Army Regulation 350-50

3 April 2013

Effective date: 4 May 2013

UNCLASSIFIED

Training

Combat Training Center Program



SUMMARY of CHANGE

AR 350-50
Combat Training Center Program

This major revision, dated 3 April 2013—

* Adds Chief of Staff, Army vision and guidance (para 1-5 a and 1-5 b ).

* Adds Joint context (paras 1-5 c , 1-5 d , and 1-5 j ).

* Updates Combat Training Center training focus (para 1-5 f ).

* Discusses role of mission rehearsal exercises and mission readiness exercises (para 1-5 i ).

* Adds Joint National Training Capability (para 1-5 j ).

* Adjusts the scope of Combat Training Centers (para 1-5 k ).

* Defines scope and purpose of role players and civilians on the battlefield (para 1-6 b (3)(b)).

* Adds Combat Training Center Accreditation Program (para 1-6 d ).

* Adds provision for U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command operational environment assessment support to the Combat Training Centers on a semiannual basis (para 2-1).

* Changes Commanding General, U.S. Army Forces Command "operational control" of Joint Readiness Training Center and National Training Center Operations Groups to "command" (para 2-14 b ).

* Assigns Commanding General, U.S. Army Forces Command responsibility of providing doctrinally based, performance oriented after action reviews to the rotational training units (para 2-14 e ).

* Expands Army Special Operations Forces integration throughout the Combat Training Center Program (para 2-18 and 3-2 d (5)).

* Incorporates July 2004 Chief of Staff, Army guidance reference foreign nation integration into Combat Training Center training and the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7 continental United States Combat Training Center approval authority (app B).

* Aligns regulation with AR 350-1 (throughout).

* Changes Battle Command Training Program to Mission Command Training Program (throughout).



Chapter 1
Introduction

1-1. Purpose

This regulation describes the objectives, organizations, and concept of operations for the Department of the Army (DA) Combat Training Center (CTC) Program. It also designates Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA), Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7 (DCS, G-3/5/7) as the CTC Program Director with program execution authority on behalf of the Chief of Staff, Army (CSA). Finally, it prescribes CTC Program responsibilities, policies, and planning and programming guidance for the shared command and control, management and administration, and advisory roles of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM), and U.S. Army, Europe (USAREUR).

1-2. References

Required and related publications and prescribed and referenced forms are listed in appendix A .

1-3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms

Abbreviations and terms used in this regulation are defined in the glossary .

1-4. Responsibilities

Responsibilities are listed in chapter 2 .

1-5. Vision, guidance, and objectives

a. Vision The purpose of the CTC Program is to generate ready units and agile leaders who are confident in their ability to operate in complex environments. The CTCs will lead the Army's transition to unified land operations as described in ADP 3-0. This transition includes a bridging period when CTCs sustain the Army's seasoning in irregular warfare and re-establish training superiority in major combat operation skills. Success is defined as growing the next generation of adaptive Army leaders and providing relevant land forces for Army Force Generation (ARFORGEN) requirements; both equally skilled and trained to standard in offense, defense, and stability operations. The CTC Program has led Army cultural changes throughout its history. The challenge in this period is to identify innovative training methods to reduce overhead without sacrificing training quality, standards, or outcomes.

b. Objectives.

(1) Focus on a mission-essential task list (METL) with training for combat operations as part of the Joint team.

(2) Train for unified land operations and decisive action missions including: offense, defense, stability, and defense support of civil authorities.

(3) Stress realistic, sustained, multi-echelon, and fully integrated collective combat training for brigade combat teams (BCTs), multifunctional support brigades, functional support brigades, division and corps headquarters, Army service component commands (ASCCs), and operational headquarters training to fulfill missions as Joint Force Land Component Commands (JFLCCs) or Joint Task Forces (JTFs).

(4) Focus on performance-oriented training in a realistic tactical or operational environment assessed against established tasks, conditions, and standards.

(5) Support achieving and sustaining leader development and unit warfighting readiness using a combination of integrated live, virtual, and constructive (LVC) simulations.

(6) Facilitate commanders' readiness assessment through live-fire, force-on-force, and computer-simulated exercises that integrate all aspects of lethal and nonlethal effects, tailored to the operational environment from platoon to corps-level and based on unit warfighting focus and CTC capabilities.

(7) Include instrumented urban operations (UO) training experience during the rotation.

(8) Incorporate reception, staging, onward movement, and integration (RSOI) operations, regeneration, and deployment training.

(9) Fully integrate decisive actions.

(10) Execute mission rehearsal exercises (MREs) for brigades and below and mission readiness exercises (MRXs) for divisions and above, as required.

c. Mission. The CTC Program will provide realistic Joint and combined arms training, according to Army and Joint doctrine, approximating actual combat. The CTC Program —

(1) Provides commanders, staffs, and units an operational experience focused on unit readiness balanced with leader development requirements.

(2) Increases unit readiness for deployment and warfighting.

(3) Produces bold, innovative leaders through stressful tactical and operational exercises.

(4) Facilitates dissemination of doctrine throughout the Army.

(5) Provides feedback to the Army and Joint participants to improve warfighting.

(6) Provides a data source for lessons learned to improve doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership and education, personnel, and facilities (DOTMLPF) to prepare for unified land operations.

(7) Embeds most recent tactics, techniques, and procedures from current operations in theater to better prepare follow-on units.

d. Rigor. During a fixed site CTC experience, commanders will train with the equipment they would expect to take to war, to the extent possible. During an exportable training capability (ETC) experience, commanders may have to train with fewer resources than what they may deploy with; however, the ETC will train whatever capability the unit has available. In order to provide a realistic training environment, each CTC will —

(1) Provide an environment in which rotational unit commanders can train to established standards (for example, METL, Combined Arms Training Strategy, and approved training guidance).

(2) Replicate (not duplicate) the operational environment (OE) of the theater to which the unit will likely deploy.

(3) Conduct doctrinally based after action reviews (AARs) focused on observed performance that enables Soldiers and leaders to discover for themselves what happened, why it happened, and how to sustain strengths and overcome weaknesses.

(4) Stress all warfighting functions in decisive air-ground unified land operations where both lethal and nonlethal solutions could be employed.

(5) Provide a freethinking, capabilities-based, opposing force (OPFOR) with an equal chance to win.

(6) Develop tactical or operational level of war scenarios where the outcome is not assured and that promote initiative-oriented warfighting skills for commanders.

(7) Ensure consequences of military decisions are fully played out.

(8) Dedicate a portion of the rotation to retraining those tasks which the commander deems essential for their unit to increase proficiency. (Retraining is not an indication of failure.)

(9) Execute training in compliance with applicable safety regulations and other applicable safety publications (for example, AR 385-10 , AR 385-63 , DA Pam 385-30 , and other applicable publications).

e. Combat training centers. The CTC Program includes the Mission Command Training Program (MCTP, formerly known as the Battle Command Training Program); Joint Multinational Readiness Center (JMRC), including its ETC; Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC); and the National Training Center (NTC). JMRC, JRTC, and NTC are collectively referred to as the maneuver CTCs (MCTCs) or fixed CTC sites. The JMRC-provided ETC executes live force-on-force maneuver training at a designated training location.

(1) The MCTP, located at Fort Leavenworth, KS, is the Army's primary CTC for mission command training using constructive simulations. MCTP supports the ARFORGEN training and mission preparation progression and other Army requirements. MCTP conducts or supports combined arms training that simulate unified land operations in the OE, at worldwide locations. The MCTP provides training events for BCTs, multifunctional support brigades, functional support brigades, divisions, corps, ASCCs, and JFLCCs, JTFs, and in accordance with the ARFORGEN readiness model. MCTP provides training in coordination with Joint Staff J7 to commands and/or staffs that are designated to serve as a JTF. The MCTP creates training experiences that enable the Army's senior mission commanders to develop current, relevant, and campaign-quality, Joint and expeditionary mission command instincts and skills.

(2) The JMRC, in a forward deployed environment at Hohenfels, and Grafenwoehr, Germany, trains BCTs by conducting force-on-force and live-fire training in a joint scenario across the range of conflict, using an LVC training model, as portrayed by a professional OPFOR and controlled by an expert and experienced operations group (OPS GRP). Training occurs under tough, realistic, combat-like conditions across a wide range of likely tactical operations and MREs capable of full integration into higher-level exercises and scenarios. Within the ARFORGEN readiness model, JMRC will normally focus on collective training events supporting USAREUR BCTs in the available force pool. JMRC is a fixed site MCTC with the ability to conduct ETC missions. JMRC has the capability to support continental United States (CONUS) ARFORGEN ETC events, if directed.

(3) An ETC provides a BCT level exercise that includes elements of all the traditional pillars of the CTC program, conducted at a Power Generation Platform, home station, or other designated location. Within the ARFORGEN readiness model, the JMRC-provided ETC exercises will primarily focus on training support for BCTs as early as the rotational training unit (RTU) resources will allow during the train/ready force pool cycle; however, they will retain the flexibility and capability to conduct MREs supporting BCTs transitioning between the train/ready and available force pools during operational surge situations and/or periods when fixed sites are unavailable. The JMRC-provided ETC expands the capacity of the CTC Program by taking the exercises to where the training is required, thereby supporting a Joint expeditionary mindset. The JMRC-provided ETC simultaneously includes all BCT components, which could include training in an LVC environment, to fully exercise the entire BCT organization in a field environment during the execution of a force-on-force tactical scenario. The JMRC-provided ETC will provide training and assistance to a designated unit to operate as the OPFOR against the rotational BCT.

(4) JRTC at Fort Polk, LA and NTC at Fort Irwin, CA train Army BCTs by conducting force-on-force and live-fire training in a Joint scenario across the range of conflict using an LVC training model as portrayed by a professional OPFOR and controlled by an expert and experienced OPS GRP. Training occurs under tough, realistic, combat-like conditions across a wide range of likely tactical operations and MREs capable of full integration into higher-level exercises and scenarios. Within the ARFORGEN readiness model, JRTC and NTC will normally focus on collective training events supporting BCTs transitioning between the train/ready and available force pools. However, JRTC and NTC may also be tasked to execute METL-focused rotations in support of BCTs progression through the train/ready force pool when required by ARFORGEN demands.

f. Training focus. The CTCs are the "engine of change" for collective training in the Army. What is trained and exercised at the CTCs drives training across the Army. The CTC methodology is an approach to excellence and not necessarily a specific place or a fixed location. Whether collective training is conducted at a fixed center, a Power Generation Platform, home station, or other location; it will normally involve simultaneous, noncontiguous, continuous, and distributed operations. The learning and experience gained from the CTC rotations set new goals for sustainment and improvement in training and operations following the rotation. Commanders will consider CTC rotation feedback when assessing readiness for operational deployment in general or to validate readiness for a specific mission. The training event provides essential feedback to the senior trainer and commander to determine if the unit is ready to progress to the next ARFORGEN force pool. The OPFOR will have capabilities that can be adjusted to satisfy METL-linked training objectives and friendly forces training outcomes.

g. Support to Army Force Generation. The CTC Program contributes to ARFORGEN training and mission preparation progression with exercises and training events, which provides feedback to commanders and enables their readiness assessment. Priority for CTC scheduling is established by the ARFORGEN synchronization meetings conducted under the direction of FORSCOM. Units that do not fall under the ARFORGEN management process may be trained by the CTC Program to support readiness progression when resources and scheduling allow.

h. Deployment training. Deployment is a mission-essential task for Army units. It supports the Army's vision of strategic responsiveness. MCTCs will continually refine methods to enhance deployment training. MCTCs will typically conduct an RSOI phase as part of each rotation; however, some units and scenarios such as forced entry preclude an RSOI phase. Deployment training may also include a realistic OPFOR that attempts to disrupt the deployment operation. MCTP training events will exercise deployment training tasks as part of their MCTP military decisionmaking process.

i. Mission rehearsal exercises and/or mission readiness exercises. The CTCs will be used to prepare units for operational deployments and combat. The focus will be on unit readiness and leader development. MCTCs will replicate the relief in place and/or transfer of authority process of the area of responsibility to maximum extent as time and resources allow.

(1) Mission rehearsal exercises. A mission tailored training and rehearsal exercise for deploying units, conducted to reinforce a commander's vision and intent and expose the unit to conditions approximating those in the theater of employment. The MRE is conducted at a maneuver CTC and may be embedded in an MRX for the higher headquarters (that is, division or corps). The MRE begins with the first day of RSOI (building combat power) at the MCTC and ends when the unit main body has cleared the MCTC and returned to home station.

(2) Mission readiness exercises. A command and staff level command post exercise conducted as a culminating training event for deploying Active Army and Reserve Component divisions and corps with subordinate brigade-level headquarters. The MRX can be conducted at home station or at an alternate site by MCTP. The MRX begins at the start of exercise (Day One for the simulation supported exercise) at the MRX site and concludes at the end of the exercise for the simulation supported exercise at the MRX location. The MCTP mission command seminar is not part of the MRX although MRX themes may be addressed during the seminar.

j. Joint context for training. A Joint context will be provided at the MCTCs and during MCTP training events as applicable to the unit's training objectives. Army CTCs will have a persistent capability to link to Joint National Training Capability (JNTC); however, operational requirements and scheduling conflicts may preclude this linkage for some rotations. Regardless of linkage to the JNTC environment, CTCs will provide the correct Joint context for training across all warfighting functions so leaders, Soldiers, and units are ready to operate in the Joint environment and understand the interdependencies shared by the Army forces and other components of the Joint team. The goal is to improve Joint interoperability by using the capabilities provided by an integrated LVC training environment. The JNTC's elements of Joint context are as follows:

(1) Coherent Joint training.

