Army Regulation 420-1


  12  February  2008

  Effective date: 19  February  2008

  RAR issue date: 24  August  2012

UNCLASSIFIED

Facilities Engineering

Army Facilities Management



SUMMARY of CHANGE

AR 420-1
Army Facilities Management

This rapid action revision, dated 24 August 2012—

* Only updates chapter 3 to reflect the removal of procedural material used to develop DA Pam 420-1-1.

* Only updates chapter 7 to reflect the removal of procedural material used to develop DA Pam 420-1-3.

* Makes administrative changes (App A: Added the following publications: AR 27-10, 36 CFR 251.56, 41 CFR 102-32, DOD 5500.7-R, DODI 1015.10, DODI 1100.16, DODI 1225.9, EPA PB94-163-95-250, PL 90-284, PL 98-115, UFC 3-120-10, UFC 3-250-18FA, UFC 3-260-03, UFC 3-310-05A, UFC 3-400-01, UFC 3-430-09, UFC 4-010-02, UFC 4-711-01, UFC 4-721-01A, UFC 4-721-11.1, UFC 4-860-01FA, UFC 4-860-03, UFGS 33 51 15, and 10 USC 2922. Corrected the following publication titles: AR 710-3, DA Pam 5-20, DA Pam 420-1-1, DA Pam 420-1-2, DA Pam 420-1-3, DA Pam 600-45, DA Pam 708-1, EM 385-1-1, FHWA PD-96-001, FM 7-0, NFPA 72, NFPA 96, PWTB 200-1-4, PWTB 200-1-14, TI 800-01, UFC 1-900-01, UFC 3-230-08A, UFC 3-550-03FA, UFC 3-560-01, UFC 3-700-01A, UFC 4-020-02FA, UFC 4-020-03FA, and UFC 4-020-04FA. Removed "-STD" from DOD 6055.09. Deleted the following publications: AR 95-2, AR 672-20, AR 700-138, AR 740-1, AFARS 45.6, 26 CFR 251.56, EO 13148, EO 13149, EPA 530-R-95-003, ICSSC RP 2.1A, NISTIR 5382, TM 5-682, TM 5-800-4, TM 5-811-1/ AFJMAN 32-1080, TM 5-813-3/AFM88-10, Vol 3, TM 5-853-1/ AFMAN 32-1071, Vol 1, TM 5-853-2/ AFMAN 32-1071, Vol 2, TM 5-853-3/ AFMAN 32-1071, Vol 3, and TM 5-853-4. Removed the following obsolete publications: DA Pam 200-1, DA Pam 415-15, DODD 1015.2, DODI 7310.1, 29 CFR 1910.139, 49 CFR 1.48, TM 5-644, TM 5-646, TM 5-651, UFC 3-430-05FA, UFGS 33 51 03.00 10, UFGS 33 51 06.00 20, and 10 USC 2672. Updated all publication Web sites. Corrected the following form titles: DA Form 11-2 and HUD Form 903.1. Updated DA Form 373-R-E. Deleted DD Form 1970).

This administrative revision, dated 17 June 2009—

* Improves clarity by correcting terminology used for assessment of risks (para 25-4f(8), 25-4i(5), 25-16, 25-20, 25-39a, and 25-46).

* Makes administrative changes (throughout).



Part One
General Installation Management

Chapter 1
Introduction

1-1. Purpose

This regulation provides policies and responsibilities for conduct and management of facilities engineering, housing, fire and emergency services, and environmental support.

1-2. References

Required and related publications and prescribed and referenced forms are listed in appendix A.

1-3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms

Abbreviations and special terms used in this regulation are explained in the glossary.

1-4. Responsibilities

The following responsibilities are applicable to this regulation in general. Individual chapters identify specific program chapter responsibilities:

a.  The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installations and Environment) (ASA (IE&E)) has the principal responsibility for all Department of the Army matters related to all installations and environment, and safety and occupational health.

(1)   The ASA (IE&E) sets the strategic direction, determines objectives, establishes policy, sets standards, and proposes programming and funding for these programs.

(2)   See additional ASA (IE&E) responsibilities as indicated below—

(a)   Family housing (see para s13-4a3-4a).

(b)   Military construction (see para 4-4b).

(c)   Facilities engineering materials, equipment, and relocatable buildings (see para s16-4b6-4b).

(d)   Utilities and energy management (see para 22-4a).

(e)   Fire and emergency services (see para 25-4a).

b.  See the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) (ASA (FM&C)) responsibilities as indicated below—

(1)   Family housing (see para 3-4b).

(2)   Military construction (see para 4-4c).

c.  See the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs (ASA (M&RA)) responsibilities as indicated below—

(1)   Policy for nonappropriated funds (see para 3-4c).

(2)   Military construction (see para 4-4d).

d.  See paragraph 6-4a for specific responsibilities to the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology) (ASA (ALT)).

e.  See paragraph 4-4a for central management oversight by the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) (ASD (HA)).

f.  See paragraph 3-4e for Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1 (DCS, G-1) responsibilities.

g.  See Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7 (DCS, G-3/5/7) responsibilities as indicated below—

(1)   Military construction (see para 4-4g).

(2)   Utilities and energy management (see para 22-4b).

h.  See Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4 (DCS, G-4) responsibilities as indicated below—

(1)   Military construction (see para 4-4e).

(2)   Utilities and energy management (see para 22-4c).

i.  See Chief Information Officer/G-6 (CIO/G-6) responsibilities as indicated below—

(1)   Military construction (see para 4-4f).

(2)   Utilities and energy management (see para 22-4d).

j.  See The Surgeon General's responsibilities as indicated below—

(1)   Military construction (see para 4-4j).

(2)   Utilities and energy management (see para 22-4i).

k.  The Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (ACSIM) has Army Staff (ARSTAF) responsibility for development, integration, and interpretation of standards, policies, and doctrine for planning, execution, and administration of garrison operations. The ACSIM will—

(1)   Advise the ASA (IE&E) on—

(a)   Planning, developing, implementing, and evaluating:

1.   Comprehensive installation management.

2.   Facilities.

3.   Government-owned or Government-controlled housing.

4.   Environmental programs.

5.   Work classification.

6.   Project approvals to meet Army needs.

(b)   Facilities aspects of the Army program objective memorandum (POM); The Army Plan (TAP); and the planning, programming, budgeting, and execution system (PPBES).

(2)   Develop and interpret Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA) policy and provide ARSTAF supervision and evaluation of public works programs to include facilities, government-owned or government-controlled housing, and environmental management and public works activity work management, organization, and staffing.

(3)   Represent the Department of the Army in Department of Defense (DODD), private sector, and interagency meetings and in the development and coordination of Department of Defense (DOD) and interagency policy and standards.

(4)   Serve as HQDA functional proponent on Army panels and to assist the Chief of Legislative Liaison on legislative actions as required.

(5)   Interpret and prepare DA responses to Congressional inquiries and to General Accounting Office (GAO), Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) and Army Inspectors General (IGs), and U.S. Army Audit Agency (USAAA) reviews, audits, and investigations.

(6)   Review and submit relevant interagency reports.

(7)   Manage technology transfer and provide technical support information and guidance regarding facilities engineering, energy efficiency, corrosion prevention and control, public works management and business practices, real property master planning, automated systems, and professional development and training.

(8)   formulate policy and provide oversight for privatization of utilities systems.

(9)   Manage the development, acquisition, training, fielding, customer support, and maintenance of automated data processing (ADP) systems and Sustainment Management Systems (SMS) for which ACSIM is the proponent; and maintain the corporate database for the Army's real property inventory with the guidance and oversight of the ASA (ALT) and CIO/G-6.

(10)   Oversee Installation Management Command (IMCOM) compliance with DOD-approved standards and methodology documented as part of the Business Enterprise Architecture (BEA) and Business Management Modernization Program (BMMP) to include adherence to OSD expenditure threshold approval and certification requirements.

(11)   Manage the Army Facilities Standardization Program.

(12)   Provide policy and oversight of public works supply, storage activities, relocatable buildings, and other public works equipment.

(13)   Manage the Army' s non-tactical vehicle (NTV) and base-level commercial equipment programs.

(14)   Ensure safety and risk management are integrated in all installation operations (for example, facilities, utilities, non-tactical vehicle, equipment, planning and design, and community activities/operations).

(15)   See the following additional specific responsibilities.

(a)   Family housing (see para 3-4d).

(b)   Military construction (see para 4-4h).

(c)   Facilities engineering materials, equipment, and relocatable buildings (see para 6-4c).

(d)   Transportation infrastructure and dams (see para 7-4a).

(e)   Utilities and energy management (see para 22-4e).

(f)   Utility services (see para 23-4a).

(g)   Fire and emergency services (see para 25-4b).

l.  See paragraph 4-4i for principal officials of other ARSTAF agencies responsibilities.

m.  The Chief of Engineers (COE) will—

(1)   Serve as the ARSTAF official responsible for formulation, implementation, management, and evaluation of engineering, construction, real property, real estate, and technical support for DA. This includes ARSTAF responsibility for policies and procedures for acquisition, management of title, granting use, and disposal of real property, the engineering and facilities portion of contingency plans and base support development, topographic and construction aspects of space, the Prime Power Program, the Real Estate Relocation Assistance Program, the Commercial Utilities Program (also known as the Army Power Procurement Program of Utilities Contracting Program), and the execution of Military Construction (Army).

(2)   Maintain Army corrosion control design guidance.

(3)   Coordinate with DOD staff elements, other DOD components, and other Federal agencies regarding:

(a)   Development of technical standards, criteria, and procedures.

(b)   Preparation and revision of tri-Service technical publications concerning corrosion prevention.

(4)   See the following additional specific responsibilities:

(a)   Military construction (see para 22-4a).

(b)   Utility services (see para 23-4b).

n.  The Chief, National Guard Bureau (CNGB) will—

(1)   Perform the responsibilities specified within individual chapters.

(2)   for those garrisons/installations/facilities/sites that are under their command and control and that are fully or partially operated and maintained by Federal funds, have the same responsibilities for those garrisons/installations/facilities/sites as listed for Commander, IMCOM in paragraph f, below and elsewhere in this regulation.

(3)   See the following additional specific responsibilities:

(a)   Military construction (see para 4-4q).

(b)   Utilities and energy management (see para 22-4h).

o.  The Chief, Army Reserve (CAR) will—

(1)   Perform the responsibilities specified within individual chapters.

(2)   See AR 140-483 for additional responsibilities of the CAR relating to Army Reserve military construction (MILCON) and base operations (BASOPS).

(3)   See the following additional responsibilities:

(a)   Military construction (see para 4-4p).

(b)   Utilities and energy management (see para 22-4h).

p.  The Commander, IMCOM will—

(1)   Establish the organization and procedures for garrison public works operations/functions addressed in this regulation.

(2)   Manage and integrate the delivery of facilities engineering services across garrisons to assure consistent quality with optimal customer satisfaction.

(3)   Develop public works operational plans, and Armywide service and performance standards.

(4)   Establish and maintain technical guidance and support for facilities.

(5)   Seek Armywide efficiencies.

(6)   Identify and standardize Armywide garrison management initiatives.

(7)   Monitor compliance with Management Controls.

(8)   Establish procedures for review, validation, prioritization, and consolidation of garrison reports.

(9)   Review work classification, technically review projects, and approve projects within delegated limits or forward projects to the appropriate approval authority.

(10)   Implement technology transfer.

(11)   Comply with DOD-approved standards and methodology documented as part of the Business Enterprise Architecture (BEA) and Business Management Modernization Program (BMMP) to include adherence to OSD expense/investment threshold approval and certification requirements.

(12)   Ensure that contracts for operation and maintenance of infrastructure assets by a contractor include provisions assigning the awardee responsibility for performance of all applicable actions required for compliance with appropriate Federal, state, and local health, safety, and environmental laws and regulations.

(13)   Establish Memoranda of Agreement (MOAs) or Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) with , Army Service Component Commands, and Direct Reporting Units regarding the provision of base support oversight as described in paragraph g.

(14)   Ensure safety and risk management are integrated in all installation operations (for example, facilities, utilities, non-tactical vehicle, equipment, planning and design, and community activities/operations).

(15)   See the following additional specific responsibilities.

(a)   Management of public works activities (see para 2-4a).

(b)   Family housing (see para 3-4I and 3-97b).

(c)   Military construction (see para 4-4k and 4-22d(2)).

(d)   Buildings and structures (see para 5-4a).

(e)   Facilities engineering materials, equipment, and relocatable buildings (see para 6-4d).

(f)   Transportation infrastructure and dams (see para 7-4b).

(g)   Utilities and energy management (see para 22-4k).

(h)   Utility services (see para 23-4c).

(i)   Fire and emergency services (see para 25-4f).

q.  Commanders of Army Commands (ACOMs), Army Service Component Commands (ASCCs), and Direct Reporting Units (DRUs)—

(1)   Will perform the responsibilities specified for them within individual chapters.

(2)   That retain command and control over installations will—

(a)   Establish the organization and procedures for garrison public works operations/functions at installations for which they maintain command and control addressed in this regulation.

(b)   Develop or obtain public works operational plans and commandwide service and performance standards.

(c)   Establish and maintain or obtain technical guidance and support for facilities.

(d)   Seek commandwide efficiencies in the execution of installation support services.

(e)   Monitor compliance with Management Controls.

(f)   Establish procedures for review, validation, prioritization, and consolidation of garrison reports.

(g)   Review work classification, technically review projects, and approve projects within delegated limits or forward projects to the appropriate approval authority.

(h)   Implement installation technology transfer.

(i)   Comply with DOD-approved standards and methodology documented as part of the Business Enterprise Architecture (BEA) and Business Management Modernization Program (BMMP) to include adherence to OSD expense/investment threshold approval and certification requirements.

(j)   Ensure that contracts for operation and/or maintenance of infrastructure assets by a contractor include provisions assigning the awardee responsibility for performance of all applicable actions required for compliance with appropriate Federal, state, and local health, safety, and environmental laws and regulations.

(k)   Ensure safety and risk management are integrated in all installation operations (for example, facilities, utilities, non-tactical vehicle, equipment, planning and design, and community activities/operations).

(l)   Establish MOAs or MOUs with IMCOM for base-level operations support responsibilities listed above.

(3)   See the following additional specific responsibilities:

(a)   Family housing (see para 3-4k).

(b)   Military construction (see para 4-4m).

(c)   Buildings and structures (see para 5-4b).

(d)   Transportation infrastructure and dams (see para 7-4d).

(e)   Utilities and energy management (see para 22-4l).

(f)   Fire and emergency services (see para 25-4c).

r.  See Commander, TRADOC responsibilities paragraph 4-4o.

s.  See Commander, U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) responsibilities paragraph 4-4t.

t.  See Commander, Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command (SDDC) responsibilities paragraph 4-4u.

u.  The Senior Commander will—

(1)   Provide executive level oversight of installation support services.

(2)   See the following additional specific responsibilities:

(a)   Management of public works activities (see para 2-4b).

(b)   Military construction (see para 4-4r).

(c)   Fire and emergency services (see para 25-4g).

v.  The Commander, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) will—

(1)   Provide technical support and reimbursable services concerning—

(a)   Facilities planning, acquisition, design, construction, inspection, maintenance and repair, and disposal.

(b)   Environmental support.

(c)   Real estate.

(d)   Research and development.

(e)   Technology transfer.

(2)   See the following additional specific responsibilities:

(a)   Family housing (see para 3-4f).

(b)   Military construction (see para 4-41).

(c)   Facilities engineering materials, equipment, and relocatable buildings (see para 6-4e).

(d)   Transportation infrastructure and dams (see para 7-4c).

(e)   Utilities and energy management (see para 22-4m).

w.  See Directors of IMCOM regions specific responsibilities as indicated below—

(1)   Family housing (see para 3-54e(3), 3-85c, and 3-97c).

(2)   Military construction (see para 4-4n).

x.  See Garrison Commanders specific responsibilities as indicated below—

(1)   Family housing (see para 3-4j).

(2)   Military construction (see para 4-4s).

(3)   Fire and emergency services (see para 25-4i).

y.  See Commander, U.S. Army Information Systems Engineering Command (USAISEC) responsibilities paragraph 4-4v.

z.  See Commander, Army and Air Force Exchange Services (AAFESs) responsibilities paragraph 4-4x.

aa.  See Director, Defense Commissary Agency responsibilities paragraph 4-4y.

ab.  See commanders of tenant activities at Army installations responsibilities paragraph 4-4z.

ac.  See Chief, Public Affairs responsibilities paragraph 22-4j.

ad.  See Commanding General, U.S. Army Petroleum Center responsibilities paragraph 23-4f.

ae.  See Director of Environmental Programs responsibilities paragraph 25-4e.

af.  See Chief, Fire and Emergency Services responsibilities paragraph 25-4j.

ag.  See Chief, Army Housing Division (AHD) responsibilities paragraph 3-4g.

ah.  See USACE District Engineer responsibilities paragraph 3-93b(1).

1-5. Installation Management Board of Directors

The Installation Management Board of Directors (IMBOD) will provide strategic direction for all Army matters and be the principal committee that adjudicates issues pertaining to all installation activities. The IMBOD is co-chaired by the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army and the ASA (IE&E). It will recommend strategic plans prepared by the ACSIM for approval by ASA (IE&E), which outline goals and objectives, as well as approve program, resource and finance strategies for implementing operations approved in the strategic plan.

1-6. Chapter exponents

The chapter exponent is the office responsible for all aspects of the management controls associated with a given chapter of this regulation. The chapter exponent is to an individual chapter of this regulation as the proponent is to the regulation. The exponents of chapters are shown in table 1-1.

Table 1-1. Table of chapter exponents
ExponentChapterTitle
Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management 1Introduction
2Management of Public Works Activities
3Housing Management
4Army Military Construction Program Development and Execution
5Buildings and Structures
6Facilities Engineering Materials, Equipment, and Relocatable Building Management
7Transportation Infrastructure and Dams
8Management, Acquisition, and Use of Motor Vehicles
9Army Installation Design Standards
10Master Planning for Army Garrisons
11The Army Installation Status Report Program
14Real Property Inventory Management
15Utilization of Real Property
17Real Property Category Codes
22Army Energy and Water Management Program (AEWMP)
23Utility Services
25Fire and Emergency Services
26Private Organizations on Department of the Army Installations
27Civilian Inmate Labor Program
29Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Activities and Nonappropriated Fund Instrumentalities
30Army Reserve Land and Facilities Management
Chief of Engineers12Acquisition of Real Property and Interests Therein
13Real Estate Claims Founded Upon Contract
16Disposal of Real Estate
18Federal Legislative Jurisdiction
19Annexation
20Mineral Exploration and Extraction
21Management of Title and Granting Use of Real Property
24Acquisition and Sales of Utilities Services
28State and Local Taxation of Lessee's Interest in Wherry Act Housing

Chapter 2
Management of Public Works Activities

Section I
Introduction

2-1. Overview

This chapter provides basic policies and specific responsibilities for conduct and management of garrison level public works activities which include facilities engineering, housing, and environmental support. This chapter includes guidance for establishing facilities maintenance and repair (M&R) standards and policies for planning and executing facilities projects. It defines the functional role of the IMCOM; the ACOMs, ASCCs, DRUs; the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Installation Support Program; and provides for an annual Department of the Army Public Works Awards Program.

2-2. Applicability

This chapter applies to the active Army, U.S. Army Reserve-funded installations, and to the U.S. Army Reserve tenant organizations on active Army installations. This chapter does not apply to virtual garrisons represented by the Army Reserve regional readiness support commands; the Army National Guard; garrisons and activities, or parts thereof, which have been licensed to the District of Columbia or to any state, territory, or commonwealth of the United States for use by the National Guard; single project-owned or leased civil works facilities of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; national cemeteries; facilities occupied by Army activities as tenants when support is provided by another government agency; and Government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO) industrial plants/activities.

2-3. Chapter exponent

The exponent of this chapter is the ACSIM (DAIM-ODF).

2-4. Chapter responsibilities

The following responsibilities are in addition to the general responsibilities identified in paragraph 1-4.

a.  Commander, IMCOM, in addition to those responsibilities identified in paragraph 1-4f, will—

(1)    Establish a program of on-site assistance visits to ensure management controls compliance, assess program management, and resolve specific issues at garrisons.

(2)    Develop IMCOM procedures for evaluation and selection of nominees for the Department of the Army public works awards programs.

(3)    Centralize funding and management of training in support of garrison public works mission.

(4)    Establish and administer Installation Planning Boards for installations under IMCOM jurisdiction.

(5)    Implement the Army Corrosion Prevention and Control policy for facilities in accordance with Section VI of this chapter.

b.  Senior Commanders will—

(1)    Serve as chairman of the Installation Planning Board.

(2)    Establish force protection levels and requirements.

(3)     Establish non-garrison:

(a)    Training priorities.

(b)    Mission priorities.

(c)    Installation construction priorities supporting mission activities as outlined in chapter 4.

Section II
General Public Works Operations Policy

2-5. Basic functions

a.  The IMCOM will determine the organizational structure to provide public works services at garrisons under its control.

b.  Established organizational structures must provide the following functions at the garrison level:

(1)    Performing real property master planning in accordance with AR 210-20.

(2)    Operating and managing all functions listed in chapter 3 for government owned or government controlled housing and providing asset management functions for housing operated under the provisions of the Residential Communities Initiative (RCI) program.

(3)    Complying with good engineering practices; applicable Federal, State, and local statutes; and applicable Army regulations in performing M&R and construction projects executed by the IMCOM garrison public works activity, troop units, and/or other activities and tenants (including private sector and nonappropriated fund (NAF) entities). Ensure compliance with the Installation Design Guide (IDG) and garrison facility standards. In the event of conflicts between this regulation and country-specific Final Governing Standards and other host-nation regulations/statutes, IMCOM will establish situationally unique specific guidance.

(4)    Coordinating M&R and construction at privatized facilities such as housing and utilities in accordance with privatization contracts and agreements that define government-private sector relationships.

(5)    Recording all real property and work management data using the Army's Integrated Facilities System (IFS) where the Standard Finance System (STANFINS) is used. Where STANFINS is not used, real property data will be recorded using IFS, and work management data will be recorded using other systems that capture and compile cost and performance data in sufficient detail to support internal cost and management analysis. At installations with contracted base support, contractors will be responsible for providing work management data compatible with IFS.

(6)    Performing work classification. The garrison staff officer charged with facilities engineering, housing, and environmental support is responsible for this function.

(7)    Performing or providing oversight of assigned contract administration tasks as Contracting Officer's Representatives, Ordering Officers, and Inspectors with authorities delegated by the supporting Contracting Officer.

(8)    Establishing and implementing procedures to prevent unauthorized changes to structures or facilities, removal or disposal of facility components, and/or changes in the established use-status of facilities.

(9)    Establishing and implementing procedures to conduct public works training.

(10)    Organizing public works activities and engineer resources capable of providing:

(a)    Planning, programming, budgeting, budget execution and accounting, and budget review.

(b)    Resource Management Plans (RMPs) in accordance with DA Pam 420-6, Annual Work Plans (AWPs) and prioritization.

(c)    Optimal customer service-satisfaction standards.

(d)    Real property and space utilization management to include conducting real property inventories, preparing reports, and conducting surveys required by AR 405-45, AR 405-70, AR 405-80, and AR 500-10.

(e)    Establishment of an environmental program in compliance with AR 200-1 and Federal, State, and local environmental statutes and regulations to provide integration of environmental issues with the processes of facilities management and housing.

(f)    Establishment of a cultural resources program in accordance with AR 200-1 to include preparing historical inventories, historical preservation plans, and archeological surveys and conducting consultations with proper State and Federal agencies and private organizations prior to undertaking work on structures or land that meets the criteria of, or is listed in, AR 200-1.

(g)    Establishment of a natural resources program in accordance with AR 200-1 with particular emphasis on management of threatened and endangered species.

(h)    Establishment of occupational safety and health programs to assure compliance with AR 40-5 and AR 385-10.

(i)    Conduct of traffic engineering activities in accordance with AR 55-80 and chapter 7 of this publication to include coordination of requirements with appropriate law enforcement, safety, security, and transportation officials.

(j)    Oversight of operations and personnel certification of the garrison's utilities systems, coordination of acquisition and sales of utility services, and provision of public works activity technical support to the Contracting Officer in acquiring contracts for utility services in accordance with AR 420-41.

(k)    Establishment of an energy and water management program in accordance with chapters 22 and 23 and of this publication.

(l)    Relocatable buildings in accordance with chapter 6 of this publication.

(m)    Packing and crating services.

(n)    Maintenance of public works operations equipment.

(o)    Real property maintenance supply support through—

1.    Public works supply and storage activities.

2.    Property accountability for public works equipment.

3.    Performance or oversight of delegated contract administration tasks to include quality assurance surveillance and evaluation of contractor performance.

(p)    Coordinating public works operations in support of emergency action plans.

(q)    Preparation and submission of DD Form 1391 (FY __ Military Construction Project Data) for M&R or construction projects over the dollar thresholds given here and in AR 140-483 and chapter 4 of this regulation and when required by IMCOM.

(r)    Performance or oversight of assigned contract administration tasks with authorities delegated by the supporting contracting officer.

(s)    An Assessable Unit Manager for internal control review procedures in accordance with AR 11-2 and identification of deficiencies to the garrison or installation support activity commander.

2-6. Work and cost reporting

The IMCOM will ensure that work and cost reporting include—

a.  Public works records that provide visibility over what, where, why, how, when, and how much work is performed on real property facilities, including work performed by contractors. Work authorizing documents, regardless of the method of performance, will be recorded.

b.  Work documents (service orders, standing operations orders, individual job orders, and so forth) that report costs incurred by the IMCOM garrison public works activity for work on an Army-owned real property facility (RPF), direct and reimbursable, regardless of funding source or method of accomplishment. The IMCOM public works activity will capture costs in enough detail to ensure compliance with project approval authority and the Chief Financial Officer Act, to develop accurate rates for reimbursable services, and to support the public works activity's review and analysis of work accomplished. The minimum essential required capability is to accumulate costs at the work authorizing document level. This includes work accomplished for non-DOD activities.

c.  Recording transactions in the finance and accounting system for use in management of programming funds for future years. Cost transactions must be recorded as direct obligations in the accounts where the execution takes place. Obligations and expenses must be recorded as work is accomplished. Environmental costs will be included as expenses of Installations Support.

2-7. Work planning

a.  The AWP is a consolidation of all developed plans into a single integrated 5-year plan that reflects all major requirements, initiatives, actions, and objectives. Minimum routine M&R tasks and major projects shall be incorporated into the AWP as outlined in DA Pam 420-6. Installation site maps should be used as a visual aid to help depict and present the annual and long-range work plans portion of the AWP.

b.  Preparation and periodic updating of work plans will comply with the following guidance. All work identified as a result of comparing the inspection reports with the performance standards will be used to identify total requirements.

c.  The AWP shall identify the major M&R projects planned for accomplishment in the program fiscal year and contain the following:

(1)    The minimum maintenance tasks that should be accomplished at least once annually for basic preventive and safety/functional needs. Routine maintenance should be programmed annually, to maintain acceptable and economical levels of performance. Separate individual job orders (IJOs) which include specific task description and location, the unit of measure, and unit cost, will be prepared to facilitate orderly planning, review, and analysis for each of the tasks.

(2)    The major M&R portion of the AWP will identify work based on comparison of major M&R alternatives. Prioritization of major M&R projects should be based upon cost, type of repair, structure type and condition, local conditions, and realistic budget levels.

d.  Long-range plans will be developed for a 5 year period, year by year and consist of the level of anticipated work requirements.

e.  Minor construction projects will conform to the Master Plan for the installation in accordance with AR 210-20 and to the Installation Design Standards.

2-8. Customer service

The IMCOM will establish and implement customer service standards. Customer service is a compelling factor in the improvement of business practices, evaluation of effectiveness, establishment of work standards, and cost considerations (see DA Pam 420-6 for procedural guidance for implementing a customer service program).

2-9. Alternative methods and sources

When requirements exceed organizational capabilities, IMCOM will require that its public works activities make maximum use of alternative performance methods and labor sources for providing services, accomplishing increased workload, or reducing shop backlogs, including:

a.  Commercial contractor performance.

b.  Overtime and temporary hires, providing allocated work-years are not exceeded.

c.  Rescheduling or deferring work of lower priority.

d.  Borrowing labor from, or transferring work to, another work center.

e.  Use of prison inmate labor.

f.  Partnerships, contracts, and mutual aid agreements with municipalities or other Government agencies, including USACE organizations.

g.  Consolidation of functions into regional operations.

h.  Privatization of functions.

2-10. Host-tenant relationship

The IMCOM will ensure that its garrison operations comply with the following host-tenant relationships:

a.  The M&R or construction work funded by tenant activities will be coordinated with and approved by the IMCOM garrison public works activity regardless of the source of funds or method of accomplishment. Tenants will report all Installations Support related costs to the IMCOM public works activity for recording in the IFS. These procedures will ensure that all M&R and construction are in accordance with the garrison's real property management plans. The IMCOM will also ensure that work accomplished does not violate Federal or state laws; DOD or Army regulations; building and construction codes, standards, and criteria; garrison facility standards; the IDG; or the Army IDS manual, and that it does not exceed any local utility infrastructure capabilities.

b.  Tenant and satellite activities are responsible for providing the host IMCOM public works activity with unique criteria and justifications for real property planning and management support. Tenant and satellite activities will budget, fund, and reimburse the host for minor construction projects that are unique to the tenant or satellite activity mission.

c.  In general, IMCOM garrison public works activities will require reimbursement for all levels of support that are tenant unique; that is, costs that are attributable to the tenant and that the tenant is able to influence directly or which exceed established, Armywide levels of service. In certain circumstances, the host is responsible for providing facilities engineering, housing, and environmental support services to tenants on a non-reimbursable basis. The IMCOM will determine whether support is reimbursable according to separate policy directions issued by HQDA, and IMCOM may delegate authority for such determination to public works activity managers and their commanders. Additional guidance on reimbursement for housing support is provided in chapter 3. Guidance on reimbursement for NAF activities is provided in AR 215-1.

d.  With respect to U.S. Army Reserve (USAR) facilities, designated regional readiness sustainment commands (RRSCs) are responsible for and manage USAR real property programs to include master planning, programming, M&R and construction of facilities; service support; and environmental functions. The relationship between the garrison and the RRSC is a "technical-support-provider-managing-customer" relationship. In critical support areas in which the RRSC Engineer staff requires professional engineer, environmental, and other staff support, a detailed memorandum of agreement will exist between each RRSC and a supporting organization that will provide the required service or technical support (see AR 140-483 for specific Army Reserve facility management policy).

e.  The IMCOM public works activities will have support agreements with all Army, DOD, or other Government tenants/customers for which they provide facilities engineering, housing, or environmental management support services. Requirements for recurring support and specific negotiated provisions for support will be documented in the support agreement. For example, if public works personnel are dedicated full-time to medical facilities support, they will provide support on a reimbursable basis stipulated in a support agreement.

2-11. Government furnished, contractor occupied facilities

A contractor host is required to coordinate with its servicing public works activity manager and to obtain approval from the garrison commander before facilities on a garrison are made available for contractor use. Before approval and contract award, square footage, type of space provided, and reimbursement for utilities will be defined in the contract.

Section III
Operation and Maintenance Project Approval and Execution (see chapter 3 for Army Family Housing)

2-12. General

a.  The IMCOM will ensure that the scope of work to be included in a project is based on good engineering practices, environmental impact, operational or administrative considerations, and life cycle cost effectiveness. Customers and tenants normally identify the makeup of projects based on need, funds available (if reimbursable), and command priorities. The IMCOM will provide advice to customers and tenants on the technical, regulatory, and statutory feasibility of their projects. The IMCOM will also ensure that projects are reflected in, and comply with, the garrison real property master plan, the Installation Design Guide, resource management plans, and facility standards.

b.  Work will not be started without prior written project approval from the proper authority. DA Form 4283 (Facilities Engineering Work Request) is the standard project approval document.

c.  Projects will not be split into increments solely to reduce the estimated costs below statutory limitations, contracting thresholds, or project approval levels. DA Pam 420-11 provides guidance for project definition and documentation.

d.  A minor construction project includes all work necessary to produce a complete and usable facility or a complete and usable improvement to an existing facility. A construction project will be financed from appropriations available for operations and maintenance if the project has total funded costs of $750,000 or less, or if it has total funded costs of $1.5 million or less and is intended solely to correct a deficiency that is life-threatening, health-threatening, or safety-threatening. Military construction, Army (MCA) funds will not be used to finance projects under $750,000 unless approved in advance by HQDA (DAIM-ODC).

e.  Work to be done on an existing facility will be consistent with the design use and remaining economic life of the facility. If construction work will change the facility category code according to AR 415-28, the category code change will be approved prior to commencement of work (see AR 405-70).

f.  The DOD Explosive Safety Board (DDESB) approves all plans for siting and construction or modification of facilities for manufacturing, storing, handling, maintaining, developing, demilitarizing, testing, transporting, or disposing of military explosives or ammunition. The DDESB also reviews and approves site plans for facilities which do not involve hazardous materials but which would be exposed to such risks if not properly located. All information, reports, and requests for assistance, are submitted to the DDESB through command safety channels, to Director, U.S. Army Technical Center for Explosives Safety (see AR 385-10, para 5-6).

g.  Separate M&R and minor construction projects may be grouped into one contract for procurement, or a single project may be accomplished with more than one contract. The total funded cost of all elements of the project will not exceed the total authorized cost of the project.

h.  More than one category of work may be approved on one document, provided that work in each category is within the commander's approval authority. Each category of work is separately subject to the appropriate approval limitations given in this chapter and in chapter 3 for Family housing projects. If the commander's authority for one or more categories of work is exceeded, separate approval documents are required for work that is to be approved by higher authority. The estimated funded and unfunded costs (see para 2-17) for each category of work will be identified separately on the project approval document.

i.  The M&R and minor construction projects will comply with applicable requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), sections 4321-4370f, title 42, United States Code (42 USC 4321-4370f), the National Historic Preservation Act, 16 USC 470-470x-6, and other environmental requirements (see AR 200-1, AR 200-2, and 32 CFR 651).

