vital importance that proximity resulting from access to the area is treated equal to above.

Limited area

A restricted area containing a security interest or other matter, in which uncontrolled movement will permit access to such security interest or matter; access within limited areas may be prevented by escort and other internal restrictions and controls.

Controlled area

That portion of a restricted area usually near or surrounding an exclusion or limited area. Entry to the controlled area is restricted to authorized personnel. However, movement of authorized personnel within this area is not necessarily controlled. Mere entry to the area does not provide access to the security interest or other matter within the exclusion or limited area. The controlled area is provided for administrative control, safety, or as a buffer zone for security in depth for the exclusion or limited area. The proper commander establishes the degree of control of movement

Ride awhile-walk awhile method

A law enforcement or security patrolling technique. The MWD team patrols for a period of time in a vehicle and then dismounts for an appropriate period of time to patrol an area on foot. This method increases the potential area the team can cover, as well as allowing the team to concentrate their foot patrols in especially critical areas.

Risk

The degree or likelihood of loss of an asset. Factors that determine risk are the value of the asset to its user in terms of mission criticality, replace ability, and relative value and the likelihood of aggressor activity in terms of the attractiveness of the asset to the aggressor, the history of or potential for aggressor activity, and the vulnerability of the asset.

Risk analysis

Method of examining various risk factors to determine the risk value of likelihood of resource loss. This analysis will be used to decide the level of security warranted for protection of resources.

Risk factors

Elements that make up the total degree of resource loss liability. Factors to be considered in a risk analysis include the importance of the resource to mission accomplishment; the cost, volume, criticality and vulnerabilities of the resources; and the severity of threats to the resources.

Risk level

An indication of the degree of risk associated with an asset based on risk analysis. Risk levels may be Levels I, II, or III, which correspond to low, medium, and high.

Risk value

Degree of expectation or likelihood of resource loss. The value may be classified as low, medium, or high.

Safe

A GSA Class 5 Map and Plans Security Container, Class 6 Security Filing Cabinet or refrigerator or freezer, secured with an approved locking device and weighing 500 pounds or more, or secured to the structure to prevent removal.

Schedule I drug

Any drug or substance by whatever official name (common, usual, or brand name) listed by the DEA in 21 CFR 1308.11, intended for clinical or non-clinical use.

Sealed containers

Wooden boxes, crates, metal containers, and fiber containers sealed in a way to show when the containers are tampered with after sealing. The method of sealing depends of the type of construction of the containers. Sealing may be by metal banding, nailing, airtight sealing, or wax dripping (for fiber containers). In key control, a sealed container is also a locked key container or a sealed envelope containing the key or combination to the key container.

Security card

An official distinctive identification (pass or card) that identifies and authorizes the possessor to be physically present in a U.S. Army designated restricted area.

Security engineering

The application of engineering principles to the protection of assets against various threats through the application of construction and equipment application.

Security lighting

The amount of lighting necessary to permit visual surveillance by security police or by supervisory personnel.

Security procedural measures

Physical security measures to counter risk factors that will periodically change over a period of time such as criminal, terrorist, and hostile threats. The procedures can usually be changed within a short amount of time and involve manpower.

Sensitive conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives

See categorization of such items in AR 190-11 , appendix B.

Sensitive items

Material requiring a high degree of protection to prevent unauthorized acquisition. This includes arms, ammunition, explosives, drugs, precious metals, or other substances determined by the Administrator, Drug Enforcement Administration to be designated Schedule Symbol II, III, IV, or V under the Controlled Substance Act of 1970.

Storage

Any area where AA&E are kept. Storage does not include items in process of manufacture, in use, or being transported to a place of storage or use.

Survivability

The ability to with stand or repel an attack, or other hostile action, to the extent that essential functions can continue or be resumed after the hostile action.

Tactics

The specific methods of achieving the aggressor's goals to injure personnel, destroy Army assets, or steal Army materiel.

Tactical vehicle

A vehicle with military characteristics designed primarily for use by forces in the field in direct connection with, or support of, combat or tactical operations, or the training of troops for such operations.

Tenant activity

A unit or activity of one Government agency, military department, or command that occupies facilities on an installation of another military department or command and that receives supplies or other support services from that installation.

Terrorism

The calculated use of violence or the threat of violence to inculcate fear; intended to coerce or to intimidate governments or societies in the pursuit of goals, that are generally political, religious, or ideological.

Terrorism counteraction measures

Term used previously for combating terrorism (see definition of this term).

Terrorist group

A politically, religious, or ideologically oriented group which uses terrorism as its prime mode of operations.

Threat management force

An action force from the installation that responds to major disruptions on installations. The threat management force should be of sufficient size to manage the disruption and will usually involve a command element, security element, negotiation team, special reaction teamT, and logistical element.

Waiver

Temporary relief from specific standards imposed by this manual (regulation) pending actions accomplishment of actions that will conform to the standards required. Compensatory measures are required.

Section III

Special Terms

AN

ammonium nitrate

ANS

ammonium nitrate mixed with sugar

CBP

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

CESK

canine explosive scent kit

CTD

combat tracker dog

C4

composition 4 plastic explosive

IMAS

International Mine Action Standards

KM

kennel master

MDD

mine detection dog

PEDD

patrol explosives detector dog

PE4

British plastic explosive number 4

PDDD

patrol drug detector dog

SSD

specialized search dog

TOVEX

water gel

TRS

Training Readiness Squadron