(2) Joint tactics, techniques, and procedures.

(3) Joint doctrine.

(4) Joint exercise control for Joint tasks.

(5) Live and/or simulated forces support for Joint tasks.

(6) Joint event analysis.

(7) Joint training and/or experiment objectives.

(8) The OPFOR planning and integration.

(9) Scenario support.

(10) Joint command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance.

k. Scope. The scope of training for MCTCs will be focused at the BCT level. The MCTP scope will be tailored as appropriate to train BCTs, multifunctional support brigades, functional support brigades, divisions, corps, ASCCs, JFLCCs, and JTFs. The CTC training requirements will include the following:

(1) Operations in a unified land operational environment.

(2) Scenarios which support decisive actions in the OE.

(3) Defining the role of intelligence in stability operations and allowing commanders to integrate the full range of intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance assets available now and in the future.

(4) Integrating and enhancing the use of foreign languages and/or cultural awareness at CTCs.

(5) Incorporating OPFOR and friendly forces space-based capabilities and information technology.

(6) Execution-centric training.

(7) Realistic sustainment warfighting function integration.

(8) Exportable training that supports a Joint expeditionary mindset.

1-6. Concepts

a. Concept of operations. The CTCs design training scenarios to increase unit collective proficiency in the most realistic and challenging training mission space available. This CTC environment maximizes benefits for the entire training unit. Within the construct of the OE, the CTC battlefield arrays the training unit against an OPFOR replicating a free-thinking, capabilities-based threat with an equal chance to "win" in a scenario tailored to the specific theater to which the training unit will deploy or likely to deploy. The operational environment portrayed during training is replicated and enhanced by a variety of tools and methods sufficient to meet training requirements. The CTC commander controls the elements of the training environment through exercise design and execution, using the minimal control necessary to ensure unit training objectives are exercised. The CTC commander also uses instrumentation to support exercise control and collect objective data on unit performance. The CTCs replicate higher and adjacent headquarters by a combination of the training unit, simulations, and permanently stationed organizations operating under control of the CTC commander. This simulation employs Army mission command systems and other digitized capabilities.

b. The Combat Training Center Program pillars. The CTC Program employs a pillar concept for internal management. The pillars are explained below.

(1) Training unit. Rotational unit composition will be in accordance with the DCS, G-3/5/7-approved CTC Program troop lists, which will be updated periodically. Sponsoring Army commands (ACOMs) or ASCCs may approve changes or exceptions to the DCS, G-3/5/7-approved CTC Program troop lists for specific rotations. For those specific rotations where exceptions to the DCS G-3/5/7-approved CTC Program troop lists are approved, the sponsoring ACOM or ASCC is responsible for providing the additional manpower; observer, coach, trainer augmentation at MCTCs rotations and MCTP Warfighter exercises (WFXs); transportation, and funding resources to accommodate the increase in rotational unit size or capability. Organizational guidelines for training units are described in chapter 3 . The DCS, G-3/5/7, as the Director of the CTC Program, is the approval authority for all approved troop list changes which impact upon CTC Program resources.

(2) Operations Group.

(a) The OPS GRP, staffed by highly qualified observer coach trainers at all CTCs, provides the foundation for successful CTC rotations. CTC observer coach trainers, qualified to conduct an analysis of a unit and leader's performance while facilitating a meaningful AAR, are critical to the success of the CTCs. The AARs will reinforce Army doctrinal standards and emerging lessons learned from ongoing operations and leverage the learning opportunities presented by underscoring strengths and weaknesses demonstrated during the exercise. More frequent in-stride AARs, targeted at small audiences to provide initial observations to leaders, which do not disrupt the mission rhythm of the training event, will be normal. This does not preclude the conduct of formal AARs, when, in the judgment of the CTC commander, are deemed appropriate. Additionally, the OPS GRP develops realistic scenarios for unified land operations and decisive actions, as appropriate for the specific CTC and exercise. OPS GRPs replicate the echelon above the RTU headquarters. In order to facilitate training and assist the RTU in achieving rotational training objectives the OPS GRPs, MCTC, and MCTP observer coach trainer teams, will have current digital mission command and communications capabilities in order to seamlessly operate with digitally-enabled units. These capabilities must be fielded to the CTCs when available, and include, but are not limited to, Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below, Blue Force Tracker, Joint Capabilities Release and Army Mission Command Systems, Joint Network Node, Global Broadcast Service, Secure Internet Protocol Router, Nonsecure Internet Protocol Router Net, and other systems, as developed.

(b) This regulation defines the CTC Program requirements for MCTC and MCTP observer coach trainer coverage or focus (see table 1-1 ).

Table 1-1. Combat Training Center Program observer coach trainer focus
MCTP JMRC JRTC NTC ETC
BCTs, multifunctional support and functional support brigades, divisions, corps, ASCCs, JFLCCs, and JTFs (in coordination with Joint Staff J7) Platoon and/or company to BCTs Squad to BCTs Platoon and/or company to BCTs Platoon and/or company to BCT

(c) In addition to the observer coach trainer specified above, the MCTP OPS GRPs require the mission command expertise of senior observers to coach, teach, and mentor senior unit commanders and participate in the training process. Senior observer support will be acquired in accordance with Department of Defense (DOD) and DA guidelines.

(3) Operational environment and/or opposing forces.

(a) The OPFOR, replicating the military aspect of the OE, will remain the best-trained adversarial force in the world and provide a relevant experience at all CTCs. The CTC OPFOR will provide the toughest, most challenging fight short of war for rotational units. To be credible, it must be equipped to replicate capabilities of modern threat units and the variables of political, military, economic, social, and infrastructure information with the addition of physical environment and time factors in order to stress the leaders and unit capabilities of the RTU. The OPFOR will be capable and able to replicate a hybrid threat, capability-based, adaptive, and have the ability to engage and defeat the RTU. It will employ multiple and diverse capabilities and will follow a generalized doctrine that is reflective of a wide range of potential threats. This doctrine will be descriptive rather than prescriptive and is intended simply to provide a framework to guide OPFOR operations. It will be a learning OPFOR and have appropriate equipment and Instrumentation, Training Aids, Devices, Simulators, and Simulations (ITADSS) that enhance training realism.

(b) To support decisive action while replicating the human terrain of the OE, the CTC environment will include elements of future conflict and threat capabilities. One of these elements is civilians on the battlefield. Civilians on the battlefield in general are functions performed by numerous role players to present required conditions of OE that will help friendly units achieve their training objectives. A detailed discussion of civilians on the battlefield requirements and resourcing for each MCTC can be found in the CTC Master Plan (MP); however, a definition of the categories for the role players are provided below —

(1) Generic role players. These are personnel designated to replicate normal civilians on the battlefield and/or noncombatants, such as innocent bystanders, shopkeepers, and Family members. They have no special skills but should be capable of replicating a realistic representation of the OE (number of males, females, and ages) during specific missions.

(2) Special skill role players. These are hired personnel with unique knowledge, expertise, or experience suitable to the training environment for example a nonforeign language role player or cultural role player (provincial reconstruction teams experience, interagency experience (for example, State Department) and detainee training).

(3) Foreign language speakers. Foreign language speakers support training objectives that are centered on geographically based scenarios and require replication of languages and/or dialects. Foreign language speakers are typically native and/or fluent speakers, but may also include linguists with a defense language proficiency test rating of 3/3 or the equivalent (that is, college). Foreign language speakers are required role players that provide realistic and viable training conditions, especially during MREs.

(4) Cultural role players. These are hired personnel with specific cultural experience for a target country or region who provide a realistic cultural experience to friendly forces training experiences that are deemed critical to the success of unit training objectives; they are also typically native foreign language speakers. These individuals typically play critical roles within training scenarios such as governors, mayors, police chiefs, religious leaders, and key community persons. Cultural role players are required role players that provide realistic and viable training conditions, especially during MREs.

(c) Additionally, CTC training venues will include other random variables such as: media play, nongovernmental organizations and/or private voluntary organizations, displaced civilians, terrorists, UO, insurgents, weapons of mass destruction, information operations, and other diverse complicating factors.

(4) Instrumentation, training aids, devices, simulators, and simulations. The ITADSS provide essential capabilities to achieve the goals of the CTC training strategy. The Army will achieve instrumentation commonality and interoperability across the MCTCs to achieve efficiencies of scale and support a standard data collection and dissemination capability for AARs and Army learning. This will enable a fluid exchange of information and lessons learned across the Army. The MCTCs will instrument live-fire and UO. Simulations will support training requirements at all CTCs. ITADSS system and AAR systems will interoperate with the Army mission command systems, to the maximum extent possible and be capable of operating in a classified mode up to secret system high level, if required. All materiel developers (MATDEVs) (program executive officers (PEOs) and program managers) will include CTC training requirements in their system fielding plans and life cycle planning as identified in the capability documents. The JMRC-provided ETC will employ exportable instrumentation systems that may have reachback capability to fixed-site MCTCs instrumentation extending the battlespace and providing more diverse training sites.

(5) Facilities. The CTC infrastructure plays a vital role supporting the day-to-day operations, the rotational training mission, and the training unit. Adequate resources to support this role directly impact the CTCs' mission success. The buildings supporting day-to-day operations include, but are not limited to, instrumentation requirements; AAR and OPFOR facilities; generic Tactical Engagement Simulation System storage; buildings supporting prepositioned vehicles, equipment, and ITADSS fleets with their associated maintenance support buildings; logistics sustainment facilities; and contractor support facilities. The garrison commander has responsibility for supporting these as part of the base operations and/or sustainment, restoration, and modernization mission funding. Garrison commanders are responsible for supporting RTU and augmentation personnel housing and feeding facilities, with the associated utility, access, security, and support infrastructure outside the "maneuver box," and for maintenance and repair of buildings, land, and land improvements that are not the responsibility of the Integrated Training Area Management Program but required to support CTC mission training inside the "maneuver box." The JMRC-provided ETC rotations will require comparable facility support from the supported units or institutions when conducting exported rotations. Responsibilities of garrison commanders of power generation platforms and home stations hosting ETC rotations will encompass real property assets; such as UO sites, road and land maintenance; wash rack facilities; and any facility that directly impacts the rotating unit's training scenario or ability of the JMRC-provided ETC to enable the training event.

c. Leader development. The CTCs are leader development facilities. They focus on training and developing self-confident, adaptive, and self-aware leaders, who are able to quickly assess ambiguous situations, make decisions, and act on them.

(1) The Leader Training Program (LTP) executed by each MCTC provides collective mission command training for commanders and staffs within BCTs and rotational support elements. This training builds on capabilities established during the brigade warfighter exercises and at home stations. It focuses on preparing BCTs for their subsequent operationally focused rotation at a MCTC. Training develops military decisionmaking process skills and orients on the tasks and conditions unique to the unit's designated mission. A core curriculum of common training topics is included. Additionally, a menu of supplemental training topics is provided to support commanders' training objectives. The LTP will normally be conducted during a 7-day to an 8-day period.

(2) During CTC and JMRC-provided ETC rotations, leaders will receive assessments on their leadership and its effects on mission outcomes. Knowledge gained from these assessments will leverage the CTC training environment for leader development. Every CTC training exercise produces leaders who understand their individual training development requirements so that they may improve their tactical abilities and leadership skills.

(3) To support leader development, each CTC requires a robust, standardized data-collection capability for processing lessons learned. This enables the Army to draw meaningful conclusions from CTC training. The CTCs will collect and submit lessons learned to the Center for Army Lessons Learned in accordance with AR 11-33 . Additionally, each CTC will rapidly integrate combat relevant lessons learned disseminated by Center for Army Lessons Learned or other approved Army venues.

d. Combat Training Center accreditation. The TRADOC, on behalf of the CTC Program Director, accredits the CTC Program every 2 years. Goals of the accreditation process include the following: (1) standardization, (2) equitable resource allocation, and (3) identification of systemic issues. The Director, CTC Directorate, in support of the CTC Responsible Official (for example, Deputy Commanding General, TRADOC for Combined Arms), plans and executes the CTC accreditation process in coordination with FORSCOM and USAREUR and develops an accreditation report addressing each of the areas below:

(1) OPFOR and/or OE replication (conducted annually).

(2) OPS GRP (MCTC and MCTP observer coach trainer training and equipping).

(3) ITADSS.

(4) Facilities (in coordination with FORSCOM, TRADOC, USAREUR, and U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM), the CTC accreditation process will address facilities-related issues).

(5) Resource management.

e. Joint National Training Capability Accreditation. Joint Staff J7 conducts a separate (JNTC) accreditation described in Joint publications.

f. Combat Training Center Proponent Review Program. This program is executed through visits to the CTCs by proponent center and school personnel. This program ensures DOTMLPF observations, lessons learned, and emerging trends from the CTCs are expeditiously integrated into proponent course curricula, training materials development, doctrine, tactics, techniques, and procedures by proponents. Proponent visits are funded by the CTC Program and requests are forwarded to CTC Directorate, Resource Management Division.

Chapter 2
Responsibilities

2-1. Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology)

The ASA (ALT) will —

a. Manage research; development; and test evaluation and plan, program, and budget for the acquisition of CTC nonsystem ITADSS and LVC integration efforts.

b. Ensure PEOs and project managers plan, program, and budget appropriate levels of research; development; test and evaluation; procurement; and operation and maintenance, Army (OMA), dollars within their programs for development, acquisition, life cycle management support, life cycle maintenance support, and fielding of the system training package. Planning considerations include system and nonsystem ITADSS applications for CTC training and CTC instrumentation system interface.

c. Provide points of contact to monitor CTC nonsystem ITADSS programs as part of the overall ITADSS Program.

d. Direct the acquisition of the DCS, G-3/5/7-approved requirements for CTC ITADSS that fulfills an urgent training requirement.