2-13. World War II temporary buildings

a.  The Army considers WWII temporary buildings as functionally inadequate and uneconomical as long-term solutions to mission requirements, except for selected intermittent uses such as annual training. The Army goal is to eliminate most WWII temporary buildings on active Army garrisons.

b.  All work on WWII temporary buildings will be governed by requirements for facilities use, economic considerations, and good engineering judgment. The WWII temporary buildings will not be renovated to satisfy Base Realignment and Closure actions, unit stationing or realignments, new unit activations, or other projected missions.

c.  If the total of all maintenance, repair, and alteration costs in a WWII temporary building project exceeds $40 per square foot, approval by the Garrison Commander is required. This requirement applies to all WWII temporary buildings, regardless of current use and project funding source. Project approval stated elsewhere in this regulation apply.

d.  Garrison Commander will not delegate approval authority for projects concerning WWII temporary building whose costs exceed $40 per square foot.

2-14. Authorization for minor construction projects

a.  Commander, IMCOM may approve a minor construction project with total funded costs of $750,000 or less, or total funded costs of $1.5 million or less if the project is intended solely to correct a deficiency that threatens the life, health, or safety of personnel. Commander, IMCOM may delegate approval authority to Headquarters, IMCOM (HQ, IMCOM) staff members and to IMCOM region directors. Commander, IMCOM may delegate and may permit redelegation of all or part of his/her approval authority except as prohibited by paragraph 2-13d, above. All delegations and redelegations of approval authority will be in writing and will be commensurate with the technical capability to review projects. Commander, IMCOM is responsible for review and evaluation of the management of delegated approval authorities.

b.  Commander, IMCOM will establish controls to prevent costs for approved projects from exceeding approval limits. If it becomes apparent that the projected total funded cost of a minor construction project will exceed the IMCOM approval limit, all work will be halted immediately (see chap 4 for processing procedures for MCA approval and funding).

c.  Commanders of ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs who have installation management responsibilities have the same authority and responsibilities as noted in paragraphs 2-14a and 2-14b.

2-15. Minor construction prohibitions and limitations

a.  The following practices constitute statutory violations and are prohibited:

(1)    Acquisition or improvement of real property facilities through a series of minor construction projects.

(2)    Subdivision of a construction project to reduce costs to a level that meets a statutory limitation, or the splitting or incrementing of a project to reduce costs below an approval or contracting threshold.

(3)    Development of a minor construction project solely to reduce the cost of an active military construction project below the level at which Congress would be informed of a cost variation.

b.  Minor construction authority will not be used to begin or complete construction projects contained in the annual Military Construction Authorization Act, nor be used as a basis to complete projects financed under other authorizations when available funding is lacking.

c.  Any project proposed under minor construction authority that has been previously denied authorization by Congress requires approval by the Secretary of the Army or designee, regardless of cost.

d.  Project cost limitations in effect at the time of approval of a minor construction project remain in effect throughout the life of the project.

e.  AR 405-80 describes limitations on expenditures for maintenance, repair, and minor construction for leased facilities.

2-16. Authorization for maintenance and repair projects

a.  Commander, IMCOM may approve maintenance and repair projects when:

(1)    The funded project cost does not exceed $3 million; and for a combined maintenance and repair project, the total of the maintenance cost and the repair cost does not exceed $3 million.

(2)    The repair cost (or repair plus construction project cost for a combined undertaking) does not exceed 50 percent of the replacement cost of the facility for projects whose funded costs are greater than $750,000.

(3)    WWII temporary buildings that have total repair and construction costs in excess of $40 per square foot in accordance with paragraph 2-13.

(4)    Environmental documentation has been completed in accordance with AR 200-1 and 32 CFR 651.

b.  Commander, IMCOM may delegate and may permit redelegation of all or part of his/her approval authority except as prohibited by paragraph 2-13d, above. All delegations and redelegations of approval authority will be in writing and will be commensurate with the technical capability to review projects. Commander, IMCOM is responsible for review and evaluation of the management of delegated approval authorities.

c.  Approving officials will ensure that all repair projects, regardless of costs, are consistent with force structure plans, more cost effective than replacement, and an appropriate use of operations and maintenance funds.

d.  Projects funded by tenant activities will be coordinated and approved through IMCOM host-garrison command channels, regardless of the source of funds. Projects financed by the private sector for government use will also be coordinated and approved through IMCOM' s host-garrison command channels. The IMCOM will establish a work approval and reporting mechanism with tenants who have the capability to separately document and contract for projects independent of the IMCOM garrison public works activity.

e.  HQDA will approve or disapprove projects that exceed IMCOM approval authority. Requests for approval will be forwarded through the IMCOM to the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (DAIM-ODF), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600, for processing to the HQDA approval authority. Requests will include an explanation of project funding and a statement that the project has had a technical review. Project numbers will be identified in the requests. No project will be advertised until it is approved by the designated approval authority. Requests for approval to advertise projects of an urgent nature concurrent with project review and prior to project approval will be considered by HQDA on a case-by-case basis.

f.  All work on a project will be halted as soon as it becomes apparent that the projected total funded cost of a project will exceed the specific HQDA cost approval for the project. HQDA reapproval of the project at the higher projected cost is required before any additional project work is done.

g.  Documentation required for the approval of projects submitted to HQDA includes the following:

(1)    A completed DD Form 1391, FY__Military Construction Project Data.

(2)    An operational necessity statement.

(3)    A decision analysis.

(4)    A detailed cost estimate.

2-17. Project costs

When a construction project and an M&R project are combined in one undertaking, each may be treated as a separate project for approval limitation purposes. Engineering estimates may be used to allocate the funded costs between the construction project and the M&R project. This will determine project approval authority. When the work is so integrated that separation of construction from M&R effort is not possible, the entire undertaking will be considered as one construction project.

a.  When projects are proposed for accomplishment by a USACE district or regional business center, the cost estimate will be coordinated with the district or regional business center engineer. Transmittals of DD Form 1391 to HQDA will indicate that such coordination has been made. Before a project is submitted to USACE for execution, IMCOM will ensure that the garrison public works activity has determined the work classification for the project.

b.  Safeguarding information. All documents reflecting detailed cost of work estimates of a project prior to contract award will be marked "FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY."

c.  Appropriations that finance a project will be used to reimburse other appropriations for all funded costs initially financed by such other appropriations. Funded costs include—

(1)    Government-owned real property, materials, supplies, services, rental trailers and buildings, utilities, or items applicable to the project.

(2)    Installed capital equipment and installed building equipment.

(3)    Transportation costs applicable to materials, supplies, real property items, installed equipment, and government-owned equipment.

(4)    Civilian labor costs including labor costs of foreign national civilians, but not including civilian prisoner labor. Costs of foreign military troops such as Korean Augmentation to the U.S. Army will be treated as unfunded costs. However, costs for labor provided by foreign quasi-military organizations that are paid from the Operation and Maintenance, Army (OMA) appropriation, such as the Korean Service Corps, are funded costs.

(5)    Supervision and inspection costs.

(6)    Troop travel and per diem directly related to the project.

(7)    Costs for maintenance and operation of government-owned equipment (including organic troop unit equipment) and rental cost for non-government equipment.

(8)    Costs for preparation of operation and maintenance manuals for installed systems.

(9)    Demolition and site preparation costs.

(10)    The cost of installing equipment in place in new facilities.

(11)    Costs of mitigation identified in environmental documentation completed in accordance with 32 CFR 651.

d.  The total funded cost of a multi-year repair project over $750,000 on a single RPF will include all phases of the project.

e.  In comparing funded project costs with facility replacement cost, all known major repairs and alterations to the facility will be included. Replacement cost will be based on a facility of the same square footage and same type construction (temporary or permanent). This may be computed using the methodology in UFC 3-700-01A. However, use the updated DOD Area Cost Factors and Facility Unit Cost Table, paragraphs 3.2.1 and 3.2.2 of the Programming Administration and Execution System (PAX) Newsletter available at the PAX Web site (http://www.hq.usace.army.mil/cemp/e/ec/pax/paxtoc2006.htm.) Any costs of demolition, asbestos removal, site work, and historic considerations will be included in determining the replacement cost.

f.  Unfunded project costs are limited to the following:

(1)    Costs financed from military personnel appropriations.

(2)    Depreciation of government-owned equipment (except depreciation cost of a plant owned by working capital funds).

(3)    Materials, supplies, and items of installed equipment that have been obtained from other U.S. Government agencies or foreign governments without reimbursement. When such items become available as excess distributions from other Government agencies, their value will be at Federal Supply Catalog prices or estimated replacement value according to Defense Finance and Accounting Service-Indianapolis (DFAS-IN) 37-1 regulation.

(4)    Costs of real property items relocated on the same garrison except transportation and relocation costs.

(5)    Planning, engineering, and design costs before and during construction.

(6)    Costs for licenses and permits required by state or local laws for pollution abatement or by Status of Forces Agreements overseas.

(7)    Material costs of equipment-in-place items.

(8)    Civilian and military prisoner labor.

(9)    Public works activity overhead costs such as utilities, supplies, equipment, and supervisors (second-line and above).

g.  Operation and maintenance, Army funds or their equivalent may be used to fund design for nonappropriated fund construction, provided no additional manpower authorizations are required.

2-18. Project technical review

a.  Commander, IMCOM has responsibility for final technical review and approval of drawings, plans, and approval and technical documents related to projects executed by subordinate organizations. Commander, IMCOM may delegate part or all of this authority with redelegation authority as desired. Technical reviews include environmental, fire and emergency services, safety, medical, energy and water conservation, anti-terrorism/force protection, and other considerations that affect the eventual success of the project. Subordinate organizations must have the technical review capability to meet project review responsibilities.

b.  Commander, IMCOM will ensure that all projects are adequately reviewed by an agency possessing the required technical expertise prior to approval (see DA Pam 420-11 for guidance on work classification).

c.  Projects for facilities that involve the electronic processing of classified material and projects that include provision of a radio frequency interference or tempest-shielded enclosure require a technical security review by the garrison Provost Marshal Office and the Tempest Security Officer during the initial planning stages of the project. Requirements for shielded enclosures must be approved by the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-2 ((DCS, G-2) (DAMI-CI), 1000 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-1000.

2-19. Damaged facilities

a.  Expedited project approval and execution procedures will be used for projects for repair of facilities (including Family housing) damaged by fire, storm, flood, freeze or other natural occurrences, regardless of the project funding source. Necessary approvals and congressional notifications will be obtained while prospective contractors are preparing their proposals. Work on the project should begin and be completed as quickly as possible.

b.  Project approval requests that require HQDA approval will be submitted through IMCOM channels to Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600, within 30 days of the damage. Army Family housing (AFH) projects requiring HQDA approval will be submitted to Chief, AHD (DAIM-FDH-F), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600. The following minimum information will be provided (this information is sufficient to accomplish HQDA approval actions and Congressional notifications for Family housing and Installations Support projects):

(1)    Description of the facility to include space utilization information and effects of any planned base realignment or closure actions. If applicable, include a justification for repair of an excess or oversize facility.

(2)    Date, cause, and type of damage.

(3)    Scope of work included in project.

(4)    Cost of repairs and brief breakout of funded costs.

(5)    Replacement cost of the facility. Include cost to current standard for all facilities and the replacement cost of Family housing at current authorized square footage.

(6)    Availability of existing space, on or off the garrison, to house the dislocated function, and explain the impact if repairs are not accomplished. For AFH projects, state the deficit or excess from the latest housing survey.

(7)    Appropriate environmental review documentation.

(8)    Brief decision analysis to justify course of action.

(9)     for Family and unaccompanied housing projects, state the cause of damage; whether negligence or abuse is suspected or charged; whether appropriate action has been taken under provisions of 10 USC 2775 to recover repair costs; and, if appropriate, what costs were recovered.

(10)    State whether expedited procurement procedures (for example, restricted competition and/or bid time) are being used.

(11)    Estimated completion date.

2-20. Combined funded construction projects

a.  Nonappropriated funds or private funds may be used with appropriated funds (APF) when it can be shown that the construction requirements are intended for different purposes (for example: garrison-required and OMA-funded asphalt street construction work may be combined with an adjacent NAF-funded asphalt "go-cart" race track and parking lot project that is generated by Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR)). The combination of funding sources will not be used to increment the project or to circumvent limitations. Combined construction requirements having a total cost of $750,000 or less may be approved by Commander, IMCOM. Approval authority may be delegated.

b.  Combined construction requirements with a total cost in excess of $750,000 will be submitted through IMCOM channels to the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (DAIM-ODF), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600 for review and approval processing.

2-21. Real property facilities project files

a.  The IMCOM will ensure that the public works activity establishes a project file for each RPF project within the scope of this regulation when construction costs are $15,000 or more and when maintenance and repair costs are $50,000 or more. For single undertakings involving both construction and M&R, only one project file will be established. Electronic document processing and storage may be used for these files. Each file will represent a complete historical record of a project, from inception to filing of the actual costs incurred, and will contain the following documentation for each project:

(1)    DA Form(s) 4283 (Facilities Engineering Work Request) and/or approval memorandum(s) with DA Form(s) 2702 (Bill of Materials) if used. The file may contain more than one work order and/or memorandum, if it is desired to control each classification of work.

(2)    Record of estimates, justification for the project, and related correspondence (initial estimate, identification of estimator, DD Form 1391, job phase calculation sheets, identification of funded and unfunded costs, calculations to show how costs were developed, identification of crafts involved, source documents and other background documents related to estimates and justifications).

(3)    Requests for approval by higher authority and signed approval documents, including letters, estimates, specifications, and plans.

(4)    Revised plans and estimates, if changes to these documents were required by the approving authority.

(5)     A day-to-day blotter record showing all actual costs incurred to date on projects approaching regulatory or statutory limitations. Maintenance and analysis of this blotter record should prevent violation of the Anti-Deficiency Act.

(6)    DD Form 1354 (Transfer and Acceptance of DOD Real Property) properly signed and dated.

(7)    Construction in progress reports submitted in compliance with the Chief Financial Officer's Act.

(8)    Warranty schedules and dates.

b.  Project files should include other documentation that is pertinent to the history of the project, such as—

(1)    A document signed by the requesting agency indicating when the need for a construction project became known, when the work must be completed, and what the consequences would be if the project were not completed by the specified time.

(2)    A notation that the inventory of military real property has been changed to include the sum of the actual facilities engineering, architectural, and other outside services for design, plan, specification, and survey costs of a construction project. The changes will be reported in the Integrated Facilities System.

(3)     A cross-reference to the appropriate section of garrison master plans and resource management plans.

Section IV
Utilization of Personnel and Administration

2-22. Manpower guidance

Methods used for determining manpower requirements are in accordance with manpower policies outlined in AR 570-4 and AR 71-32. Manpower requirements are based on the most effective and efficient organization and, therefore, represent the minimum essential numbers of civilian and military positions needed to accomplish valid mission responsibilities for the organization. Methodologies to determine manpower needs include manpower surveys/studies; the Manpower Staffing Standards System (MS-3); and staffing guides. Other methodologies include computer modeling, comparative analysis, and other statistical analyses as well as local appraisal when workload is not quantifiable and measurable.

2-23. Assignment of personnel

This regulation does not provide authority to establish positions, civilian personnel grade levels, or classification for any given set of duties, functions, or responsibilities. Positions are to be filled by personnel who meet the requirements of the appropriate job series in Office of Personnel Management qualifications standards.

2-24. Use of civilian personnel, inmate labor, or troops

a.  Construction, repair, maintenance, and operation of real property will be done through the most economical means available, consistent with mission and statutory requirements. AR 570-4 and AR 614-200 prescribe policies that apply to the use of civilian personnel and troops in performing public works activities. Army policy regarding self-help labor by civilians and troops is provided in chapter 5.

b.  Army experience has shown that inmate labor can be used under carefully controlled circumstances as a more economical method of providing some base services. Use of civilian inmate labor may allow accomplishment of needed tasks that might not be possible under manning and funding constraints. Military and civilian correctional facilities are both permissible sources of inmate labor. Specific policies covering military prisoner labor are included in AR 190-47.

(1)    Civilian inmates may perform preservation and maintenance of grounds and facilities, construction and demolition of buildings, road repair, custodial services, and transportation of debris to recycling centers. The Commander, IMCOM will, through command channels, request HQDA approval of the scope of inmate labor. Primary issues for the IMCOM are selection of work to avoid competition with existing in-house or contractor resources and to avoid interference with missions and operations. Inmate labor is intended to augment, not displace, the Army's civilian or contractor workforce.

(2)    Army policy permits garrison commanders to initiate discussions with representatives from the Federal Bureau of Prisons (FBOP) at the local and regional levels. However, garrison commanders are not authorized to negotiate with representatives of State or local correctional or governmental agencies. Basic requirements that IMCOM must observe for a garrison program to use civilian prisoner labor are—

(a)    Development of an MOA between the garrison and the warden of the prison involved.

(b)    Development of a garrison plan governing local operation of the program.

(c)    HQDA approval of the MOA and garrison plan before the program can be put into effect. Detailed information on stipulations required in the MOA and garrison plan may be obtained from HQDA, Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (DAIM-OD), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

2-25. Training and education programs

The IMCOM will develop garrison training programs that identify training needs and maintain the management and technical proficiency of public works personnel. Public works and related professional training opportunities to include training for appropriate certifications and state licenses should be part of the training plan.

2-26. Contract performance

a.  Decisions to convert in-house public works activities to contract performance will be made in accordance with the Commercial Activities Program requirements of AR 5-20 or appropriate host nation rules for activities outside the continental United States.

b.  The IMCOM may rely on contractor performance for work that is beyond the existing local in-house workforce capability. Added work that is clearly beyond the capability of the in-house workforce, but which must be performed, will be accomplished normally by augmentation contracts. The IMCOM may obtain architect-engineer (A-E) services (such as engineering, design, and construction supervision or inspection services) beyond garrison and IMCOM capabilities from outside sources. The A-E design contract services will be obtained through the USACE district or other authorized contract support agency. Projects will be accomplished by contract unless the projects are done by troop labor or are normally in-house work and subject to provisions of AR 5-20.

c.  Job Order Contracting may be used in accordance with Army Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement, Subpart 17.90. Contracts may be awarded and administered by a supporting USACE district or by the local garrison contracting support organization.

d.  When a contractor performs any public works activities, IMCOM will develop and implement procedures to monitor and evaluate contractor performance. The IMCOM public works staff members may be authorized to act as Contracting Officer's Representatives.

Section V
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Installation Support Services

2-27. Description

The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Installation Support Program provides installations support to U.S. Army Garrisons. It is a business concept focused on extending manpower capacity at the garrisons and enhancing mission support and technical capabilities. This support to garrisons is normally fully reimbursable.

2-28. Installation Support Program policy

The USACE will assign a district, which has military programs responsibilities, to provide garrison support for each Army garrison or USAR RRSC.

a.  The USACE also provides support services through other activities that have no geographic boundaries, such as the Installation Support Center of Expertise (ISCX) at the Huntsville Engineering and Support Center, and the USACE Engineering Research and Development Center (ERDC). The USACE support from these organizations may be provided directly to garrisons worldwide.

b.  A garrison or RRSC will normally request support directly from its designated district or regional business center (RBC). However, a garrison or RRSC may request support from any other district or RBC, ISCX, or a USACE laboratory.

c.  Standard USACE engineering design and construction criteria will be changed and adapted to meet the IMCOM's new facilities engineering requirements when any USACE activity performs garrison support work. Supporting USACE activities will comply with IMCOM's quality standards. This adherence to quality standards shall include but not be limited to the Army Standards, Army Installation Design Standards, the Installation's Design Guide, and the installation's operational, environmental, maintenance, and repair procedures. Health, life, safety, or other statutory or regulatory requirements will not be compromised. The primary venue for achieving resolution of disagreements regarding the appropriateness of engineering and construction criteria or procedures for Installation Support work is the Project Delivery Team (PDT). In accordance with project management business practices, the team will attempt to resolve issues internally. If issues cannot be resolved within the team, the issue will be raised concurrently through the district's and IMCOM command channels for resolution.

d.  Installation support requirements vary greatly in their type, size, complexity, cost, and timing. In order to provide maximum support for garrisons, USACE commanders will avoid establishing cost or complexity criteria for accepting work. When practical, the supporting USACE activity shall work with IMCOM to group individual small project design, contracting, or construction management requirements to minimize administrative processing costs.

2-29. Types of installation support offered

The type and range of services available from the total USACE Installation Support network include:

a.  Development of scopes of work and performance work statements.

b.  Technical assistance and troubleshooting.

c.  Mobilization and peacetime master planning services.

d.  Project development (scoping, feasibility studies, planning charrettes, and DD Form 1391 assistance).

e.  Technical studies and analysis (energy, natural resources, historical, structural).

f.  Facility space planning and stationing analyses.

g.  Project design and engineering services (MCA design is not considered to be installation support work, since it is not garrison funded).

h.  Real estate services (appraisals, acquisitions, leases, easements, permitting, disposals, tenant real property agreements, and real estate planning reports).

i.  Contract acquisition and administration in conjunction with architect-engineer services, job order contracting, and other specialized engineering and construction related services.

j.  Construction management services (supervision and inspection, quality assurance).

k.  Environmental analyses and remediation.

l.  Engineering economic analyses.

m.  Other specialized support to the public works activity that is typically provided by garrison functional staff. As authorized by the garrison commander, the public works activity may obtain supplemental support from USACE in the following areas, in coordination with the appropriate garrison functional staff element:

(1)    Public affairs support for engineering and construction related issues.

(2)    Personnel services related to the engineering and scientists career programs (including recruitment and training of interns).

(3)    Legal services rendered to assist the garrison legal office regarding specialized issues related to engineering, construction, and environmental programs.

(4)    Contracting support for construction, environmental, maintenance, and repair projects. This may include, but is not limited to, acquisition of contracts that are to be returned to the garrison for administration.

n.  Other services as requested by garrisons, subject to approval of the District Commander, to include non-traditional facilities management services.

2-30. Installation Support Program functions

Each District Commander—

a.   Conducts face-to-face meetings with all supported garrisons within 60 days of assumption of duties as a District Commander, and meets with a newly assigned garrison public works manager within 60 days of the manager's assignment.

b.  Develops descriptions of, and procedures and points of contact for, the types of reimbursable and non-reimbursable support services.

c.  Monitors customer satisfaction.

2-31. Non-reimbursable installation support services and funding

a.  Most installation support services are reimbursable and will be funded by IMCOM. The Centrally Funded USACE Installation Support services fall into one of four categories—Project Managers Forward (PM-F) at selected supported Army garrisons and other IMCOM activities; Installation Support Checkbook dollars; Installation Support Program managers at USACE regional activities; and USACE-IMCOM Liaison Officers (LNOs). These non-reimbursable Installation Support services and funding will be managed in coordination with IMCOM. The funding for non-reimbursable Installation Support services is OMA and accordingly, services need to comply with the rules associated with the OMA appropriation.

(1)    Project Managers Forward—The limited number of PM-Fs will generally be located at power projection and power support garrisons. Serves as the garrison's "One-Door-To-The Corps," assisting in focusing USACE support to public works managers in accomplishment of their missions and elevating mutual concerns and needs to the USACE District, RBC, USACE-IMCOM LNOs, or other appropriate USACE activity for assistance.

(2)    Installation Support Checkbook Funds— Limited non-reimbursable funds to support the Installations Support mission at IMCOM and Army garrisons. This Installation Support Checkbook funding is generally for program/project assistance and should be in support of multiple activities on a garrison, or for multiple garrisons (for example, utility rate intervention cases that support several Army garrisons).

(3)    Installation support managers at USACE regional activities—Usually referred to as Installation Support Offices (ISO); serve as the regional integrators of all Installation Support assets available at district, RBC, lab, centers, and Headquarters, USACE (HQ USACE), as required.

(4)    USACE-IMCOM LNOs—LNOs will be established as deemed appropriate through negotiation between USACE and IMCOM. The USACE-IMCOM LNOs ensure that USACE resources are applied so that Army garrisons receive the best engineering support across the entire spectrum of USACE activities.

b.  USACE laboratories may provide non-reimbursable services for tasks that are coordinated and consistent with IMCOM priorities to the extent Installation Support Checkbook funds are available.

Section VI
Army Corrosion Prevention and Control Policy for Facilities

2-32. General

a.  This section addresses policy concerning DA long-term strategy to minimize the effects of corrosion on Army facilities and equipment.

b.  The principal objectives of corrosion prevention and control (CPC) policy are to:

(1)    Design, construct, and maintain dependable and long-lived structures, equipment, plants, and systems.

(2)    Conserve energy and water resources.

(3)    Reduce costs due to corrosion, scale, and microbiological fouling.

(4)    Ensure compliance with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Transportation, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and other applicable regulations and guidance.

c.  The CPC will be incorporated as part of the entire facility life cycle, including design, construction, and operation. The DOD Corrosion Prevention and Control Planning Guidebook (http://www.dodcorrosionexchange.org) provides detailed guidance and will be used to develop and implement a CPC Program.

d.  The establishment of Corrosion Prevention Advisory Teams (CPAT) and Contractor Corrosion Teams (CCT) as described in the DOD Corrosion Prevention and Control Planning Guidebook is the responsibility of the design agent and is required for all projects with a programmed amount of $5 million or greater. However, CPC measures must be considered for all construction, repair, and maintenance projects regardless of cost or funding source.

2-33. Corrosion program manager

Ensure each region and garrison has a trained corrosion program manager appointed in writing. At a minimum, training will include either the National Association of Corrosion Engineers' (NACE) Basic Corrosion Course or the Army Corps of Engineers' Basic Corrosion PROSPECT Course. Additional training and certification is recommended and is available through NACE.

Section VII
Public Works Annual Awards Program

2-34. General

The Department of the Army Public Works Awards Program includes honorary and monetary special act or service awards presented to individuals in a variety of public works positions and activities. Honorary corporate awards are presented to recognize excellence in group activities that support the execution of garrison public works functions. The IMCOM will administer this program for the Army as detailed in DA Pam 420-6.

2-35. Eligibility and nominations

Eligibility and evaluation criteria are different for each award. The criteria, detailed procedures, and schedules for nominations will be announced by IMCOM. Selections of award winners will be announced by HQDA each year. An appropriate HQDA representative will present awards to winners. Suitable publicity will be given to this program at all levels. Personal information used in publicity releases or submitted in support of requirements established by this regulation and any supplements to it will comply with all applicable Privacy Act requirements.

Chapter 3
Housing Management

Section I
Introduction

3-1. Overview

This chapter provides policies, procedures, and responsibilities for the management and operation of the Army's permanent party and privatized housing programs. It addresses Government-owned and Government-controlled AFH to include general/flag officer's quarters (GFOQ) and Government-owned and Government-controlled unaccompanied personnel housing (UPH) for permanent party (UPH (PP)) personnel to include barracks. It also addresses the engineering, resource, and furnishings management programs related to housing. Unless specifically stated, this guidance refers solely to Government-owned housing. It provides policy on establishing and administering rental rates for Government-owned and Government-controlled housing and charges for related facilities. It includes policy and procedures for housing managers to effectively support the housing requirements of mobilization efforts. For specific guidance on the management of the RCI Program, refer to the Residential Communities Initiative, ASA (IE&E), Portfolio and Asset Management Handbook (current version).

3-2. Applicability

This chapter applies to the Active Army, the Army National Guard of the United States (ARNGUS), Army National Guard (ARNG), and the U.S. Army Reserve (USAR), except as follows:

a.  Civil works housing under control of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

b.  Family housing for caretakers at national cemeteries.

c.  Military Assistance Program and Military Assistance Advisory Group housing activities except for accounting procedures set forth in DOD 7000.14-R.

d.  Family housing transferred to other Government agencies by permit.

e.  Family housing at Kwajalein.

f.  ARNG Family housing and unaccompanied personnel housing facilities and related furnishings.

g.  USAR Family housing facilities and related furnishings.

h.  Recreational housing.

i.  Housing furnishings support for reception centers and confinement centers.

j.  Military treatment facility lodging such as Fisher House.

k.  Army lodging.

l.  The residence portion of the U.S. Military Academy's Cadet Chapel except for the necessity to collect rent for shelter and services provided in accordance with Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-45 and section XV of this chapter.

3-3. Chapter exponent

The exponent of this chapter is the ACSIM (DAIM-ISH).

3-4. Chapter responsibilities

The following responsibilities are in addition to the general responsibilities identified in paragraph 1-4 of this regulation.

a.  The ASA (IE&E) will—

(1)    Provide overall policy and program direction for housing programs.

(2)    Manage privatized housing programs.

b.  The ASA (FM&C) will—

(1)    Provide overall policy for management of APF.

(2)    Control AFH and military construction, Army (MCA) appropriations' funds.

(3)    Manage the Army budget as appropriation sponsor per AR 1-1.

(4)    Provide direction on fiscal policy and economic analysis.

c.  The ASA (M&RA) will provide overall policy for nonappropriated funds.

d.  The ACSIM will—

(1)    Be the program manager for the AFH and MCA appropriations.

(2)    Serve as the functional manager for the AFH and UPH programs, including the UPH management account of the operation and maintenance, Army (OMA) appropriation.

(3)    Develop policy and procedures for the administration, operation, and management of the Army's housing programs.

(4)    Provide staff supervision for operating and managing the Army Housing Services Office Program and Equal Opportunity in Off-post Housing (EOOPH) Program.

(5)    Serve as the DA proponent for developing, preparing, and maintaining DA publications which provide policy, guidance, and direction on Army housing programs.

(6)    Coordinate any exceptions to personnel housing policies contained in sections III, IV, and VI of this chapter with the DCS, G-1.

(7)    Coordinate any exceptions to construction execution and rental rates for Government-owned and Government-controlled housing and charges for related facilities with HQ U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

(8)    Determine housing requirements and validate space requirements to house Soldiers for mobilization, contingencies, operations other than war, and deployments.

(9)    Develop and manage a housing management civilian career program for housing personnel.

(10)    Manage the housing furnishings program (see para 3-69c for specific details).

(11)    Manage the Army's housing leasing program (see para 3-86 for specific details).

(12)    Manage GFOQ intensively per Congressional direction (see para 3-98 for specific details).

(13)    Evaluate the effectiveness of Army housing programs.
Note.See also paragraph
3-56c(1) for service order priority system.

e.  The DCS, G-1 will—

(1)    Set forth policy on the following:

(a)    Eligibility for, assignment to, and termination from housing.

(b)    Adequacy standards for housing livability.

(c)    Military compensation issues related to housing.

(d)    Off-post Army Housing Services Office and EOOPH programs.

(2)    Serve as the proponent agency for personnel housing policies set forth in sections III, IV, and VI of this chapter.

f.  The Commander, USACE will—

(1)    Serve as the DOD construction agent responsible for the design and construction of military construction (MILCON) facilities where designated by the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD).

(2)    Manage the design, construction, and real estate activities associated with the MILCON program.

(3)    Develop policy and procedures for establishing and administering rental rates for Government-owned and Government-controlled housing and charges for related facilities.

(4)    Determine rental rates for Government-controlled and Government-sponsored housing and related facilities in the continental United States (CONUS), Hawaii, and Alaska.

(5)    Locate, negotiate, and execute housing leases in the U.S.

g.  Chief, AHD, ACSIM is under the control of the ACSIM's Director of Installation Services (IS). The Chief, AHD will serve as advisor and responsible official for the ACSIM in matters pertaining to the day-to-day operation and management of Army programs for PP housing (that is, AFH and UPH (PP)). As such, the Chief, AHD will—

(1)    Perform all responsibilities as AFH appropriation manager for requirements determination per AR 1-1.

(2)    Perform all responsibilities as AFH manager for program and performance per AR 1-1.

(3)    Prepare all Army Family housing construction (AFHC) and AFH operations budget exhibits for submission through the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations, Housing and Partnerships to the ASA (FM&C).

(4)    Perform as functional manager for the execution of Army programs for PP housing.

(5)    Develop and maintain the Army's PP housing master plans.

(6)    Validate requests for acquisition of PP housing.

(7)    Serve as functional manager for Armywide, PP housing information systems support for the ARSTAF and the IMCOM, its regions, and their installations.

(8)    Serve as DA staff proponent for all matters relating to housing career program management.

(9)    Serve as DA staff proponent for housing professional training.

(10)    Develop, prepare, and maintain for the ACSIM, DA publications which provide policy, guidance, and direction on Army PP housing programs.

h.  Chief, Public Private Initiatives Division, ACSIM is under the control of the ACSIM's Director of IS.

(1)    Serve as DA staff proponent for private housing programs.