2-2. Chief Information Officer/G-6

The CIO/G-6 will —

a. Direct the Army Spectrum Certification Program for supportability of conceptual, experimental, developmental, and operational spectrum-dependent equipment per DODD 5000.01 , DODI 4650.01 , and DODI 5000.02 .

b. Review Army materiel objectives and requirements to identify potential effects on the spectrum per AR 70-1 . When applicable, ensure coordination of the acquisition of radio frequency spectrum guidance, support requirements, and host nation requirements for CTC materiel prior to assumption of developmental contractual obligations.

c. Integrate communication systems fielding programs and respective system and nonsystem ITADSS to ensure CTCs can integrate and support newly fielded systems with ITADSS that can interface with instrumentation systems on the CTC battlefields.

d. Architecture, Operations, Networks, and Space Directorate will coordinate specialized spectrum management requirements for the MCTCs and process requests for spectrum resources.

e. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the Combat Training Center Directorate (CTCD) in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

f. Provide information assurance advice and assistance to CTCs for implementation of AR 25-2 .

2-3. Chief of Public Affairs

The CPA will —

a. Serve as DA staff proponent for CTC public affairs training matters.

b. Establish training standards for CTC public affairs training.

c. Provide public affairs training development assistance to CTCs.

2-4. Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1

The DCS, G-1 will —

a. Ensure assignment of high-quality, highly experienced, and branch qualified cadre, in accordance with current year Active Army manning guidance, to all CTC OPS GRPs that support CTC requirements in accordance with the MCTC and MCTP observer coach trainer coverage stated in paragraph 1-6 b (2) and the associated table.

b. Manage CTC OPS GRP officer and noncommissioned officer follow-on assignments to reinforce and promote CTC experience throughout the Army.

c. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

2-5. Deputy Chief of Staff, G-2

The DCS, G-2 will —

a. Supervise the management of the CTC OPFOR Program according to AR 350-2 .

b. Provide support to TRADOC as the responsible agency to provide the CTC OPFOR Program, the Army Threat Simulators Program, and other threat training programs.

c. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

d. Provide system performance information and funding to Program Executive Office for Army Simulation, Training, and Instrumentation (PEO STRI) for development of unclassified and classified OPFOR training systems.

e. Provide oversight for CTC security requirements, in coordination with the CIO/G-6.

2-6. Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7

The DCS, G-3/5/7 will —

a. Serve as the Director of the CTC Program and provide training, policy, resources, and management oversight.

b. Serve as the Army Staff focal point for all Army and Joint service CTC actions and specify Army directed training at the CTCs. (The DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) serves as the DCS, G-3/5/7 principle advisor for all CTC matters and executes additional CTC Program responsibilities in accordance with this regulation.)

c. Manage the CTC Program and approve the CTC MP. The CTC MP complements this regulation by providing long-range planning guidance, program vision, scope, mission, and CTC initiatives. Ensure coordination of CTC long-range resource plans with the Army Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution System, including the Army Modernization Plan; Research, Development, and Acquisition Plan; military construction, Army (MCA) Program; and total Army analysis. Include Army National Guard (ARNG) and U.S. Army Reserve (USAR) requirements in the program objective memorandum (POM) process. Consider and incorporate appropriate lead times required for completing CTC-related projects.

d. Establish program priorities and resource requirements for the CTCs. CTC Program priorities and resources will be managed by DAMO-TR management decision evaluation package (MDEP) managers.

e. Approve CTC concepts of operations through the review and update of this regulation, the conduct of CTC quarterly reviews (QRs) and semiannual council of colonels (CoC), and approval of the CTC MP at each POM cycle.

f. Coordinate HQDA CTC information requirements.

g. Provide chair for CTC CoC and co-chair CTC QRs.

h. Establish program priorities and resource requirements for the CTCs participation in JNTC implementation and training transformation.

i. Integrate combat, protection, and sustainment operations into all CTCs to train Army units for unified land operations.

j. Exercise Army Staff lead in staffing and coordinating CTC-unique ITADSS requirements documents that require HQDA or DOD approval. Integrate CTC Program requirements into the Training Support System Program to ensure sufficient ITADSS and OPFOR modernization at the CTCs to keep operational and training systems current and the most efficient technologies are used to minimize cost.

k. Coordinates cross program evaluation group requirements.

l. Approve directed requirements for CTC-unique ITADSS and forward to the ASA (ALT) for acquisition approval.

m. Approve and/or disapprove recommended changes to the DCS, G-3/5/7-approved CTC Program troop lists and publish changes.

n. Ensure staffing of CTC OPS GRP is resourced adequately with personnel possessing the correct skills, knowledge and attributes to execute their assigned duties, and in accordance with the HQDA manning guidance.

o. Approve and/or disapprove requests for foreign units to participate at CONUS CTCs.

p. Delegate approval authority to the Commanding General (CG), USAREUR for requests from foreign units to participate at JMRC.

2-7. Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4

The DCS, G-4 will —

a. Review and approve contract requests submitted to the DCS, G-4 (DALO-SUS) for contractor access to the DOD supply system in accordance with AR 725-50 .

b. Review, establish, and approve any noncontract related contractor policy guidance and directives for training and exercises in accordance with AR 715-9 .

c. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

2-8. Deputy Chief of Staff, G-8

The DCS, G-8 is responsible for programming, DA studies and analysis, and externally directed reviews. The DCS, G-8 will —

a. Serve as the principal advisor to the CSA on Joint materiel requirements, integration of DOTMLPF, and the materiel program execution over their life cycles.

b. Responsible for transitioning approved Army requirements, including CTCs requirements, from the planning to the programming phase of the Army Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution System.

c. Support the production, delivery and integration of training and training support for unit set fielding in coordination with the ARFORGEN training and mission preparation requirements and the CTC rotational schedule as developed by the ARFORGEN synchronization meetings.

d. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

e. Develop and defend the Army POM; the Future Years Defense Program; and the independent assessment, integration, and synchronization of the Army POM.

2-9. Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management

The ACSIM is responsible for the promulgation of policy and integration of doctrine pertaining to the planning programming, execution, and operations of Army installations. In that capacity, the ACSIM will —

a. Serve as the principal advisor to the CSA for providing a usable installation platform for accomplishing CTC missions.

b. In coordination with the DCS, G-3/5/7, and in accordance with AR 420-1 , review and evaluate ACOM, ASCC, and direct reporting units (DRU) military construction projects to support CTCs. Prepare and present military construction program to the Senior Leaders Department of the Army, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Office of Management and Budget, and Congress.

c. Through the Chief of Environmental Programs, identify and integrate environmental requirements and support services.

d. Through the Chief of Environmental Programs (DAIM-ISE), serve as staff proponent for CTC installation environmental concerns.

2-10. Director, Army National Guard

The DARNG will —

a. Identify to the CTC responsible official (RO) the OMA funding required for ARNG CTC rotations (MCTP, JRTC, NTC, and JMRC-provided ETC) and transportation of field and sustainment maintenance units to the NTC for each POM or budget-year cycle. ARNG units participating in CTC rotations, as directed mission support to troop list requirements, are resourced by HQDA, CTC Program, through the responsible ACOM. DARNG is responsible for funding pay and allowances. Additionally, the DARNG will provide resources for ARNG units conducting annual training (AT) at the CTCs in any status other than as directed mission support to the rotation.

b. Conduct a periodic review of the DCS, G-3/5/7-approved CTC Program troop lists in coordination with CTC sponsoring ACOMs, ASCCs, the CTC Program RO, and the DCS, G-3/5/7.

c. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

d. Support additional training days for extended rotations, beyond normal AT, when coordinated with the sponsoring ACOM and the CTC.

e. Provide MCTC and MCTP observer coach trainer augmentation support for ARNG rotations when requirement exceeds OPS GRP assigned tables of distribution and allowances (TDA) or approved troop list.

f. In coordination with the CG, FORSCOM for ARFORGEN considerations, designate three ARNG battalions per maneuver CTC with habitual relationships to potentially serve as OPFOR should Active Component OPFOR units fully deploy.

g. Provide representation in CTC QR process and provide a voting member to the CTC CoC.

2-11. Chief, Army Reserve

The CAR will —

a. Assist FORSCOM and USAREUR by —

(1) Designating USAR units for participation in CTC rotations in support of ARFORGEN requirements.

(2) Maintaining a centralized management system for USAR unit participation at the CTCs.

(3) Synchronizing and coordinating all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

b. Identify to the CTC RO the OMA funding required for transportation of field and sustainment maintenance units to the NTC for each POM or budget-year cycle. USAR units participating in CTC rotations as directed mission support to troop list requirements are resourced by HQDA, CTC Program, and through the responsible ACOM. CAR is responsible for funding pay and allowances. Additionally, CAR will provide resources for USAR units conducting AT at the CTCs in any status other than as directed mission support of a troop list requirement.

c. Support additional training days for extended rotations, beyond normal AT, when coordinated with the sponsoring ACOM and the CTC.

d. Provide MCTC and MCTP observer coach trainer augmentation support when requirement exceeds OPS GRP TDA.

e. Provide representation in CTC QR process and provide a voting member to the CTC CoC.

2-12. Commanding General, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

The CG, USACE will —

a. Manage and execute CTC training facility engineering, design, and construction according to AR 420-1 , and other technical engineering and construction regulations and manuals issued by USACE.

b. Manage and execute real estate activities in accordance with the AR 405 series and other technical real estate regulations and manuals issued by the CG, USACE.

c. Manage and execute railroad improvements, extensions, and construction as minor construction or as an unspecified minor military construction, Army or MCA project, in accordance with AR 420-1, and other technical engineering and construction regulations and manuals issued by the CG, USACE.

2-13. Chief of Engineers

The COE is responsible for the promulgation of policy and integration of doctrine pertaining to engineering, construction, and real estate. In that capacity, the COE will serve as the principle advisor to the CSA for providing engineering, construction, and real estate for accomplishing CTC missions.

2-14. Commanding General, U.S. Army Forces Command

The CG, FORSCOM will —

a. Command, operate, and maintain the JRTC and the NTC.

b. Command JRTC and NTC OPS GRP.

c. Provide required force structure to support the JRTC and NTC mission; including an OPS GRP at the JRTC and NTC that is staffed, equipped, and organized to develop scenarios; execute the scenarios as the training unit's higher headquarters; observe and analyze the performance of training units using Army doctrinal standards; and provide lessons learned and detailed feedback to the unit and the Army. The TDA for each CTC OPS GRP will be designed to support the CTC's DCS, G-3/5/7-approved CTC Program troop lists and must be periodically reviewed. FORSCOM, as a goal, will fill 100 percent of OPS GRP personnel authorizations through permanent party assignment. FORSCOM will coordinate with the rotational unit's ACOM or ASCC to fill individual rotational observer coach trainer shortfalls for 80 percent of authorized TDA positions within the approved troop list. The rotational unit's higher headquarters will provide MCTC observer coach trainer support in excess of the OPS GRP TDA authorizations and when rotational units exceed the approved troop list.

d. Provide equipment and materiel needed for JRTC and NTC mission accomplishment.

e. Ensure that AARs are doctrinally based, focused on performance not process, and executed in a manner that facilitates Soldiers and leaders discovering for themselves what happened, why it happened, and how to sustain strengths and overcome weaknesses. The MCTC OPS GRPs will provide the rotational unit at least one opportunity to conduct a leader-led AAR per rotation.

f. Provide doctrinally based take-home packages.

g. Provide an OPFOR for JRTC and NTC. The modification table of organization and equipment (MTOE) and TDA for each MCTC OPFOR will be designed to support that MCTC's mission and friendly forces troop list. FORSCOM will fill authorized OPFOR MTOE and TDA with permanent party or augmentee personnel. FORSCOM will ensure all or any OPFOR support required in excess of the OPFOR MTOE and TDA is scheduled during the ARFORGEN synchronization meetings.

h. Conduct the following scheduling functions for subordinate units and other ASCCs and applicable DRUs:

(1) The JRTC, MCTP, and NTC, including JMRC for CONUS ETC requirements in accordance with ARFORGEN synchronization meetings.

(2) The ARNG and USAR unit participation at MCTP, JRTC, NTC, and JMRC-provided ETC.

(3) U.S. Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) and U.S. Army, Pacific (USARPAC) unit participation in MCTP, JRTC, NTC, and JMRC-provided ETC.

(4) Coordination of units to augment the OPFOR at JRTC and NTC.

(5) Coordination of higher headquarters requirements for FORSCOM MCTP rotations, including ARNG MCTP rotations.

(6) Manage ASCC, corps, division, and brigade throughput.

(7) Conduct quarterly ARFORGEN synchronization meetings.

(8) Development and maintenance of a centralized management system for ARNG and USAR unit participation at the CTCs, including JMRC-provided ETC participation in coordination with USAREUR and the JMRC. The system will consist of a 5-year plan that captures all unit requirements and provides long-range planning guidance and information to participating ARNG and USAR units.