(2)    Serve as DA staff proponent for privatized housing training programs.

(3)    Serve as DA staff proponent for all privatized executive homes (GFOQ).

(4)    Perform all responsibilities relating to oversight of privatized programs.

i.  The Commander, IMCOM will—

(1)    Accomplish integrated execution of installation management related policies, plans, and programs as developed and promulgated by the ARSTAF.

(2)    Fund the garrisons.

(3)    Disseminate planning, programming, and budgeting guidance as prepared by the ARSTAF.

(4)    Seek Armywide installation management initiatives and standardize implementation of those initiatives. Provide housing expertise and site assistance visits to assist installations in resolving specific housing issues as needed.

(5)    Ensure that the regions provide standard levels of service across the Army. Oversee the staffing, administration, management, and operation of their housing programs per this regulation.

(6)    Assign functional proponents for determination and validation of regional requirements for PP housing.

(7)    Prepare and submit program objective memorandum (POM)/Budget Estimates Submission (BES) input for consolidation and HQDA approval.

(8)    Prioritize nonmission related projects.

(9)    Perform regional AFH mid-year execution/reallocation review.

(10)    Evaluate the effectiveness of their housing programs.

(11)    Oversee the management of their housing furnishings program (see para 3-69c for specific detail).

(12)    Implement the Army's housing leasing program (see para 3-86 for specific detail).

(13)    Serve as the HQDA level integrator between HQDA functional proponents and the field.

(14)    Coordinate the identification of the services to be provided and the standards to be met.

(15)    Oversee the management of GFOQ on an intensive basis (see para 3-98b for specific details).

(16)    Ensure that installation actions submitted to higher headquarters conform to this regulation.

(17)    Monitor the development of the housing portion of installation mobilization plans.

(18)    Provide oversight of housing privatization initiatives.

(19)    Review installation RCI due diligence; participates in RCI source selection evaluations; monitor installation progress on the community development and management plan (CDMP); and review monthly and quarterly asset management reports.

(20)    Provide guidance to installation on formation of RCI team and ensures adequate residual staffing of installation housing division that undergoes RCI.

j.  Garrison commanders will—

(1)    Provide adequate PP housing facilities and services.

(2)    Operate and manage their PP housing programs per this regulation.

(3)    Manage their utilization of PP housing.

(4)    Manage their housing inventory.

(5)    Manage their housing furnishings program (see para 3-69c for specific detail).

(6)    Participate in the execution of the Army's housing leasing programs (see para 3-87 for specific detail).

(7)    Manage their mobile home parks (see sec XII of this chapter for specific detail).

(8)    Manage their GFOQ on an intensive basis (see para 3-98d for specific detail).

(9)    Provide housing services both to help DOD personnel and their Family members locate acceptable, affordable, and nondiscriminatory housing in the local community and to provide an orientation to housing in the local community. Ensure that all assignment orders for personnel governed by this regulation contain the following statement in the special instruction paragraph: "You are required to report to the Housing Services Office serving your existing and new duty stations before you make housing arrangements for renting, leasing, or purchasing any off-post housing".

(10)    Transfer functions in accordance with the RCI process where applicable.

(11)    Oversee preparation of the housing appendix to the engineer annex of the installation mobilization plan (IMP), where required.

(12)    Maintain and provide information from the installation's housing information systems database.

(13)    Support their mobilization missions and training requirements.

(14)    Ensure that all facilities used for housing, both owned and leased, are included in the real property inventory (RPI). Housing owned by a private entity, but on Government-owned lands will also be included, but with a special code.

(15)    Develop, promulgate, and implement a formal service order (SO) maintenance priority system for their installations.

(16)    Manage the Army mobile home parks (see paras 3-92b and 3-94b).

k.  Commanders of ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs will—

(1)    Establish liaisons between assigned military units and IMCOM.

(2)    Monitor service accomplishment through the chain of command.

(3)    Ensure that installation mobilization plans support their mobilization missions.

(4)    Prioritize mission related projects.

3-5. Statutory authority

Statutory authority for this chapter is derived from Titles 5, 10, 15, 18, 29, 31, 37, and 42 of the United States Code (USC), Executive Orders, the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR), and issuances from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the General Services Administration (GSA).

3-6. Policy overview

a. Housing objectives.  

(1) Basic housing groups.   The Army's overall housing program encompasses the management of 2 basic groups of housing. These are PP housing and Army lodging. Family housing and UPH for personnel, to include barracks, comprise housing. Army lodging consists of temporary short term housing for transient personnel and authorized guests.

(2) Permanent party housing.   PP housing is addressed in this regulation. The objective of Family housing and UPH (PP) is to provide adequate housing for eligible military and DOD civilian personnel who are permanently assigned or attached to installations or to activities located within a 1-hour commute of an installation (see paras 3-16a; 3-16d; 3-16e; and 3-20b through 3-20i).

(3) Army lodging.    The objectives of Army lodging are as follows:

(a)    Provide accommodations to military and DOD civilians visiting installations in TDY status and to other authorized guests.

(b)     Provide short-term accommodations for—

1.    Military personnel and/or their Families arriving or departing installations incident to permanent change of station (PCS).

2.    Department of Defense civilian personnel and/or their Families (OCONUS) arriving or departing installations incident to PCS.

3.    Other authorized guests.

b. Entitlements.  

(1) Housing.   Assignment of Government housing to PP personnel is not an entitlement. PP personnel are entitled to housing allowances to secure private housing in the civilian community if Government housing is not provided.

(2) Furnishings.   

(a) Family housing.   Persons eligible for Family housing have no legal entitlement to Government-provided furnishings. Furnishings are provided when it is considered in the best interest of the Government.

(b) Unaccompanied personnel housing.   Personnel assigned to UPH are authorized Government-provided furnishings.

c. General policies.  

(1)    All housing facilities, services, and programs will be operated in support of the Army Communities of Excellence (ACOE) program so as to improve the quality of life and provide comfortable places for people to live.

(2)    The private sector is normally relied on as the primary source of housing. The Government will provide housing only where private sector housing is not available, is too costly, or is substandard. Exceptions are for military necessity (see DOD 7000.14-R).

(3)    Housing Services (HS) will be provided to locate adequate housing in the civilian community. Installations must certify that they have actively pursued off-post housing within the housing market area (see para 3-109).

(4)    Off-post housing will be provided on a nondiscriminatory, equal opportunity basis regardless of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, or Familial status (see DODI 1100.16).

(5)    Provisions for providing housing facilities accessible to physically handicapped individuals will be in accordance with the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS).

(a)     for military Family housing, at least 5 percent of the total inventory but not less than 1 unit (on an installation-by-installation basis) of all housing will be accessible or readily and easily modifiable for use by persons with disabilities. Common areas such as, parking, play areas, streets, and walks and common entrances to multi-unit buildings and facilities will be designed and built to be accessible. In addition, persons with disabilities must have access to programs and activities conducted in public entertainment areas of Government Family housing units and in support facilities provided for Government Family housing residents.

(b)    The UPH for able-bodied military personnel only need not be designed to be accessible to persons with disabilities, but adaptability is recommended since the use of the facility may change with time.

(6)    In general, housing managers will make decisions on the basis of the prudent landlord concept, that is, consider whether a prudent landlord in the private sector would take a proposed action.

(7)    Residents of housing facilities may be held liable for damage to any assigned housing unit, or damage to or loss of any equipment or furnishings assigned to or provided such residents if the damage or loss was caused by the negligence or willful misconduct of the residents or their Family members or guests. This includes loss or damage caused by pets (see para 3-65).

(8)    The basic Self-Help Program, which is in concert with the prudent landlord concept, optimizes the use of scarce resources and gives residents a feeling of homeownership and will be employed to the maximum extent practicable.

(9)    Soldiers or DOD civilians who are stationed in a foreign country, and whose housing status is not the acknowledged responsibility of any other DOD component or Government agency program, shall be supported by the military department that has construction agent responsibility for that country.

(10)    Housing managers at all levels will be aware of Federal, State, and local resources/assistance available for detecting and reducing drug-related (including alcohol) incidents in on-post and off-post housing.

(11)    Soldiers will be paid a partial dislocation allowance (DLA) to occupy/vacate Government Family housing at a permanent duty station for the convenience of the Government (see 37 USC 407(c) and Joint Federal Travel Regulations (JFTRs)).

(a)    A partial DLA must be provided to a Soldier who is ordered for the convenience of the Government to occupy/vacate Government Family housing due to—

1.    Privatization.

2.    Renovation.

3.    Any reason other than a PCS.

(b)    Partial DLA is not authorized for—

1.    Local moves from Government Family housing upon separation or retirement.

2.    Moves incident to PCS.

3.    Moves for the convenience of the Soldier to include moving from off-post to on-post (unless Soldier is key and essential), promotion, and change in Family size or bedroom requirement.

4.    Voluntary moves initiated by the Soldier for reasons of pending divorce or Family separation.

5.    Moves due to member's misconduct.

d. Centralized housing management.  

(1)    Each installation responsible for operating and maintaining a Government housing inventory will have a centralized housing office which should be a separate organizational entity. This office should be headed by a full-time professional housing manager in the career program 27, professional series 1173 housing management. At smaller installations, housing functions may be combined with other functions; however, responsibilities for housing functions will not be fragmented.

(2)    The installation housing manager serves as a channel of communication between the garrison commander and the housing residents. This ensures a check and balance between what the installation provides and what is acceptable to the residents.

(3)    The HS will be an integral part of the housing management office. If an installation has no housing inventory, HS will be obtained from another installation in the area or by combining HS responsibility with some other installation function, which is logically related to housing.

e. Staffing.  

(1)    Housing offices will be staffed and operated by permanently assigned personnel trained in professional housing skills. Staffing will be done in accordance with approved staffing guides.

(2)    The Housing Services Office (HSO) will be sufficiently staffed to permit execution of the HS program mission.

f. Commercial Activities Program.  Housing responsibilities and workload may be separated into contractible and noncontractible categories based on projecting those functions which must be performed by Government employees. The policies, procedures, and responsibilities for carrying out the Commercial Activities Program are prescribed in AR 5-20.

g. Exceptions and waivers.  

(1)    This regulation imposes requirements upon the Army and its activities, installations, and personnel. These requirements derive from the following:

(a)    Public Law, that is, statutory requirements.

(b)    Congressional direction, often given the force of law.

(c)    Directives from higher authority, such as the Executive Office of the President, the OMB, and the OSD.

(d)    Direction from Army leadership, such as the Secretary of the Army (SA), the Chief of Staff, Army (CSA), and their staffs.

(2)    The requirements which flow from paragraphs 3-6g(1)(a) through 3-6g(c) above describe certain limits within which the Army must operate. The requirements which derive from paragraph 3-6g(1)(d), also define limits. These latter limits have been learned from experience. They are not intended to be restrictive but are necessary for one or more of the following:

(a)    Effective establishment of priorities.

(b)    Control of programs and resources.

(c)    Operational needs of higher level headquarters in justifying and defending the resource needs of housing.

(d)    Armywide consistency in dealing with personnel.

(3)    Statutory requirements, cost limitations, dollar thresholds, quantity constraints, approval authority levels, and reporting requirements identified in this regulation must be observed.

(4)    Requests for exceptions to policy or waivers in PP housing operational matters will be sent through command channels to the ACSIM (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

(5)    Requests for exceptions or waivers on matters listed below will be sent through command channels to the DCS, G-1 (DAPE-HR-PR), 300 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0300.

(a)    Housing eligibility.

(b)    Assignment to and termination from housing.

(c)    Housing adequacy standards.

(d)    Housing equal opportunity programs.

(e)    Military housing compensation.

(f)    Housing Referral Services.

(6)    Requests for exceptions or waivers on matters for RCI Program, refer to the Residential Communities Initiative, (Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations & Environment), Portfolio and Asset Management Handbook (current version).

3-7. Information requirements

a. General.  Housing information requirements and specific reporting and information requirements for housing programs and their purposes are addressed in DA Pam 420-1-1.

b. DA Form 4939 (General/Flag Officer's Quarters Quarterly Expenditure Report) (RCS ENG-328).  

(1)    This report provides both O&M and post acquisition construction budget execution data for each GFOQ in the Army's Family housing inventory. It will be used by IMCOM, garrison commander, and the GFOQ resident in carrying out their respective responsibilities for prudent management of GFOQ. See DA Pam 420-1-1 for a sample DA Form 4939 with instructions for completing the form.

(2)    All installations that have funded GFOQ, whether Government-owned or Government-leased, will prepare the report.

(3)    General instructions are provided below.

(a)    Reports will be prepared for each dwelling unit (DU) that is—

1.    Designated for and occupied by a general or flag officer for any portion of the reporting period.

2.    Not designated as GFOQ but temporarily assigned as such.

(b)    Reports will include all funds allocable to the housing unit during the full fiscal quarter even though not assigned to a general or flag officer for the full reporting period.

(c)    All fiscal data will be based on expenditures and conform to the allocation rules in paragraphs 3-104e and 3-104f.

(d)    Reports are required for GFOQ with approved diversions to unaccompanied officer personal housing (UOPH) when the general/flag officer resident is entitled to BAH at the "without dependents" rate. Records of expenditures will be kept in the file established for the specific GFOQ. Regardless of funding source, GFOQ cost limitations must be adhered to.

(e)    Funding data will be derived from the cost accounts maintained as prescribed in DFAS-IN Manual 37-100-FY. Detailed cost account data for O&M will be reported by the cost categories and detailed subordinate cost accounts shown on the report form and described in DFAS-IN Manual 37-100-FY.

(f)    Reports will be reviewed by the housing manager and the Director of Public Works (DPW) and certified by the housing manager.

(g)    Reports will be prepared quarterly as of the end of each fiscal quarter.

(h)    Reports will be provided each GFOQ resident quarterly within 30 to 45 days after the end of the quarter.

(i)    Installation personnel will submit each quarterly report (DA Form 4939) for the fiscal year to the appropriate IMCOM region and to IMCOM (DAIM-ISH) via Enterprise Military Housing general flag officer module. The Army uses the information from the GFOQ Web site database to complete the annual roll up report of Army Housing GFOQ expenditures (see DA Pam 420-1-1).

3-8. Management control

a. Management control provisions.  

(1)    Housing is a highly visible necessity affecting every member of the Army and their Families, . It has a direct impact on Soldier retention and both individual and unit readiness. Housing is a DOD and Army top quality of life concern.

(2)    The provision, management, and operation of Army housing is an enormous undertaking which consumes substantial resources. The different types of housing in the inventory (Family, UPH (PP), and trainee barracks) are governed by a wide array of laws, criteria, thresholds, limitations, and approval authorities. The sizes of the housing inventories and the diversity of guidance applicable to the varied types of housing offer ample opportunity for fraud, waste, and misuse. Hence, housing programs are intensively managed at all levels, from Congress down to the installation.

(3)    AR 420-1 has integrated appropriate management controls throughout. These controls address the various types of housing, their related functional areas, and the programs that guide them.

b. Management control evaluation checklists.  

(1)    A management control evaluation checklist has been developed for the key management controls identified to each of the significant housing functions. The checklist at appendix T addresses the following housing functions:

(a)    Family housing (see para T-10a).

(b)    UPH (PP) (see para T-10b).

(c)    HS (see para T-10c).

(d)    Mobile home parks (see para T-10d).

(e)    Housing furnishings management (see para T-10e).

(f)    Housing requirements determination (see para T-10f).

(g)    Military housing privatization (see para T-10g).

(h)    Rental rates for housing and related facilities (see para T-10h).

(i)    Housing planning for mobilization (see para T-10i).

(2)    Checklists and related documentation should be retained on file for use during staff assistance visits, inspections, and audits.

Section II
Financial Management

3-9. General

a. Scope.  This section prescribes policies for the management of funds appropriated or otherwise made available for Army PP housing programs (see DA Pam 420-1-1 for an overview discussion of housing-related funds processes and procedures).

b. Financial management responsibilities.  Housing financial management is a shared responsibility at all levels. In coordination with the Director of Resource Management (DRM), or equivalent, housing managers will—

(1)    Manage housing resources and assets.

(2)    Carry out financial management policy and procedures.

(3)    Plan, develop, and coordinate current and long-range programs.

(4)    Develop and justify housing budgets.

(5)    Ensure the validity and accuracy of housing requirements documentation.

(6)    Ensure maintenance and oversight of the Army's fiduciary interest in housing under the Military Housing Privatization Initiative (MHPI) to include the application and use of resources for the benefit of its Soldiers within the framework of the partnership between the Army and an eligible entity (see para 3-111 for details on privatized housing).

(7)    Review and analyze housing financial programs to include the following:

(a)    Establishing, collecting, and maintaining cost and performance data in enough depth and detail to justify the programs before advisory and review committees.

(b)    Ensuring validity of charges and accurate measurements of performance for housing regardless of degree of responsibility.

(c)    Monitoring cost limitations to prevent violations.

(d)    Recommending the distribution and use of AFH and OMA housing funds.

(e)     Ensuring cost-effective and efficient use of resources.

c. Specific policy.  

(1) Nonappropriated fund.   Fees charged to occupants of Government-owned UPH (PP) for housekeeping services will be deposited in a lodging facility nonappropriated fund (NAF) instrumentality (NAFI), established, administered, and operated per AR 215-1. These revenues will be used for the purpose of paying the cost of limited housekeeping services for UPH (PP).

(2) By statute.   

(a)    Family housing funds may be used only for Family housing.

(b)    No OMA or other appropriation or funds may be spent on Family housing facilities except—

1.    When Family housing units are diverted to UPH use, operating costs including utilities, services, and furnishings will be funded from the OMA appropriation. (Maintenance and repair (M&R) costs for these units will continue to be charged to the AFH appropriation.)

2.    When the garrison commander directs the emergency relocation of Army personnel and their Families because their DUs are uninhabitable, the Army may pay for those excess lodging and subsistence costs with APF. Under such circumstances, the Army may expend OMA funds to—

(a)    Pay for commercial lodging expenses resulting from the order to vacate Government housing.

(b)    Reimburse dislodged Soldiers for costs that directly resulted from the requirement to vacate Government housing and were necessary to provide temporary habitation.

3.    Requests for other exceptions may be submitted to IMCOM (DAIM-ISH).

3-10. Planning, programming, and budgeting formulation

a. Overview.  

(1)    Prudent management of both existing housing inventories and future acquisition requires a broad perspective of what is needed to acquire, revitalize, operate, and maintain these inventories and to ensure that the housing facilities continue to be available and livable as long as needed to house the force.

(2)    Effective life cycle management requires—

(a)    Identifying what needs to be done and setting the goals and objectives for satisfying these needs (planning).

(b)    Translating goals and objectives into finite action in consideration of alternatives, trade-offs, and the need to balance requirements against limited resources (programming).

(c)    Developing detailed fund estimates to support plans and programs and obtaining resources needed to execute them (budgeting).

b. Planning.  

(1)    Planning is essentially a HQDA function with the field providing input in support of HQDA initiatives. Housing managers at all levels will develop implementing plans which support the mission priorities contained in such guidance as The Army Plan (TAP), Program and Budget Guidance (PBG), and the Army Family Housing Master Plan (FHMP) and the Army Barracks Master Plan (BMP), both of which address the Army's housing facility strategy.

(2)    In fulfilling their financial management responsibilities, housing managers will establish objectives and mission priorities and will program workloads for their housing programs.

(3)    Each installation will have a current, integrated series of plans associated with the sustainment of its housing inventories. These plans will convey a complete picture of what is needed to ensure that the inventories will serve their intended purposes or will address the planned disposition of units to be removed from the active inventory.

(a) Operations and maintenance.   Each installation will have an annual work plan (AWP) and an unconstrained long-range work plan (LRWP) for the O&M of its housing facilities. Separate plans should be prepared for AFH and UPH (PP).

1. Annual work plan.   Prior to the start of each fiscal year (FY), the DPW, or equivalent, in conjunction with the housing manager, will prepare the AWP showing the breakdown of O&M funds. It will be based on the current LRWP and current inspections. It will serve as a resource for identifying and scheduling all work and services according to resources available and priorities established by the garrison commander. AWP is a planning document that reflects the best information available and is adjusted throughout the year. M&R projects (to include incidental improvements for AFH) included in the AWP must be developed into project format.

2. Long-range work plan.   Annually, the housing manager, in conjunction with the DPW, or equivalent, prepares the LRWP (covering the 5-year period beyond the AWP) for O&M work and services. The LRWP may highlight significant areas of concern. It may also suggest a course of action which the corresponding AWP does not indicate when the AWP is considered by itself.

(b) Construction.   The identification of new construction and modernization requirements for housing are found in the Army's housing master plans. These plans are based on the Army's housing needs as influenced by the available inventory and its condition. On-post housing facilities assets are identified in the real property inventory (RPI) and off-post assets in the housing market analysis (HMA). Quality of the on-post assets is identified in the Installation Status Report (ISR). The quality of off-post assets is identified in the HMA.

1.    Based on the data in these documents, both new construction and modernization projects which require construction funds are reflected in the Capital Investment Strategy (CIS) of the Real Property Master Plan (RPMP), cover the 6-year POM period, and comprise the future years program (FYP) (see DA Pam 420-1-1). The basis for the Short Range Component (SRC) is the garrison commander's unrestrained overall general plan for satisfying real property requirements (see AR 210-20).

2.    The housing master plans and the FYP give the housing manager a more comprehensive appreciation for what is required to have housing facilities available for their intended use.

(c) Review of plans.   A concurrent and integrated review of the plans discussed (see paras 3-10a and 3-10b) will provide a complete perspective of housing facilities. This will aid the housing manager, the DPW, and the garrison commander in making sound and sensible management decisions about housing facilities.

(d) Disposition of plans.   

1.    The housing manager will review all plans identified (see paras 3-10a and 3-10b).

2.    The IMCOM regions will send the FYP to IMCOM per DA Pam 420-1-1.

c. Programming.  Housing managers will develop workload and project requirements for all housing programs for inclusion in the formal resource requests to IMCOM. Care will be taken to develop data that—

(1)    Conform to IMCOM guidance, regardless of source.

(2)    Closely parallel the plans in paragraph 3-10b.

d. Budgeting.  Housing managers will ensure that plans and programs are appropriately translated into budget estimates. Resource requirements identified in budget estimates will be consistent with workload levels reflected in inventory, accounting, manpower, furnishings, and other records, databases, and reports (see para 3-7 and DA Pam 420-1-1).

3-11. Budget execution and records

a. Budget execution.  Each level of command will develop financial plans that support approved programs and assure the maximum use of resources during the budget execution year. To this end, housing managers, in conjunction with the functional budget analyst, will—

(1)    Ensure that annual funds are programmed as necessary to accomplish all major M&R (especially direct contracts) included in the AWP during the first 3 quarters of the FY being executed.

(2)    Request adequate funding to support the planned use of APF. Estimates of quarterly or monthly (as applicable) funding requirements will be developed on the basis of supporting the scheduled work in the AWP. Allocation requirements will not be developed on a straight line percentage basis nor will they be merely restatements of the obligation plans. Command requirements will consider the impact of and explain, as necessary, front loading for items such as leasing contracts, coal procurement, furnishings procurement, and projects having a "subject to the availability of funds (SAF)" clause in unawarded contracts.

(3)    Ensure obligation plans are realistic and support the AWP.

(4)    Review periodically, or at least quarterly, status of resource and work plans.

(5)    Request (ASA (FM&C) and ACSIM) mid-year/mid-cycle reviews of their programs during the budget execution year. Identification of the need for and the parameters and instructions for such in-progress reviews will be set forth in separate "call" memorandums as required.

b. Limitations and approval authorities.  

(1) Congressional limitations.   In its management of APF, Congress has prescribed certain statutory limitations which affect various programs and subprograms. Additionally, the Congressional committees, which have proponency for the various APF, prescribe administrative limitations from time to time. Any of these limitations may be changed or deleted annually. Also, new limitations may be added each year.

(2) Other limitations.   Limitations have also been promulgated by OMB, OSD, and IMCOM for the reasons cited in paragraph 3-6g(2).

(3) Quantification of limitations.   

(a)    Principal cost limitations and approval authority levels are summarized in paragraph 3-14.

(b)    Other limitations currently in effect are addressed in those sections of this chapter that pertain to the program or subprogram affected by each specific limitation.

c. Records.  

(1) Family housing.   

(a)    Housing managers, in conjunction with the functional budget analyst, will review accounting records and reports in order to—

1.    Monitor actual obligations against obligation plans.

2.    Track reimbursable collections against appropriate accounts.

(b)    Housing managers will also maintain the following files for Family housing.

1. Project files.   Project files to include copies of contracts, purchase requests, and project approval documents. A separate file will be kept for each project.

2. Cost data files.   A separate cost data file for each housing unit that is susceptible to incurring large costs (for example, high cost leased housing, historic DUs, oversized DUs, and GFOQ). Special emphasis will be given a DU that is likely to exceed congressional limitations.

3. Incidental improvement projects.   A file of approval documents and cost records for each incidental improvement project.

(2) Unaccompanied personnel housing (permanent party).    Housing managers, in conjunction with the functional budget analyst and fund manager, will be familiar with records and reports that address the operations and expenses and obligations for UPH (PP).

3-12. Fund use and control policies directly applicable to Army Family housing

a. Basic policies.  

(1) Common service policy.   

(a)    Each command or agency will plan, program, and budget for all costs that apply to the housing units it controls, operates, and maintains. This includes housing units operated under permit from other military Services, other governmental agencies, or other governments. Where military personnel of another DOD component (for example, U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Marine Corps) occupy Army-controlled housing, reimbursement from the sponsoring component and vice versa is prohibited. Reimbursement from non-DOD agencies is required.

(b)    The common service principle is not applicable to support services procured by or from another Service for which reimbursement is required to appropriations other than AFH.

(2) Family housing operations and maintenance.   These funds will apply to operation and maintenance and those incidental improvements accomplished under limited authority (see para 3-14).

(3) Major maintenance and repair and/or improvement projects requiring higher authority approval.   Project descriptions will address the need and will state requirements by FY. Housing managers must ensure that cost limitations and approval authorities are not exceeded (see para 3-14).

(4) Intra-Army reimbursable work.   

(a)    The housing manager is responsible for initiating all documents for intra-Army reimbursable work which will result in an obligation against AFH funds.

(b)    DD Form 448 (Military Interdepartmental Purchase Request) (MIPR) will be used at the installation level by the housing manager in requesting routine work or services to be performed by other installation activities.

(c)    The installation activity designated to accomplish the work or provide the services will be responsible for accepting the purchase request using DD Form 448-2 (Acceptance of MIPR) and establishing controls so that total funds on the purchase request are not exceeded during work execution. Should a shortage of funds develop, the performing activity will take action to request additional funds, informing the housing manager of the amounts required and explaining the situations that created the funding shortfall. Neither further work will be accomplished nor services provided until the housing manager has provided additional funds.

(d)    The housing manager will provide DD Form 448 to the performing installation activity at the beginning of each quarter or monthly (as applicable) for all reimbursable services such as the following:

1.    Refuse collection and disposal.

2.    Entomology services.

3.    Transportation.

4.    Utilities.

5.    Furniture repair, handling, and moving.

6.    Routine M&R not to exceed the service order (SO) level.

7.    Fire and emergency services. The ratio of Facility Activity Code (FAC) 7100 (Family Housing Dwelling) to total square feet (SF) at the installation will be used to prorate the percent of the fire and emergency services costs that will be Family housing.

(e)    The acceptance of the DD Form 448 by the performing activity will be the basis for recording an obligation against AFH funds on the first working day of the fiscal quarter or month (as applicable) for which services are requested. A monthly reconciliation between expenses and obligations and against available funds will be accomplished as of the end of each month. DD Form 448 issued in subsequent quarters or months (as applicable) will give full consideration to any unexpensed balances remaining from previous quarters.

(f)    Individual M&R projects are directly funded and will not be reimbursed through reimbursable orders.

b. Reimbursements earned and collected.  

(1)    AFH facilities and services are provided to certain residents on a reimbursable basis. Examples of residents or users that fall under these provisions are as follows:

(a)    Owners of privately-owned mobile homes located on Army-owned mobile home parks.

(b)    Non-DOD uniformed personnel of the U.S. Coast Guard, Public Health Service, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

(c)     foreign service officers and American Red Cross personnel.

(d)    Authorized civilian residents.

(2)    Reimbursements may come from a number of sources (see 10 USC 2831). Examples of reimbursement sources are as follows:

(a)    Proceeds from the rental of Family housing and mobile home facilities under Army control (see also para 3-16d(11)(b)).

(b)    Collections from the rental of Army-controlled furnishings.

(c)    Reimbursements from the residents of Army-controlled Family housing and mobile home rental facilities for services rendered, utilities consumed, and maintenance and repairs provided.

(d)    Funds obtained from individuals as a result of losses, damages, or destruction to Army-controlled Family housing and mobile home rental facilities and to Army-controlled furnishings that were caused by the abuse or negligence of such individuals.

(e)    Reimbursements from other Government agencies for expenditures from the AFH account.

(f)    Proceeds of the handling and disposal of Family housing (including related land and improvements) (para 3-12d).

(3)    Rental rates will be established per policy in sections XII and XV of this chapter.

(4)    Proceeds from the collections set forth in paragraph 3-12b(2) will be credited to the AFH account to defray AFH program costs.

(5)    Reimbursable support provided by AFH to users will be by written agreements. The written agreements will include the minimum data shown in AR 37-49.

c. Service and administrative type buildings.  The O&M costs for service-type buildings (for example, office buildings or warehouses), where the entire building is used exclusively for Family housing, are proper charges to AFH. No costs of shared administrative building space will be charged to the AFH on a pro rata or other basis.

d. Handling and disposal of receipts from excess Family housing.  

(1)    Receipts accruing from the handling and disposal of any excess AFH will be transferred into the AFH account as prescribed by law (see DOD 7000.14-R).

(2)    Each installation, having excess property for disposal, will provide funding for the necessary maintenance, protection, and other expenses until property disposal action has been properly completed.

(3)    Costs to remove housing that is to be replaced by new construction will be charged to the site preparation costs of the new construction project.

(4)    Costs of housing to be demolished under provisions of AR 405-90 will be charged to AFH.

e. Charges to foreign military personnel.  

(1) foreign military students or trainees.   

(a)    When U.S. student requirements for Family housing have been satisfied and will continue to be satisfied for the projected duration of the foreign student's occupancy, charge costs incident to the O&M of DU. Table 3-1 provides guidance for calculating such costs (see DOD 7000.14-R).

(b)    When foreign students occupy DU which are not excess to U.S. needs, charges will be in accordance with section XV.

(2) Personnel Exchange Program.   The PEP personnel will be charged an amount not to exceed the BAH of a U.S. member of equivalent grade.

(3) Other foreign military personnel.   All other foreign military personnel will be charged as follows:

(a)    In accordance with the terms of agreement between the U.S. and foreign Governments.

(b)    Where no formal agreements exist, in accordance with rental rates established per section XV of this chapter.

Table 3-1. Calculation of Family housing charges for foreign military students
StepAction
1Identify the O&M costs incurred for the installation Family housing inventory using the recent annual AFH cost report.
2Inflate STEP 1 costs by the O&M inflation factor published in the PBG.
3Divide STEP 2 costs by number of DUs in inventory to determine annual cost per DU.
4Divide STEP 3 costs by 12 to arrive at the average monthly cost per DU.
5Add $100 to the STEP 4 results. (The $100 is an empirical figure-predicated on interest and principal for debt amortization-and is used in lieu of depreciation.)

3-13. Army Family housing costing

for a general overview of AFH accounts, see DA Pam 420-1-1. For more detailed information, see DFAS-IN Manual 37-100-FY.

a. Funded cost reconciliation.  Funded costs for a reporting period must reconcile to obligations incurred for the same period.

b. Administrative support and supervision costs.  Costs that apply to administrative support and supervision will be limited to those incurred at the installation level. (Exclude any cost at levels of command above the installation.)

c. Intra-appropriation transfers.  Congress has limited the ability to transfer funds within, among, and between the accounts and subaccounts of AFH. No transfers are permitted between construction accounts and the accounts for operations, maintenance, utilities, leasing, and privatization (Budget Program (BP) 190000). Within BP 190000, Congress has established thresholds that limit the amounts of funds that can be transferred among and between the O&M accounts and subaccounts. Unless otherwise notified by HQDA, all reprogramming requests for fund transfers among and between AFH O&M accounts and subaccounts will be submitted to OASA (FM&C) and SAFM-BUI-F for approval and action.

d. Elements of cost.  

(1) Labor cost.   

(a)    Civilian and military labor costs will be charged to AFH. If overseas Family housing activities employ indigenous personnel (local national or third country national), costs will include a percentage of direct labor costs to cover leave, retirement, and any other allowances or employee benefits payable by the Army. Only personnel assigned against the tables of distribution and allowances (TDAs) for Family housing management activities will be costed directly to AFH.

(b)    AFH will reimburse the appropriate operating appropriation for its pro rata share of labor costs in Joint Family housing, and UPH (PP) activities. This includes labor costs in the office of the housing division. It also includes the Housing Division Chief and Secretary, program and budget activities working in both the Family and UPH areas, HS activities, and in-house labor involved in the control, moving, and handling of Family and UPH furnishings.