(9) Development and maintenance of an assessment program for ARNG BCTs participation at the JRTC, NTC and JMRC-provided ETC.

i. Identify long-term (POM) support requirements for MCTP, JRTC, and NTC (that is, field and sustainment maintenance, sustainment brigades, aviation, field artillery brigades, OPFOR, engineer, and heavy equipment transport) to the National Guard Bureau and CAR.

j. Provide program and budget funding for ARNG and USAR units participating in JRTC, NTC, and JMRC-provided ETC rotations as a directed mission in support of a troop list requirement.

k. Identify and submit all funding requirements (for example, OMA, Overseas Contingency Operations (OCOs), research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E), other procurement, Army (OPA), and MCA) for rotations and/or operations for each POM or budget-year cycle to CTCD, in support of the CTC RO for validation through the CTC CoC governance process and subsequent approval by the DCS, G-3/5/7 MDEP manager. Funding requirements and/or requests will not be submitted directly to the DCS, G-8 or the Army Budget Office.

l. Provide MCTC and MCTP observer coach trainer augmentation support for FORSCOM rotations when requirement exceeds operations group assigned TDA authorizations and when rotational units exceed the approved troop list.

m. Publish a FORSCOM-specific CTC implementing regulation addressing the policies, procedures, and requirements for training at the JRTC and NTC. Such regulations will be developed and revised in coordination with affected ASCCs, applicable DRUs, the CTC Program RO, and the DCS, G-3/5/7.

n. Ensure safety and composite risk management (CRM) is implemented in planning, preparation, and execution of all CTC Program operations and training.

o. Provide ACOM representation in CTC QR and a voting member to the CTC CoC.

p. Conduct an annual review and assessment of the DCS, G-3/5/7-approved CTC Program troop lists in coordination with TRADOC, CTC sponsoring ACOMs, ASCCs, and the CTC Program RO and submit the results to the DCS G-3/5/7 for approval. If no troop list exists for a CTC Program, FORSCOM in coordination with TRADOC, the CTC sponsoring ACOMs, ASCC, and the CTCD in support of the CTC RO will develop a recommended troop list and forward it to DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) for approval.

q. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

r. Identify and coordinate IMCOM support requirements for JRTC and NTC.

s. Program, budget, and provide resources to support assigned FORSCOM units and their subelements and spectrum management responsibilities per AR 1-1 and AR 5-12 .

t. Implement and integrate Army spectrum management doctrine, policy and procedures to support Army and Joint contingencies, field training exercises, and command post exercises.

u. Support CTC Accreditation Program.

2-15. Commanding General, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

The CG, TRADOC will —

a. Assist the DCS, G-3/5/7 with administration and integration of the CTC Program. Examples are such as providing training models for CTCs including exercise scenarios, OPFOR models, observer coach trainer training requirements, assessment criteria, CTC resources, and the CTC MP.

b. Designate the Deputy Commanding General, TRADOC for Combined Arms as CTC RO to support administration of the CTC Program as directed by the DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) (see para 3-3 c ).

c. The CTC RO, in coordination with FORSCOM, USAREUR, and TRADOC, oversees development of recommend priorities for the allocation of Army resources identified to support the CTC Program for the DCS, G-3/5/7 approval.

d. Ensure that the following functions and support requirements of the CTCs are met:

(1) Develop the Army blueprint scenario, in accordance with the CSA guidance, to be used as the foundation for rotational training scenarios. The Army blueprint scenario will be integrated with the institutional training base scenarios and modified by the training unit commander to meet specific training objectives.

(2) Base scenarios and missions on approved doctrine and ensure they are tactically sound while simultaneously applying lessons learned.

(3) The DCS, G-2 provides unclassified operational environment assessments (OEAs) to each CTC on a semi-annual basis to aid exercise planners in developing realistic scenarios that accurately portray the OE variables for generic exercises or a specific MRE or MRX. OEAs provide an outsider's view of the most probable and dangerous enemy tactics, techniques, and procedures that should be considered during an exercise (at times referred to as Red Teaming). OEAs are country and region specific unclassified assessments that provide credible and feasible 12 month projections for MRXs and MREs and wildcards of what a unit may encounter.

(4) Establish and update standards for MCTC and MCTP observer coach trainer training programs and core characteristics for LTPs, in coordination with CTC Accreditation Program.

e. Appoint a MCTP commander whose principal duties include direct supervision of the MCTP, including serving as deputy exercise director during the WFX phase of division or corps MCTP rotations, brigade WFXs, and mission readiness exercises. Provide MCTP OPS GRPs that are staffed, equipped, organized, and trained to develop scenarios; execute the scenarios as the unit's higher headquarters during seminars, to include replication of unified land operations in the OE; prepare, construct, and execute the WFX with the unit's higher headquarters; assess the performance of training units against Army doctrinal standards; and collect embedded source data and information and provide detailed feedback to the unit. TRADOC, as a goal, will fill 100 percent of the MCTP OPS GRPs personnel requirements through permanent party assignment. TRADOC will coordinate with the rotational unit's ACOM or ASCC to fill individual MCTP rotational observer coach trainer shortfalls for 80 percent of authorized TDA positions within the approved troop list which TRADOC is unable to support. TRADOC will provide temporary duty funding to support these augmentation requirements. The rotational unit's higher headquarters will provide MCTP observer coach trainer support in excess of the OPS GRP TDA authorizations and when rotational units exceed the approved troop list.

f. Assess CTC requirements based on the CTC client needs, CTC capabilities, and doctrine. Integrate needs assessments for identification of doctrine, training, leader development, and organizational applications. Develop and validate requirements to meet CTC needs. Ensure integration of these requirements with existing capabilities. If a materiel solution is required the training or combat developer (Army Training Support Center-TRADOC Capability Manager-Live, assisted by PEO STRI), develops an initial capabilities document, capabilities development document and capabilities production document to support Milestone A, Milestone B, and Milesetone C decisions, respectively. Army Training Support Center is responsible for ensuring that the initial capabilities document, capabilities development document, and capabilities production document reflect CTC requirements. CTC requirements affecting DOTMLPF will be developed by proponent combat and training developers.

g. Support the DCS, G-2 by —

(1) Designating a proponent for the integration and validation of the CTC OPFOR Program, in accordance with AR 350-2 .

(2) Developing CTC OPFOR Program policies, objectives, and guidelines.

(3) Developing, implementing, and validating an OE MP that incorporates the OE to include an adaptive, free-thinking, and opportunistic OPFOR that can challenge Army and Joint forces across the operational spectrum and supports CTCs' requirements. The maintenance of the OE MP includes an annual validation of environmental training conditions such as replicating civilians on the battlefield with role-players, applicable linguists, and infrastructure and integrating these requirements into the CTC MP and funding requirements documents (issue sheets) for POM and budget-year submission.

(4) Providing intelligence support to the CTC OPFOR Program.

(5) Accrediting CTC replication of the OE and OPFOR for decisive action training or threats for MREs and MRXs doctrine, tactics and capabilities.

(6) Provide OEAs to CTC exercise planners to aid in the development of realistic and challenging scenarios that support both decisive action and MRE and MRX training.

(7) Leading efforts for OE/OPFOR modernization initiatives to ensure consistency and validity of threat capabilities and OE portrayals across LVC domains.

h. Provide an organization and/or facility at Fort Leavenworth, KS for the collection, analysis, integration, and dissemination of key combat training data in accordance with AR 11-33 . The facility will have the resources to receive process, analyze, disseminate, and archive emerging operational observations, insights, and lessons from the CTCs, major training exercises, and lessons learned from operational theaters. Additionally, this organization will employ observation detachments at the CTCs for the collection and dissemination of observations, insights, and lessons for incorporation into CTCs' training scenarios.

i. Develop requirements for ITADSS and assist the MATDEV in CTC ITADSS concept formulation.

j. Provide certification information for all proposed or conceptual developments that will impact on the electromagnetic spectrum.

k. Participate in the ARFORGEN synchronization meetings to coordinate MCTP training events.

l. Schedule and coordinate CTC CoC and CTC QRs in coordination with the DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR).

m. Host a semiannual CTC meeting on behalf of the DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR).

n. The CTC RO, in coordination with FORSCOM, USAREUR, and TRADOC, oversees development of recommendations, validation, and integration of the CTC Program OMA; research, development, and acquisition; OPA; MCA; POM; and budget requirements for the DCS, G-3/5/7 approval.

o. Develop a CTC MP for each POM cycle and update.

p. Publish a MCTP implementing regulation that addresses ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs specific requirements.

q. Ensure safety and CRM is implemented in planning, preparation, and execution of all CTC Program operations and training.

r. Provide support to FORSCOM in conducting periodic reviews of the DCS, G-3/5/7-approved CTC Program troop lists in coordination with CTC sponsoring ASCCs, the CTC Program RO, and DCS, G-3/5/7.

s. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

t. Execute biennial (every 2 years) CTC Accreditation Program and draft the biennial report in support of the CTC Program Director.

2-16. Commanding General, U.S. Army Europe

The CG, USAREUR will —

a. Command, operate, and maintain the JMRC as a dual mission fixed site MCTC and ETC.

b. Support the ARFORGEN process by providing ETC exercises as coordinated through the FORSCOM ARFORGEN synchronization meetings.

c. Provide an OPS GRP for JMRC that is staffed, equipped, organized, and trained to develop scenarios; execute the scenarios as the training unit's higher headquarters; observe and analyze the performance of training units using Army doctrinal standards; and provide lessons learned and detailed feedback to the unit and the Army. The TDA for the OPS GRP will be designed to support the troop list as approved by DA. USAREUR, as a goal, will fill 100 percent of OPS GRP personnel authorizations through permanent party assignment. The rotational unit's higher headquarters will provide MCTC and MCTP observer coach trainer augmentation in excess of the operations group TDA authorizations and when the rotational units exceed the approved troop list.

d. Provide an OPFOR for JMRC. The MTOE or TDA for the OPFOR will be designed to support both the friendly forces and OPFOR mission. USAREUR will fill authorized OPFOR MTOE or TDA through permanent or augmentee assignment. The rotational unit's higher headquarters will provide all OPFOR support required in excess of the OPFOR MTOE or TDA.

e. Ensure that AARs are doctrinally based, focused on performance not process, and executed in a manner that facilitates Soldiers and leaders discovering for themselves what happened, why it happened, and how to sustain strengths and overcome weaknesses. The MCTC OPS GRPs will provide the rotational unit at least one opportunity to conduct a leader-led AAR per rotation.

f. Provide doctrinally based take-home packages.

g. Participate in the ARFORGEN synchronization meetings to —

(1) Identify and coordinate JMRC ETC scheduling.

(2) Coordinate higher headquarters requirements for USAREUR Operational Command Post MCTP rotations.

(3) Coordinate ARNG and USAR activities related to the JMRC.

h. Identify long-term (5-year plan) support requirements for JMRC, including the ETC (for example, field and sustainment maintenance, sustainment brigades, aviation, OPFOR, engineer, and heavy equipment transport) with ARNG and USAR.

i. Identify and submit all funding requirements (for example, OMA, OCO, RDT&E, OPA, and MCA) for rotations and operations for each POM or budget-year cycle to CTCD, in support of the CTC RO, for validation through the CTC CoC governance process and subsequent approval by the DCS, G-3/5/7 MDEP manager. Funding requirements and/or requests will not be submitted directly to the DCS, G-8 or the Army Budget Office.

j. Publish an ASCC-specific CTC implementing regulation addressing the policies, procedures, and requirements for training at JMRC. This regulation will be developed and revised in coordination with affected ASCCs, applicable DRUs, the CTC Program RO, and the DCS, G-3/5/7.

k. Ensure safety and CRM is implemented in planning, preparation, and execution of all CTC Program operations and training.

l. Provide ASCC representation in CTC QR process and provide a voting member to the CTC CoC.

m. Conduct spectrum management for the JMRC in accordance with unified command directives, Host Nation agreements, and AR 5-12 .

n. Conduct an annual review of the DCS, G-3/5/7-approved CTC Program troop lists in coordination with CTC sponsoring ACOMs, ASCCs, the CTC Program RO, and the DCS, G-3/5/7.

o. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

p. Support CTC Accreditation Program.

2-17. Commanding General, U.S. Army Pacific

The CG, USARPAC will —

a. Participate in the ARFORGEN synchronization meetings to —

(1) Identify and coordinate MCTP rotations for subordinate commands.

(2) Coordinate higher headquarters requirements for USARPAC Contingency Command Post MCTP rotations.

(3) Coordinate and inform the CTC community on progress and status of the FY12 USARPAC and Eighth, U.S. Army (EUSA) integration into a single ASCC, resulting roles and missions modifications, and impact on the ARFORGEN process and CTC Program requirements.

b. Identify and submit all funding requirements (for example, OMA and OCO) for rotations and operations for each POM or budget-year cycle to CTCD, in support of the CTC RO, for validation through the CTC CoC governance process and subsequent approval by the DCS, G-3/5/7 MDEP manager. Funding requirements and/or requests will not be submitted directly to the DCS, G-8 or the Army Budget Office.

c. Provide MCTP observer coach trainer augmentation support for USARPAC rotations when requirement exceeds operations group TDA authorizations and when rotational units exceed the approved troop list.

d. Provide ASCC representation in CTC QR process and provide a voting member to the CTC CoC.

e. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

f. Conduct spectrum management in accordance with unified command directives, Host Nation agreements and AR 5-12 .