(c)    Military personnel directly assigned to Family housing management activities will be accounted for as an unfunded cost within the Family housing structure. However, labor costs of construction units composed of foreign nationals, but excluding U.S. military labor are funded MILCON project costs (see DOD 7000.14-R).

(2) Material.   

(a)    Stock fund items will be costed and obligated, simultaneously, at current standard prices at the time the order is placed on the stock fund.

(b)    Other than stock fund, items will be costed at actual prices at the time requisition is filled or contractual document is concluded.

(c)    Except for self-help items unique to Family housing, inventories of material and supplies will not be separately procured or maintained for the operation and maintenance of Family housing. Authorized equipment and material, not included in an installation's normal inventory, which is required for immediate use will be procured with direct charge to AFH.

(3) Equipment cost.   

(a)    Costs for use of equipment under rental contracts with private vendors will be recorded at the time of usage in the amounts provided by the contract.

(b)    Government-owned equipment will be costed based on the hours of use and chargeable at the rates set in chapter 6 of this publication. Government-owned equipment and vehicles used in the O&M of Family housing will be provided by the installation on a reimbursable basis.

(4) Contracts.   Costs of all contracts that solely support Family housing will be charged directly to AFH funds. AFH funds will not be used to reimburse OMA on a pro rata basis for any M&R project unless work was done on Family housing property.

(5) Utilities.   At all activities, regardless of the accounting system used, utilities will be costed to AFH at a computed unit-cost rate comprised of the following elements:

(a)    Cost of the utility service purchased.

(b)    Line loss in transmission.

(c)    Normal operation and maintenance of the utility distribution system outside of the Family housing areas, excluding major one-time or non-recurring cost of M&R projects. (Costs of both major one-time and recurring M&R projects for the portions of the distribution system within the Family housing areas are charged directly to AFH.)

e. Direct costs.  

(1)    Direct costs are those that may be identified specifically with any one job, activity, or function. These costs are billed directly to the reimbursing activity by the activity which provides the support services. Normally, fractional parts of an hour, as opposed to whole hours, will be charged to each job.

(2)    The direct O&M costs for Family housing include—

(a)    Management (less those support costs which are indirect support costs).

(b)    Services (less those costs which are indirect support costs).

(c)    Furnishings (less those costs which are indirect support costs).

(d)    Miscellaneous.

(e)    M&R, including incidental improvements (less those costs which are indirect support costs).

(f)    Utilities.

(g)    Lease payments.

(3)    Real property maintenance activities which have shop or productive expense rates will add those rates to direct work or services in support of Family housing. These rates are considered to be direct costs.

f. Indirect support costs.  

(1)    Certain services are furnished in support of Family housing facilities for which it is not feasible to make a direct charge to AFH. Examples are services performed by civilian personnel offices, resource management offices, supply offices, and engineering offices. These support services constitute indirect support and incur indirect support costs.

(2)    Although indirect costs will be charged to AFH, no such charges will be applied against an individual housing unit's cost limitations. Only direct costs will be applied against unit cost limitations.

(3)    Activities that bill AFH for support costs will identify separately the direct and indirect support costs. Housing managers will be provided with full supporting documentation, analyses, and methodologies used to identify indirect support costs before approving the expenditure of AFH funds for these costs.

g. Construction costs.  Construction and improvement projects and their costs are managed by the supporting USACE district and division. The USACE districts and divisions report progress and costs through their channels to Headquarters, USACE and HQDA. The DPW and housing managers will monitor progress and costs of construction.

h. Security costs.  

(1)    Personnel who are considered to be potential terrorist targets must be protected. This requirement extends to the physical security of their Government-provided housing, including leased housing.

(a)    AFH funds will be used for security upgrades, including installed equipment classified as real property. These upgrades must be monitored by the IMCOM to ensure that adequate controls over the expenditure of AFH funds are established.

(b)    At isolated locations that have only Family housing, AFH funds may be used for perimeter guards.

(c)    OMA and/or OPA funds will be used for items or equipment like radios, or other portable equipment that can be used to support the entire mission at the installation.

(2)    Security upgrades using AFH funds will be validated by the installation provost marshal and force protection officer. This will ensure the level of protection provided the housing is related directly to the level of anti-terrorism protection required. The DPW will ensure compliance with life, safety, and building codes in any building modification.

(3)    The delegation of funding approval authority for AFH BP 190000 funding includes requirements for security upgrades.

3-14. Dollar limitations and approval authorities

a. Family housing.  Dollar limitations and approval authorities for Family housing are summarized in table 3-2. These limitations are based on obligations of funds. Cost limitations for special allowance items for special command positions are addressed in paragraph 3-100 and table 3-11.

b. Unaccompanied personnel housing (permanent party).  Chapters 2 and 4 and of this publication set forth the cost limitations and approval authorities for MCA/OMA funded facilities such as UPH (PP).

Table 3-2. Dollar limitations and approval authorities
Level of Command/
Agency
New Construction
(BP 10000000)
Improvements
(BP 60000000)
M&R
(BP 192000)
Incidental
Improvement
(BP 192000)
O&M
(BP 192000)
Congress
Authorize and appropriate.
Approves all individual projects. Approves reprogramming for projects when revised estimate exceeds 125 percent of program amount (PA) or $2 million, whichever is less.
Approves A/E designs which exceed $1 million.
Authorize and appropriate.
Approves projects requested when cost (adjusted by area cost factor) exceeds $50, 000 per DU. Approves reprogramming when revised estimate exceeds $50, 000 per DU and any project whose revised estimate exceeds PA by 125 percent or $2 million, whichever is less.
Authorize and appropriate.

GFOQ: Approves total M&R (including incidental improvements) estimated to exceed $35,000 per DU per FY.

Per Project:
Above $7.5 million.
Authorize and appropriate.
Authorize and appropriate.

GFOQ: Approves total O&M estimated to exceed $35,000 per DU per FY.
OSDApportionment/
Program Authorization.
Apportionment/
Program Authorization.
Apportionment/ Program Authorization.Apportionment/ Program Authorization.Apportionment/
Program
Authorization.
HQDAReprogram internally (within authorization and appropriation) projects with revised estimate up to 125 percent or $2 million above the approved amount, whichever is less.Per DU:

Less than $50,000 (adjusted by area cost factor).

Per Project: Reprograms internally (within annual appropriation and authorization) projects up to 125 percent or $2 million, whichever is less, where individual dwelling unit costs do not exceed $50,000 (adjusted by area cost factor).
Notifies Congress semiannually of changes from congressionally-approved project list.
Per DU:

GFOQ:
$30,000 or more for a single major M&R project per DU.

Non-GFOQ:
M&R estimated to exceed $30,000 per DU per FY.

Per Project: $1M or more, not to exceed 50 percent of DU replacement cost.
Per DU:
$3K or more per dwelling unit per FY; over $30,000 per FY when work supports requirements for physically handicapped.

Per Project: Delegated.
 
HQ, IMCOMNone.None.Per DU: (Delegated to installation):

GFOQ:
$30,000 for a single major M&R project per DU.

Non-GFOQ:
Less than $30,000 for major M&R (including incidental improvements) per FY.

Per Project: Less than $1 million, not to exceed 50 percent of DU replacement cost.
Per DU:
(Delegated to installation):

Less than $3,000 per FY; less than $30,000 per FY when work supports requirements for physically handicapped.

Per Project: Less than $750,000 per FY or $1.5 million for health, life, or safety threatening requirements.
 
IMCOM regionNone.None.As delegated by higher HQ.As delegated by higher HQ.As delegated by higher
HQ (see HQ, IMCOM above).
InstallationNone.None.As delegated by higher HQ (see HQ, IMCOM above).As delegated by higher HQ (see HQ, IMCOM above).GFOQ only:
Approves total combined O&M estimated at less than $35,000 per DU per FY where the M&R component is less than $25,000.

Notes:
1. Statutory limitations-(a) New Construction (BP 10000000). Cost limit is approved by individual project in Public Law (PL) of FY. (b) Improvements (BP 60000000). Cost limit is $50,000 per DU ($60,000 to support the Exceptional Family Member Program) as adjusted by area cost factor except as otherwise approved by individual project in PL of FY. Cost per DU includes proportional costs of other real property serving the DU. The cost limit includes concurrent M&R and incidental improvements. The cost limit is effective only during execution of the project and is not limited by FY. This limit does not apply to repair or restoration of DU damaged by fire, flood, or other disaster; however, the installation is required to notify ACSIM of the restoration and cost to repair the DU. (c) M&R of GFOQ (BP 192000). Total M&R (including incidental improvements) estimated to exceed $35,000 (absolute) per DU per FY must be included in the budget justification material for congressional review and approval. For purposes of this threshold, M&R costs include work done outside the 5-foot building line (grounds maintenance, utility lines, driveways, sidewalks, and design costs). Increases for change of occupancy will not exceed $5,000 or 25 percent, whichever is less, above the congressionally-approved limit. Out-of-cycle requests to execute work will not be submitted to Congress unless they are for bona fide emergencies. They must be submitted to Congress over the signature of the Secretary of the Army. (d) Incidental Improvements (BP 192000). Cost limit is $750,000 per project or $1.5 million for health, life, or safety threatening requirements. (e) Leasing (BP 194000). Annual leasing costs per Family DU are limited to $12,000 (domestic) and $20,000 (foreign). A small number of leases exceeding these limits is authorized to OSD who allocates them to the military Services.
2. Administrative limitations (Congressional)-M&R of non-GFOQ. Total M&R (including incidental improvements) estimated to exceed $7.5 million per project requires advance prior congressional notification.
3. Administrative limitations (HQDA)-(a) Construction. All construction projects for GFOQ will be included in the annual budget submittal to Congress. No construction projects will be done for GFOQ through reprogramming action. (b) Damaged or destroyed DU. The restoration of damaged or destroyed DU will be funded with M&R funds in accordance with the following: less than $30,000 approved at HQ, IMCOM level (as delegated); $30K or more but less than 50 percent of replacement cost approved at HQDA level. Where restoration cost exceeds 50 percent of replacement cost, HQDA will determine whether repairs will be funded with M&R funds or with construction funds. Except for GFOQ, the FY M&R limitations per DU do not apply to repair or restoration of DU damaged by fire, flood, or other disaster. (c) O&M of GFOQ. Total O&M estimated to equal or exceed $60,000 (absolute) per DU per FY, where the M&R component is less than $35,000, must be approved by ASA (IE&E).

Section III
Assignment, Occupancy, and Termination

3-15. General

a. Scope.  This section establishes policies for eligibility, assignment, occupancy, and termination of Government-owned or Government-controlled Family housing and UPH (PP). This excludes privatized housing.

b. Grade comparisons.  The grades of DOD civilian employees will be integrated into military grade groups as shown in table 3-3.

Table 3-3. Military and civilian schedule of equivalent grades for housing assignment purposes
Military grade groupCivilian grade group (see note)
 Senior executive
Service/
Senior level
General scheduleEducators
(20 USC 901-907)
Nonappro-priated fund employeesWage system
O-7 thru
O-10
SES 1 thru 6
ES 1 thru 6
  NF6 
O-6 GS-15   
O-5 and W-5 GS-14 and GS-13Schedule KNF5WS-14 thru WS-19
WL-15 and production support equivalents
O-4 and W-4 GS-12Teaching principals,
schedule L
  
O-3 and W-3 GS-11 and GS-10Schedule C,
Step 4 and above,
and schedules D-F and M-O
NF4
WS-8 thru WS-13
O-2, W-1, and W-2 GS-9 and GS-8Schedule C, Steps 1-3NF3WL-6 thru WL-14
O-1 GS-7  WG-12 thru WG-15 and production support equivalents
E-7 thru E-9 GS-6  WS-1 thru WS-7
E-5 and E-6 GS-5  WL-1 thru WL-5
WG-9 thru WG-11
E-4 GS-4 NF2
WG-1 thru WG-8
E-1 thru E-3GS-1 thru GS-3NF1

Notes:
1. This table is based on the military/civilian relationship established for Geneva Convention purposes. NAF positions will be considered equivalent to their counterparts under the General Schedule and Wage System. Senior Executive Service positions shall be considered equivalent to GS-16 through GS-18 positions. Senior Level positions shall be considered equivalent to Senior Executive Service positions. For the Wage System, when a more precise relationship to military rank or General Schedule grades is necessary, this shall be determined by the garrison commander using the grade groupings in the table as a guide. Equivalent grades for other civilian employees not included in the table shall be determined by the garrison commander using the table as a guide.

3-16. Assignment of Family housing

a. Eligibility for Family housing.  The following categories of personnel are eligible for Family housing:

(1)    Military personnel with accompanying Family members (with accompanying command-sponsored Family members in overseas areas).

(2)    DOD civilian employees and civilians with accompanying Family members who are DOD-sponsored (key and essential) civilian personnel as authorized by AR 420-1.

(3)     foreign military trainees, foreign Personnel Exchange Program and integrated personnel, special projects personnel (foreign military and civilian), and foreign liaison personnel with accompanying Family members as authorized by this regulation.

(4)    Unmarried chaplains and unaccompanied married chaplains (see also paras 3-16d(15), 3-20e, and 3-29a(2)(c)(2)).

b. Designation of housing.  

(1)    The garrison commander designates housing for occupancy by personnel in various pay grade groups. Family housing should be designated for occupancy as follows:

(a)    General and flag officers (O-7 through O-10).

(b)    Senior grade officers (O-6).

(c)    Field grade officers (O-5, O-4, CW5, and CW4).

(d)    Company grade officers (O-1 through O-3, WO1 through CW3).

(e)    Enlisted personnel (E-1 through E-9) may be further categorized, that is, senior noncommissioned officers (NCOs) (E-7 through E-9)/junior NCOs and junior enlisted (E-6 and below) may be even further categorized based upon the needs of the installation.

(2)    The garrison commander further designates specific DUs for use by personnel assigned to selected key and essential positions. These include special command positions (see para 3-99b), installation and garrison commanders in the grade of O-6 (see para 3-70b(2)), the Sergeant Major of the Army (SMA) (see para 3-71b(1)), and special command sergeant major (CSM) positions (see para 3-71a). Collectively, these DUs are referred to as representational housing.

(3)    Commanders will ensure equitable distribution of Family housing assets among all pay grades by means of reallocation/redesignation action (see sec V of this chapter).

c. Bedroom eligibility.  

(1)    The garrison commander establishes bedroom eligibility based on local requirements and assets availability. (For recommended bedroom eligibility guidelines, see DA Pam 420-1-1.)

(2)    The garrison commander may stipulate 2 Family members share a bedroom for equitable distribution of the inventory.

(3)    Installation policy will not require that more than two Family members share a bedroom, except for:

(a)    The sponsor and spouse.

(b)    Authorized Family members who are married to each other.

(4)    A sponsor may voluntarily choose to be assigned to a DU where the number of Family members sharing a bedroom exceeds the established installation policy.

(5)    When the sponsor or spouse is pregnant (as confirmed by medical authority) and is accompanied by other Family members, the sponsor may apply for and occupy housing with a separate bedroom for the expected child.

(6)    A Family member who has a severe physical or mental disability, as confirmed by medical authority, is authorized a separate bedroom.

d. Assignment provisions.  

(1)    Assignment will not be made unless the sponsor is expected to occupy the housing for a minimum of 6 months.

(2)    Unmarried sponsors with accompanying (command sponsored for OCONUS) Family members will compete equally with married sponsors for Family housing. This includes sponsors whose sole Family members are expected to reside with them full-time based on legal custody but who are enrolled as full time students at an institute of higher learning (that is, college or equivalent).

(3)    In cases where courts award joint custody of children and the single Soldier has no other Family members, assignment to Family housing is authorized only if the Soldier has physical custody of the children for more than 6 consecutive months per year. Family housing applicants must submit copies of court documents which provide for physical custody of the children for more than 6 months per year.

(4)    Personnel will not be assigned to more than 1 Family housing DU at the same time. During intra-post moves the effective date of assignment to the new DU will be the same as the effective date of termination from the old DU. The resident forfeits BAH for only 1 DU. Therefore, the other unit will be considered vacant for utilization reporting purposes.

(5)    Pregnant military personnel (with no other Family members) will not be assigned to Family housing until the birth of the child. Exception to policy may be granted by the garrison commander on a case-by-case basis.

(6)    The following categories of personnel who intend occupancy of, or overnight visitation to, a Family housing DU will provide proof of registry to the provost marshal's office prior to occupancy. Failure to do so will result in the host sponsor being evicted from housing.

(a)    Soldiers who are required to register as sex offenders pursuant to AR 27-10 or who are registered or who are required to register as a sex offender under any other provision of law.

(b)    Any Family member who is registered or who is required to register as a sex offender under any provision of law.

(c)    Any DOD civilian employee or civilian who is registered or who is required to register as a sex offender under any provision of law.

(d)    Any Family member of a DOD civilian employee or civilian who is registered or who is required to register as a sex offender under any provision of law.

(7)    Sponsors with exceptional Family members may forward a request for special housing consideration in writing to the DPW housing management division. The housing manager, in conjunction with the medical department and the EFMP Committee, will make a recommendation to the garrison commander.

(8)    Accompanied foreign military trainees may be assigned Family housing only after all U.S. military requirements are satisfied.

(9)    Personnel Exchange Program personnel function as fully integrated members of the Army and will be housed on the same basis (that is, grade category and priority) as equivalent U.S. personnel.

(10)    The foreign personnel below may be assigned excess Family housing unless a memorandum of understanding (MOU) or memorandum of agreement (MOA) dictates otherwise. Foreign military personnel who claim housing eligibility due to the provisions of an MOU or MOA must provide a copy of the document to support their application.

(a)    Special projects personnel (foreign military and civilian) who participate in specific projects, studies, or programs mutually beneficial to the U.S. and their parent Government.

(b)     foreign liaison personnel who function on behalf of their Government.

(11)    DOD civilian employees, except key and essential personnel as determined by the garrison commander, shall rely on private communities for housing support. For assignment to military Family housing, DOD civilian employees will be integrated into grade categories per table 3-3.

(a)    In CONUS, Alaska, and Hawaii garrison commanders may grant exceptions to civilian employee reliance on private sector housing for valid reason, such as isolated duty location. Where military Family housing is provided, rent will be charged per section XV of this chapter.

(b)    In foreign countries and U.S. possessions and territories, DOD U.S. citizen civilian employees (both APF and NAF) recruited in the United States may be authorized to occupy excess military Family housing without charge, if adequate housing in the private community is not available. These personnel will forfeit their housing allowances or living quarters allowances (LQAs). Forfeited allowances, in an amount equal to the actual costs of housing services rendered (to include utilities), will be transferred to AFH as a reimbursement (see para 3-12b(2)(a)). However, as housing for key and essential civilian employees is funded by APF direct appropriations, housing allowances forfeited by them is statutorily prohibited from transfer to AFH as a reimbursement.

(c)    The housing of DOD civilian employees who are not key and essential personnel will not be used as justification to retain excess military Family housing. However, where divestiture of excess military Family housing is not feasible, the following action may be taken:

1.    In the U.S., garrison commanders may lease excess Family housing in remote areas to DOD civilian employees. Such housing will be provided on a rental basis in accordance with section XV.

2.    In foreign areas, where not prohibited by a Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA), DOD U.S. citizen civilian employees (both APF and NAF) and DOD-sponsored U.S. citizen civilian contractor personnel may be assigned to excess military Family housing on a voluntary basis or as a condition of employment. Before offering housing as a condition of employment, coordination must be made with the local housing authority. Contractor personnel may be assigned to excess military Family housing if their contract specifically includes housing or the IMCOM region approves the exception. These personnel shall voluntarily authorize the use of their LQA to reimburse AFH for the actual costs of housing services rendered (including utilities costs). The actual costs of military Family housing must be less than LQA. The host IMCOM region will administer and execute MIPRs under funded reimbursable procedures. The assignment of civilians must not prevent the future assignment of Soldier Families to military Family housing.

(d)    In overseas areas NAF employees who are authorized housing or an housing allowance shall have equal priority with APF civilian employees for assignment to Family housing per DOD 1401.1-M. Occupancy by NAF employees shall be on a reimbursable basis in accordance with DOD 7000.14-R. For reimbursement, use available APF or NAF in consonance with the funding of the NAF employee's position. Outstanding accounts with Family housing for NAF employees shall be paid promptly.

(12)     Where DOD-sponsored civilian personnel (for example, U.S. or third country national bank employees and key contractor personnel) serving DOD military installations at overseas locations cannot obtain suitable housing in the vicinity of the installation, they may occupy DOD Family housing on a rental basis as determined per section XV, where not prohibited by a SOFA. Priority for assignment will be determined by the garrison commander.

(13)    When American Red Cross personnel are provided Government housing in the U.S., the American Red Cross personnel or the American Red Cross shall pay the rental rate established in accordance with section XV. In foreign countries, American Red Cross personnel will be furnished housing on the same basis as DOD civilian employees.

(14)    In overseas locations, housing may be provided on a reimbursable basis to the United Service Organizations, Incorporated (USO) executive and professional staff where it is within the capability of the overseas military command and not prohibited by a SOFA. The rates charged will be equal to the housing allowances or rate charged to equivalent grade civil service employees.

(15)    Unmarried chaplains and unaccompanied married chaplains will compete equally for AFH with sponsors within the appropriate grade category. They will not be required to share Family housing. In all circumstances, assignments to Family housing will result in forfeiture of housing allowances. Diversion of the Family housing DU is required per paragraphs 3-16a(4), 3-20e, and 3-29a.

(16)    Garrison commanders will allow spouses to sign for housing and furnishings in the absence of the sponsor. A power of attorney or notarized statement is not required.

(17)    Chief warrant officers in grades CW-4 and CW-5 will be assigned field grade officer housing unless they voluntarily accept company grade housing. Such acceptance will remain in effect until departure from the installation.

(18)    Under unusual circumstances, housing may be assigned to personnel in one pay grade category above or below that for which housing is designated. When assigning housing under these circumstances, the housing manager will ensure that assignments reflect an equitable distribution of assets among pay grades.

(19)    Soldiers married to other service member whose spouses accompany them are authorized assignment to Family housing on the same basis as other married personnel. Where one Soldier is an officer and the other is enlisted, the garrison commander, based on local circumstances, may elect a housing assignment that will—

(a)    Best maintain good order and discipline within the community, and

(b)    Be in the best interest of the Service.

(20)    When Soldiers married to other service member whose spouses do not accompany them but who arrive within 120 days of each other, the first Soldier to arrive at the new duty station may apply for and be assigned Family housing provided that the second arriving Soldier does not accept Family housing elsewhere (see para 3-16d(4)). A copy of orders for both Soldiers is required.

e. Assignment priorities.  Assignment priorities are set forth in table 3-4.

Table 3-4. Priority of assignment for Family housing
PriorityPersonnel category (see notes 1, 2, and 3)
1Key and essential military and civilian personnel.
2Personnel in pay grades for whom the housing has been designated in equal priorities—
Military personnel and authorized civilian employees assigned or attached for duty at the installation.
Army personnel not assigned or attached to an installation but assigned for duty within 1 hour commuting distance of the installation.
Independent duty personnel of any Service working within 1 hour commuting distance of the installation. (see note 4.)
Military personnel of other uniformed Services assigned for duty within 1 hour commuting distance of the installation for whom support agreements for housing have been established.
Personnel Exchange Program and integrated personnel assigned or attached to the installation.
Active Guard Reserve (AGR) personnel serving on active duty (AD) pursuant to 10 USC and who are assigned or attached for duty at the installation or within one hour commuting distance of the installation.
National Guard personnel serving on AD pursuant to 32 USC who are assigned to tenant units on the installation. (Support agreements should be in place.) The garrison commander may establish a maximum tenancy of 4 years for these personnel.
Other personnel for whom support agreements executed at the Secretary of the Army level exist which direct specific assignments.
3Army personnel not assigned to an installation but assigned outside the 1 hour commuting distance boundary who request housing support. A housing support agreement is required.
4Military personnel of all uniformed Services; including 32 USC AGR for whom support agreements have not been established and who are assigned or attached for duty within one hour commuting distance of the installation. A maximum tenancy of 4 years may be established for AGR personnel.
5Other personnel for whom support agreements for housing have been established—
Foreign military students, foreign liaison personnel, other allied military personnel, and special projects personnel assigned or attached to the installation (unless a higher priority has been designated in an MOU or MOA).
Nonmilitary uniformed personnel of the Public Health Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration assigned or attached to the installation.
Other personnel for whom support agreements executed at the SA level exist which allow the garrison commander to make directed assignments.
6In CONUS, unaccompanied Families of military personnel.

Notes:
1. The garrison commander may deviate on a case-by-case basis to alleviate undue hardships.
2. Listings within personnel categories are not intended as an order of assignment priority but as an explanation or clarification of types of personnel in a given priority.
3. Housing may be assigned to personnel one pay grade category above or below that for which the housing is designated.
4. If there is more than 1 installation (with Family housing) within commuting distance of the independent duty site, the nearest 1 (by travel time in normal commuting hours) shall be the Family housing provider unless another installation consents to a transfer of the responsibility.

f. Waiting lists.  

(1)    A waiting list shall be established for each designation of Family housing by bedroom composition. Separate waiting lists may be established when the housing units are designated for special uses, such as students. The sponsor's grade and bedroom requirement will determine the waiting list on which the name is placed. The relative position on a waiting list will be determined by the eligibility date criteria set forth in paragraph 3-16g. All other criteria being equal, the position on the waiting list will be determined by rank and date of rank with the senior member having the higher priority.

(2)    An applicant may elect, in writing, to be placed on a waiting list for housing with less bedrooms than that authorized. If housing is assigned under this procedure, residents will be considered adequately housed for the remainder of the tour unless the number of the sponsor's Family members increases.

(3)    An applicant may elect, in writing, to be placed on a waiting list for housing with 1 bedroom more than that for which qualified. This may be done when—

(a)    Sponsor or spouse is pregnant (as confirmed by medical authority) upon arrival at the installation.

(b)    Adoption of a child has been approved by a court of competent jurisdiction.

(4)    Applicants may not be on more than 1 adequate housing waiting list at one time. Applicants may apply for adequate and substandard housing at the same time.

(5)    Pregnant military personnel, otherwise without Family members, may be placed on the waiting list when pregnancy is confirmed by medical authority.

(6)    Promotable applicants may elect, upon arrival at the installation, to be placed on the waiting list for housing designated for their promotable grade. Personnel who attain promotable status while occupying adequate housing may be authorized to go on the waiting list at the discretion of the garrison commander.

(7)    If an applicant requests and is allowed to change from 1 waiting list to another, the date of eligibility will be the date of change to the new waiting list.

(8)    Sponsors will not be placed on a waiting list at the gaining installation prior to the Soldier signing out at the losing installation. Soldiers must sign-in at the new duty station before assignment is made. DA Form 31 (Request and Authority for Leave) and DA Form 137-2 (Installation Clearance Record) will indicate date departed last permanent duty station.

(9)    When a Soldier is ordered on PCS with TDY en route, the spouse is authorized to apply for housing at the new duty station prior to the arrival of the sponsor. The effective date of the spouse's signing for housing shall not be earlier than the PCS location reporting date of the sponsor.

(10)     When there are wide differences in style, age, or location of Family housing, waiting lists may be established for each type of housing. Applicants may apply for the type of housing desired and will be assigned accordingly except in foreign areas, Hawaii, and Alaska, when such assignment would result in housing remaining vacant or in extended temporary lodging payments.

(11)     If the Soldier is unable to accept housing for reasons beyond the Soldier's control (for example, hospitalization, emergency leave, restrictive lease clause, or unavoidable delay of Family's arrival), the Soldier will retain relative position on the waiting list.

(12)     If a specific offer of adequate housing is declined, the Soldier's name may either be removed from, or placed at the bottom of, the waiting list. Subject to the provision of paragraph 3-16f(11), the policy on housing assignment declination will be published and prominently displayed. Additionally, Soldiers declining a specific offer of housing will sign a simple statement acknowledging the declination.

(13)     The relative position of the top 10 percent of personnel on each housing assignment waiting list will be stabilized (freeze zone). However, personnel in key and essential positions will be placed at the top of the freeze portion of the waiting list or immediately below other key and essential personnel (para 3-16i).

(14)     Sponsors who have been given a firm (oral or written) commitment for housing will not be displaced by arriving Families added to the waiting list.

(15)     The freeze zone may be extended beyond the top 10 percent to include the names of personnel who are scheduled to be assigned to housing within 60 days or deferred as authorized in paragraph 3-16f(11).

(16)     Garrison commanders may approve exceptions to waiting list policies under special circumstances such as extreme hardship, compassionate, or medical reasons.

(17)     Waiting lists to include name and eligibility date will be kept current and prominently displayed in a public area at the housing office.

g. Eligibility date.  Eligibility date for placement on a waiting list or assignment to housing will be as indicated below provided application is made no later than 30 days after reporting to the new duty station.

(1)    PCS personnel (with or without TDY en route) arriving in—

(a)    Continental United States. Date departed last permanent duty station. For personnel arriving from 1 station unit training (OSUT), advanced individual training (AIT), basic training, Officer Candidate School (OCS), and similar training, use date departed the school/training to determine eligibility date for placement on a Family housing waiting list.

(b)    Outside continental United States (including Hawaii and Alaska). Date departed last permanent duty station from another Army command (ACOM), ASCC, or DRU, as appropriate.

1.    Military personnel who are directed to transfer within or between OCONUS ASCCs prior to completion of their original OCONUS accompanied tour (their date expected to return from overseas (DEROS) does not change) will receive the date departed last permanent duty station for original accompanied overseas tours.

2.    Military personnel who complete an original OCONUS accompanied tour and begin another OCONUS accompanied tour (their DEROS changes) will receive the date departed last permanent OCONUS duty station.

(2)    New accessions to the Army (for example, enlistment, induction, lateral entry, direct appointment of critical specialty, and so forth). Date of enlistment or entry on active military service if with Family members or date of acquiring Family members, whichever is later.

(3)    Personnel from a dependent-restricted overseas location.

(a)    Upon completion of a dependent-restricted tour, including involuntary extension beyond initial tour, date departed previous duty station for the dependent-restricted tour or a maximum 14-month credit. Soldiers who obtain Family members during the tour and were separated from those Family members will receive credit only for time separated. Voluntary extensions beyond the initial tour negate all credit.

(b)    A sponsor's eligibility for placement on a waiting list at the next installation of assignment is not affected by a stop movement action. Soldiers involuntarily extended due to stop movement will retain their waiting list status for up to 14-month credit.

(4)    Personnel whose last permanent assignment was to a medical holding detachment. Date departed last station where travel of Family members and shipment of household goods was authorized.

(5)    All other personnel (including all civilians).

h. Application, assignment, and termination documents.  

(1)    Application for Government Family housing and off-post civilian housing will be on DD Form 1746 (Application for Assignment to Housing) (see DA Pam 420-1-1). Information on DD Form 1746 will be supported by PCS orders or data will be verified by the Military Personnel Office. Copies of supporting documents will be retained in the Soldier's housing assignment file. Enterprise Military Housing generated applications may be used in place of the DD Form 1746.

(2)    Applicants will be informed of the availability of Family housing through issuance of DD Form 1747 (Status of Housing Availability). An Enterprise Military Housing-generated document may be used in place of the DD Form 1747.

(3)    All housing will be assigned and terminated by letter, memorandum, or locally developed form. Housing staffs, in conjunction with other agencies, should help ensure that the Soldier's BAH entitlement starts and stops in accordance with guidance provided in JFTR, chapter 10. Assignment and termination documents will be numbered consecutively by FY and will contain the following information:

(a)    Effective date of assignment. This will be the day housing is assigned.

(b)    Effective date of termination.

1.     for the purpose of starting housing allowance, this will be the date housing is vacated, cleared by the housing manager, or date the Soldier departs the installation on PCS, whichever is earlier, unless housing continues to be occupied by Family members (see para 3-54e).

2.     for the purpose of computing occupancy of AFH, the termination date will be the date the housing manager clears the housing from the occupant or from the contracted cleaning team, whichever is later, but not more than three working days beyond the end of the contracted cleaning period.

(c)    Sponsor's rank, last name, first name, middle initial, social security number (SSN), and military organization. If military spouse is assigned to or terminates the same housing, enter the spouse's rank, name, SSN, and military organization.

(d)    Housing address.

(e)    Statement from the garrison transportation officer that the cost of the move is either at Government or individual expense. Moving expense guidelines will be in accordance with JFTR (see also para 3-6c(11) for policy on DLA).

(f)    Statement that the housing is to be occupied by the sponsor and Family members.

(g)    Statement that the housing is substandard (when applicable) and the amount of BAH to be forfeited.

(4)    Distribution of assignment and termination documents will be as directed by the garrison commander, but will include as a minimum the following:

(a)    Military personnel.

1.    Original copy to individual.

2.    One copy to the operating location/finance and accounting office (OPLOC/FAO) within 3 working days following assignment or termination.

(b)    Department of Defense civilian employees.

1.    Original copy to individual.

2.    One copy to the servicing civilian personnel office within three working days following assignment or termination.

(c)    Families of absent sponsors assigned to excess housing.

1.    Original assignment or termination document to Soldier's spouse or authorized Family member.

2.    One copy to the servicing OPLOC/FAO within 3 working days of assignment or termination. Document will contain a statement to the effect that housing is or was for occupancy by the Family of the absent sponsor.