2-18. Commanding General, U.S. Army Special Operations Command

The CG, USASOC will —

a. Participate in the ARFORGEN synchronization meetings to identify and coordinate MCTC, MCTP, and JMRC-provided ETC training events for USASOC units.

b. Identify, task, and fund USASOC rotational units.

c. Identify, task, and fund USASOC units to augment USASOC rotations, when units do not have sufficient assets to meet the authorized CTC troop list.

d. Identify and submit all funding requirements (for example, OMA) for rotations and operations for each POM or budget-year cycle to CTCD, in support of the CTC RO, for validation through the CTC CoC governance process, and subsequent approval by the DCS, G-3/5/7 MDEP manager. Funding requirements and/or requests will not be submitted directly to the DCS, G-8 or the Army Budget Office.

e. Exercise approval authority and resourcing responsibility for USASOC unit requests which exceed the CTC authorized troop list in coordination with the CTC Program Director. Upon USASOC approval, provide additional personnel, equipment, and funding needed by the CTC OPS GRP to support and control increased unit training packages.

f. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

g. To the maximum extent possible, resource the CTC Program OPS GRPs with Army Special Operations Forces (ARSOF) subject matter experts in accordance with approved CTC TDAs. Additionally, equip the ARSOF subject matter experts with any required ARSOF-peculiar, Major Force Program equipment necessary to support the conduct of CTC rotations.

h. Provide MCTC and MCTP observer coach trainer augmentation support for USASOC rotations when requirements exceed the OPS GRP TDA.

i. Provide OPFOR augmentation support for outstations when requirement exceeds CTC capability.

j. Provide ASCC representation in CTC QR process and provide a voting member to the CTC CoC.

k. Coordinate spectrum requirements for special forces groups or teams or organizations.

2-19. Commanding General, Eighth U.S. Army

The CG, EUSA will —

a. Participate in the ARFORGEN synchronization meetings to identify and coordinate MCTP training events and brigade decisive action exercises for subordinate units.

b. Identify and submit all funding requirements (for example, OMA) for rotations and operations for each POM or budget-year cycle to CTCD, in support of the CTC RO for validation through the CTC CoC governance process and subsequent approval by the DCS, G-3/5/7 MDEP manager. Funding requirements and/or requests will not be submitted directly to the DCS, G-8 or the Army Budget Office.

c. Provide MCTP observer coach trainer augmentation support when requirements for EUSA rotations exceed the OPS GRP TDA and when rotational units exceed the approved troop list.

d. Provide ASCC representation in CTC QR process and provide voting member to the CTC CoC.

e. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

f. Conduct spectrum management in accordance with unified command directives, Host Nation agreements, and AR 5-12 .

2-20. Commanding General, U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command

The CG, ATEC will —

a. Ensure that CTC training applications are considered and incorporated into new system and ITADSS acquisition strategy operational and system evaluation requirements.

b. Ensure necessary operational test and system evaluation requirements established by the combat developer and assigned by a Test and Evaluation Working-level Integrated Product Team are fulfilled for all CTC-specific ITADSS.

c. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

2-21. Commanding General, U.S. Army Network Enterprise Technology Command and 9 th Signal Command (Army)

The CG, NETCOM will —

a. Provide information mission area planning and engineering tasks to support CTC base communications and network requirements.

b. Provide guidance and support for planning and executing information management executed at the CTCs.

c. Program and obtain resources to engineer and operate mobile spectrum monitoring facilities to support Army spectrum management activities in accordance with AR 5-12 .

d. Plan, program, budget, and provide resources for executing assigned spectrum management, electromagnetic compatibility assurance, testing, and evaluation in accordance with AR 5-12.

e. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

2-22. Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command

The CG, MEDCOM will provide Level 1 and Level 2 medical coverage to the echelons above brigade unit personnel that support the rotation but do not deploy from the cantonment area. This coverage includes any personnel which need to be evacuated beyond the brigade aid station but do not require hospitalization.

2-23. Commander, U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center

The Commander, USARC will —

a. Conduct centralized accident investigations for Class A and selected Class B aviation accidents and for selected Class A ground accidents.

b. Advise the CTCs on all safety related issues and evaluate the OPS GRP's assessment of CRM performance by rotational units to ensure Army units receive training to protect the force in future training and operations.

2-24. Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Installation Management Command

Under the General Staff supervision of the ACSIM, the CG, IMCOM will —

a. Assist in defining and documenting CTC training facility requirements.

b. Provide CTC mission commanders with mission support training facilities (formerly base operations) and sustainment, revitalization, and modernization support.

2-25. Commanders, Combat Training Centers (Mission Command Training Program, Joint Multinational Readiness Center, Joint Readiness Training Center, and National Training Center)

The Commanders, CTCs MCTP, JMRC, JRTC, and NTC will —

a. Develop and conduct doctrinally sound training in accordance with CSA scenario blueprint guidance that supports unified land operations and decisive action missions.

b. Provide a realistic and stressful combat training environment for combined arms and Joint training which approximates actual combat.

c. Conduct an accurate portrayal of a capabilities-based OPFOR in the OE, according to TC 7-100 .

d. Train and certify observer coach trainers and augmentation observer coach trainers to TRADOC-established standards.

e. Conduct brigade-level LTPs at JMRC, JRTC, and NTC based on established core characteristics (in accordance with para 1-6 c ).

f. Conduct brigade-level, division-level, corps-level, and ASCC-level meetings in MCTP.

g. JMRC provides ETC, as designated.

h. Provide TRADOC with data, information, and lessons learned from the CTC in accordance with AR 11-33 .

i. Support CTC RO in development of CTC MP.

j. Participate in the ARFORGEN synchronization meetings.

k. Participate in resource validation visits.

l. Participate in CTC Review Program that comprises doctrinal review visits, threat validation visits, focused rotations, and trends reversal.

m. Assist TRADOC and U.S. Army Materiel Command in the development of CTC ITADSS requirements and in testing and fielding of ITADSS to be used at the CTCs.

n. Develop, coordinate, and execute support agreements, with other Services to ensure Joint support of Army training requirements. Submit these agreements through CTC sponsoring ACOMs and the CTC RO to the DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR), for approval.

o. Identify and submit all funding requirements (for example, OMA, OCO, RDT&E, OPA, and MCA) for rotations and operations for each POM or budget-year cycle to CTCD, in support of the CTC RO for validation through the CTC CoC governance process and subsequent approval by the DCS, G-3/5/7 MDEP manager. Funding requirements and/or requests will not be submitted directly to the DCS, G-8 or the Army Budget Office.

p. Participate in periodic review of the DCS, G-3/5/7-approved CTC Program troop lists in coordination with CTC sponsoring ASCCs, ACOMs, the CTC Program RO, and the DCS, G-3/5/7.

q. Synchronize and coordinate all proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD in accordance with paragraph 3-1 a .

r. Coordinate, plan, program, and fund for adequate management and supervision of the training spectrum.

s. Participate in the CTC Accreditation Program in accordance with paragraph 1-6 d of this regulation.

t. Provide representation in CTC QR process and provide a voting member to the CTC CoC.

2-26. Program Executive Office for Army Simulation, Training, and Instrumentation

The PEO STRI will —

a. As directed by the ASA (ALT), be responsible for the materiel development and procurement of nonsystem ITADSS, OPFOR equipment, performance training data (classified and unclassified), and integration of system ITADSS into the CTCs.

b. Execute materiel development and readiness functions outlined in AR 70-1 and AR 350-38 as they pertain to acquisition and life cycle support of CTC ITADSS, including fixed instrumentation. These include requirements to —

(1) Manage the development, acquisition, and testing of Army-sponsored requirements and agreed upon ACOM and ASCC sponsored requirements.

(2) Perform the concept formulation for all CTC-unique ITADSS.

(3) Support development of basis of issue plan feeder data and qualitative and quantitative personnel requirements information under AR 71-32 .

(4) Identify to the CTC responsible official required contractor logistics support funding for CTC ITADSS for each POM or budget-year cycle.

(5) Maintain design and configuration control over CTC-unique ITADSS.

(6) Provide instrumentation to support the training, training assessment, and analysis feedback requirements of the CTCs.

c. Process DD Form 1494 (Application for Equipment Frequency Allocation) in support of CTC systems that are spectrum dependent in accordance with AR 5-12 .

d. Provide logistics assistance office representatives to support units training at each CTC.

e. Ensure development of training system performance data.

f. Support CTC Accreditation Program.

g. Provide representation in CTC QR process and provide an advisory and/or nonvoting member to the CTC CoC.

2-27. Program executive officers and/or project managers

The PEO and/or project manager is the Army agent charged with fielding a supportable system to each gaining organization and further charged with planning, programming, budgeting, and executing associated funding. System PEOs and/or project managers with approved Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System requirements will —

a. Include potential applications of system and nonsystem ITADSS into CTC training in all system concept formulation, development, growth, and funding. They will coordinate with CTC Headquarters, TRADOC, FORSCOM, USAREUR, 7th Army Joint Multinational Training Commander, U.S. Army Materiel Command, DAMO-TRS, and PEO STRI. The review will consider all aspects of DOTMLPF implications and ARFORGEN fielding schedules.

b. Ensure current fielding of CTC ITADSS prior to or with each new system.

c. Fund, develop, acquire, and field CTC training subsystem training materiel with the materiel system.

d. Program and budget funds to support changes to fielded ITADSS with CTC application resulting from changes or modification to the supported system.

e. Provide funding to PEO STRI for the performance of system CTC ITADSS concept formulation efforts.

f. Consider electromagnetic spectrum and other environmental impacts of the system at each CTC.

g. Provide system performance data and funding to PEO STRI for development of system training performance data.

h. Ensure CTCs are included in digital system fielding plans.

i. Address requirements for information assurance and software upgrades, licensing, and life cycle support for all ITADSS capabilities acquired for the CTC Program.

j. Build systems to interoperate with the CTCs in accordance with the interface and data models.

Chapter 3
Combat Training Center Program Planning and Management

This chapter describes HQDA planning and management policies and guidance applicable to the CTC Program, to include the program's policies, organizational guidelines for training units, the CoC process, CTC MP, and scheduling.

3-1. Policies

a. All ACOMs, ASCCs, DRUs, commanders of centers, and HQDA Staff will synchronize and coordinate proposed CTC Program training and equipment changes with the CTCD to ensure that CTC Program requirements and modernization are linked to a viable resourcing strategy and CTC vision for the future. The CTCD will ensure synchronization with validated Army doctrine, training strategies, and interoperability with existing and planned CTC-unique training equipment and ITADSS. Coordination is necessary to ensure standardized training environments exist across the CTCs, eliminate unnecessary duplication, and allow for logical sustainment and integration planning.

b. The CTCs will not be used for any function other than the chartered training mission and focus without the sponsoring ACOM and ASCC commanders' approval.

c. Operational testing may be conducted at the CTCs only if it supports integration and capstone experiments in a joint context using approved operational scenarios and a free-thinking OPFOR. Funding will be provided by the requesting agency.

d. Normally, experimental and/or developmental testing will not be conducted at the CTCs. All testing requests must be approved by the rotational unit, the sponsoring ASCC or ACOM, the DCS, G-3/5/7, and the respective CTC.

e. The ACOM commanders are the approval authority for other Services to participate in CTC rotations.

f. The participation of armed forces from other nations is an important issue. The DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR), is the approving authority for all foreign nation participation at the CONUS CTCs. Procedures for coordinating participation by foreign nations are detailed at appendix B .

3-2. Training strategy

a. The purpose of the CTCs is to develop self-aware, adaptive leaders and Soldiers with a Joint expeditionary mindset, and trained units for unified land operations. The CTC's are enablers of and full participants in the JNTC. As part of JNTC implementation, CTCs will develop the capability to extend the CTC experience beyond the CTC borders.

(1) As the manning paradigm changes for BCTs, CTCs are now able to prepare entire units for combat that will not be impacted by normal permanent changes of station and changes in duty assignment, immediately following the rotation. As a result, emphasis shifts from giving a brigade and/or battalion commander a rotation during their command tenure to preparing entire units for combat through warfighting rotations focused on readiness.

(2) The CTCs will accomplish this by integrating the OE into all training. This environment will include: simultaneous, noncontiguous, and continuous operations potentially as a distributed, global, LVC environment under a decisive action context. Army units will get a rigorous fight in the OE focusing on offensive, defensive, and stability operations against an unpredictable, free-play, and thinking OPFOR.

(3) The battlefield will be arrayed in-depth to maximize stress on digital command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance systems. Complex instrumented terrain including UO or military operations on urbanized terrain will be available for each rotation. Instrumented feedback for both formal and informal AARs will provide the necessary lessons learned for leaders, units and the Army at large. Lessons learned from combat will be fed into CTC rotations to stay abreast of adaptive threats. ARSOF operations, as available, will be integrated throughout the rotation as well as realistic sustainment warfighting functions play to stress the logistics structure.

(4) Leaders in MCTC exercises will be required to fight their units on arrival as part of the deployment exercise. All CTC scenarios are set in a Joint context and include Joint interdependence and interagency participants in rotations.

b. The MCTCs (JMRC, JRTC, and NTC) provide required training for ground-maneuver BCTs to conduct brigade force-on-force live maneuver training against an adaptive, capabilities-based OPFOR on an instrumented battlefield with feedback provided by a professional force of observer coach trainers. MCTCs are capable of providing combined arms live-fire, force-on-force, and UO training. Similarly, MCTPs provide required training for commanders and staffs of divisions, corps, ASCCs, BCTs, multifunctional support brigades, and functional support brigades to train against an adaptive, capabilities- based world-class OPFOR on a realistic and stressful simulated battlefield.

c. The CTCs provide the capstone collective live training event in the combined arms training strategies. Home station training should prepare units to gain the maximum benefit from their CTC experience.

d. The BCTs deploying to the maneuver CTCs are task organized with combat, protection, and sustainment assets necessary to execute wartime missions. They conform to approved troop lists contained in the regulations of those ACOMs and ASCCs sponsoring CTCs and are based on the DCS, G-3/5/7-approved CTC Program troop lists. As the Army moves to BCT designs, troop lists have been adjusted accordingly. Echelons above brigade and echelons above division assets will be limited to those combat, protection, and sustainment units that are in direct support of the BCT. The requesting unit will fund all echelons above brigade and echelons above division assets not in direct support of the BCT. Units not on the DCS, G-3/5/7-approved CTC Program troop lists must be approved and funded by the sponsoring command (that is, ACOM, ASCC, or other DRU). The scope of unit training at each maneuver center is generally as follows:

(1) Joint Multinational Readiness Center. The JMRC is capable of providing Army, Joint, and multinational forces a training experience at fixed facilities in Germany or anywhere in the world as an ETC. The JMRC trains BCTs of all types with habitual support brigades slices with tough, realistic, and demanding training with rotations which include: force-on-force training, live fire exercises, MRE, and leader training programs. Within the ARFORGEN readiness model, JMRC will primarily focus on collective training events supporting Available Pool BCTs. The JMRC will be ready to support CONUS ARFORGEN ETC events, as required. The JMRC is not capable of executing simultaneous fixed MCTC and standalone ETC events.

(2) Joint Readiness Training Center. The JRTC trains BCTs of all types in a force-on-force and live fire training environment. Within the ARFORGEN readiness model, JRTC will primarily focus on collective training events supporting BCTs transitioning between the Ready and Available Force Pools. JRTC quickly adapts to BCT formations as the Army transforms.

(3) National Training Center. The NTC trains BCTs of all types in a force-on-force and live fire training environment. Within the ARFORGEN readiness model, NTC will primarily focus on collective training events supporting BCTs transitioning between the Ready and Available Force Pools. NTC will train BCT formations as the Army transforms.

(4) Stryker Brigade Combat Team. Stryker BCT rotations are inherently more robust, in personnel and equipment than other BCT rotations. This in turn creates a requirement for the sponsoring ACOM or ASCC to provide additional manpower and/or equipment resources for these rotations. Regardless of the rotation type, all CTC Program funded requirements will be based on the DCS, G-3/5/7-approved CTC Program troop lists.

(5) USASOC subelements are integrated to the maximum extent possible at JMRC, JRTC, and NTC. Units assigned to USASOC participate at the MCTCs in varying degrees dependant on the operational requirements levied on USASOC. Under most conditions, USASOC units operate in support of a Joint Special Operations Task Force. When there is a requirement to synchronize activities with conventional force operations a special operations command and control element (SOCCE) is established. The SOCCE is the focal point for the synchronization of special operations forces (SOF) activities with conventional force operations. It performs C2 or liaison functions according to mission requirements and as directed by the establishing commander. The SOCCE normally is employed when SOF conduct operations in support of a conventional force. It co-locates with the command post of the supported force in order to coordinate, synchronize, and deconflict its operations with the operations of the supported force and to ensure communications interoperability with that force. The SOCCE receives SOF operational, intelligence, and target acquisition reports directly from deployed SOF elements and provides them to the supported headquarters.

(6) Normally, an aviation task force supports each CTC rotation as part of the troop list.

(7) Protection and sustainment units from both the ARNG and USAR may be provided the opportunity to participate at both JRTC and NTC on a case-by-case basis as resources and scheduling allow.

(8) The ARNG receives four to five MCTC rotations per year in accordance with ARFORGEN priorities. If sourced against an operational mission, the designated unit will receive a fixed site MCTC (MRE) event prior to deployment.

e. Mission Command Training Program. Units participate in MCTP under the following guidelines:

(1) The primary training audience for corps and division warfighting exercises includes the warfighting unit commander and staff. The secondary training audience includes major subordinate command commanders, separate commanders, and staff.

(2) BCT WFX rotations (ARNG brigades and Active Army BCTs) include the brigade command group, brigade staff (personal, coordinating, and special staff), battalion commanders and staff, and appropriate divisional slice element.

(3) Multifunctional support brigades and functional support brigade WFX rotations (ARNG, USAR, and Active Army) include the brigade command group, brigade staff (personal, coordinating, and special staff), and battalion commanders and staff. These rotations are embedded in corps and division warfighting exercises.

(4) Each combatant command (COCOM) ASCC is allocated one ASCC MCTP supported event annually. This MCTP supported event, conducted by OPS GRP A or D, must be sponsored by the COCOM and supported by a Joint Warfighting Center training event. JTF and/or ASCC exercises include the JTF and ASCC group, the staff (personal, coordinating, and special staff), and major subordinate command commanders determined by the commander's training objectives. Exercise commanders determine participation of ARNG and USAR organizations (that is, separate brigades, ARNG divisions, and ARNG and USAR protection and sustainment units), the mix of heavy and light units, the decision to conduct Joint and combined operations, and appropriate ARSOF (Military Information Support Operations, Civil Affairs, Special Forces, Special Operations Aviation Regiment, and the 75th Ranger Regiment) organizations would also be determined by the commander's exercise objectives.

(5) The MCTP will be prepared to train BCTs and expand its role to support JFLCC and JTF training.

3-3. Combat Training Center Program Organization and Management

a. Combat Training Center Program Administration. CTC Program organization and management is described in figure 3-1 .



Figure 3-1. Combat Training Center Program organization and management


b. Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7 as the Director of the Combat Training Center Program.

(1) Exercises staff oversight and management of the CTC Program.

(2) The DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) serves as the DCS, G-3/5/7 principle advisor for all CTC Program matters and executes additional CTC Program responsibilities in accordance with this publication.

(3) Establishes priorities for allocation of CTC Program resources (current year, budget-year, and POM), to include JNTC priorities and funding. During current year, resourcing of a new requirement will require authorization of the CTC CoC and approval of the DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR).

c. Combat Training Center Responsible Official (Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command for Combined Arms).

(1) Directs the day-to-day planning, administration, validation, and integration of the CTC Program in support of CG, TRADOC and the DCS, G-3/5/7.

(2) Provides a CTCD operating under the direct supervision of the Deputy Commanding General, Combined Arms Center-Training. CTCD serves as the staff for the CTC RO and the extended staff of DCS, G-3/5/7 to facilitate administration, integration, validation, resourcing, and management of the CTC Program. Specifically, CTCD is responsible for ensuring CTC Program requirements and modernization are linked to a viable resourcing strategy and CTC vision for the future. Additionally, CTCD assists in programming and integrating DOD Training Transformation (that is, Joint National Training Capability) initiatives into the CTC Program.

(3) Recommends funding priorities to the DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) for execution of the CTC Program.

(4) Develops requests for resourcing the CTC Program for current and projected Army operations.

(5) Develops, coordinates, and oversees submission of CTC Program related POM funding requests for DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) approval.

(6) Allocates resources across the CTC Program based upon the DA guidance and priorities for support of the ARFORGEN process.

(7) Provides guidance and staff coordination for allocation of training enablers and capabilities to the CTCs to facilitate a standard training capability across all 4 CTCs.

(8) Develops the CTC MP for submission to the DCS, G-3/5/7 for approval with each POM submission. The CTC MP will focus on long-range planning and funding strategies to include modernization initiatives.

(9) Promotes and supports the continuing relevance of the operational environment at all CTCs and JMRC-provided ETC in coordination with the TRADOC G2 and other applicable commands and organizations.

(10) Conducts the CTC Accreditation Program.

(11) Conducts periodic CTC meetings and other forums to support execution, integration, and administration of the CTC Program.

d. Combat Training Center Program.

(1) Operates under the auspices of the Training General Officer Steering Committee (TGOSC). TGOSC purpose and membership requirements are defined in AR 350-1 .

(2) The TGOSC is the approval authority for the CTC Program CoC.

e. The integration forum. The DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) typically chairs the integration forum. The forum submits recommendations to the TGOSC concerning prioritization of home station and/or deployed, institutional, and CTC strategic issues.

f. The Combat Training Center council of colonels.

(1) The CTC CoC is chaired by the DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TRC) and is co-chaired by the Director, CTCD. Table 3-1 depicts the CTC CoC structure and voting members. Changes to the structure of the CTC CoC may be recommended by the CTC CoC for approval by the DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR).

(2) The CTC CoC meets semiannually to manage CTC Program policies, priorities, and initiatives. A simple majority vote cast by voting members constitutes a CTC CoC decision or recommendation on CTC initiatives. The CTC CoC recommends approval of the CTC Program budget-year OMA funding and POM submissions and submits them to the CTC RO, who forwards them to the DCS, G-3/5/7. Additionally, the CoC will review MCA projects, specific to the CTC Program.

(3) The CTC CoC recommends approval of the CTC Program research, development, and acquisition initiatives (modernization) and priorities through the training support work group to the integration forum, which then go to the TGOSC. The CTC CoC policy decisions will be forwarded to the TGOSC for approval. Those requiring DA approval will be forwarded to the DCS, G-3/5/7 or briefed during the TGOSC.

(4) In the event the TGOSC is out of cycle, the CTC RO will forward CTC CoC recommendations directly to the DCS, G-3/5/7 CTC Program Director.

Table 3-1. Combat Training Center Program council of colonels membership
Agency or command Voting member Advisory or Nonvoting
DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TRC)

(DAMO-TRS)
Chief, Collective Training Division, Training Directorate (Chair)
Chief, Training Simulations Division
 
National Guard Bureau Chief, Operations Division Chief, Operations Division  
Office of the Chief, Army Reserve Director, Operations, Readiness, and Force Development  
PEO STRI   Project manager for training devices
Project manager for field operations
FORSCOM, DCS, G-3/5/7 JRTC
NTC
Assistant G-3, Chief of Training
CG, JRTC designated representative
CG, NTC designated representative
 
TRADOC

MCTP


Commander, MCTP designated representative
 
Combined Arms Support Command   Director of Training
DCS, G-2 Director, OE and/or OPFOR Application Directorate
 
Combined Arms Center Director, CTC Directorate (co-chair)
Army Training Support Center- TRADOC Capability Manager-L
 
DCS, G-3/5/7   Director, Training Integration Directorate
USAREUR

7 th Army Joint Multinational Training Command

JMRC


Director of Training



Commander, Operations Group designated representative
 
USARPAC DCS, G-3/5/7  
USASOC DCS, G-3/5/7  
EUSA DCS, G-3/5/7 TNG  

3-4. Combat Training Center Master Plan

a. The CTC MP documents a constantly evolving process of identifying long-range planning guidance, CTC Program vision, mission, and scope to ensure maximum benefit from investment in the Army CTCs. It outlines and describes the direction and objectives required to execute the CTC Program.

b. The objectives of the CTC MP are to —

(1) Chart future growth and development of the CTCs and document the action plan for implementation.

(2) Articulate all requirements necessary to support future training strategies.

(3) Coordinate efforts of ACOMs, ASCCs, staffs, combat developers, training developers, and MATDEVs to support CTC requirements.

(4) Provide a framework for CTC decision analysis.

c. The CTC Program develops the CTC MP through a series of events including various assessments and resource programs for manpower, dollars, equipment, ITADSS, and facilities. The CTC MP is submitted to the DCS, G-3/5/7 to support CTC Program input for each POM cycle and will be updated, as required.

3-5. Scheduling

a. Ideally, MCTP, MCTC, and JMRC provided ETC training events will be scheduled 5 years out and synchronized with ARFORGEN scheduling. These include all brigade, division, Corps, and Joint rotations. The scheduling and integration of foreign units into a CONUS CTC rotation will be accomplished upon participation approval granted by the DCS, G-3/5/7 (see app B ).

b. Scheduling of units to be trained in the CTC Program is accomplished during the ARFORGEN synchronization meetings. These meetings are hosted by FORSCOM and the following organizations participate in the scheduling process: the DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR); TRADOC; FORSCOM (includes a representative from each corps); USARC; ARNG; USARPAC; U.S. Army South; USAREUR; EUSA; USASOC; MCTP; JRTC; JMRC; and NTC. USAREUR should conduct a semiannual theater synchronization meeting prior to the FORSCOM hosted ARFORGEN Synchronization General Officer Steering Committee.

3-6. Combat Training Center capabilities and/or rotation requirements

a. Maneuver Combat Training Center.

(1) The NTC will be resourced for 10 rotations annually.

(2) The JRTC will be resourced for 10 rotations annually.

(3) The JMRC will be resourced for four fixed rotations and four exportable rotations annually.

b. The MCTP will be resourced to have the capability to —

(1) Plan and conduct 10 corps or division JTF MRX and/or WFX events annually with two events being a corps or division embedded exercise.

(2) Support up to six ASCC training events annually as directed by the DCS, G-3/5/7.

(3) Plan and conduct 20 tactical level WFX for Active Army and ARNG BCTs combined.

(4) Plan and conduct 21 multifunctional support brigade WFXs and/or MRXs annually, including multifunctional support brigade mission command seminars.

(5) Plan and conduct 15 functional support BCT WFXs and/or MRXs annually, including functional support brigade mission command seminars.

(6) Support two USARPAC and/or EUSA, one U.S. Army North, one USAREUR, one U.S. Army Central Command, and the DCS, G-3/5/7 designated exercise annually. The throughput capabilities shown above were established prior to changes in force structure under grow the Army transformation, particularly for multifunctional support brigades and functional support brigades. Mismatches in the capabilities and total ARFORGEN throughput requirements will be handled by prioritizing units based on available pool missioning at the ARFORGEN synchronization meetings. Additionally, MCTP frequently receives contingency missions to conduct training events for deploying units such as the counterinsurgency seminars. These events are funded by deployment funds but impact on the MCTP capacity to train units.

c. Ideally, a MCTP rotation consists of six events with one optional event. The standard events are:

(1) Concept development meeting and/or exercise development meeting.