3.    One copy to sponsor's unit commander. When the sponsor's new organization is not known, send to the Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS)-Indianapolis Center (DFAS-PMTCA/IN), Indianapolis, IN 46249-0840.

i. Key and essential personnel.  

(1)    Key and essential military and DOD and DOD-sponsored civilian employees are incumbents of designated key and essential positions as established by the garrison commander in coordination with the installation commander or senior mission commander. The duties of key and essential positions require the incumbents' immediate availability on the installation due to military necessity. Therefore, they must reside in Government housing.

(2)    The designation of key and essential positions will be kept to an absolute minimum to ensure maximum housing equity for all Soldiers.

j. Substandard housing assignment.  Personnel will not be mandatorily assigned substandard housing except for reasons of military necessity. Separate waiting lists will be maintained and assignment procedures will be as stated for adequate housing. Assignment to or application for, substandard housing does not preclude Soldiers from applying for adequate housing (see para 3-24).

k. Mandatory assignment (foreign areas only).  The garrison commander may mandatorily assign adequate housing if necessary to maintain maximum occupancy. The following conditions apply:

(1)    Personnel will not be mandatorily assigned until all volunteer Families, regardless of rank, are assigned.

(2)    Personnel will be mandatorily assigned only to housing adequate for their grade and bedroom requirement except in cases of military necessity.

(3)    Garrison commanders will consider assignment of all personnel listed in table 3-4 before implementing mandatory assignment procedures.

(4)    Soldiers will be informed of housing availability and the possibility of mandatory assignments before or upon application for Family housing. A DD Form 1747 may be used for this purpose (DA Pam 420-1-1). Soldiers who have been notified in writing that housing will not be mandatorily assigned will not be required to move on post, regardless of subsequent changes in housing availability.

(5)    Mandatory assignment will not be made if—

(a)    Soldier has less than 1 year's duty time remaining at the installation.

(b)    Such assignment would cause extreme hardship.

(6)    Personnel who make commitments for community housing after receipt of PCS orders without first reporting to the housing office may be mandatorily assigned.

(7)    If a Soldier refuses to occupy Government housing, the Soldier will be advised in writing that housing allowances will be forfeited as long as housing adequate for their grade and bedroom requirement is available.

l. Home purchase statement.  A DD Form 1747 may be used as a statement that the member will not be required to occupy Government housing. The statement will assist members to obtain Federal Housing Administration (FHA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), or other loans.

m. Mobile homes and mobile home spaces.  

(1)    Mobile home spaces in Government-owned parks are primarily for use by members accompanied by Families. Mobile homes may be owned, leased, or otherwise acquired by the member. Potential occupants need not have possession of a mobile home at time of placement on the waiting list. If a Soldier sells a mobile home to another Soldier, the garrison commander will determine if the mobile home must be moved from the space (see para 3-92e).

(2)    Contractor-owned and contractor-operated mobile homes are not Government housing for assignment purposes. However, the housing office will maintain waiting lists and provide prospective tenants to the contractor. Occupancy of these units does not preclude application by Soldier for Government housing (see para 3-92d).

n. Other Family housing programs.  

(1)     Title 10 USC 2835 or domestic build-to-lease housing and both domestic and foreign Government-leased units are Government-controlled Family housing for assignment purposes (see para 3-87b(4)).

(2)     Title 10 USC 2836, or rental guarantee, housing is not considered Government-controlled housing for assignment purposes. A separate waiting list will be maintained and prospective tenants will be referred for occupancy. When 97 percent utilization by Families cannot be maintained, unaccompanied or eligible DOD personnel will be referred (see para 3-87b(4)).

(3)    Privately-owned Wherry housing is not Government-controlled housing for assignment purposes. However, the garrison commander may certify prospective tenants to the owner.

(4)     Title 10 USC 2871 (that is, privatized) housing is available at selected locations under the RCI (see para 3-111). RCI housing is not considered Government-controlled housing for assignment purposes. The RCI partner, not the Army, makes the assignments.

3-17. Occupancy of Family housing

a. Occupancy by non-Family members.  Persons other than Family members, as defined in glossary, may be permitted to reside in Family housing. The following apply in such cases:

(1)    Sponsor will request approval in writing through the housing office to the garrison commander to allow non-Family members to reside in housing. Non-Family members who are registered or who are required to register as sex offenders and intend occupancy of, or overnight visitation to, a Family housing DU will sign in at the provost marshal's office. Failure to do so may result in the host sponsor being evicted from housing.

(2)    Approval does not imply an extension of other benefits or privileges to which non-Family members are not otherwise entitled.

(3)    When the garrison commander is the sponsor, his or her immediate superior must approve the request.

(4)    Approved occupancy will be equitable for all Soldiers and not adversely impact on health, safety, morale, or welfare of the installation.

(5)    Additional bedroom requirements are not authorized to accommodate non-Family members.

(6)    Neither storage of the sponsor's household goods at Government expense to accommodate the non-Family member's household goods is authorized nor is storage or shipment of non-Family member's household goods.

(7)    Residence in housing overseas by non-Family members must be consistent with applicable host nation laws, SOFAs, and other international agreements. Residence in Government housing by non-Family members under this policy does not make those individuals a "dependent of a member of the force" under current SOFAs. Such persons are not entitled to the rights and privileges afforded by these agreements.

(8)    The garrison commander may revoke authorization for non-Family members to reside in housing for misconduct or when in the best interests of the Army for reasons relating to health, safety, morale, or welfare on the installation.

(9)    Questions regarding occupancy of housing by non-Family members may be referred to the supporting Office of the Staff Judge Advocate (OSJA) or legal counsel for assistance.

b. Civilian employees occupancy limitation.  Key and essential civilian employees (CONUS and OCONUS) will continue assignment to Family housing without time limitation. For other than key and essential civilian employees OCONUS, Family housing assignments may be terminated after 5 years at the same geographical location. Civilian employees will be given written notification of this condition of occupancy at time of housing assignment (see para 3-18d).

3-18. Termination of Family housing

a. Termination of housing.  

(1)    Unless otherwise authorized, Family housing will be terminated by the Soldier under the following conditions:

(a)    When the installation ceases to be the permanent station of the sponsor.

(b)    When the sponsor or Family members no longer reside in the housing, except in those cases of intractable marital discord, under the provisions of paragraph 3-18b(2)(i) or of joint custody where Family members reside with the sponsor for more than 6 months per year, under the provisions of paragraph 3-18b(2)(j).

(c)    Upon request of the sponsor, when occupying Government-owned substandard housing.

(d)    Upon sponsor's retirement or separation from the Service.

(e)    Upon request of the sponsor for personal convenience when termination does not result in vacant housing (foreign areas only).

(2)    Government housing may be terminated at the discretion of the garrison commander under the following conditions:

(a)     for medical, hardship, or compassionate reasons.

(b)     for misconduct of the sponsor, Family members, or guests.

(c)    When residents are involved in misuse or illegal use of housing contrary to safety, health, or morale.

(d)    Upon request of the sponsor when approved retirement date has been established.

(e)     for repeated waste of energy resources (to include utilities).

(f)    When, under the provisions of paragraph 3-18b(2)(i), a determination is made that, due to the inability of a sponsor and his or her spouse to resolve intractable and acerbic marital difficulties, neither party of the marriage shall remain in housing.

(3)    In cases of involuntary termination, written notification will be provided to the resident at least 30 days prior to the termination date, unless otherwise directed by the garrison commander.

b. Exceptions to immediate termination.  

(1)    Exceptions to immediate termination are authorized when—

(a)    Soldier is transferred to a hospital as a patient on PCS orders.

(b)    Soldier is transferred with TDY en route to a new station where orders do not authorize movement of household goods to the TDY station. Under this condition, Soldier may retain Government housing for occupancy of Family members for up to 30 days after completion of TDY. Installations located in foreign countries must adhere to applicable host nation laws, SOFAs, and other international agreements.

(c)    Soldier is ordered on PCS to school for a period of 1 year or less and will return to the same installation upon completion of school. If, upon completion of the school, the Soldier is assigned to another installation, the Soldier must terminate housing within 30 days after completing the school. Installations located in foreign countries must adhere to applicable host nation laws, SOFAs, and other international agreements.

(2)    People are critically important to the Army. In recognition of this fact, the Army has a fundamental policy of strongly supporting the basic needs of its Soldiers and their Families. Certainly, housing is a basic need. This is so at all times but especially during periods of Familial hardship. Any unilateral termination of Family housing by the Army must take this basic policy into consideration. Accordingly, the following situations require particular attention by the garrison commander to ensure that Families are not inadvertently punished in times of great difficulty and intense distress:

(a)    When the member is reassigned from CONUS to OCONUS where Family members are authorized and deferred Family travel is approved, the garrison commander will allow Families to remain in housing up to 140 days after the sponsor's departure. Permanent change of station orders must be kept up to date by the absent Soldier during the 140 days (20 weeks).

(b)    Garrison commanders may permit Family members of sponsors who depart an installation incident to PCS to remain in housing up to 90 days to preclude undue hardship. Installations located in foreign countries must adhere to applicable host nation laws, SOFAs, and other international agreements.

(c)    Family members of AD Soldiers assigned to a dependent-restricted area may retain housing until the sponsor completes the normal dependent-restricted tour (see para 3-18c). Installations located in foreign countries must adhere to applicable host nation laws, SOFAs, and other international agreements.

(d)    Family members of prisoners of war and Family members of missing in action or other persons in a missing status as defined in AR 600-8-1 and 37 USC 551 may continue to occupy their housing until status changes.

(e)    Family members of military sponsors who died in the line of duty will be permitted to remain in assigned adequate housing without charge for a period of 365 days after sponsor's death (see 37 USC 403(l)(1)). Family members of deceased military sponsors who are occupying rented housing on the date of the sponsor's death will be permitted to continue to receive BAH up to 365 days after the sponsor's death (see 37 USC 403(l)(2)). If housing is terminated prior to 365 days subsequent to death of sponsor, a copy of termination order will be forwarded to Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) - Indianapolis Center Z (DFAS-PMTCBC/IN), Indianapolis, IN 46249-0840. If Family members are permitted to occupy the housing beyond 365 days, an amount equal to Soldier's housing allowances or appraised rental value (whichever is less) will be charged without exception. Written notifications and agreements between the resident and the garrison commander will ensure full understanding of the terms and conditions of continued occupancy. Installations located in foreign countries must adhere to applicable host nation laws, SOFAs, and other international agreements.

(f)    In hardship cases, former Uniformed Service members and their Family members, former Federal employees (or other residents) and Family members, or Family members of deceased Federal employees (or other residents) may be permitted to remain in assigned housing for a period not to exceed 60 days and will be charged an amount equivalent to the former member's full BAH (see OMB Cir A-45). Written notifications and agreements between the resident and the garrison commander will ensure full understanding of the terms and conditions of continued occupancy. Installations located in foreign countries must adhere to applicable host nation laws, SOFAs, and other international agreements.

(g)    In cases where Soldiers must serve an unaccompanied overseas tour because an exceptional Family member's authorized medical support cannot be obtained in the overseas area, CONUS garrison commanders may permit Family members of AD Soldiers to retain occupied Government-owned or Government-controlled housing until the Soldier completes the normal unaccompanied tour. The following conditions must be met:

1.    Government housing was assigned prior to the sponsor's departure.

2.     formal written request to retain housing or mobile home pad is made upon receipt of PCS orders. Request must contain—

(a)    A current Exceptional Family Member Program endorsement.

(b)    Certification from the overseas duty station medical authority that exceptional Family member's authorized medical support cannot be obtained in the area of the overseas duty station.

3.    Soldiers who retain housing and are subsequently assigned to another CONUS installation upon completion of the overseas tour must terminate housing within 30 days after returning to CONUS. Garrison commanders may grant up to 60 additional days' occupancy when Government housing will be available at the new duty station within 90 days of return.

4.    Housing may be terminated by the garrison commander if a sponsor extends the original unaccompanied overseas tour, or for other reasons. Written notification of termination will be provided to the resident at least 30 days prior to the termination date.

(h)    Where a sponsor is incarcerated by military or civilian authorities, garrison commanders will allow Families to remain in housing as long as the sponsor remains on AD unless the maintenance of good order and discipline within the community demands otherwise. In cases where the sponsor is discharged from the service (resulting in the loss of BAH entitlements), Family members may submit a request for an exception to policy for waiver of payment/retention of housing. Submit request, in accordance with paragraphs 3-6b(2)(b) and 3-6g(5) and through command channels to the DCS, G-1 (DAPE-HR-PR), 300 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0300.

(i)    Where a marriage is in difficulty due to marital discord, disharmony, and/ or break-up, there is the possibility that, given time, the Family can mend itself. If reunification is not possible, the military spouse remains a spouse until the marriage is legally dissolved. Where a Soldier is married to a service member, the senior Soldier is considered the sponsor. In cases where a sponsor and spouse are unwilling, or otherwise unable, to cohabitate due to marital discord, the garrison commander, in consultation with the sponsor and the spouse and with the Staff Judge Advocate (SJA), will make a determination as to who, if either party of the marriage, will remain in housing. Such determination should be made in consideration of the involvement of other dependent Family members of the marriage. This determination will remain in effect until resolution of the marital situation (that is, reunification, legal separation, or divorce) or until the sponsor's PCS to a location beyond a 1-hour commuting distance or separation from the Service.

(j)    Where the marriage of a Soldier married to a service member culminates in legal separation or divorce and each Soldier is given legal responsibility for one or more dependent Family members, the provisions of JFTR regarding BAH and the occupancy/termination of housing apply.

c. Retention of housing for sponsors on dependent-restricted tours.  

(1)    Soldiers who occupy Family housing or Government-owned mobile home pads and are assigned to dependent-restricted tours may voluntarily retain such facilities at their last permanent CONUS, Hawaii, or Alaska duty station. When Family members will continue to occupy the housing, the conditions below must be met.

(a)    The tour is to an area where Family member travel is restricted. (Election of an "all others" tour when assigned to an "accompanied tour" area waives retention option.)

(b)    Government housing was assigned prior to sponsor's departure to the dependent-restricted area.

(c)     formal written request to retain housing or mobile home pad is made upon receipt of PCS orders.

(d)    The Family housing or mobile home pad must be occupied by the Soldier's Family members during the Soldier's absence. If no adult Family member will remain with the Soldier's minor children, the individual designated in the Soldier's Family care plan approved under AR 600-20 may be designated in writing to assume responsibility for the care and conduct of the Soldier's minor children. Any non-Family members so designated must be approved under paragraph 3-17a of this regulation.

(2)    The involuntary extension of a sponsor on a dependent-restricted tour is a stop movement action. Garrison commanders should allow continued occupancy of CONUS Family housing for Family members of a sponsor whose dependent-restricted tour has been extended as a result of stop movement. Garrison commanders who determine that continued occupancy by a given Family not be allowed will coordinate denial action through the chain of command to the DCS, G-1 (DAPE-HR-PR), 300 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0300.

(3)    Installations located in foreign countries must adhere to applicable host nation laws, SOFAs, and other international agreements.

(4)    When both husband and wife are members of a Military Service, retention of Government housing is authorized for the spouse with or without Family members during a dependent-restricted tour.

(5)    Soldiers who retain housing during a dependent-restricted tour and are subsequently assigned to another CONUS, Hawaii, or Alaska installation upon completion of the tour, must terminate housing within 30 days after returning to the U.S. Garrison commanders may grant up to 60 additional days occupancy when Government housing will be available at the new duty station within 90 days of return.

(6)    Housing may be terminated by the garrison commander if a sponsor extends the dependent-restricted tour.

(7)    Personnel listed below will not be authorized to retain currently assigned Government Family housing. However, they will be eligible for priority assignment to other Family housing at the same installation.

(a)    Those occupying housing designated for the incumbents of specific duty positions.

(b)    Those occupying housing reserved for service school attendees.

(c)    Those occupying housing reserved for staff and faculty members at the U.S. Army War College.

(8)    Exceptions to installation participation in retention of housing for sponsors serving dependent-restricted tours will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Requests will be forwarded through command channels to the DCS, G-1 (DAPE-HR-PR), 300 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0300 for consideration.

(9)    In some cases Soldiers may be selected to participate in the Homebase and Advanced (Sequential) Assignment Program (HAAP) governed by AR 614-100 (officer) and AR 614-200 (enlisted). The program contains two options-Homebase Assignment and Advanced (Sequential) Assignment. Housing managers will review and understand the intent of this program.

d. Termination of housing occupied by civilians.  

(1)    Civilians will terminate housing under the conditions below.

(a)    Employment or contract with DOD is terminated.

(b)    Housing is no longer excess to the needs of the installation.

(c)    Conditions of eligibility cease.

(d)     When 5-year limitation of occupancy in overseas area expires except where housing is excess.

(e)    Misconduct of sponsor, Family members, or approved non-Family members.

(2)    Written notification to terminate will be provided a minimum of 30 days prior to termination date. The notification will state the reasons for termination, the date the housing must be vacated, and whether relocation is to be paid by the Government.

(3)    OCONUS, garrison commanders may permit Family members of civilian employees who are transferring within the same country to retain housing up to 90 days to preclude hardship. A written request must be submitted to the garrison commander. Forfeiture of housing allowance or rental payment must continue.

e. Eviction and repossession of units.  

(1)    In the event a resident refuses to vacate Family housing, garrison commanders will first attempt all measures that are reasonable under the circumstances to make a peaceful recovery of the housing by nonjudicial means. Such measures may include counseling of the housing residents, assisting the housing residents to secure off-post housing, and referring the housing residents to charitable, religious, or social service organizations for assistance, as appropriate.

(2)    Garrison commanders will consider the following circumstances in deciding what measures are reasonable under the circumstances:

(a)    Whether there is a need for the housing to meet a higher priority requirement.

(b)    Whether the resident was aware of the rules and regulations about Family housing occupancy.

(c)    Whether the resident faces special hardship by vacating the premises.

(3)    If taking such other measures does not result in the peaceful repossession of the housing, garrison commanders will refer the matter to their SJA or command legal counsel to determine whether legal proceedings, use of law enforcement authorities, or other measures are appropriate. In taking steps to initiate legal proceedings, the SJA or command legal counsel will follow the provisions of AR 27-40. (IMCOM region directors may not grant exceptions.)

3-19. Commercial endeavors in Government Family housing

a. Policy.  Garrison commanders are authorized and encouraged to permit limited commercial activities such as handicrafts, childcare, and sale of products by sponsors and/or Family members in Government-controlled Family housing. In foreign areas, Family housing residents may be subject to local host nation requirements as well as SOFA and customs regulations.

b. Establishment and operation.  

(1)    Requests for permission to conduct a home enterprise will be made in writing to the garrison commander or the designee. Prompt action will be taken on each request and a written response provided. In reviewing requests, garrison commanders will ensure that commercial endeavors are consistent with Federal, State, and local laws. Commanders will obtain assistance from the installation SJA. Additionally, the commander will consider local Government licensing requirements, potential Government liability, SOFA, host country business practices, and prospective advertising practices. Home enterprises cannot compete with or duplicate Installation MWR Fund (IMWRF) or AAFES sales and services. In no instance will activities be authorized or continued when they will interfere with community tranquility or pose potential safety hazards.

(2)    Structural changes to Family housing are not authorized except in instances where Family child care (FCC) homes must be upgraded to meet National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 101 standards for a 1-hour fire barrier between mixed occupancies. In these cases, the cost for upgrading the walls will be borne by AFH or OMA. In all other cases, when practical and feasible, commanders should allow residents to make minor modifications. The costs of such modifications and restorations, if required, will be borne by the sponsor (see para 3-54l).

(3)    Cost of utilities will be reimbursed to the Government at a rate jointly established by a representative of the garrison commander and the sponsor. Charges may be waived when they are minimal and in the opinion of the garrison commander reimbursement is not warranted.

3-20. Eligibility, assignment, and termination of permanent party unaccompanied personnel housing

a. Categories of permanent party unaccompanied personnel housing.  

(1) Senior officer quarters.   Housing designated for use by officers in grade of colonel (O-6) and above.

(2) Officer quarters.   Housing designated for use by officers in grade second lieutenant (O-1) through lieutenant colonel (O-5) and warrant officers.

(3) Senior enlisted quarters.   Housing designated for use by enlisted personnel in grades staff sergeant (E-6) and above in CONUS to include Hawaii and Alaska; sergeant first class (E-7) and above OCONUS.

(4) Enlisted quarters.   Housing designated for use by enlisted personnel in grades sergeant (E-5) and below in CONUS including Hawaii and Alaska; staff sergeant (E-6) and below OCONUS (excluding trainees).

(5) Trainee barracks.   Housing designated for use by personnel in basic combat training (BCT) and one-station unit training (OSUT).

(6) Reserve Component support housing.   Housing designated for use by Reserve Component (RC) personnel.

b. Priorities of assignment.  

(1)    Soldiers entitled to BAH at the with dependent rate, who are voluntarily separated from their Family members for personal reasons (that is, geographical bachelors), are not authorized assignment to UPH (PP) in the CONUS, Hawaii, and Alaska. The garrison commander may grant exceptions on a case-by-case basis (see table 3-5, note 3 applies). This affects all PP categories and all ranks except for chaplains as set forth in paragraph 3-20e and for personnel identified as key and essential.

(2)    Priorities of assignment will be made per table 3-5.

(3)    Assignment of civilians shall be based on the comparison of military and civilian grades in table 3-3.

Table 3-5. Priorities of assignment for senior officers quarters, officers quarters, senior enlisted quarters, and enlisted quarters
PriorityPersonnel category (see note 1)
IKey and essential personnel (military and civilian) who must reside on post due to military necessity.
IIPP military personnel assigned or attached for duty at the installation including PCS students who are entitled to BAH at the without dependent rate; eligible unaccompanied civilian personnel OCONUS (see para 3-20h(4)); personnel on a Family member restricted tour; unaccompanied personnel serving "all others" tours (excluding Hawaii and Alaska); and RC service members in medical holdover (MHO) status exceeding 30 days.
III unaccompanied military personnel receiving BAH for support of Family members due to divorce or separation (court ordered decree or OSJA separation agreement), or individuals with legally supported Family members, for example, children or parents (see note 2).
IVService members in OCONUS, excluding Hawaii and Alaska, entitled to BAH at the with dependent rate who are voluntarily separated from their Family members for personal reasons (that is, geographical bachelors) (see note 2).
V Title 32 AGR assigned or attached for duty within commuting distance of the installation; and foreign military personnel (see paras 3-20g and 3-20i and note 2).
VIMilitary and civilian personnel not otherwise eligible (OCONUS only) (see note 2).
VIIGeographical bachelors in the CONUS, Hawaii, and Alaska assigned to UPH (PP) by exception to policy (see note 3).

Notes:
1. Title 10 Soldiers whose duty assignments are within 1 hour commuting distance of the installation will be treated the same as those members assigned to the installation.
2. Personnel in priorities III through VI are assigned on a space-available basis. They are not required to participate in a waiting list for UPH (PP), not required to occupy UPH (PP), and not required to obtain a certificate of nonavailability (CNA). Minimum standards of adequacy do not apply to residents in these categories. Prior to assignment, these individuals will be advised in writing they may be required to vacate housing for personnel in priorities I and II upon 30-days notice. The maximum period that a Title 32 member may reside in Government housing is 4 years.
3. Minimum standards of adequacy do not apply to residents in this category. Prior to assignment, these individuals will be advised in writing they may be required to vacate housing for personnel in priorities I and II upon 30-day notice.

c. Waiting lists for senior officer quarters, officer quarters, and senior enlisted quarters.  Waiting lists will be maintained and prominently posted at the UPH office. Personnel will be placed on the waiting list by date of eligibility as shown below if application is made within 30 days of arrival at new duty station. If not, eligibility date is the date of application. The relative position of the top 10 percent of personnel on the waiting list will be stabilized (that is, placed in the freeze zone). However, personnel in key and essential positions will be placed at the top of the freeze portion of the waiting list immediately below other key and essential personnel.

(1)    PCS personnel with or without TDY en route.

(a)    CONUS date departed last permanent duty station.

(b)    OCONUS including Hawaii and Alaska.

1.    Date departed last permanent duty station from another ACOM, ASCC, or DRU as appropriate.

2.    Military personnel who are directed to transfer within or between OCONUS ASCC prior to completion of their original OCONUS tour (their DEROS does not change) will receive date departed last permanent duty station for original overseas tour. Military personnel who complete an original OCONUS tour and begin another OCONUS tour (their DEROS changes) will receive date departed last permanent duty station.

(2)    New accessions to the Army. Date of entry on AD.

(3)    Personnel whose last permanent assignment was to a medical holding detachment. Date departed last duty station from which member was assigned to warrior transition unit (WTU).

d. Assignment of housing to unaccompanied permanent party personnel.  

(1)    Assignment of all UPH will be made in writing by the UPH Office. It will include the date of assignment and housing identification and be forwarded to the individual's OPLOC/FAO within 3 working days following assignment. A local form letter or memorandum with consecutive control numbers will be used for assignments and terminations. Written orders are not required for housing assigned in bulk to units and activities; however, a list of Soldiers assigned, with pertinent information, will be forwarded to the OPLOC/FAO within 3 working days.

(2)    Incoming military personnel, an E-5 in CONUS including Hawaii and Alaska; an E-6 OCONUS and above; and officers on a current promotion list may be assigned at their option to the category of housing for the grade to which they will be promoted. Personnel who attain promotable status while occupying adequate housing may be authorized to go on the waiting list for their promotable grade at the discretion of the garrison commander. An E-6 and above in CONUS including Hawaii and Alaska; an E-7 and above OCONUS are not authorized to reside in enlisted quarters.

(3)    Personnel will not be required to occupy housing that does not meet adequacy standards except for military necessity. Mandatory assignment to inadequate housing solely to limit payment of BAH is not authorized. World War II wooden barracks will not be used as required housing for PP personnel (see para 3-26b).

(4)    Unaccompanied Soldiers married to another service member on separate tours will be assigned to housing on the same basis as unmarried personnel.

(5)    Assignment and use of housing under a unit integrity concept is authorized provided the overall installation occupancy rate for UPH (PP) does not fall below 95 percent as determined by the housing manager; exceptions will not be granted. Where necessary, the commander will direct assignment of personnel from outside organizations into unit-managed space to—

(a)    Obtain maximum utilization of adequate housing assets.

(b)    Reduce use of substandard assets.

(c)    Eliminate payment of housing allowances to personnel who can be adequately housed in Government housing.

(6)    Soldiers entitled to BAH at the "with dependent" rate may not be assigned UPH, including AFH temporarily diverted to UPH, in excess of minimum space adequacy standards (see table 3-7) without affecting the right to BAH except under the following conditions (JFTR):

(a)    It is the only UPH available and no unmarried Soldier or Soldier entitled to BAH at the "without dependent" rate is housed in UPH not meeting minimum space and adequacy standards.

(b)    The housing is not suitable for joint occupancy.

(c)    The housing is jointly occupied, if suitable for joint occupancy.

(7)    Garrison commanders may maintain adequate barracks carried in the UPH database as "excess space" in active status to provide more space and privacy to personnel listed in table 3-5 as priority I and II.

(8)    Soldiers in a WTU status exceeding 30 days on active Army and USAR installations will be housed in facilities that accommodate their medical conditions and are comparable to PP housing on the same installation. At a minimum, such housing will be safe, secure, and climate controlled, with inside bathrooms and privacy between sleeping areas. Appropriate accommodation will be provided for Soldiers with functional limitations.

e. Assignment of housing to chaplains.  

(1)    Unmarried chaplains and unaccompanied married chaplains are authorized to compete equally for Family housing within the appropriate grade category regardless of whether UPH is available. They may, at their request, choose a private UPH apartment consisting of a bedroom, bathroom, living room, and kitchen or kitchenette.

(2)    Chaplains entitled to BAH at the "with dependent" rate are subject to the limitation set forth in paragraph 3-20d(6). If UPH is not available or is not adequate, they may compete for Family housing (see paras 3-16a(4), 3-16d(154), and 3-29a(2)(c)(2)).

f. Assignment of housing to unaccompanied law enforcement, criminal investigation, and counterintelligence personnel.  

(1)    Enlisted military police and personnel assigned to military police units will be billeted in facilities separate from other Soldiers, including those areas of barracks separated by wings or floors. Personnel may be billeted in OQ or SEQ when available.

(2)    Enlisted Criminal Investigation Division (CID) special agents and laboratory examiners will be billeted with other CID Command (CIDC) personnel in facilities separate from other Soldiers, or they may be billeted in OQ or SEQ. Enlisted CIDC administrative personnel will normally be billeted with CIDC personnel or with military police personnel. If suitable facilities are not available, CID special agents, laboratory examiners, and administrative personnel may be given a certificate of nonavailability (CNA).

(3)    Enlisted counterintelligence (CI) Soldiers requiring special billets, as certified by their commanders, must be billeted with other CI Soldiers in facilities separated from other Soldiers. When facilities are not available, they will be housed in OQ or SEQ or given a CNA.

(4)    The IMCOM region directors may not grant exceptions to the provisions in paragraphs 3-20f(1) through 3-20f(3).

g. Assignment of housing to Reserve Component personnel.  

(1)    Initial active duty for training . These RC personnel are considered trainees and will be billeted in the same manner as Active Army trainees.

(2)    Annual training. When performing AT with a unit (to include individual travel but joining the unit) RC personnel will be assigned Government housing regardless of adequacy. However, commanders should ensure that this does not result in conditions dangerous to health or safety. RC personnel on AT as individuals (such as Individual Mobilization Augmentation Soldiers) in a per diem status should be housed on the same basis as other personnel of equal grade and duty status. RC personnel on AT as individuals not in a per diem status will report to their local supervisor for housing assistance.

(3)    Active duty for training, active duty for special work, and active duty. The RC Soldiers performing active duty for training (ADT), ADSW, or AD will be housed the same as Active Army Soldiers. If performing ADT with a unit, these personnel will be housed on the same basis as the unit.

(4)    Inactive duty training. The RC members performing IDT at home station may be provided UPH (PP) or housing normally set aside for RC use, if available (see table 3-5 for priority).

(5)    Active Army Soldiers attending Reserve Component courses of instruction. These students will be required to occupy housing according to the policy set by the school commandant and the garrison commander. The Active Army Soldier will be provided housing in the same manner as for other students (either Active Army or RC) attending the course.

(6)    Active Army participants in Reserve Component unit activities. Active Army personnel who directly participate in maneuvers, exercises, war games, Army Training and Evaluation Programs (ARTEPs), or in field exercises conducted by RC units during AT or IDT will be provided housing (to include tentage) without charge and without regard to adequacy.

(7)    Reserve Component support housing. This housing is designated for use by RC personnel. The garrison commander or appropriate representative will assign, terminate, and determine adequacy standards of RC support housing.

(8)    Active Guard Reserve personnel.

(a)     Title 10 USC personnel. Title 10 USC AGR personnel without Family members will be assigned UPH per priorities outlined in table 3-5.

(b)     Title 32 USC personnel. The AGR personnel serving on AD pursuant to 32 USC who are attending service schools will be housed on the same basis as other students. A maximum tenancy of 4 years may be established for 32 USC AGR personnel.

(9)    DODI 1225.9, Billeting for Reserve Component Members. Reserve Component members, traveling more than 50 miles from their home station to perform IDT will receive billeting with the same priority as AD members traveling under orders away from their permanent duty station (10 USC 12604 (a)). As stated in DODI 1225.9, RC members performing IDT and are not otherwise entitled to travel and transportation allowances, will be provided lodging in kind, as provided in 37 USC 404(i)(1)(a), when transient Government housing is not available.

h. Assignment of housing to civilian employees.  

(1)    Civilian employees shall rely primarily on private communities for housing support, except for military necessity.

(2)    Civilian employees who occupy key and essential positions may occupy housing without time limits.

(3)    In CONUS, Alaska, and Hawaii DOD civilian employees who occupy UPH (PP) will pay a rental charge determined per section XV. When American Red Cross personnel are provided Government housing in the U.S., American Red Cross personnel or the American National Red Cross shall pay the rental charge established per section XV of this chapter.

(4)    In foreign countries and U.S. possessions and territories where DOD U.S. citizen civilian employees (both APF and NAF) recruited in the U.S. and American Red Cross personnel cannot obtain suitable housing in civilian communities, the overseas commander may authorize them to occupy housing on a rental basis per section XV. DOD U.S. citizen civilian employees (both APF and NAF) and DOD-sponsored U.S. citizen civilian contractor personnel who live in Government housing will forfeit their housing allowances or LQAs. Forfeited allowances will be transferred to the appropriate account as a reimbursement. In foreign countries, American Red Cross personnel will be furnished housing on the same basis as DOD civilian employees. The overseas commander will limit occupancy by other than key and essential civilian employees to 5 years at a single geographical location to maintain equity and reasonable distribution of assets.

i. Assignment of housing to foreign military personnel.  

(1)     foreign military trainees (FMTs) are on invitational travel authorizations. Insofar as possible, FMTs will be housed in PP housing (see assignment priority V).

(2)    Personnel Exchange Program (PEP) and integrated personnel function as fully integrated members of the U.S. Army. They are housed on the same basis as equivalent U.S. personnel.

(3)    Special projects personnel (foreign military and civilian) participate in a specific project, study, or program which will mutually benefit the U.S. and parent governments. They will be housed (see assignment priority V) unless an MOU or MOA dictates otherwise.