(2) Initial planning meeting with an embedded site survey.

(3) C4I meeting.

(4) Mission Command Seminar.

(5) WFX.

(6) Exercise director's briefback, is an optimal event and conducted when unresolved issues exist or at the discretion of the exercise director and either a take home package (Active Army units) or proficiency sustainment package (Reserve Component units).

d. The MCTP conducts two types of division or corps rotations (standard and nonstandard).

(1) A standard rotation is a division or corps rotation with the units or resources identified in the MCTP implementing regulation. The 2ID hosts all division-level or brigade-level meetings in Korea because of its remote location and unique mission. Because 2ID forward deployed brigades do not have the opportunity to participate in CONUS CTC (JRTC or NTC), they receive a brigade WFX rotation every other year. All other MCTP command seminars are primarily conducted at Fort Leavenworth, KS.

(2) A nonstandard rotation reflects extraordinary circumstances and requires exceptional support.

(a) Inclusive rotation. A MCTP exercise within the scope of a separate exercise (for example, a division warfighting exercise conducted during a corps command post exercise), or a corps exercise conducted during a Joint, combined, or COCOM exercise.

(b) Expanded rotation. The MCTP will be prepared to train BCTs and expand its role to support JFLCC and JTF training.

(c) Embedded rotation. Corps WFX with one of its subordinate divisions executing a warfighting exercise simultaneously. For example, during a III Corps exercise, the 1st Cavalry Division would also execute their exercise. ACOMs approve embedded rotations. Multifunctional support brigade and functional support BCT WFX rotations conducted by MCTP will be embedded rotations.

(d) Funding. Rotations will be funded to meet the requirements of the standard troop list consisting of peacetime command relationships. The training unit funds all additional resources (that is, personnel, cost, and equipment) above the standard troop list required to execute the rotation.

e. The DCS, G-3/5/7, in coordination with FORSCOM, is the approval authority for all nonstandard MCTP rotations. Approval for nonstandard MCTP rotations must be granted prior to the initial planning meeting for the rotation.

f. The ASCC training varies in size and complexity based upon the specific exercise objective or real-world contingency. The OPS GRP Delta's role in ASCC training is to train designated Army headquarters commanders and their staffs to operate as an ASCC within a Joint force during unified land operations.

Appendix A
References

The Official Army Publications Web Sites.

Publication Section I
Required Publications

AR 5-12. Army Use of the Electromagnetic Spectrum   (Cited in paras 2-14s , 2-16m , 2-17f , 2-19f , 2-21c , 2-21d , and 2-26c .)

AR 70-1. Army Acquisition Policy   (Cited in paras 2-2b , 2-26b .)

AR 70-41. International Cooperative Research, Development, and Acquisition   (Cited in para B-3a .)

AR 71-32. Force Development and Documentation-Consolidated Policies   (Cited in para 2-26b(3) .)

AR 350-1. Army Training and Leader Development   (Cited in para 3-3d(1) .)

AR 350-2. Opposing Force (OPFOR) Program   (Cited in paras 2-5a , 2-15g(1) .)

AR 350-38. Training Device Policies and Management   (Cited in para 2-26b .)

AR 380-10. Foreign Disclosure and Contacts with Foreign Representatives   (Cited in paras B-2b , B-3a , B-4a , table B-5 , and table B-6 .)

AR 420-1. Army Facilities Management   (Cited in paras 2-9b , 2-12a , and 2-12c .)

AR 725-50. Requisition, Receipt, and Issue System   (Cited in para 2-7a .)

Publication Section II
Related Publications

A related publication is a source of additional information. The user does not have to read it to understand this publication.

ADP 3-0. Unified Land Operations  

ADP 7-0. Training Units and Developing Leaders  

AR 1-1. Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution System  

AR 11-2. Managers' Internal Control Program  

AR 11-31. Army Security Cooperation Policy  

AR 11-33. Army Lessons Learned Program (ALLP)  

AR 12-15. Joint Security Cooperation Education and Training  

AR 15-1. Boards, Commissions, and Committees - Committee Management  

AR 25-2. Information Assurance  

AR 25-30. The Army Publishing Program  

AR 380-5. Department of the Army Information Security Program  

AR 385-10. The Army Safety Program  

AR 385-63/MCO 3570.1C. Range Safety  

AR 405 series. Real Estate  

AR 614-10. Army Military Personnel Exchange Program with Military Services of Other Nations  

AR 715-9. Operational Contract Support Planning and Management  

CJCSI 7401.01F. Combatant Commander Initiative Fund (CCIF)   (Available at http://www.dtic.mil/cjcs_directives/support/cjcs/cjcscurrent.pdf .)

DA Pam 385-30. Mishap Risk Management  

DODD 5000.01. The Defense Acquisition System   (Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives. )

DODI 4650.01. Policy and Procedures for Management and use of the Electromagnetic Spectrum   (Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives .)

DODI 5000.02. Operation of the Defense Acquisition System.   (Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/ .)

TC 7-100. Hybrid Threat  

Publication Section III
Prescribed Forms

This section contains no entries.

Publication Section IV
Referenced Forms

Unless otherwise indicated below, DA Forms are available on the APD Web site ( http://www.apd.army.mil ). DD forms are available from the Office of the Secretary of Defense Web site ( http://www.dior.whs.mil ).

DA Form 11-2. Internal Management Control Evaluation Certification  

DA Form 2028. Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms  

DD Form 1494. Application for Equipment Frequency Allocation  

Appendix B
Use of Combat Training Center by other Nations

B-1. Limited opportunities

CONUS CTCs will not be used routinely to train units or personnel from other nations (to include reciprocal unit exchanges). However, under provision of this paragraph, CONUS CTCs can be used to disseminate Army training philosophy and methodology to allies through visits, exchange officers, observers and controllers, the LTP, and limited unit access. JMRC, being forward deployed, can provide critical training with North Atlantic Treaty Organization partners and other allied forces. JMRC security cooperation, reciprocal unit exchange (RUE), and equal value exchange programs enable coalition interaction and support during ARFORGEN scheduled exercises.

B-2. Access by units of other nations

a. Approval authority. Access to CONUS CTCs as part of the friendly forces or OPFOR by units or elements from other nations is governed by AR 12-15 and requires the DCS, G-3/5/7 approval secured using procedures in tables B-1 through B-6 . The CG, USAREUR is designated the approval authority for access by another nation to U.S. rotations at JMRC and will approve requests consistent with parameters of this regulation, CSA guidance, and applicable agreements with the Federal Republic of Germany or other Host nations in the case of JMRC-provided ETC exercises. The DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) is the overall coordinator for issues involving other nation access that requires the DCS, G-3/5/7 approval. The Army's Security Cooperation Guidance will be considered in the process of approving other nation's unit participation in the CTC Program.

b. Criteria for approval of access to Combat Training Centers by non-U.S. units. Participation of another nation in training at CTCs will not displace a U.S. unit or element that needs training, nor will it be allowed to jeopardize the ability of participating U.S. units to accomplish their training objectives. Authorization must be obtained in accordance with AR 380-5 and AR 380-10 should the disclosure of classified military information to representatives of foreign governments be required to accomplish the U.S. rotational unit training objectives. Finally, the other nation must agree to reimburse the U.S. for training and related support (foreign military sales (FMS), foreign military financing, RUE, or the foreign nation's participation may be eligible for funding by the Combatant Commander Initiative Fund (see Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Instruction 7401.01F ).

c. Scheduling of units. Scheduling the participation of units or elements from other nations in training at MCTP, JRTC, and NTC will be accomplished at periodic ARFORGEN synchronization meetings following the DCS, G-3/5/7 approval. Focus for new requests should be second fiscal year out. At that time, FORSCOM will assign the DCS, G-3/5/7 approved requests as prioritized by DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR, DAMO-SSI, and DAMO-SSR) to rotations they can accommodate and are consistent with the Army's Security Cooperation Strategy.

B-3. Access by individuals of another nation to Combat Training Centers for training

a. Long-term individual access to Combat Training Centers. Long-term access by certain individuals from another nation is approved under provisions of several HQDA-managed programs. AR 614-10 governs the exchange of individuals in selected MTOE or TDA duty positions. AR 70-41 governs the exchange of scientists and engineers and AR 380-10 governs the establishment of foreign liaison offices. These programs require concurrence of the DCS, G-3/5/7 before establishing a position at any CONUS CTC. The CG, USAREUR may authorize the establishment of temporary multinational observer coach trainers to support designated coalition training at the JMRC.

b. Short-term training of individuals. Requests for an individual of another nation to participate in training at CONUS CTCs (for example, on-the-job-training, training for observer coach trainers, or training by the LTP) will be processed as FMS cases and will be referred by Security Assistance Training Directorate to DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR), which will begin processing the requests using the procedures specified in table B-2 for the DCS, G-3/5/7 approval. Requests for an individual of another nation to participate in training at JMRC require approval of the CG, USAREUR and will be granted consistent with parameters of this regulation, CSA guidance, and applicable agreements with the Federal Republic of Germany or other Host nations in the case of JMRC-provided ETC exercises. HQDA approval is not required for foreign personnel participating in an authorized Military Personnel Exchange Program. Similarly, HQDA approval is not required if the individual of another nation would deploy on real-world military operations with the U.S. unit scheduled for a CTC rotation and when the individual will perform during the CTC rotation in the same capacity as during real-world military operations.

B-4. Visitors from other nations to Combat Training Centers

a. Requests from another nation for individuals to visit or observe a Combat Training Center rotation. Visits will not exceed three days, with the exception of the CG, USAREUR approval to facilitate multinational observer coach trainers exchanges at the JMRC. Requests to visit or observe a CTC rotation are submitted through that nation's embassy in Washington, DC to the DCS, G-3/5/7 under the provisions of AR 380-10 . After accomplishing the coordination specified in table B-5 , the DCS G-3/5/7 or their designee on behalf of HQDA will officially respond to the request for visit authorization.

b. U.S. invitations for individuals of another nation to visit or observe a Combat Training Center rotation. Before such invitations are offered, the DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR), using the procedures specified in table B-6 , will approve them.

B-5. Reimbursement for the cost of visitor or individual and/or unit access

a. Unless funded by the Combatant Commander Initiative Fund or authorized and appropriated by Congress for this purpose, the other nation will pay for the cost of any support or training provided by a CTC. Reimbursement will be made according to applicable security assistance provisions, that is, according to the FMS program, RUE agreements, or other formal arrangement approved by HQDA.

b. The CTC will be reimbursed for all costs incurred as a result of another nation's access, that is, costs over and above those that would have been incurred if the other nation were not there. Reimbursable costs will include the cost of any software and hardware changes to ITADSS or instrumentation required to support participation of the other nation in training.

c. Any required software and hardware changes will be identified by TRADOC and/or PEO STRI, validated by the CTC RO, approved by DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR), and accomplished by PEO STRI.

B-6. Assistance and information on Combat Training Center concepts, developments, and operations

These can be provided to allied nations seeking to establish their own CTCs consistent with current DOD and DA guidance.

Table B-1. Request for training at continental United States Combat Training Center from another nation, in accordance with AR 12-15
Requesting office Action
Other nation's embassy in Washington, DC Forwards request to DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR)
DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR) 1. Informs U.S. Embassy in requesting nation that request is being processed.
2. Asks U.S. Embassy in requesting nation to verify that —
- The Secretary of Defense has received no credible information from State Department that a member of the participating unit from the requesting nation has committed a gross violation of human rights.
- Participating unit from requesting nation has roughly same proficiency as participating U.S. units.
3. Confirms that requested training supports combatant commander and Army engagement objectives and/or priorities.
4. Verifies that unit from requesting nation is likely to conduct combined operations with U.S. Forces.
5. Forwards recommendation to DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR).
6. If DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) secures approval of request from DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR) —
- Informs U.S. Embassy in requesting nation.
- Prior to ARFORGEN synchronization meeting, provides FORSCOM (through DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR)) a prioritized list for each CONUS CTC of all training for units of requesting nations planned there during next 2 years.
DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) 1. Confirms an umbrella RUE memorandum of agreement between nations is in place.
2. Coordinates with ASCC of U.S. unit to ensure —
- Participation of requesting nation will not jeopardize training of U.S. unit.
- U.S. unit can support proposed RUE.
3. Coordinates with CTC ACOM to ensure —
- Participation of requesting nation will not jeopardize training or feedback to U.S. unit.
- CTC can support proposed RUE.
- CTC will be reimbursed for all incremental costs
4. Secures the DCS, G-3/5/7 approval of requesting nation participation and RUE.
5. Responds to request through DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR) to embassy of requesting nation in Washington, DC. If approved, response informs requesting nation that —
- Agreement with ASCC for specific RUE event is required.
- Separate foreign visit request is required.
6. If approved, directs ASCC of U.S. unit to negotiate agreement with requesting nation for RUE event.


Table B-2. Request for training at continental United States Combat Training Center from another nation, in accordance with AR 12-15 (support provided under an foreign military sales case)
Requesting office Action
Requesting nation's embassy in Washington, DC Forwards request to DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR).
DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR) 1. Informs U.S. Embassy in requesting nation that request is being processed.
2. Asks U.S. Embassy in requesting nation to verify that —
- The Secretary of Defense has received no credible information from State Department that a member of the participating unit from the requesting nation has committed a gross violation of human rights.
- Participating unit from requesting nation has roughly same proficiency as participating U.S. units.
3. Confirms that requested training supports combatant commander and Army engagement objectives and/or priorities.
4. Verifies that unit from the requesting nation is likely to conduct combined operations with U.S. Forces.
5. Verifies that nothing precludes support being provided under FMS case.
6. Forwards recommendation to DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR).
7. If DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) secures approval of request from DCS, G-3/5/7, then it —
- Informs U.S. Embassy in requesting nation.
- Informs the Security Assistance Training Directorate.
- Prior to ARFORGEN Synchronization Meeting, provides FORSCOM (through DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR)) a prioritized list for each CONUS CTC of all training for units of requesting nations planned there during next 2 years.
DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) 1. Coordinates with ASCC of U.S. unit to ensure —
- Participation of requesting nation will not jeopardize training of U.S. unit.
- U.S. unit can support proposed training.
2. Coordinates with CTC ACOM to ensure —
- Participation of requesting nation will not jeopardize training of U.S. unit.
- CTC can support proposed training.
- CTC will be reimbursed for all incremental costs.
3. Secures DCS, G-3/5/7 approval for unit(s) of requesting nation to participate in training. Secures DCS, G-3/5/7, approval for individuals of a requesting nation to participate in training.
4. Responds to request through DAMO-SSR to embassy of requesting nation in Washington, DC. If approved, response asks requesting nation to initiate an FMS case and foreign visit request.
5. Informs CTC ACOM and ASCC of U.S. unit.
Security Assistance Training Directorate 1. Establishes details of FMS case through coordination with CTC ACOM.
2. Prepares cost estimate, to include cost of training.
3. Prepares letter of offer and acceptance (cost) and forwards to requesting nation for signature.
4. Notifies all concerned of acceptance and/or refusal.
5. Ensures that funds are forwarded to CTC ACOM and/or rotational unit ASCC.


Table B-3. Request to train another nation at continental United States Combat Training Center from U.S. sponsor, in accordance with AR 12-15 (support provided under provisions of a reciprocal unit exchange agreement)
Requesting office Action
ASCC sponsoring the RUE 1. Verifies umbrella RUE memorandum of agreement between nations is in place.
2. Asks DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR), through CTC ACOM, if permissible to invite other nation to participate in RUE at CTC. Request includes —
- Description of proposed training (what, for whom, when, and where).
- Estimate of all incremental resources to the CTC Program (for example, funding, translators, and controllers) and to the unit.
- Description of how and by whom incremental resources will be provided.
CTC ACOM 1. Confirms CTC —
- Can support without jeopardizing U.S. training.
- Can support within resource estimates.
- Will be reimbursed for all incremental costs.
2. Forwards recommendation to DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR).
DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) 1. Reviews request to ensure —
- Proposed RUE would not jeopardize training of U.S. units.
- Umbrella RUE memorandum of agreement is in place.
- Proposed training and related support have been adequately described.
- Incremental costs to unit and CTC have been identified.
- CTC will be reimbursed for all incremental costs.
2. Asks DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR) to verify that —
- RUE supports combatant commander and Army engagement objectives and/or priorities.
- Unit from the other nation is likely to conduct combined operations with U.S. Forces.
- U.S. Embassy in other nation has confirmed that participating unit from the other nation has roughly the same proficiency as participating U.S. units and that the Secretary of Defense has received no credible information from State Department that a member of participating unit from the other nation has committed gross human rights violations.
3. Secures the DCS, G-3/5/7 approval for other nation to participate and for the RUE.
4. Responds to request authorizing ASCC to —
- Propose RUE to other nation.
- Negotiate agreement with other nation for specific RUE event.
- Schedule RUE through FORSCOM ARFORGEN Synchronization meeting.
- Inform other nation that a separate foreign visit request is required.
5. Informs DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR).
DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR) 1. Informs U.S. Embassy in other nation and other nation's embassy in Washington, DC.
2. Prior to ARFORGEN Synchronization Meeting, provides FORSCOM (through DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR)) a prioritized list for each CONUS CTC of all training for units of other nations planned there during next 2 years.


Table B-4. Request to train another nation at continental United States Combat Training Center from U.S. sponsor, in accordance with AR 12-15 (support provided with U.S. funding, for example, foreign military financing)
Requesting office Action
ASCC sponsoring the proposed training 1. Verifies that U.S. funding is available.
2. Asks DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR), through CTC ACOM, if permissible to invite other nation to participate in training at CTC. Request includes —
-Description of proposed training (what, for whom, when, and where).
-Estimate of all incremental resources to the CTC Program (for example, funding, translators, and controllers) and to the unit.
-Description of how and by whom incremental resources will be provided.
CTC ACOM 1. Confirms CTC —
-Can support without jeopardizing U.S. training.
-Can support within resource estimates.
-Will be reimbursed for all incremental costs.
2. Forwards recommendation to DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR).
DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) 1. Reviews request to ensure —
-Proposed participation would not jeopardize training of U.S. units.
-U.S. funding is available.
-Proposed training and related support have been adequately described.
-Incremental costs to unit and CTC have been identified.
-CTC will be reimbursed for all incremental costs.
2. Asks DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR) to verify that —
-Proposed training supports combatant commander and Army engagement objectives and/or priorities.
-Unit from the other nation is likely to conduct combined operations with U.S. forces.
-U.S. Embassy in other nation has confirmed that participating unit from the other nation has roughly the same proficiency as participating U.S. units and that the Secretary of Defense has received no credible information from State Department that a member of participating unit from the other nation has committed gross human rights violation.
3. Secures the DCS, G-3/5/7 approval for other nation to participate.
4. Responds to request authorizing ASCC to —
-Invite other nation to participate in training via invitational orders.
-Schedule training through FORSCOM ARFORGEN Synchronization meeting.
5. Informs DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR).
DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR) 1. Informs U.S. Embassy in other nation and other nation's embassy in Washington, DC.
2. Prior to ARFORGEN Synchronization meeting, provides FORSCOM (through DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR)) a prioritized list for each CONUS CTC of all training for units of other nations planned there during next 2 years.


Table B-5. Request for visit to the Combat Training Center from another nation, in accordance with AR 380-10
Requesting office Action
Requesting nation's embassy in Washington, DC Forwards request to DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR).
-If available, submits request via Foreign Visits System.
-If the Foreign Visits System is not available, submit a memo or letter.
DCS, G-2 1. Assist DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) with the processing of requests.
2. DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR), in coordination with DCS, G-3/5/7 DAMO-TR, will confirm that —
-Visit supports combatant commander and Army engagement objectives and/or priorities.
-U.S. Embassy in requesting nation has verified that visitors are not objectionable to the Government.
3. Replies to requesting nation's embassy and informs all concerned, if visit can be supported.
4. Authorizes direct coordination between requesting nation and CTC for visit arrangements.
DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) 1. Coordinates with CTC ACOM, who evaluates the visit request in accordance with AR 380-10 , determines if the visit can be supported, and validates that the visit proposal will not require training to be provided.
2. Packages request and secures the DCS, G-3/5/7 approval.
3. Provides feedback of request approval to DCS, G-2 and DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR).


Table B-6. Request for visit to the Combat Training Center from U.S. sponsor, in accordance with AR 380-10
Requesting office Action
Sponsor (ASCC, COCOM, Military Department, DOD agency, or State Department agency) Asks DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) if permissible to invite visitors from other nation.
-Describe who, what, when, where, and why.
-Identify source of funds for any required support.
DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR) 1. Assist DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) with the preparation and processing of invitation.
2. Informs U.S. Embassy in sponsored nation that request is being processed.
3. Asks U.S. Embassy in sponsored nation to verify that visitors are not objectionable to U.S. Government.
4. Verifies that proper funds are being used to support the visit.
5. Informs U.S. Embassy in sponsored nation and sponsored nation's embassy in Washington, DC.
DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR) 1. Coordinates with CTC ACOM, who determines if the visit can be supported and validates that the visit proposal will not require training to be provided.
2. Packages invitation and secures the DCS, G-3/5/7 approval.
3. Authorizes sponsor to issue invitation.
4. Authorizes direct coordination between CTC and sponsor or other nation for visit arrangements.
5. Informs DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-SSR); DCS, G-2; and CTC ACOM.

Appendix C
Internal Control Evaluation

C-1. Function

The function covered by this evaluation is the administration of the CTC Program.

C-2. Purpose

The purpose of this evaluation is to assist FORSCOM, TRADOC, USAREUR, and the CTCs in evaluating the key internal controls listed. It is not intended to cover all controls.

C-3. Instructions

Answers must be based on the actual testing of key internal controls (for example, document analysis, direct observation, sampling, and simulation). Answers that indicate deficiencies must be explained and the corrective action identified in supporting documentation. These internal controls must be evaluated at least once every 5 years. Certification that this evaluation has been conducted must be accomplished on DA Form 11-2 (Internal Control Evaluation Certification).

C-4. Test questions

a. Does the CTC Program governance process provide validation and prioritization of requirements and allocation of resources? (HQDA and TRADOC)

b. Has TRADOC conducted an accreditation of the CTC Program every 2 years? (TRADOC)

c. Has TRADOC integrated lessons learned from CTC rotations into the training development process? (TRADOC)

d. Has FORSCOM conducted a quarterly CTC Program scheduling meeting? (FORSCOM)

e. Have ACOM and ASCC regulations been developed for each CTC? (FORSCOM, TRADOC, and USAREUR)

f. Has operational testing at the CTCs been conducted only on instrumentation and training devices to be used at the CTCs? (CTCs)

g. Has the DCS, G-3/5/7 approval been obtained prior to use of a CONUS MCTC by units and/or elements from other countries? (MCTCs)

h. Has CG, USAREUR approval been obtained prior to the use of JMRC by units and/or elements from other countries? (USAREUR)

i. Are CTC training schedules developed, coordinated, and integrated into unit training plans according to ADP 7-0? (FORSCOM)

j. Have FORSCOM and USAREUR included approved requests for foreign unit participation at a MCTC in the MCTC training schedule? (FORSCOM and USAREUR)

C-4. Supersession

This evaluation replaces the evaluation for the CTC Program previously published in AR 350-50 , dated 24 January 2003.

C-5. Comments

Help make this a better tool for evaluating internal controls. Submit comments to the DCS, G-3/5/7 (DAMO-TR), 400 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0400.

Glossary

Section I

Abbreviations

AAR

after action review

ACOM

Army command

ACSIM

Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management

ARFORGEN

Army Force Generation

ARNG

Army National Guard

ARSOF

Army Special Operations Forces

ASA (ALT)

Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology)

ASCC

Army service component command

AT

annual training

ATEC

U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command

BCT

brigade combat team

CAR

Chief, Army Reserve

CG

Commanding General

CIO/G-6

Chief Information Officer/G-6

CoC

council of colonels

COCOM

combatant command

CONUS

continental United States

CRM

composite risk management

CPA

Chief of Public Affairs

CSA

Chief of Staff, Army

CTC

Combat Training Center

CTCD

Combat Training Center Directorate

DA

Department of the Army

DARNG

Director, Army National Guard

DCS, G-1

Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1

DCS, G-2

Deputy Chief of Staff, G-2

DCS, G-3/5/7

Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7

DCS, G-4

Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4

DCS, G-8

Deputy Chief of Staff, G-8

DOD

Department of Defense

DOTMLPF

doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership and education, personnel, and facilities

ETC

exportable training capability

EUSA

Eighth U.S. Army

FMS

foreign military sales

FORSCOM

U.S. Army Forces Command

HQDA

Headquarters, Department of the Army

IMCOM

U.S. Army Installation Management Command

ITADSS

Instrumentation, Training Aids, Devices, Simulators, and Simulations

JFLCC

Joint Force Land Component Command

JMRC

Joint Multinational Readiness Center

JNTC

Joint National Training Capability

JRTC

Joint Readiness Training Center

JTF

Joint Task Force

LVC

live, virtual, and constructive

LTP

Leader Training Program

MATDEV

materiel developer

MCA

military construction, Army

MCTC

maneuver combat training center

MCTP

Mission Command Training Program

MDEP

management decision evaluation package

MEDCOM

U.S. Army Medical Command

METL

mission-essential task list

MP

Master Plan

MRE

mission rehearsal exercise

MRX

mission readiness exercise

MTOE

modification table of organization and equipment

NETCOM

U.S. Army Network Enterprise Technology Command

NTC

National Training Center

OCO

Overseas Contingency Operations

OE

operational environment

OEA

operational environment assessment

OMA

operation and maintenance, Army

OPA

other procurement, Army

OPFOR

opposing force

OPS GRP

operations group

PEO

program executive officer

PEO STRI

Program Executive Office for Army Simulation, Training, and Instrumentation

POM

program objective memorandum

QR

quarterly review

RDT&E

research, development, test, and evaluation

RO

responsible official

RSOI

reception, staging, onward movement, and integration

RTU

rotational training unit

RUE

reciprocal unit exchange

SOCCE

special operations command and control element

SOF

special operations forces

TDA

tables of distribution and allowances

TGOSC

Training General Officer Steering Committee

TRADOC

U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

UO

urban operations

USACE

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

USAR

U.S. Army Reserve

USAREUR

U.S. Army, Europe

USARPAC

U.S. Army, Pacific

USASOC

U.S. Army Special Operations Command

WFX

Warfighter exercise

Section II

Terms

This section contains no entries.

Section III

Special Terms

This section contains no entries.