(4)    Liaison personnel function entirely in behalf of their parent governments and are precluded from functioning as PEP/integrated or special projects personnel. They will be housed only when housing is excess to U.S. military requirements unless an exception is approved by the IMCOM region or an MOU or MOA dictates otherwise. In granting exceptions, commanders will ensure uniform application regardless of country represented.

j. Conditions of termination.  

(1)    Assignments to UPH (PP) will be terminated in writing under the following conditions:

(a)    When the installation ceases to be the permanent station of the Soldier.

(b)    When the housing is required for higher priority personnel.

(c)    On request of a Soldier—

1.    Voluntarily occupying inadequate housing.

2.    As a single Soldier in the grade of staff sergeant (E-6) or above in the CONUS including Hawaii and Alaska; sergeant first class (E-7) or above OCONUS, who desires to reside off post, except as described elsewhere in this section.

(d)    When housing that was constructed for use of military personnel, but leased to civilian employees, is required to meet the military housing needs of the installation except in the case of a situation covered by paragraph 3-18b(2)(i).

(e)    When Family members are located within 1 hour commuting distance of the installation, except in the case of a situation covered by paragraph 3-18b(2)(i).

(f)    At the discretion of the garrison commander, when a Soldier no longer performs the duties of the position that entitled him or her to occupy that particular housing.

(g)    Under conditions other than paragraphs 3-20(a)through (e) when approved by the garrison commander.

(2)    In cases of involuntary termination of housing, the garrison commander will notify the individual concerned in writing stating the conditions of termination. Thirty days advance notice will normally be given.

k. Authority to live off post.  

(1)     The authority to live off post may be denied if it would adversely affect a training mission, military discipline, or military readiness. (IMCOM region directors may not grant exceptions.)

(2)    Garrison commanders may authorize single Soldiers in the grade of sergeant (E-5) and below CONUS including Hawaii and Alaska; staff sergeant (E-6) and below OCONUS, to reside off post under the following conditions:

(a)    When adequate housing is not available and military necessity is not a factor.

(b)    When the Soldier is pregnant.

(c)    When the Soldier has purchased a home near the installation prior to notification of assignment to that installation.

(3)    When a Soldier married to another Soldier without Family members resides off post and 1 of the Soldiers departs on a separate tour, the other Soldier will not be ordered to return to housing.

(4)    Personnel who are authorized to reside in the civilian community shall receive HS counseling on the Equal Opportunity in Off-post Housing Program before negotiating a rental or lease agreement for community housing.

(5)    In foreign areas only, the garrison commander may mandatorily assign adequate housing to individuals otherwise authorized to live off post as identified in para (1) above to maintain optimum occupancy. The following conditions apply:

(a)    Personnel will not be mandatorily assigned until all volunteer unaccompanied Soldiers are assigned.

(b)    Personnel will be mandatorily assigned only to housing adequate for their grade requirement except in cases of military necessity.

(c)    Garrison commanders will consider assignment of all personnel listed in table 3-5 before implementing mandatory assignment procedures.

(d)    Soldiers will be informed of housing availability and the possibility of mandatory assignments before or on application for housing. Soldiers who have been notified in writing that housing would not be mandatorily assigned will not be required to move on post, regardless of subsequent changes in housing availability.

(e)    Mandatory assignment will not be made if—

1.    Soldier has less than 1 year's duty time remaining at the installation.

2.    Such assignment would cause extreme hardship.

(f)    Personnel who make commitments for community housing after receipt of PCS orders without first reporting to the housing office may be mandatorily assigned.

(g)    If a Soldier refuses to occupy Government housing, he or she will be advised in writing that their BAH will be forfeited as long as housing adequate for their grade is available.

l. Nonavailability of adequate permanent party housing.  

(1)    If adequate housing is not available, a CNA will be issued. When a member in the grade of sergeant (E-5) or below in CONUS including Hawaii and Alaska; staff sergeant (E-6) and below OCONUS, is authorized to live off post and receives BAH at the without dependent rate, the Soldier will be informed in writing that one of the following applies:

(a)    Housing may be made available to you within 6-12 months of your arrival. You may make temporary or semipermanent arrangements off post for no more than 12 months from the time of your arrival. You will be required to renew your CNA 90 days before your lease is up and will be required to accept Government housing at the end of your CNA period if housing is available.

(b)    Housing will be made available to you within 3-6 months of your arrival you may make temporary arrangement off post on a month-to-month basis.

(c)    Housing will not be made available during your tour of duty and you should make permanent billeting arrangements off post.

(2)    If UPH (PP) becomes available, Soldiers in the grade of sergeant (E-5) through private (E-1) in CONUS; staff sergeant (E-6) through private (E-1) OCONUS, residing off post and receiving housing allowances at without dependent rate will be required to occupy UPH. However, involuntary assignments will not be made if the garrison commander determines that financial hardship will occur.

(3)    Garrison commanders are the authority for issuance and control of CNAs for BAH at the without dependent rate. With HQ IMCOM approval, a garrison commander may further delegate to the installation housing manager. Requests to delegate will be submitted through appropriate command channels to HQ IMCOM for consideration. A quarterly review of all current CNAs and available UPH (PP) will be made by the garrison commander and provided to HQ IMCOM. The review will consist of an assessment of available adequate UPH (PP) assets and current CNAs within each unit. The installation housing manager is responsible for CNA recordkeeping.

3-21. Army policy on liability for damage to military permanent party housing and related furnishings and equipment

a. General.   Under 10 USC 2775, as implemented in AR 735-5, a Soldier is liable to the U.S. for damage to any assigned housing and related equipment or furnishings, if the damage is caused by the Soldier's abuse or negligence. The term assigned housing means both Family and UPH.

b. Limitation.  A Soldier's liability under AR 735-5 for damage to assigned housing and related equipment and furnishings is limited to 1 month's basic pay unless the damage or loss was the result of the Soldier's gross negligence or willful misconduct. For example, a Soldier is grossly negligent if he is aware of specific risks posed by the reckless, wanton, or deliberate conduct of Family members or guests, and fails to exercise available opportunity to prevent or limit the damage. In the absence of evidence to the contrary, Soldiers will be presumed to be on notice of risks attending the activities of those whom the Soldier allows upon the premises.

c. Waiver of claim.  The authority to waive, in whole or part, a claim under 10 USC 2775 has been delegated to those commanders who exercise final approval authority for Reports of Survey under AR 735-5. The dollar limitations on commander's final approval authority for Reports of Survey shall also apply to that commander's authority to waive claims under 10 USC 2775. In the event that a waiver is denied, enlisted and officer personnel have the right to appeal that denial to the appellate authority. The appeal of a denied waiver under 10 USC 2775 shall be made in the same manner as, and concurrently with, an appeal of a finding of liability under AR 735-5. In the event that such an appeal is denied, enlisted members have the additional right to request a remission of indebtedness under 10 USC 4837 and AR 600-4.

d. Acknowledgement of responsibilities and potential liability.  

(1)    All PP housing residents will be provided copies of a locally prepared Liability for Damage to Assigned Housing notice and are required to provide a written acknowledgement of receipt. In addition to the Liability for Damage to Assigned Housing notice, military Family housing residents will be provided copies of a locally prepared Conditions of Occupancy for Military Housing statement and must also provide a written acknowledgement of receipt of that statement. (See DA Pam 420-1-1 for examples of recommended content for the notice and the statement.)

(2)    Refusal to sign either or both acknowledgements of receipt does not relieve the resident of liability. Any such refusals will be documented and filed by the housing office.

Section IV
Adequacy Standards

3-22. Scope

This section sets forth adequacy standards for Government-owned and Government-controlled housing. It also addresses adequacy standards of off-post housing for PP personnel. These adequacy standards should not be confused with the special procedures used for Family housing identified to Congress prior to 1973 as substandard (see para 3-24 below). For a general description of the differences between construction design standards and adequacy standards, see DA Pam 420-1-1.

3-23. Adequate housing

a. Adequacy standards for Government-controlled Family housing.  

(1)    The garrison commander will determine the adequacy of Family housing per the standards below. Appearance and habitability will be reviewed annually or between major deployments.

(2)    Family housing units which equal or exceed the following standards are considered adequate:

(a) Location.   A housing unit will not be located in close proximity to sources of objectionable noise, odors, and health and safety hazards to residents. Reasonable proximity to runways, industrial areas, troop areas, and ammunition storage areas is characteristic of many installations; therefore, the influence of this factor will be limited to those cases where unacceptable proximity results in persistent annoyance or hazard.

(b) Site conditions.   

1. Drainage.   Suitable drainage and soil stabilization will be provided.

2. Access.   Suitable roadways, sidewalks, and steps will be provided as necessary for convenient access to DUs.

3. Parking.   Off-street parking shall be provided (up to a maximum of two cars per DU).

(c) Size.   The minimum areas in net and gross SF and in net and gross square meters (SMs) for DUs are listed in table 3-6. (For construction benchmarks, see DA Pam 420-1-1.) Only in unusual circumstances will a DU be declared inadequate because of insufficient space. A DU shall not be classified as inadequate on the basis of the current resident's grade if the DU is adequate for a lower grade.

Table 3-6. Minimum net floor area per Family housing dwelling unit (see notes 1 and 2)
Number of bedrooms: 1
Space (SF): 550 (net) / 682 (gross)
(SM): 51 (net) / 63 (gross)
Number of bedrooms: 2
Space (SF): 750 (net) / 930 (gross)
(SM): 70 (net) / 86 (gross)
Number of bedrooms: 3
Space (SF): 960 (net) / 1190 (gross)
(SM): 89 (net) / 111 (gross)
Number of bedrooms: 4 or more
Space (SF): 1190 (net) / 1476 (gross)
(SM): 111 (net) / 137 (gross)

Notes:
1. Space criteria are based on OMB Circular A-45.
2. for construction sizing benchmarks, see DA Pam 420-1-1.

(d) Condition of dwelling unit.   A DU must have—

1.    Structural soundness without potential health or safety hazards to residents.

2.    Hot and cold potable running water.

3.    At least 1 bathroom per floor of DU-1; with flushable commode, lavatory, and shower or tub and other with flushable commode and lavatory.

4.    A kitchen with sink, refrigerator, and range with oven.

5.    Sanitary facilities and sewage disposal.

6.    A heating system where the climate requires one.

7.    Electrical service.

8.    The minimum number of bedrooms to ensure no more than 2 Family members share a bedroom.

9.    Proper M&R performed to meet adequacy standards.

10.    Hard-wired smoke detectors in the appropriate locations (para 3-49).

(3)    In no case will a Family housing DU now designated as adequate be redesignated as substandard nor occupied on an adjusted BAH basis (see para 3-24a).

(4)    One of the following actions must be taken immediately with respect to any Government-owned DU which does not meet the standards in paragraph 3-23(2).

(a)    When there is a continuing long-term requirement for the DU, bring it back up to standards with an M&R or construction improvement project or replace it with a new construction project as soon as reasonably possible.

(b)    When there is no continuing long-term requirement for the DU, remove it from the Family housing inventory by conversion or disposal action as soon as reasonably possible.

(5)    Local regulations concerning smoking policy will be in accordance with existing Federal laws, Army regulations, or guidance. AR 600-63 contains specific guidance on smoking.

b. Adequacy standards for Government-controlled permanent party unaccompanied personnel housing.  

(1)    The garrison commander will operate and maintain UPH (PP) in accordance with this regulation and will ensure that the level of living experienced by UPH (PP) residents meets or exceeds the standards below. Appearance and habitability will be reviewed annually or between major deployments.

(a)    The housing must provide a decent, safe, sanitary, and habitable accommodation in good repair.

(b)    The minimum space and privacy standards for UPH (PP) in table 3-7 will be used to determine adequacy. These standards will apply worldwide. Housing managers should avoid confusing these standards with construction design standards (see DA Pam 420-1-1). Instructions for obtaining current barracks construction criteria are contained in paragraph 3-82b(4).

(c)    Men and women occupying UPH (PP) will be similarly housed; however, separate and secure sleeping and bathroom facilities will be provided. Two rooms served by the same bathroom will be assigned to personnel of the same gender.

(d)    Furnishings shall be provided per section IX of this chapter.

(2)    The UPH (PP) which does not meet adequacy standards will be brought up to standard, replaced, or disposed of as soon as reasonably possible. PP barracks will be revitalized in accordance with the Army Barracks Master Plan (BMP). Appearance and habitability will be reviewed at least annually.

(3)    The UPH (PP) approved, designed, and constructed under criteria exceeding these adequacy standards will use their construction design criteria as minimum standards for the facility.

(4)    Instructions for obtaining current PP barracks sizing benchmarks for construction are contained in paragraph 3-82b(4). Whenever possible, these design criteria will be used in the modernization of troop barracks. In terms of the number of persons per PP barracks room, the capacities of barracks constructed prior to the adoption of the current design differ from those in the current design. barracks designed and constructed to Volunteer Army (VOLAR) standards, the "2+2" standard, the "2+0" standard, the "1+1" standard or the "1+1E" standard have differences which affect the space available per person. Nonetheless, while minimum acceptable space and privacy standards are shown in table 3-7, whenever possible, 1 space will be allocated to a corporal/specialist (E-4) through private (E-1) and 2 spaces will be allocated to sergeants (E-5) and staff sergeants (E-6). This allocation of additional spaces for junior NCOs accounts for the difference between total spaces and the number of Soldiers that can be housed when describing the barracks inventory, that is, spaces versus faces, and defining requirements.

(5)    Soldiers in AIT (including Soldiers training for an additional skill identifier (ASI)) are authorized 90 net SF (8.3 net SM) of living space per construction design criteria. Existing facilities for AIT and ASI Soldiers will be considered adequate and will not be modified simply to meet the space criteria. For those installations which conduct OSUT and have both OSUT and AIT Soldiers in the same facility, 72 net SF (6.7 net SM) is considered adequate and does not authorize programming for construction or modification for these AIT Soldiers. Requirements surveys will count spaces based on the current real property records (72 or 90 net SF/6.7 or 8.3 net SM). When there is justification for construction or modification of the facility for reasons other than space, the 90 SF (8.3 SM) will apply for AIT and ASI Soldiers.

(6)    Local regulations concerning smoking policy will be per existing Federal laws, Army regulations, or guidance. AR 600-63 contains specific guidance.

(7)    Standards for PP civilians are based on the comparable military grades in table 3-3.

(8)    Temporary facilities will not be considered adequate (see paras 3-20d and 3-26).

(9)    Classification information for UPH (PP) is set forth in paragraph 3-30b.

Table 3-7. Minimum standards of acceptable space and privacy, existing unrevitalized inventory (see notes 1 and 2)
Grade:E-9, CW3, CW4, CW5, and O-3 and above
UPH (PP): 400 SF/37.2 SM net living area: living room, bedroom, private bath, access to kitchen or officer dining facility receiving APF support
Grade:WO1, CW2, O-1, and O-2
UPH (PP): 250 SF/23.2 SM net living area: sleeping/living room, private bath
Grade:E-7 through E-8
UPH (PP): 270 SF/25.1 SM net living area: private room, private bath
Grade:E-5 and E-6
UPH (PP): 135 SF/12.6 SM net living area: private room, bath shared with not more than 1 other (see notes 3 and 4)
Grade:E-5 and E-6 (attending additional skill training (AST))
UPH (PP): 135 SF/12.6 SM net living area: private room, bath shared with not more than 1 other (see note 3)
Grade:E-1 through E-4 (except recruits and trainees)
UPH (PP): 90 SF/8.3 SM net living area: not more than 4 per room, central bath (see note 3)
Grade:E-1 through E-4 (attending AIT/ASI)
UPH (PP): 90 SF/ 8.3 SM net living area: not more than 4 per room, central bath
Grade:E-1 recruits and trainees
UPH (PP): 72 SF/6.7 SM net living area: open bay, central bath

Notes:
1. The net living area of a private room or suite is measured from the inside face of the peripheral wall and includes all such enclosed, unshared spaces and partitions. The net living area in a shared room comprises the clear area in the sleeping room allocated for an individual's bed, locker, and circulation; it excludes lounges, bathrooms, hallways, door swing areas, and storage areas designed for military mobility and/or field gear or equipment. In open bay, net living area is one equal share per person. The open bay comprises all within the peripheral walls.
2. Standards for PP civilians are based on the comparable military grades in table 3-3.
3. Minimum space criteria vary for certain UPH building designs. Paragraph 3-23b addresses these variations.
4. Per 37 USC 403(e)(3) PP E-6 personnel entitled to BAH at the without dependent rate may elect to not occupy UPH (PP) which does not meet the minimum standard.

c. Adequacy of off-post housing for permanent party personnel.  

(1)    Assessment of housing. In the case of off-post housing for PP personnel, there are 2 distinct assessments.

(a)    Acceptability (or suitability). This refers to the resident's perception of how well the housing unit meets his or her housing needs.

(b)    Adequacy. This refers to the housing manager's appraisal of how well the housing unit conforms to criteria established to identify housing units that will meet the need for properly housing Soldiers and their Families. The number of adequate housing units is entered in the housing analysis and is used to develop housing requirements data for housing master plans (see sec XIV of this chapter).

(2)    Determination of adequacy.

(a)    The determination of the adequacy of rental housing in local communities is a key factor in identifying housing. Units will be considered adequate if they meet the criteria in paragraph 3-23c(3), unless the commander determines that the location involves excess travel time in mission essential situations.

(b)    When a Soldier living off post reports unacceptable housing conditions, that housing is inspected by the housing office using the criteria in this regulation (excluding bedroom count, cost, and distance). If the housing office verifies the Soldier's report, that housing is not counted as an asset against housing requirements.

(3)    Criteria for adequacy.

(a)    Location.

1.     The one-way distance from the housing unit to the installation is within 1 hour commute by privately-owned vehicle during normal commuting hours, or within other limits to satisfy mission requirements.

2.    The housing unit is not in an area, subdivision, or housing complex designated by the garrison commander as not acceptable for reasons of health or safety.

(b)    Cost. For making programming and/or acquisition decisions, the average total monthly cost must not exceed the amounts established by OSD. Total monthly cost includes rent, utilities (except costs reimbursed by the move-in housing allowance (OCONUS) and telephone which is paid by the resident), and other operating costs. Other operating costs include lease required real property insurance, lease required repair fees, a prorated portion of any renter paid real estate agent fee (where customary), and the average monthly cost of any stove or refrigerator provided by the renter in the absence of either landlord-furnished appliances or Government-furnished appliances (OCONUS).

(c)    Condition. The housing unit must—

1.    Be a complete unit with private entrance, bath, and kitchen for sole use of its residents. It must be so arranged that both kitchen and bedrooms can be entered without passing through bedrooms.

2.    Be well maintained and structurally sound. It must meet applicable codes and not pose a health, safety, or fire hazard.

3.    Have hot and cold running potable water. In some foreign areas, construction/building standards for community housing do not provide for potable running water. In such cases, hot and cold running water will be provided and a continuous supply of potable water will be made available.

4.    Have a shower or bathtub, lavatory, and a flashcube toilet in the primary bathroom.

5.    Have a permanently installed, adequately vented, heating system where the climate requires one and have air conditioning (AC) if on-post housing is authorized to be air conditioned.

6.    Have adequate electrical service for normal electrical equipment and lighting.

7.    Have cabinets in the kitchen, space and connections for a stove and refrigerator, and space for food preparation.

8.    Afford convenient access to parking.

9.    Have convenient access to roadways and sidewalks.

10.    Have smoke detectors installed and properly operating per state and/or local regulations, laws, or codes. (For purposes of housing requirements analysis, lack of a smoke detector will not cause a requirement for construction of additional on-post housing.)

11.    Have connections for a washer and dryer or access to laundry facilities on the premises.

12.    Have adequate sanitary and sewage disposal facilities.

(d)    Size.Table 3-6 lists minimum areas for DUs. Only in unusual cases, however, will units be declared inadequate solely because of insufficient floor space. This applies especially to mobile homes.

(4)    Resident-owned housing. All resident-owned housing will be considered adequate.

3-24. Substandard Family housing

a. Affected housing.  Substandard Family housing consists of only those inadequate Family housing units which were specifically identified to Congress by the Services through OSD in, and prior to, FY1973. The authority to declare units substandard has expired.

b. Disposition of substandard housing.  Substandard Family housing will be scheduled for improvement, renovation, replacement, or disposal.

c. Improvement policy.  Substandard housing will be improved to adequacy standards when—

(1)    There is a long-term or indefinite duration requirement for the DUs.

(2)    This requirement is for eligible personnel.

(3)    The necessary improvements can be made with a reasonable amount of funds. A reasonable expenditure will not exceed 50 percent of the current construction cost.

d. Policy on retention.  Continued retention is contingent upon meeting the following conditions:

(1)    The housing can be made adequate with a reasonable expenditure of funds and programmed for requisite revitalization.

(2)    The housing is safe, decent, and sanitary so as to be acceptable for occupancy pending revitalization.

(3)    There is a need which cannot be met by locally available private housing.

(a)    Need must be determined in accordance with current programming criteria. Under no circumstances will units be retained as substandard housing where adequate private housing is available at reasonable costs.

(b)    The requirement to retain must be for eligible personnel who—

1.    Are awaiting scheduled construction of new housing, or

2.    Have only a short-term requirement for the housing.

(4)    A rental charge (not to exceed 75 percent of full BAH) will be charged to the residents for such housing. However, when such housing is occupied by other than members of the Uniformed Services and their Families, full rent and charges shall be collected from the residents.

(a)    Nonroutine repairs and improvements, during the remaining life of the units, will be limited to those repairs or improvements necessary to keep units in a safe, decent, and sanitary condition. Total rental income for that housing project may be less than all routine O&M costs, plus the costs of any nonroutine repairs or improvements, made during any period. As long as units are retained, all reasonably necessary M&R to keep units in a safe, decent, and sanitary condition may be accomplished without regard to income.

(b)    Substandard units which can be economically improved to adequate standards will be reclassified on completion of the project. Appropriate notations and changes will be made to real property records.

(c)    IMCOM may approve reclassification of Family housing units erroneously identified as substandard.

e. Disposition policy.  

(1)    Substandard Family housing will be scheduled for disposition if it does not meet the criteria for retention in paragraph 3-24d. Substandard housing may be disposed of as follows:

(a)    Conversion to other use. Garrison commanders may request conversion of substandard housing to a use other than Family housing. Costs of conversion may not be funded from AFH and the converted units will not be returned to Family housing use without prior approval of HQDA (DAIM-ISH). If approved, the cost of returning the units to the Family housing inventory will not be funded by AFH.

(b)    Disposal by sale or demolition. Disposal is done per AR 405-90. Cost of disposal will be per DFAS-IN Manual 37-100-FY when it has been determined that such costs are properly chargeable to AFH. (In this regard, consider inactive substandard units as pending disposal action unless units are reclassified per paragraphs 3-24d(4)(b) and 3-24d(4)(c).

(2)    Prior approval of HQDA (DAIM-ISH) is required for diversion, conversion, or disposal of substandard housing except as permitted in paragraphs 3-24d(4)(b) and 3-24d(4)(c). Requests for diversion, conversion, or disposal will include data outlined in paragraph 3-29.

f. Assignment.  Assignments to substandard housing will be made on a voluntary basis only, except for reasons of military necessity (see para 3-16j).

Section V
Occupancy and Disposal

3-25. Scope

This section provides housing occupancy goals and establishes policy for changing functional use of housing facilities and the disposal of DUs.

3-26. Goals

The Army's goal is to achieve the best occupancy rates possible through optimum management of its housing inventories. This conserves public funds, focuses limited resources on occupied units, and maximizes availability of housing to eligible personnel.

a. Family housing.  

(1)    The goal of each installation is to achieve an occupancy rate of 95 percent. The maximum acceptable vacancy is 5 percent for adequate DUs. Vacancy rates above 5 percent require an analysis to determine if DUs are excess to needs. No vacancy rate is set for substandard DUs because occupancy is on a voluntary basis. However, every effort should be made to maximize their occupancy.

(2)    Vacancy rates are determined from Business Occupancy Program (BOP) reports.

b. Unaccompanied personnel housing (permanent party).  

(1)    The goal for each installation is a utilization rate of 95 percent for adequate housing.

(2)    Eligible Soldiers will not be required to occupy temporary World War II or substandard UPH (not upgradeable) facilities except for military necessity (see para 3-20d(3)).

(3)    As necessary, garrison commanders may maintain in active status those adequate barracks carried as "excess" in order to provide to priority I and II personnel (see table 3-5) space and privacy, which approaches current Army barracks construction criteria. Commanders should make this happen whenever their inventories allow.

3-27. Occupancy

a.  Adequate housing will be assigned with the least delay to ensure maximum occupancy. No unit will be kept vacant when ready for occupancy. The garrison commander may make exceptions for key and essential personnel and students.

b.  Installations will obtain maximum occupancy by—

(1)    Continuous advance planning.

(2)    Maintenance of waiting lists.

(3)    Prudent scheduling of maintenance.

(4)    Prompt performance of M&R work.

(5)    Prompt assignment of housing.

3-28. Changes in functional use

a. Designation of housing.  Government-provided housing is acquired to meet the needs of personnel in various grade groups. Upon initial occupancy, housing is designated for use by personnel in certain grade groups. These designations, which reflect functional uses of the housing, are permanent, but may be changed to meet changing requirements. For a description of housing specific category codes (CATCODEs) identifying functional use and the types of changes applicable to housing, see DA Pam 420-1-1.

b. Considerations in making changes.  Decisions regarding changes in functional use are based on the following:

(1) Need for facilities.   Current and projected numbers and types of housing facilities will determine needs.

(2) Duration of change.   A change will be either temporary or permanent.

(a)    Temporary changes are further classified as either reallocation or diversion. Real property records must be annotated to reflect the temporary change, and the annotation will include the current use CATCODE and the start and end dates of the temporary change. For descriptions of reallocation and diversion and their effect on CATCODE, see DA Pam 420-1-1.

(b)    Permanent changes are further classified as either redesignation or conversion. Conversions require changes to the design CATCODEs in real property inventory records. For descriptions of redesignation and conversion and their effect on CATCODEs, see DA Pam 420-1-1.

c. Approval authority.  

(1) Family housing.   All diversions and conversions will be approved by HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

(2) Delegation.   Diversion and conversion approval authority will not be delegated except when Family housing is diverted to UPH specifically for occupancy of unaccompanied pregnant Soldiers. Under this specific circumstance, garrison commanders are delegated the authority to approve diversions of this nature for up to 6 months.

(3) Unaccompanied personnel housing.   Diversions will be approved in accordance with paragraph 3-30c(1)(b) and conversions in accordance with paragraph 3-30d(2).

(4) Army lodging.   Any diversion or conversion to or from Army lodging to AFH or UPH must be approved by HQDA. Submit request to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

d. Diversion and conversion limitation.  Diversions up to and beyond 3 years, any combination of 2 or more DUs into a single DU, and any diversion or conversion that results in a DU having more than 5 bedrooms must be approved by HQDA. Submit request to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

3-29. Family housing

a. Reallocation and diversion of Family housing.  

(1) Reallocation of Family housing.   

(a)    Family housing areas and, in some cases, individual DU are designated by the garrison commander for use by grade categories.

(b)    Garrison commanders may reallocate DU from one grade category to another (that is, change the last 2 digits in the 5-digit CATCODE) when—

1.    There is an imbalance in distribution of existing on-post, off-post, or both on-post and off-post DUs.

2.    Circumstances do not warrant permanent change in allocation of DUs.

(c)    A comparison of Family housing assets against requirements will be made annually. In assessing the needs for reallocation of Family housing assets, consider the following:

1.    Housing requirements within each grade category, by bedroom count, including current, projected, and programmable changes.

2.    Recent or projected mission changes.

3.    Approved and programmed construction, both on-post and off-post.

4.    Separation of officer and enlisted Families.

5.    Disparity of waiting time between grade categories.

(2) Diversion of Family housing.   

(a)    Facilities constructed as Family housing DUs or permanently converted to such use will not be diverted to other use (that is, change the 3-digit CATCODE), unless they are excess to Family housing needs. Family housing units will not be declared diverted for routine M&R, for cleanup, or while awaiting assignment.

(b)    Authority to divert Family housing to non-Family housing use is held at HQDA (see para 3-28c).

(c)    A DU may be diverted to UPH when needed to house—

1.    Permanently assigned commanders with the rank of colonel (O-6) or above who are entitled to BAH at the without dependent rate and are required to reside on the installation. Such commanders will forfeit their housing allowances during the period of occupancy. This applies only when available UPH facilities lack the entertainment area to meet social obligations.

2.    Unmarried chaplains and unaccompanied married chaplains.

(d)    Diverted facilities must be monitored to ensure timely return to Family housing use.

(e)    DUs will not be altered or modified in any way that will preclude their restoration to Family housing use at a later date.

(f)    Cost limitations on Family housing will apply to those DUs that have been diverted to other use but remain in the Family housing inventory.

(g)     for preparation of a request for approval to divert Family housing to other use see DA Pam 420-1-1.

(3) Reallocation and diversion documentation.   

(a)    Documentation will be kept on file during the period of reallocation or diversion. Diversions do not change the total inventory.

(b)    Real property inventory records will be annotated to reflect reallocations and diversions.

b. Redesignation and conversion of Family housing.  

(1) Redesignation of Family housing.   

(a)    Garrison commanders may redesignate adequate DU to alleviate inequity of available housing among grade categories. They will notify HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600 through their IMCOM region of redesignations which they approve.

(b)    Redesignation of GFOQ and GCQ requires prior approval of HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

(c)    DU requirements will be analyzed as in paragraph 3-29a(1)(c) prior to proposing redesignation.

(d)    Redesignation must be based on long-term requirements and current and long-range construction plans. It should take into account the physical location and amenities of existing and approved future units.

(e)    Whether redesignation should be pursued will be considered at least annually and will be evaluated when—

1.    The installation conducts a housing requirements determination action (see sec XIV of this chapter).

2.    There is a significant change in installation population (increase, decrease, ratio adjustment among grade categories, or bedroom requirements) or available on-post or off-post housing assets.

3.    Waiting periods differ greatly between grade categories with like bedroom requirements.

4.    There are constant diversions to maintain equity balance.

(2) Conversion of Family housing.   

(a)    AFH funds will not be used to support a DU or other Family housing real property that has been converted.

(b)     for preparation of a request for approval for conversion of Family housing to other use see DA Pam 420-1-1.

(c)    Requests which are based on economic factors will include an economic analysis (EA) which must demonstrate that retention as Family housing is not economically feasible.

(d)    Converted DU will not be included in the Family housing inventory or reported after the initial report of conversion.

(3) Redesignation and conversion documentation.   

(a)    Redesignation and conversion actions will be properly documented and entered into Housing Operation Management System (HOMES) or other housing management information system.

(b)    Installation real property inventory records will be changed to reflect redesignations and conversions.

c. Inactivation of Family housing.  

(1)    Family housing units are considered to be in an "active" status unless DUs which have no anticipated occupancy for a period of 3 months or more are specifically removed from that status. Family housing units will not be declared "inactive" for routine M&R, cleanup, or while awaiting assignment.

(2)    DUs may be inactivated when—

(a)    All efforts to fill the units through voluntary assignment, assignment of Family members of absentee sponsors, and other management options such as diversion, conversion, or (in foreign areas) mandatory assignment (see para 3-16k for condition under which mandatory assignment may be considered) have been exhausted and there is no foreseeable need for the DU for the next 3 months.

(b)    The installation has been announced for closure or mission reduction and, as a result, housing requirements are diminished or DUs are vacant pending disposition.

(3)    Facilities declared "inactive" will receive only the basic maintenance necessary to protect the Government's capital investment. Provisions will be made to prevent loss from fire, theft, vandalism, or avoidable deterioration and to preclude the development of unsafe, unsanitary, or unsightly conditions.

d. Reactivation of Family housing.  Garrison commanders may reactivate DUs when the conditions for inactivation cease to exist.

e. Disposal of Family housing.  Disposal will be considered when real property is excess to the needs of Family housing (or there are better alternatives to meeting the requirement) and conversion is not an acceptable or practical alternative. Alternatives to disposal may entail divestiture or sale of the property, demolition, replacement, conversion, or transfer to other than AFH control (for example, privatization). Priority will be given to obsolete and excess housing units that can be disposed of as part of an AFHC funded project or privatization action.

(1)     for preparation of a request for approval to dispose of Family housing see DA Pam 420-1-1.

(2)    Disposal of Family housing will comply with AR 405-90. All disposal of Family housing will be documented on DA Form 337 (Request for Approval of Disposal of Buildings and Improvements). AR 405-90 states the approval authorities.

(3)    Disposal will not normally be approved where a Family housing deficit exists and the DU can be economically retained or reconfigured for continued Family housing use.

(4)    In all cases, a copy of the approval memorandum and signed DA Form 337 will be provided to HQDA (DAIM-ISH) at least 21 calendar days prior to the award or execution of any disposal action.

3-30. Unaccompanied personnel housing

a. Unaccompanied personnel housing real property records.  A physical inventory of UPH will be conducted periodically, but no less than biennially to validate and update inventory records. This validation and update will consider the results of space management surveys and may result in changes in use to ensure effective utilization of assets. Inventory validations and updates will be coordinated with the Real Property Officer, Space/Facility Manager, and Master Planner.

b. Classification of unaccompanied personnel housing (permanent party).  

(1)    All UPH will be classified as "1+1," "1+1E", "2+2", "Modified 2 + 2", other adequate, substandard (upgradeable), or substandard (not upgradeable) (see glossary for definitions of these terms).

(2)    The garrison commander will classify UPH per the guidelines in paragraph 3-23b.

(3)    Neither cosmetic nor other deficiencies that are correctable with O&M funds will justify a substandard classification.

(4)    The UPH will not be classified as substandard merely because the facility does not meet current construction design standards.

(5)    The absence of recreational facilities at an installation will not be a basis for declaring Government housing substandard.

(6)    The UPH classifications will be annotated on real property records. These annotations will be changed whenever a classification is changed. The UPH will be classified in facility CATCODE series 721 or 724.

c. Diversion of unaccompanied personnel housing.  

(1) Basic policy.   

(a)    Diversion of UPH will not result in dislocating personnel to housing of lesser quality.

(b)    Authority to divert adequate UPH or substandard UPH (upgradeable) buildings or parts of buildings to other UPH use (that is, change either last 2 or 3 digits of 5-digit CATCODE) is held by the IMCOM with copy furnished to HQDA (DAIM-ISH). Authority to divert adequate UPH or substandard UPH (upgradeable) for use by activities unrelated to UPH (that is, change 3-digit CATCODE) is held at HQDA. Diversion requests will be sent to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

(2) Diversion.   

(a)     for preparation of a request for approval of diversion of UPH assets, see DA Pam 420-1-1.

(b)    Approval to divert or continue diversion of adequate or substandard UPH (upgradeable) will be granted only when it has been determined that—

1.    Diversions are being made on an austere basis.

2.    Use of existing temporary-type facilities to provide required facilities is not feasible.

3.    Early MCA programming for the type of facilities for which the diversion is required is accomplished at a high priority to insure retention of the program.

4.    The installation has enough permanent-type UPH to accommodate the troop strength assigned and diversion will not result in issuance of CNAs.

(c)    Existing adequate UPH or substandard UPH (upgradeable) will not be used as distinguished visitor quarters (DVQ) unless they are excess to requirements. The IMCOM region approval is required.

(d)    There is no restriction on the diversion of substandard UPH which is not economically upgradeable to acceptable UPH standards.

(e)    Diverted UPH spaces will be counted as UPH assets including when determining requirements; however, they will not be counted as UPH vacancies in calculating utilization rates.

(3) Diversion documentation.   Approval documentation will be kept on file during the period of diversion and real property records will be changed to reflect diversion.

d. Conversion of unaccompanied personnel housing.  

(1)    Conversion may change UPH functional use to non-UPH functional use (that is, change 3-digit CATCODE). However, conversion may also change a facility's functional use from one UPH use to another UPH use (that is, change the last 2 or 3 digits of the 5-digit CATCODE). For example, if requirement is to house visiting officers and housing constructed for officers (CATCODE 72410) is available to satisfy that requirement, conversion action must be initiated to change the category to visiting officers quarters (CATCODE 72412).

(2)    Authority to convert adequate UPH or substandard UPH (upgradeable) buildings or parts of buildings to other UPH use (that is, change either last 2 or 3 digits of 5-digit CATCODE) is held by the IMCOM with copy furnished to HQDA (DAIM-ISH). The authority to convert adequate UPH or substandard UPH (upgradeable) buildings or parts of buildings to non-UPH use is held at HQDA. Conversion requests will be sent to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

(3)    Conversion of adequate UPH or substandard UPH (upgradeable) buildings, or parts of buildings, is subject to the following conditions:

(a)    Installations will seek opportunities to convert excess permanent space to allow the relocation of activities occupying space in temporary facilities.

(b)    No permanent space will be converted where the same category of space in temporary facilities is in use.

(c)    Facilities constructed within the last 5 years will not be converted.

(d)    Conversion from a shortage category to an excess category is prohibited.

(e)    UPH conversion approval will be valid for one year after date of approval. Approval of a UPH conversion for which a change in the functional use of space, as approved, has not taken place within one year will be rescinded automatically on the anniversary date of the approval.

(f)    Real property records will be changed to reflect approved conversions after change in functional use of space has been made; not upon approval.

(g)    Conversion of space from a shortage category to another shortage category will be approved only after giving consideration to how future force structure changes, weapons systems deployments, and contingency planning will affect overall facilities needs.

(4)     for preparation of a request for approval to convert adequate UPH or substandard UPH (upgradeable), see DA Pam 420-1-1.

e. Inactivation of unaccompanied personnel housing.  

(1)    UPH is considered to be in an "active" status unless specifically removed from that status.

(2)    Garrison commanders may inactivate UPH which has no anticipated occupancy for a period of 3 months or more when—

(a)    All efforts to fill the UPH through voluntary assignment, other management option such as diversion or conversion, or mandatory assignment have been exhausted and there is no foreseeable need for the UPH for the next three months; or

(b)    The installation has been announced for closure or mission reduction, and, as a result, UPH requirements are diminished, or UPH is vacant pending disposition; or

(c)    The UPH is undergoing major M&R or improvements which preclude occupancy for an extended period of time.

(3)    Facilities declared "inactive" for reasons other than major M&R or improvements will receive only the basic maintenance necessary to protect the Government's capital investment. Provisions will be made to prevent loss from fire, theft, vandalism, or avoidable deterioration and to preclude the development of unsafe, unsanitary, or unsightly conditions.

f. Reactivation of unaccompanied personnel housing.  Garrison commanders may reactivate UPH when the conditions for inactivation cease to exist.

g. Disposal of unaccompanied personnel housing.  Disposal of UPH will be done in accordance with AR 405-90.

3-31. Host-tenant and logistic support agreements

a. Host-tenant concept.  Policies and procedures on host-tenant interservice and intergovernmental support agreements between ACOMs, ASCCs, DRUs, IMCOM, organizations, units, or activities are described in DODI 4000.19 and ACSIM's Support Agreement Handbook (available at http://www.hqda.army.mil/acsimweb). DD Form 1144 (Support Agreement) will be used to complete agreements, when required.

b. Host-tenant housing policy.  

(1)    DOD military personnel assigned to an installation for duty, and those assigned to units attached to the host for housing support, are eligible for housing assets under control and jurisdiction of the host. All eligible personnel will compete for such housing on the same basis as personnel assigned to the host. They will be assigned to housing under the provisions of this regulation.

(2)    The policy in paragraph 3-31b(1) does not relieve tenant units or activities of their obligation to enter into a host-tenant agreement, when required. Attached and tenant units and activities must advise the host installation of their housing requirements, particularly for Families and for key and essential personnel.

(3)    Any differences involving host-tenant support responsibilities or negotiations will be referred to the parent commands for resolution per DODI 4000.19.

c. Interservice, interdepartmental, and interagency support agreements.  Army commanders may be asked to provide housing support to other departments or agencies of the Federal Government, including other military departments.

(1)    Office of the Secretary of Defense has established the basic principle that each DOD component provides and arranges for the support of its own forces. In arranging for support, a component may request assistance from another DOD component.

(2)    Each DOD component must provide the support requested to the extent military requirements permit, provided—

(a)    Requested support is available or can be made available with provision of additional resources (funds, facilities, and/or manpower) and to the overall advantage of DOD.

(b)    The host has the capability of supporting the tenant without detrimental impact on its own military missions.

(3)    Interservice, interdepartmental, or interagency requests for Army housing support are negotiated per DODI 4000.19. Where a host is unable to provide housing support without additional resources, and the requestor's economic analysis shows support by the host to be more advantageous to DOD if additional resources were provided the host, the request will be passed up the host's chain of command to the ACSIM for a decision. If the decision is made to provide the host with additional resources, a budget-base (program) transfer of funds from the tenant's department or agency to the host's department will be made at departmental level.

(4)    Each level of command will attempt to resolve disagreements with other Services, departments, or agencies. Such action will be fully documented, presenting both the Army and other positions and arguments so that the next higher level is totally informed and knows what objections exist. Refer unresolved issues to HQDA (DAIM-OD), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600. Provide information copy of referral to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

d. International agreements.  

(1)    With regard to any international agreements which address housing support, ASCC commanders and IMCOM region directors will forward the following (per AR 550-51) to HQDA (DAJA-IO), 2200 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-2200:

(a)    All requests for international agreements which require OSD or HQDA approval.

(b)    Yearly records of authorizations and denials for international agreements executed within the authority delegated to their ASCCs.

(2)    Army military personnel are permitted to occupy housing of a foreign country in accordance with the terms of an existing international agreement, such as a SOFA.

(3)     foreign military personnel are permitted to occupy Army housing as specified in section III or in other existing formal agreements.

3-32. Unit moves and base realignments

a. Unit moves.  

(1)    Unit moves result from—

(a)    Unit rotation.

(b)    Restationing action.

(2)    Eligible military personnel identified for PCS reassignment with a unit move must receive fair and equitable consideration of available housing assets at the gaining installation. It is essential that all personnel receive advance notice of the housing situation at the gaining installation (as it applies specifically to them) so that they can make necessary plans and arrangements. This is especially so for those with Families. Such notification precludes speculative rumors and improves the morale and efficiency of all personnel whether they are members of the advance party or are part of a subsequent increment.

(3)    Due to time phasing of unit moves, the effective date of the merger of Family housing waiting lists will be agreed upon by the installations, IMCOM regions, and ACOMs, ASCCs, or DRUs involved as appropriate. The merger date must be equitable for all concerned and be set up to ensure minimum stagnation of waiting lists. Unresolved issues will be forwarded to IMCOM regions and, if still unresolved, to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

b. Procedures.  To achieve a smooth unit move, the following procedures will apply:

(1)    The commander of the unit being moved will—

(a)    Identify personnel for PCS reassignment with the unit.

(b)    Prepare and submit a list of all unit move personnel who are eligible and wish to be considered for Government-provided housing at the gaining installation. Separate lists will be established for FH and UPH. Each list will be arranged by grade categories. Within the Family housing list, the grade categories are further arranged according to the determined effective date of housing application for each Soldier's current category at the losing installation, and are considered as advance applications. This list is sent to the gaining installation no less than 45 days prior to the effective date of the unit move.

(c)    Submit a proposed list of key and essential personnel to the commander of the gaining installation.

(d)    Enter into host-tenant negotiations, if required, at the earliest practicable date in advance of the unit move.

(2)    The gaining garrison commander will—

(a)    Merge the Family housing section of the list of the incoming unit with the existing list for preplanning purposes.

(b)    Evaluate the impact the unit move has on existing housing waiting lists and housing forecasts.

(c)    Enter into host-tenant negotiations with the commander of the incoming unit, as necessary.

(d)    Make appropriate plans and arrangements to accommodate incoming personnel.

(e)    Provide effective housing services to include the full range of Housing Services.

(f)    Recommend revision of key and essential position list, as required.

(3)    The gaining installation will honor all housing assignment commitments issued by the gaining installation prior to merger of the waiting lists.

(4)    The final housing list of the incoming unit will be merged with the gaining installation lists no less than 30 days prior to the scheduled movement of the advance party of the incoming units.

(a)    If the personnel strength of the incoming unit is altered prior to the effective date of the unit move, the merged lists will be adjusted accordingly.

(b)    Lists of the gaining installation and incoming unit will be merged on a pro rata basis.

(c)    Individuals in the freeze zone on the gaining installation waiting list will not be displaced.

(d)     for installations with automated Family housing waiting lists, it will be necessary to adjust the effective date of application to ensure maintenance of relative positions on the list.

(5)    The merged waiting lists will be posted in the housing office for public view by both the gaining installation and the incoming unit.

(6)    The gaining installation will issue DD Form 1747 (Status of Housing Availability) to all incoming personnel. If appropriate, group statements may be issued to personnel of the incoming unit.

(7)    Approved key and essential personnel of the incoming unit will receive priority consideration for the assignment to housing. However, they will not displace personnel on the waiting list who have received a firm commitment for housing assignment. Appropriate Family housing DUs may be held vacant for a period not to exceed 30 days pending the arrival of designated key and essential personnel of the incoming unit.

c. Base realignments.  Realignment actions will often have a disruptive impact on people. Therefore, housing managers at all levels must participate in realignment studies to ensure that the housing aspects of realignments are appropriately considered before the fact (see AR 5-10).

d. Base closures.  When a base closes, commanders must ensure that military personnel and Families are moved on a scheduled basis. Housing facilities must be closed consistent with the capability to provide essential support and service. Continuous coordination among all the functional elements of the infrastructure will be essential. HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600; HQDA (DAIM-OD), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600; USACE (CERE), 441 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20314-1000; and the IMCOM region will coordinate on and issue specific guidance concerning the assignment, utilization, and ultimate disposition of housing assets.

3-33. Minimizing maintenance downtime for Family housing

The time during which DUs are out of service due to M&R must be kept to a minimum by coordination of the assignment/termination function, and the scheduling and performance of between-occupancy M&R performed by either an in-house or a contract maintenance workforce. At locations where between-occupancy M&R is accomplished by contract, the contract will include:

a. Performance time-limits clause.  DA Pam 420-1-1 provides guidelines for typical between-occupancy average times for M&R items; however, the limits to be used in a M&R contract at a specific installation should be determined based on efficiency and overall savings to the Government.

b. Liquidated damages clause.  The liquidated damages clause will reflect the loss to the Government for contractor delays beyond the stated time limits and will include BAH costs, any additional temporary payments to the Soldier while awaiting the housing, and additional costs of Government inspection.

c. Individual task listing.  The task listing will allow each of the items (requirements) to be accomplished individually or in combination with other items depending on the maintenance needs of that particular DU.

Section VI
Housing Services Office

3-34. Scope

This section prescribes policy, responsibility, and procedures governing the housing services operation and equal opportunity in off-post housing programs.

3-35. Local civilian community housing

a.  Congress has directed the DOD to rely on the local civilian community as the primary source of housing assets to meet military needs. This policy demands that the installation HSOs pursue an active role in their relationships with local community entities associated with real estate and the housing market. In establishing a mutually beneficial relationship with the community, the garrison commander will ensure that HSO will—

(1)    Participate with, and actively solicit support for military needs from, civilian rental property owners and managers, local housing authorities, real estate boards, home builders associations, chambers of commerce, planning agencies, zoning offices, financial institutions, and building permit issuing agencies.

(2)    Inform the civilian community of military housing needs and seek community acceptance of any proposed military housing acquisition programs.

b.  Actively work with the local community to enhance the HSO's ability to—

(1)    Assist newly arrived personnel in finding adequate and affordable community housing with the least possible delay.

(2)    Provide guidance and assistance to personnel in off-post housing matters on a continuing basis.

(3)    Counsel departing personnel so that they will be able to make informed decisions about housing choices at their new duty station prior to a PCS move.

3-36. Eligibility

a.  The following are eligible to participate in the HS and EOOPH programs:

(1)    All AD military personnel and their Family members.

(2)    U.S. citizen DOD employees (APF and NAF) and their Family members.

b.  Soldiers and OCONUS DOD civilian employees must report to the HSO prior to making arrangements to rent, lease, or purchase off-post housing.

3-37. Housing services functions and customer service

a. Housing services functions.  

(1)    To maximize off-post housing support in meeting Soldier needs, the installation HSO will offer as a minimum the following services:

(a)    Nondiscriminatory listings of rental and for-sale housing.

(b)    Counseling for applicants on the EOOPH program and the prohibitions against discrimination based on disability.

(c)    Assistance in resolving landlord tenant disputes.

(d)    Preliminary inquiries to validate housing discrimination complaints.

(e)    Liaison with community and Government officials and organizations.

(f)    Housing data exchange with other DOD housing offices.

(g)    Management and processing responsibilities, entitlement briefings, and certifications related to housing availability and related costs for temporary lodging expense (TLE) (see JFTR).

(h)    Government transportation for newly arrived personnel where possible to inspect community housing listings when public or private transportation is not available or convenient.

(i)    Assistance with rental negotiations and review of leases.

(j)    General housing information sufficient for the Army Community Service (ACS) to fully support the Housing Relocation Assistance Program, to include the Standard Installation Topic Exchange Service (SITES) database.

(2)    Where feasible on a space and/or resource available basis, the following additional services may be offered:

(a)    Counseling on home buying and selling, property management, and mobile homes.

(b)    Housing market area data for use in developing market analyses (see sec XIV).

(c)    Administrative assistance with utility company fees and deposits, connections, and billings.

(3)    Additionally, the following services will be provided in foreign areas:

(a)    Management and processing responsibilities, entitlement briefings and certifications of housing availability and related costs for the TLA (see JFTR), move in housing allowance (MIHA) (see JFTR); and the OHA programs. DD Form 2367 (Individual Overseas Housing Allowance (OHA) Report) will be used to determine eligibility to start, adjust, or terminate OHA. The form may be supplemented with additional information to suit local requirements. However, supplementation will not replace utilization of DD Form 2367 for its intended purposes. A copy of each completed form, any local supplement, and a copy of the individual's lease or sales agreement will be retained in the HSO's records file.

(b)    Government transportation to newly arriving personnel to inspect community housing listings.

(c)    Language interpretation in dealing with landlord and utility companies.

(d)    Rental agreements in English and local language. Every effort should be made to include the following provisions in rental agreements:

1.    A lease period with automatic renewal provision.

2.    Early termination without penalty based on appropriate military reassignment orders.

(e)    Preparation of moving in and out inventory condition report of premises with tenant and landlord.

(f)     Mandatory in-processing and out-processing of DOD personnel through the HSO as part of the local processing procedures.

(g)    Maintenance of a rotation (expected date of departure) file on DOD personnel living in private rental housing.

(h)    Documentation that applicant is actively seeking permanent housing if required to do so.

(i)    Verification that private rental housing is not vacated prematurely.

(4)    There are a number of programs that support the services in paragraphs 3-37a(1), 3-37a(2), and 3-37a(3). The programs listed below can aid the installation HSO in accomplishing its mission of making the Soldier aware of the availability of affordable, quality housing. These programs are intended to help equalize the cost to the Soldier of on-post and off-post housing.

(a)    Rental Partnership Program (see para 3-37d(2)).

(b)    Army Housing Online User Services (see para 3-27e(6)).

(c)    Housing Relocation Assistance Program (HRAP) (see para 3-27e(6)).

(d)    Deposit Waiver Program (see para 3-27e(6)).

(e)    Automated Housing Referral Network.

(5)    The HSO programs and services should be accessible to and usable by persons with disabilities. If it is not feasible to locate those services in an accessible building or if modification of a building would be an undue hardship, arrangements must be made to provide, upon request, all HSO services at an accessible location. Readers for the blind and sign language interpreters for deaf persons should be made available upon request, if feasible.

(6)    Housing managers must ensure that the responsibilities identified in paragraphs 3-27a(1)(h)and 3-27a(3)(a) are added to employee position descriptions.

(7)    The HSO hours of operation should be convenient and flexible to meet the needs of its customers.

b. Housing services staffing.  

(1)    Installation housing managers must annually assess the current strength of HSO staffs to determine whether the HS program is fully staffed, fully trained, and has the appropriate facilities and tools to anticipate and meet the requirements of incoming and outgoing Soldiers and Families. Toward that end, the Army will set staffing levels based on the number of off-post Soldiers and Families that are provided off-post housing services for the given installation (see table 3-8). The HSO must be active in the local, off-post communities in an aggressive search for additional adequate housing. The effective HSO should contain enough staff to allow sufficient time, as determined appropriate by the housing manager, to be spent off-post in direct contact with landlords, real estate agents/brokers, state and local housing staffs, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) staff, Chambers of Commerce staffs, and so forth, in a constant search for additional suitable off-post housing. The HSO should be supported with sufficient vehicles, telephone lines, a FAX machine, copy machine, computers with internet access, and other equipment and supplies essential to facilitate its work.

Table 3-8. Housing Services Office staff to eligible population
Number of FamiliesHSO Staff Level
< 1000
101 - 5001
501 - 1,9992
2,000 - 3,4993
3,500 - 6,4994
6,500 - 9,4995
9,500 - 12,4996
12,500 - 15,4997
15,000 +8

(2)    Each HSO worldwide should have sufficient telephone lines and open, immediate access to long distance/overseas telephone, internet, and FAX services. This will enable HSO staffs to obtain real time, up-to-date information about temporary and permanent housing availability at the next duty station for each departing Soldier and Family. AFH funds may be used to pay for the installation of additional lines dedicated to Family housing use and monthly costs for service. Sufficient telephone lines will help ensure that Soldiers, Families, and military units have a "soft landing" at their next duty stations.

c. Coordinated offices.  A coordinated HSO may be established in areas where more than one military installation is located. One installation should be designated to provide services, mutually agreed upon, for each installation in a geographic area, and designated the primary DOD contact with community and Government agency (local, State, and Federal) representatives. In coordinated areas, each installation should perform some or all of the HSO functions.

d. Off-post housing availability.  

(1) Housing listings.   The HSO will obtain and maintain listings of adequate rental and sales units reflecting the full range of prices, sizes, and locations of housing assets. Property considered for listing will be inspected when there is a question of adequacy. Property which is inadequate for occupancy by military Families will be identified in a restrictive sanction list which will be provided to Soldiers. Units will be listed on an approved automated system (see DA Pam 420-1-1). Property and agents against which restrictive sanctions have been imposed will be identified in a restrictive sanction list which will be provided the Soldiers.

(2) Rental Partnership Program.   The installation HSO may contact local landlords to request set-aside housing units (apartments or houses) for use by military personnel. DOD and Army sponsored civilian personnel may participate in the RPP in foreign areas. The Soldier would pay rent by payroll deduction (allotment) not greater than his or her housing allowances. The security deposit may be waived by mutual agreement. For guidelines for establishing a RPP, see DA Pam 420-1-1.

e. Assistance and counseling.  The HSO can ease Soldier and Family relocations through timely and straightforward assistance and counseling. The HSO will have the capability to—

(1)    Counsel all applicants concerning the EOOPH program with emphasis placed on the obligation of applicants to report immediately any indication of discrimination in their search for housing. A copy of the restrictive sanction list will be provided to each applicant (see para 3-38i(2)).

(2)    Counsel personnel regarding standards of conduct, the rights and responsibilities of landlords and tenants, and the availability of assistance from the HSO in resolving disputes. Local laws and regulations pertaining to the rights and responsibilities of landlords and tenants will be addressed. Desirability of military release clauses in rental contracts, legal assistance available to review proposed leases and sales contracts, and applicable laws governing refunds of advance payments for home purchases should also be addressed. Applicants will be informed of the impact of tenant conduct on continued community support to provide needed housing for DOD Families in the future.

(3)    Provide applicants with general information on the community and the support services available in handout form. For guidelines for the content of the community and support services handout, see DA Pam 420-1-1.

(4)    Furnish each applicant a copy of DA Pam 360-611 which contains guidelines on standards of conduct for military personnel who reside off post. Overseas, this publication may be supplemented to suit local conditions. Parts that do not apply overseas will be identified to the applicants.

(5)    Verify permissive TDY. Members on permissive TDY for house-hunting purposes must have a DA Form 4187 (Personnel Action) and, if applicable, a DD Form 1747 when processing through the gaining HSO (see AR 600-8-10). The Soldier must report to the gaining installation's housing office and have DA Form 4187 verified/stamped on the first available duty day. Soldiers must not negotiate or formalize acquisition of housing prior to obtaining verification/stamp (DA Form 4187). The stamp and date serves as verification of housing processing and permissive TDY status. Failure to secure the HSO validation may result in the Soldier being charged leave for the entire period.

(6)    Assist transferring Soldiers and Family members in assessing their housing relocation needs. Relocation requirements/interests not related to housing will be referred to the installation ACS office or other agency for specific assistance. Housing relocation assistance counseling will include AHOS, the HRAP, and the Deposit Waiver Program. (See DA Pam 420-1-1 for recommended content of the counseling including AHOS, the HRAP and the Deposit Waiver Program.)

(7)    Advise applicants to consider obtaining insurance coverage for premises to be rented and against loss of personal effects and household furnishings while their property is in the rented premises.

f. Complaints from the Soldier.  

(1) Community housing complaints.   Off-post housing problems concerning DOD personnel must be investigated immediately for validity and fully documented by the HSO. (Housing managers must ensure that these responsibilities are added to both the employee position descriptions and the major performance objectives/individual performance standards.) Provisions for handling on-post housing complaints are addressed in paragraph 3-63.

(2) Health, sanitation, and unfair business practice complaints.    The Armed Forces Disciplinary Control Board will be contacted for possible placement of facilities off-limits when health or sanitation complaints cannot be resolved with agents or local civilian agencies (see AR 190-24). Agents who participate in unfair business practices may be placed off limits. Examples of unfair business practices are as follows:

(a)    Those OCONUS agents who charge excess rent to Americans.

(b)    Payment of money requested in addition to the sum specified in the lease.

(c)    Nonrefund of entire security deposit even though Soldier has fulfilled all requirements of lease.

g. Advertisements and information technology.  

(1)    The HSO will assist in ensuring that only nondiscriminatory advertisements of rental or sales housing units appear in authorized DOD media formats, such as the internet, Web sites, post publications, and bulletin boards. Media formats inconsistent with the DOD policy affirming equal opportunity housing for all DOD personnel will not be used or distributed by housing offices.

(2)    The HSO will also maintain access to the internet where housing customers may view other Army installations, communities, and on-post and off-post housing.

3-38. Housing discrimination complaints

a. Equal Opportunity in Off-Post Housing Program.  

(1)     Title 42, U.S. Code, section 3601 et seq (42 USC 3601 et seq); Public Law (PL) 100-430 (1988); PL 93-383 (1974); and PL 90-284 (1968) pertain to equal opportunity for all citizens in obtaining housing regardless of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, handicap, or Familial status. These statutes are applicable in the United States. In foreign areas, the intent of the EOOPH program will be carried out to the extent possible within the laws and customs of the foreign country.

(2)    This program is intended to eliminate discrimination against DOD personnel on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, or Familial status in obtaining suitable housing accommodations in local communities. A suspected discriminatory act, with or without the filing of a formal complaint, is a valid basis for investigation.

b. Reporting housing discrimination complaints.  

(1)    Alleged incidents or complaints of discrimination must be referred to the HSO for appropriate action.

(2)    An agent's refusal to show, rent, lease, or sell otherwise suitable housing may be a basis for a housing discrimination complaint. Also, any agent's use of words or statements that indicate discrimination is considered an act or incident of discrimination.

(3)    Each alleged incident will be investigated promptly and processed within 30 working days after the complaint is filed. The garrison commander may grant an extension of 10 working days if required.

c. Preliminary inquiry.  A preliminary inquiry will begin within three working days after receipt of the complaint. The inquiry may be informal (using AR 15-6 as a guide) but must be sufficiently detailed to indicate if discrimination occurred. The HSO, or a command-designated representative where there is no HSO, will act as follows:

(1)    Notify the garrison commander immediately.

(2)    Interview the complainant promptly and obtain all relevant details.

(3)    Telephone or visit the facility or agent concerned immediately if the complaint is received shortly after the time of the alleged act and concerns the change in availability of a vacancy (such as "just rented"). Attempt to determine if a vacancy exists without making reference to the complaint received. Request the garrison commander to authorize the use of verifiers as necessary (see para d below).

(4)    Advise the complainant of the provisions and procedures in this section and the right to pursue further actions through the HUD, the Department of Justice (DOJ), and local or State agencies. Coordinate effort with the OSJA to determine to what extent legal assistance can be provided. Assist the complainant in completing HUD Form 903.1 (Victim of Housing Discrimination), if desired. Complaints can be filed on the HUD internet site at http://www.hud.gov/complaints/housediscrim.cfm. A complainant may file a complaint directly on line or print out a form to mail in. The fact that a complainant might report an act of alleged discriminatory treatment, but declines to complete a HUD Form 903.1, does not relieve the command of responsibility for making further inquiry and taking such subsequent actions as may be appropriate.

(5)    Inform the garrison commander of the preliminary inquiry results and actions taken. If the complainant cannot obtain suitable housing in a reasonable amount of time because of discriminatory practices in the community, the complainant and the commander may use this fact to justify priority assignment to military housing or reassignment for humanitarian reasons. Reassignment action is a last resort and must be justified fully through command channels.

d. Use of verifiers.  The use of verifiers is authorized to determine if a basis for the complaint exists and whether or not the practices are discriminatory. Verifiers will not be used for the sole purpose of determining sincerity or normal practices of an agent about whom the HSO has not received a housing discrimination complaint. When selecting and using verifiers, the following actions apply:

(1)    Verification of the vacancy will be made as soon as possible after an alleged act of discrimination.

(2)    Verifiers will be volunteers. The Equal Opportunity Office is a possible source for identifying individuals to be used as verifiers. HSO staff members should not be used as verifiers except in unusual situations.

(3)    The verifier determines the characteristic, that is, the suspected basis for the complainant's exclusion. Ideally, two verifiers should be used. One verifier will possess characteristics as close as possible to those of the complainant except those which are suspect as discriminatory. If a second verifier is used, the individual should possess characteristics similar to the complainant including the alleged discrimination characteristics.

(4)    Verifiers are to obtain information only on agent or facility operating policies, practices, and procedures for subsequent determination of complaint validity. Verifiers are not to make verbal or written contract for the unit, pay any money, or say they want the unit. At the end of the visit, the agent should understand that the verifier is not interested in the unit.

(5)    The following information will be obtained by the verifier, if possible.

(a) Concerning the facility.   What is available? Did it meet the requirements of what the complainant requested? Amount of rent? Deposit required? Are children and pets accepted? Is an application required? What is the time between filing application and permission to move in? Are minority Families and singles in the facility? The presence or absence of a vacancy sign will be noted along with any other information deemed appropriate.

(b) Concerning the prospective tenants.   If possible, find out what qualifications prospective tenants must meet, such as credit rating, salary, marital status, children, deposit, written applications, and the like. Also, a complete description of all procedures for becoming a tenant, including all steps from initial inquiry to moving in, should be determined. Does the manager's subjective impression of the applicant appear to play any part in the decision to rent or purchase a unit?

(6)    The verifier's statement will be completed immediately after the verification visit. It will be accurate, objective, and in detail. The following will be included:

(a)    Date, time of visit, and name and position of person contacted. Other pertinent information obtained during visit (such as length of time employed at facility and race) should be included.

(b)    Answers in first person, that is, write in first person (such as I or we) and try to use direct quotes when reconstructing the conversation. Do not use pronouns such as "he, she, or they". Who said what to whom will be clearly identified.

(c)    Signed and dated statement. Give verifier's full name, address, telephone number (duty or home), and race as relevant to complaint.

e. Complaint process.  If the basic facts of the preliminary inquiry appear to confirm the complaint (but before the final decision is made that the complaint is valid), the garrison commander will ensure that the actions to proceed with an informal hearing as discussed below begin within 3 working days after receipt of the inquiry report.

(1) Informal hearing information.   

(a)    A representative of the garrison commander will give written notice to the agent explaining the nature of the complaint and the agent's right to request an informal hearing with the garrison commander's representative.

(b)    The notification will specifically state the nature of the discrimination complaint and the right of the agent to appear personally at the hearing, be represented by an attorney, and to present evidence and call witnesses.

(c)    The notification also will state that the agent has 5 working days after receipt of the written notice to request a hearing. If no request is received within five days, the lack of response will be considered as a waiver to be present at the hearing.

(d)    The written notification will be delivered to the agent personally by a representative of the garrison commander or sent to the agent by certified mail with return receipt requested.

(2) Action on decline.   An informal hearing must be held, even if the agent or agent's attorney declines to participate.

f. Conducting an informal hearing.  

(1) Attendees.   The informal hearing will be conducted by a representative of the garrison commander at a convenient location. The agent, agent's attorney, complainant, complainant's attorney, HSO representative, SJA representative, or other designated persons may attend. The Equal Opportunity adviser will be a regular attendee.

(2) Disclosure of information.   The agent (or agent's attorney) will not be given copies of the form used by the HUD for filing housing discrimination complaints (HUD Form 903.1) or other pertinent statements that may later be required for subsequent HUD or DOJ actions. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Privacy Act consideration will be determined by the OSJA.

(3) Record of hearing.   A summary of the hearing will be prepared and placed in the complaint file. The summary will include a list of attendees, location of hearing, and summary of discussion.

g. Legal review.  

(1)    A legal review will be accomplished—

(a)    After the preliminary inquiry.

(b)    After the informal hearing.

(c)    Before the garrison commander's final decision that the inquiry supports or fails to support the complaint.

(2)    The report of investigation will be reviewed for content and completeness. A statement that such a review was conducted will be signed by an OSJA attorney performing the review. This statement will include the following:

(a)    Any necessary explanatory remarks to include comments concerning facts and evidence presented.

(b)    Information about pending complaints brought by private parties with respect to the same facility or agent.

(c)    Comments pertaining to civil rights laws relevant to the particular case.

h. Garrison commander's decision.  

(1)    Imposing restrictive sanctions is the responsibility of the garrison commander and cannot be delegated.

(2)    If the garrison commander determines that more information is required, or for any reason further inquiry is deemed necessary, an officer will be appointed from sources other than the HSO to conduct a formal inquiry or investigation as the situation warrants. The officer, if not an attorney, will be afforded the advice and assistance by the OSJA, as well as that of the housing office and the Equal Opportunity adviser.

i. Closing the case.  

(1) Failure to support complaint.   If, in the commander's judgment, the inquiry fails to support the complaint, the case will be considered closed. The commander then will take the following actions:

(a)    Inform the complainant in writing of all actions taken. Advise the complainant of the right to submit a complaint to HUD and DOJ, or pursue a private civil action in a State or Federal court.

(b)    Summarize in the report file—

1.    Practices giving rise to the complaint.

2.    Actions and results of the inquiry or investigation.

3.    Assurance (written or oral) from the agent concerning future facility or agent practices.

(c)    Include the following statement, completed by the complainant, as part of the case file: "I (am) (am not) satisfied with the efforts taken by the commander in my behalf to achieve satisfactory resolution of my off-post housing discrimination complaint." If the complainant indicates a lack of satisfaction, the reasons must be included in the case file.

(d)    Inform the agent of the results of the inquiry by command correspondence. Such correspondence will reiterate Army policy and requirements for EOOPH.

(e)     forward unsubstantiated complaint records and HUD Form 903.1 to HUD and DOJ if requested by the complainant.

(f)    Retain a copy of the report file at the installation level in accordance with AR 25-400-2 (record number 210-50v). Refer to the Army Records Information Management System (ARIMS) records retention schedule located at https://www.arims.army.mil/rrsanew/rrssrch.asp to determine the proper disposition.

(2) Supported complaint.   If the inquiry supports the complainant's charge of discrimination, and the discriminatory act is determined by the commander to conflict with Army policy, the commander will—

(a)    Impose restrictive sanctions against the agent and/or facility for a minimum of 180 days. Sanctions will remain in effect until the provisions of paragraph 3-38lbelow are met. Restrictive sanctions also will be imposed when a suspected discriminatory act, despite the absence of a formal complaint, is investigated and found valid. The fact that a validated discrimination complaint or incident has been or is scheduled to be forwarded to another agency (such as HUD or DOJ) is not cause for withholding sanction action pending the outcome of that agency's further review and investigation. To ensure program credibility, restrictive sanctions must be imposed promptly and correctly once a complaint is substantiated. When imposing a restrictive sanction, the following steps must be taken:

1.    Ensure the facilities listing is removed from the HSO files.

2.    Impose restrictive sanctions (effective the date of notification, per para 3-38i(2)(a) 4) against all facilities owned or operated by the agent concerned.

3.    Place the facility on the restrictive sanction list maintained by the HSO. The restrictive sanction list will be prepared on official letterhead stationery and signed by the commander or the commander's representative and will include authority for and conditions of the restrictive sanctions.

4.    Inform the agent concerned, by command correspondence, that restrictive sanctions have been imposed and the reasons why, the nature and minimum length of the restrictions, and the action required for their removal. Notification of restrictive sanctions may be sent by certified mail with return receipt requested or delivered to the agent personally by a command representative.

5.    Ensure all DOD personnel reporting to the HSO are provided with a copy of the restrictive sanction list. Advise personnel that they may not rent, purchase, or reside in any of the listed facilities and that doing so can result in appropriate administrative or disciplinary action. The HSO must obtain a signature on a DD Form 1746 to indicate that a list was received.

6.    Advise other military installations of the restrictive sanction action taken when the sanctioned facility is located within their commuting areas.

(b)    Inform the complainant in writing of all actions taken. Advise the complainant that the complaint will receive continuing post action including (if the complainant requests) forwarding the case file to HUD and DOJ for action. The complainant also will be counseled about the right to pursue remedies through civilian channels.

(c)    Provide a memorandum, signed by the garrison commander or his/her representative, outlining the following:

1.    Type of housing arrangements made for or by the complainant, and whether these were made by the HSO or complainant.

2.    Impact of restrictive sanctions on the EOOPH program and DOD personnel and their Families.

3.    Number of facilities and units involved, if available.

4.    Other considerations deemed relevant.

(d)    Include the following statement, completed by the complainant, as part of the case file: "I (am) (am not) satisfied with the efforts taken by the commander in my behalf to achieve satisfactory resolution of my off-post housing discrimination complaint." If the complainant is not satisfied, the reasons must be shown in the case file.

(e)    Consolidate complaints for the inquiry, legal review, and commander's memorandum when more than one complaint alleging discrimination in the same facility or by the same agent has been received. The consolidated case file must include a separate HUD Form 903.1 from each complainant who has filed a HUD Form 903.1.

j. Report of inquiry or investigation.  

(1)    When an inquiry substantiates a complaint, the original and one copy of the report will be forwarded through channels to HQDA (DAPE-HR-PR), 300 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0300 for transmittal through the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) to the Under Secretary of Defense (Personnel and Readiness). Complainant's identification will be the name of the service member, U.S. Government, or garrison commander. The HSO or its employees may not be cited as complainants.

(2)    A report of inquiry or investigation will include the following:

(a)    Transmittal documents that include copies of the transmittal memorandum to IMCOM Region, DOJ, and HUD, as applicable.

(b)    Chronology sheet that lists sequence of events by date, from receipt of complaint to conclusion of action.

(c)    Copy of discrimination complaint to include a statement that complainant was advised of the right to submit complaint directly to HUD or DOJ or to any other civilian authority. (Copy of HUD Form 903.1 will be included if complaint has been forwarded to HUD.)

(d)    Summary of inquiry.

(e)    Documents supporting investigation and inquiry.

(f)    Correspondence relating to informal hearing and resulting summary.

(g)    Legal review.

(h)    Memorandum by garrison commander or the commander's representative.

(i)    Notification of outcome to complaint.

(j)    Complainant's statement.

(k)    Notification of the imposition of restrictive sanction, if applicable.

(l)    Statement that complainant is or is not satisfied with actions taken to resolve complaint.

(m)    Statement of subsequent housing arrangements made for or by the complainant.

(n)    Any other relevant documents.

(3)    If the act of discrimination falls within existing laws, and if the complainant concurs, forward a copy of the complaint and investigation report directly to HUD within 180 days after occurrence of the alleged discrimination act. HUD Form 903.1 will be used. The original report will be sent to the local HUD Regional Office or to U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, 451 7th Street, SW, Room 5204, Washington, DC 20410-2000 (see also para 3-38c(4) above). A copy of the complaint and investigation report will be forwarded to the Department of Justice (Civil Rights Division), 950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20530-0002. A transmittal memorandum will state why the report is being sent and the names of other agencies to whom the report was sent. (This paragraph applies only to the United States; see para 3-38n for foreign areas.)

(4)    When a commander receives a complaint alleging further discrimination in a facility or by an agent after a completed case file has been forwarded, the commander will forward a summary of the facts relating to the subsequent complaint to HQDA (DAPE-HR-PR), 300 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0300. Include brief comments on how the new complaint, and information developed with respect to the complaint, affects the previous action.

k. Follow-up actions.  Subsequent to forwarding the report and all required attachments to HUD and DOJ, it is important that the commander, to the maximum extent possible, take the following actions:

(1)    Cooperate with HUD, DOJ, and local and State agency representatives during the investigation and processing of the case, should these agencies seek assistance.

(2)    Determine periodically the status of the case by maintaining liaison with the area or regional HUD office concerned. Contact will be maintained until such time as the case is resolved or closed by HUD.

(3)    Ensure that the complainant is kept informed on information received and actions taken by HUD or DOJ.

(4)    Ensure that DOD personnel comply with restrictive sanctions imposed on the facility or agent. Restrictive sanctions are not applicable to—

(a)    DOD personnel who may be residing in a facility at the time that sanction is imposed.

(b)    The extension or renewal of a rental or lease agreement originally entered into before the imposition of the sanction. Relocation of a military tenant within a restricted facility, however, is prohibited without the written approval of the commander.

(5)    On determination that a military member has intentionally taken residency in a restricted facility contrary to instructions, the commander may, if applicable, take administrative or disciplinary action.

(6)    Publish a current listing of restricted facilities periodically in the post bulletin or other appropriate means of internal distribution. As a minimum, this listing will be published when additions, deletions, or changes are made to the list.

l. Removal of restrictive sanctions.  

(1)    Restrictive sanctions may be removed only under the following circumstances:

(a)    An approved waiver from HQDA (DAPE-HR-PR) based on unusual or exceptional circumstances.

(b)    After the 180 day period, the commander's decision to remove the restrictive sanctions must be based on receiving the written assurance of nondiscrimination from the owner/agent involved.

(2)    The commander will inform the HSO, Equal Opportunity Office, and the agent, in writing when the facility is removed from restrictive sanctions. HUD and DOJ will also be advised in writing in those cases where they had been apprised of a validated discrimination complaint or incident.

m. Privacy Act and Freedom of Information Act.  Requests for information regarding off-post housing complaints and investigative files will be processed under AR 25-55 and, if applicable, AR 340-21. The FOIA requests for reports that have been referred to HUD, DOJ, and State or local agencies will be coordinated with the respective agency before any information is released. Proper coordination will ensure that on-going investigations are not harmed by the premature release of information.

n. Complaint procedures in foreign areas.  

(1)    Commanders of installations or activities outside the United States will take action outlined in this section except that cases are not forwarded to HUD or DOJ. Complainants should be made to understand that the fair housing provisions of the Civil Rights Act of 1866 and 1968 are not applicable outside the United States. However, the intent of the EOOPH Program and the prohibitions against discrimination on the basis of disabilities shall be carried out to the extent possible within the laws and customs of the foreign country.

(2)    Consult the local OSJA office to determine whether—

(a)    The laws of the country concerned prohibit any of the actions outlined in processing complaints.

(b)    There is any civil redress which can be pursued.

Section VII
Operation and Maintenance

3-39. Scope

This section establishes policy on operating and maintaining housing facilities.

3-40. General policy

a.  Housing facilities will be operated and maintained to a standard that will provide comfortable accommodations in good condition.

b.  Every effort must be made to achieve cost savings in all aspects of housing operation and maintenance.

3-41. Joint responsibility

The operation and maintenance of housing is a responsibility shared by the garrison commander and the housing resident. The garrison commander must manage and maintain the Army's housing in the best interest of the Government. Residents must exercise careful practices expected of a prudent person in the use of their housing (see sec VIII).

3-42. Energy conservation

a. Goal.  The goal of the energy conservation program is to ensure that the essential energy needs of all residents are provided without waste. Equipment and facilities will be operated and maintained in an energy efficient manner. Energy can be conserved through action by the Army and by the resident.

b. Army action.  The Army will—

(1)    Apply new techniques and devices in designing, building, modernizing, operating, maintaining, repairing, and furnishing its housing facilities so as to reflect contemporary community standards for similar categories of housing.

(2)    Develop an aggressive program to educate residents on conservation techniques, energy savings tips, and self-help actions.

(3)    Determine where excessive energy consumption occurs and develop remediation plans.

c. Resident's actions.  Residents will—

(1)    Monitor their use of utilities with a view toward operating their housing in the most energy efficient manner possible.

(2)    Report facilities deficiencies which waste energy and are beyond self-help capabilities for correction.

(3)    Reimburse the Army for utilities consumed in excess of normal household use. For example, excess use could result from recharging a battery- powered privately-owned motor vehicle or operating kilns, ovens, or welding equipment to support a profit-making venture.

3-43. Work authorization

See DA Pam 420-1-1 for work authorization procedures.

3-44. Work classification

See DA Pam 420-1-1 for work classification procedures.

3-45. Installation self-help programs

a.  Each installation may establish a self-help program in accordance with this paragraph and paragraph 5-33.

b.  If established, installation self-help programs will require residents to perform certain basic self-help tasks and will provide the opportunity for residents to perform limited improvements on their housing units and associated grounds. See DA Pam 420-1-1 for guidance on establishment of a self-help program, including a list of basic self-help tasks that can and should be performed by Family housing residents.

c.   Established self-help programs will include the following requirements:

(1)    High standards will be established for both interior and exterior work in conformance with the Installation Design Guide (IDG).

(2)    Work performed will comply with applicable building codes.

(3)    Electrical work will be done only by a licensed electrician or shop approved electrician.

(4)    Work performed will not create fire or other safety hazards.

(5)    Self-help work will not be performed where asbestos or lead-based paint (LBP) will be disturbed since only trained and certified personnel may work with these substances.

(6)    Provision of self-help stores to make supplies, equipment, and tools available.

d.  The following will be provided by the DPW or equivalent staff agency:

(1)    Appropriate work classification and project approvals.

(2)    Professional guidance during the planning, design, and execution stages.

(3)    Training, as appropriate, to program participants including volunteers, coordinators, and inspectors before work is started.

(4)    Technical assistance and project inspection.

3-46. Historic housing facilities

a.  Some Army housing facilities, particularly GFOQ, are listed individually on the National or State Register of Historic Places, are contributing structures within an historic district, have been determined eligible for listing, or are potentially eligible for listing. Stewardship of historically significant properties imparts a special responsibility to the managing installation and the residents. Decisions on use and O&M will give appropriate consideration to those facility characteristics which contribute to their historic significance.

b.  Work that may affect historically significant housing must be reviewed and coordinated per part 800, title 36, Code of Federal Regulations (36 CFR 800) and AR 200-1. If a programmatic agreement exists between the installation, the State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO), and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, work must be reviewed and coordinated in accordance with this agreement. However, the underlying philosophy of prudence still applies. The same vigilance regarding cost control and avoidance of unnecessary expenditures must be maintained as for any other housing facility.

c.  The selection of replacement materials in historic structures must be sensitive to significant character-defining features. When facsimile materials are used, the garrison commander or designated installation official must determine that they will have no deleterious effect. When in doubt, review AR 200-1 and refer to the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings.

d.  Where a comprehensive plan has been developed for the renovation and long-term maintenance or the replacement of an historic housing facility, that plan must be followed as scrupulously as possible. However, the plan should be reviewed and updated periodically to keep up with new products and materials on the market, and new construction techniques.

e.   foreign areas may have equivalent historic places which are governed by special host nation agreements for M&R work.

f.  Historic facilities must be accurately reflected in the RPI. Reconciliation with the real property officer and notification of changes will be accomplished annually.

3-47. Environmental considerations

a. Termite control.  Termites are a significant problem affecting wooden structures and components in many parts of the world. Termite control with chemicals will be done only by personnel who have been properly trained and licensed in chemical use and application, using only EPA approved chemicals. In no case will chemical treatment be applied through or under concrete slabs used in slab-on-grade construction of housing where heating, ventilating, or AC ducts are present within or beneath the slab. When chemicals are used, their type, strength, and date of application must be documented and retained in accordance with Federal and state regulations.

b. Asbestos.  Asbestos in certain forms (friable asbestos products) has been found to be a health hazard. Where asbestos is known or believed to exist, the site must be inspected and a determination made as to the containment/disposition of the material. The DPW will manage any monitoring, abatement, removal, handling, and disposal of asbestos contaminated materials. The dates of identification, monitoring, and abatement or removal will be documented and retained in housing files.

c. Radon.  Radon is an invisible, odorless, naturally occurring radioactive gas which can accumulate in housing. The EPA has published monitoring guidance, radon relative risk information, and action level guidelines (see AR 200-1). Installations will establish a radon assessment and mitigation program per guidance from the Environmental Management Office.

d. Lead.  (See chap 5, sec III for details on lead hazards.)

(1) Sources.   Lead may be found in the dust, paint, or soil in and around your home, or in your drinking water or food. You cannot see, taste, or smell lead. Lead exposure is especially harmful to young children and pregnant women. The dangers of lead are now known. Hence, house paint is now lead-free, leaded gasoline is being phased out, and household plumbing is no longer made with lead materials. Nonetheless, certain residual effects remain.

(a) Lead-based paint (LBP).   Housing units built before 1978 often contain paint with lead in it. Paint containing lead compounds constitute a potential health hazard, particularly for small children who may ingest paint chips from flaking LBPs, may chew on surfaces covered with LBPs, or may ingest lead through paint dust. The Army will not apply LBP to any facility. Installations will establish a program to identify where LBPs have been used and to manage in-place or remove this potentially hazardous material. HUD has developed guidelines for the evaluation and control of LBP hazards. These guidelines (24 CFR 35) will be followed in assessing, managing, and abating lead hazards. Refer also to existing Army guidance on the detection and abatement of LBP in Family housing.

(b) Dust.   In addition to LBP dust, other lead dust may come into the home from work clothes of persons handling lead products such as is found in batteries and radiators and from hobbies such as casting sinkers and bullets or working with stained glass.

(c) Lead in drinking water.   This too can pose a health risk. The EPA has published standards for regulated contaminants, including lead, in drinking water. The DPW must monitor the levels of lead in drinking water in Family housing per the EPA standards (see AR 200-1). If the levels are determined to be above the current standard, residents will be notified and the cause will be determined and remedial action taken.

(d) Lead in soil.   Lead-contaminated bare soil will be managed by interim controls unless economic, operational, or regulatory requirements dictate removal or disposal.

(e) Lead in food.   Lead can be introduced into food from lead crystal glassware or from imported or old pottery. These containers should not be used to serve or store food or drink.

(2) Disclosure requirements.   The HUD and EPA regulations (see 24 CFR 35 and 40 CFR 745, respectively) require the disclosure of known LBP and LBP hazards. Disclosure requirements apply to both Army-owned and Government-controlled Family housing and to privately-leased/-rented housing constructed prior to 1978. The disclosure requirements, which are to be issued when housing is assigned or leased/rented, consist of providing residents with the following:

(a)    EPA pamphlet Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home. Additionally, for Government-owned and Government-controlled Family housing, the ACSIM in cooperation with the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (CHPPM) has developed a cover for the EPA pamphlet. The cover provides specific information on the Army's LBP efforts. Each installation has been provided a copy of the cover for local reproduction. This cover will be folded around the EPA pamphlet so it is the first section to be read. There is sufficient space for each location to add installation specific information such as points of contact and phone numbers for additional information or questions.

(b)    Notice of the presence of LBP and/or LBP hazards. This notice will contain a lead warning statement, owner/lessor disclosure of presence of LBP and LBP hazards, list of records and reports available to the owner/lessor, resident's/lessee's acknowledgement, owner's/lessor's acknowledgement, and signatures and dates of resident and owner or lessee.

(c)    A copy of available records or reports pertaining to the presence of LBP or LBP hazards known or suspected in the assigned housing unit and any associated common areas, based upon actual or statistical sampling of similar units.

(3) Notification requirements.   In addition to the disclosure requirements in paragraph 3-47d(2) Family housing residents/tenants of Government-owned and Government-controlled Family housing and of rental housing built prior to 1978 must be notified when work on their housing will disturb known or suspected LBP (see 15 USC 2686).

(a)    Whenever maintenance, repair, or renovation is performed in an occupied housing unit or in the common areas of occupied multi-Family housing, both the resident and the garrison commander (or designated representative) must be notified. Workers (either in-house or contract) must comply with 24 CFR 35.

(b)    Notification will consist of two elements. First, the worker must provide the resident a copy of the EPA's pamphlet Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home. Second, the worker must attempt to obtain from the resident a written acknowledgement that the resident has received the pamphlet. Retain a copy of the record of notification at the installation level in accordance with AR 25-400-2. Refer to the ARIMS records retention schedule available at https://www.arims.army.mil/arims/default.aspx. Sample language is available at EPA's Web site: http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/.

(4) Exemptions from notification requirements.   The following are exempt from notification requirements:

(a)    Housing units constructed before 1978 that are certified as free of LBP. (Note. LBP-free means that Family housing has been found to be free of paint or other surface coatings that contain lead equal to or in excess of 1.0 milligram per square centimeter or 0.5 percent by weight.)

(b)    Pre-1978 housing units that are vacant due to major renovation or between occupancy.

(c)    Minor M&R activities (including minor electrical work and plumbing) that disrupt two square feet/0.19 square meters or less of painted surface per component.

e. Mold.  Exposure to mold can cause a variety of health effects and symptoms, including allergic reactions. Molds produce tiny spores in order to reproduce. Although there is no known practical way to eliminate all molds and mold spores in the indoor environment, indoor mold growth is controllable through moisture control.

(1)    Lack of adequate maintenance and repair may contribute to the moisture and mold problem. DPWs must work closely with the preventive medicine office to provide a healthy environment in facilities where the Army lives and works.

(2)    The CHPPM has an aggressive mold prevention campaign. CHPPM has established a data base to assist installation DPWs and preventive medicine offices in dealing with mold issues. This resource is available at CHPPM's Web site at: http://phc.amedd.army.mil/Pages/default.aspx.

3-48. Fire protection

Fire protection is one of the most essential operating services due to the destructive potential of fire to both life and property.

a.  The garrison commander will provide fire and emergency services per chapter 25 of this publication.

b.  Residents will—

(1)    Be familiar with fire precautions and take timely corrective action to prevent fire hazards.

(2)    Conduct voluntary self-inspections and monthly fire drills and establish an accountability location outside the housing for evacuating Family members.

(3)    Test installed smoke detectors quarterly.

(4)    Provide a portable, hand-held, multipurpose fire extinguisher for their housing when such housing is used as an FCC home under the provisions of AR 608-10.

(5)    Know how to report fires.

(6)     Attend command-sponsored briefings on actions to prevent fires in housing.

3-49. Smoke detection and fire suppression systems

a. Smoke detection systems.  Hard-wired automatic smoke detection systems will be installed in all housing units including mobile homes and Government-leased units. All Government-installed smoke detectors will be hard-wired to an electrical circuit without a disconnect switch. This requirement is applicable to all Government-owned, Government-controlled, or Government-leased Family housing (including housing under 10 USC 2835) and Government-owned mobile homes in the United States. In new or replacement Family housing construction and revitalization projects, all Government-installed smoke detectors in the DU will be hard-wired and interconnected. Privately-owned mobile homes located on U.S. Army property will have hard-wired automatic smoke detectors provided by the owner. Smoke detector systems will be located as follows:

(1) Family housing.   Install a single-station smoke detector between the bedroom area and the rest of the DU, on each additional level of the DU, and in the basement. Provide additional detectors when remote gang storage cubicles are used.

(2) Other housing facilities.   See chapter 25.

b. Fire suppression systems.  See chapter 25.

3-50. Carbon monoxide detectors

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, toxic gas produced by the incomplete burning of carbon-containing fossil fuels (coal, wood, charcoal, natural gas, and fuel oil). Examples of CO producing sources include space heaters, fuel fired furnaces, wood stoves, fireplaces, gas stoves, gas dryers, gas water heaters, charcoal grills, and automobile exhaust from attached garages.

a.  CO detectors must be installed in all new or revitalized housing which has a source of carbon monoxide including that with attached garages.

b.  Although not a legal requirement, installations should install or provide CO detectors/alarms for existing housing units (owned and leased) which have a potential for CO poisoning.

c.  CO detectors/alarms can be hard-wired, battery operated, or plug-ins. The types used are at the discretion of the installation, but at a minimum will be Underwriter Laboratory (UL) listed.

3-51. Policy on multiple air conditioning units

a.  Where AC is authorized, IMCOM may approve the submission of improvement projects for the installation of multiple AC units in existing facilities. DD Form 1391 (FY__ Military Construction Project Data) will be used for this purpose. This authority may be exercised when their use will both—

(1)    Provide satisfactory comfort cooling.

(2)    Result in the least life cycle cost compared to a central plant or a single refrigeration unit.

b.  The IMCOM may delegate this authority in writing to individual Regions. The final approving authority of each project involving multiple AC units will be responsible for maintaining complete documentation and records to support their decision.

c.  Use of AFH incidental improvement funds for new A/C is not authorized (see para 3-54i(2)).

3-52. Telephone and Internet service provider connection charges

a. Wiring.  

(1)    The Government is responsible for the provision and maintenance of wiring within the structure (walls, floors) of the housing unless host nation agreements alter responsibilities (see TI 801-02 and (Unified Facilities Criteria) UFC 4-711-01).

(2)    Housing residents are not to pay the fee charged by any telephone or internet service provider (ISP) company for maintaining or repairing wiring within the structure. Residents who pay the fee will not be reimbursed by the Government.

(3)    The Government will not maintain the telephone or ISP instrument or the external wiring to the receiver or wall plate of the instrument. These costs, as well as subscription fees, are payable by the subscriber.

b. Telephone and Internet service provider disconnect and reconnect costs.  These costs are payable by the subscriber. In accordance with paragraph 3-6c(11), partial DLA is intended to cover the costs which are incurred when the Government directs any housing move to or from Government housing.

3-53. Television and cable internet connection charges

a. Cable television.  (See AR 25-1 and TI 801-02 and UFC 4-711-01).

(1)    The Government is responsible for providing and maintaining wiring and outlets for cable television within the structure.

(2)    Garrison commanders may allow a commercial company to install a cable (television (TV) and/or internet) system in housing areas and facilities. The system will include a service entrance terminal for each housing unit in the housing areas and housing facilities served. Such installation will be done at no cost to the Government. Subscriber costs will be borne by the housing unit resident.

(3)    CATV in some foreign areas may not have Armed Forces Network broadcasting. CATV may be provided where the Armed Forces Network channel is not available.

(4)    Installation of CATV, satellite, or cable internet must be coordinated with the DPW.

(5)    CATV or cable internet disconnect and reconnect costs are payable by the subscriber. In accordance with paragraph 3-6c(11), partial DLA is intended to cover the costs for any cable connections which are incurred when the Government directs a move to or from Government housing.

b. Master/community antenna television.  (See AR 25-1 and TI 801-02).

(1)    An master/community antenna television (M/CATV) system may be provided only when adequate reception of the nearest commercial TV stations cannot be obtained on the most efficient type of indoor TV antenna and commercial cable TV is not available.

(2)    The M/CATV system may use conventional antennas or satellite dishes. The garrison commander will select and approve the specific reception system to be used.

(3)    Depending upon cost limitations, use construction, or M&R funds for installation. Use maintenance funds for M&R.

3-54. Family housing

a. Operations policies.  

(1)    The most effective and economic methods of providing utilities will be used.

(2)    Utility consumption will be measured, wherever feasible, by the use of meters. The types of metering available are individual, master, and sample (listed here in descending order of priority for measuring utility consumption).

(3)    Residents will conserve utilities. Repeated waste of utilities may be considered to be misconduct and constitute possible grounds for termination from housing (see para 3-18a(2)).

(4)     Window air-conditioning units, including evaporative coolers, will not be used to supplement a central air-conditioning system.

(5)    APF will not be used to haul or purchase firewood and coal for use in fireplaces or wood stoves. However, the periodic inspection and cleaning of chimney flue liners is an installation responsibility. Inspection and cleaning of chimney flue liners will be in accordance with NFPA 211, chapters 13 and 14.

(6)    The Government may provide custodial services in the common use areas of multi-Family housing, such as apartment buildings where there are common hallways, entrances, elevators, and so forth.

(7)    In buildings with more than 1 DU, the costs of services performed in common use areas, on common structural components, and on common use systems, will be prorated among all DUs in that building.

b. Utility metering.  

(1)    Each installation must have a plan for metering water and all direct energy supplies (electricity and heating/cooling) at all Family housing areas.

(2)    This plan must ensure the following:

(a)    All new construction of Family housing will have utility meters installed in accordance with TI 801-02.

(b)    Master meters will be installed as part of any new construction or revitalization project.

(c)    Existing Family housing areas will be master metered. Where master metering is not economically practicable, individual DU meters will be installed.

(d)    All multiple unit Family housing new construction and replacement projects and all significant alteration and major rehabilitation projects, which include the utility trades in more than a casual manner, will provide, where feasible, electric meter drops and, except for DU with coal-fired heating plants, heating fuel meter points as part of the project for each DU. Electrical and/or mechanical trades will not be involved in Family housing rehabilitation projects solely for the purpose of meter/drop installation.

(3)    This plan must also include the following:

(a)    A method of reading and recording utility meter readings.

(b)    An M&R program for the utility meters.

(c)    The locations where utility meters need to be installed.

(4)    Individual utility meters may be considered in Family housing areas with high energy consumption when life cycle analysis shows this approach to be the most economical. Construction requirements must be developed as a post acquisition construction project.

(5)    The installation of master meters must be accomplished through the incidental improvements account to the maximum extent possible. For those projects that cannot be accomplished as incidental improvements or are not included as part of a rehabilitation project, a separate post acquisition construction project must be developed. The IMCOM Regions will update their metering programs on an annual basis.

(6)    Each installation must have on file the method used to determine the utilities consumption in Family housing until all utilities consumed in Family housing are based on metered use.

c. Identification of housing.  

(1)    Family housing will be provided with individual building numbers (front and, if necessary, back) which are readily visible to emergency vehicles. Signage must be consistent with IDG requirements.

(2)    The IMCOM may approve the installation of individual name signs, if new, using AFH incidental improvement funds. Replacements made during a change of occupancy shall be charged to between occupancy maintenance. This authority may be delegated to garrison commanders.

(3)    Individual name signs, especially on senior officer DUs, present certain force protection/physical security concerns. Therefore, any program to install name signs will be coordinated with the installation force protection/security office.

d. Maintenance policies.  

(1) General.   The level of maintenance on DUs will be sufficient to protect the Government's capital investment and to prevent unnecessary operating costs to the Government (see paras 3-33 and 3-54 and q).

(2) Evaluation of condition of units.   Through periodic inspection of units, M&R requirements will be recorded by building component and system. This will serve as a basis for the annual and long-range work plans for assisting in the development of the RPMP. The ISR condition inspections can be used to document quality condition information.

(3) Work in common use areas.   In buildings with more than 1 DU, the costs of M&R work performed in common use areas, on common structural components, and on common use systems, will be prorated among all DUs in that building.

(4) Priorities.   Critical M&R work will be done before incidental improvement work.

(5) Maintenance and repair need.   Available AFH resources will be used to maintain, repair, and improve Family housing based on need rather than the grade of residents. Residents' requests for painting of a decorative nature or for replacement of tiles, wall coverings, or other work on the basis of either compatibility with personal furnishings or for personal preference will not be approved.

(6) Painting.   

(a)    Interior painting shall be done to maintain an attractive appearance and sanitary conditions, to protect finished surfaces, and to correct unsightly appearance. The minimum interval for cyclic painting is 3 years, unless the garrison commander determines on a case-by-case basis that some DUs require more frequent painting.

(b)    Exterior painting of masonry, wood, and ferrous meter surfaces shall be done to maintain an attractive appearance, protect surfaces, and sustain water tightness. The normal interval for cyclic painting will be 5 years except when the garrison commander determines that more frequent painting is required.

(c)    Permanent records of painting will be maintained for each Family housing facility per chapter 5 of this publication. These records will include documents which authorize painting at less than frequencies prescribed in paragraphs 3-54 d(6)(a) and 3-54 d(6)(b) .

(d)    Painting solely or primarily for the purpose of decoration, to achieve standard color, or to match furnishings is not authorized, except in leased housing which may have other finishes. Change of occupancy is not a reason for painting.

(e)    Interior painting while a DU is occupied will be done only when the resident is in agreement. The painting of occupied housing will be scheduled to minimize inconvenience to the resident, yet will be completed in the least number of days possible. Only that amount of work will be scheduled that can be completed and still allow the residents to carry on normal living activities at the end of that workday.

(7) Floors.   Where the primary floor finish requires major repair or replacement (in excess of 25 percent of total floor space), an EA will be done to aid in determining the most acceptable alternative. The EA will be included in the project file.

(a) Wood floors.   Wood floors which serve as the primary floor finish will be completely sanded and/or refinished when general deterioration has occurred. Such work will be done when the housing unit is vacant. Sanding will be kept to a minimum to ensure maximum life of the wood floor. Normally, an interval of not less than 10 years should elapse before sanding becomes necessary. Refinishing should be done not more than once every 4 years.

(b) Carpeting.   Where carpeting is determined to be the most economical primary floor finish, it will be accomplished using either M&R funds or construction improvement funds as appropriate. Any decision to use carpeting will recognize normal issues associated with change of occupancy and the cost to remedy damaged surfaces.

(c) Negligence.   Evidence of negligence, for example, damage from golf shoes, requires a financial liability investigation of property loss, statement of charges, or cash collection voucher before refinishing a damaged floor (para 3-65).

(8) Housing facility systems and components.   Systems and components (such as roofing, structural, electrical, AC, heating, plumbing, and so forth) will be repaired or replaced as needed. Theoretical life of a system or component is not sufficient basis for replacement.

(9) Grounds and landscaping.   

(a) Boundaries.   The cutting, trimming, and watering of lawns in the designated immediate area of the DU will be the responsibility of the resident, as would be expected of a tenant in private housing of similar type and value. Normally, the boundaries of the designated immediate area of responsibility will be not more than 50 feet from the DU. However, this boundary may be extended out further to a logical line of demarcation, such as a road or a fence, or to encompass small common areas (see also, para 3-101c(1)(h) for exceptions on certain GFOQ).

(b) Apartment buildings.   Grounds maintenance around multistory apartment buildings will be provided by the installation.

(c) Grounds keeping.   Under no circumstances shall gardeners be assigned to fully maintain the grounds of a specific DU. Gardening services for the pruning and trimming of trees and shrubs shall be furnished, where required, on a routine cycle based on the growing season and plant characteristics. Generally, landscaping in the common areas surrounding housing units will be limited to group plantings which will not interfere with mechanized maintenance and will facilitate the use of gang mowers whenever possible. The cost of grounds care beyond the designated immediate area will be charged to the appropriate category of facilities as common grounds maintenance.

e. Cleaning incident to vacating housing.  

(1) Resident cleaning.   

(a)    Residents are responsible for cleaning their own housing and will leave the housing in a condition suitable for immediate reassignment. Residents must complete at their expense the minimum cleaning standards for all of the housing items listed in DA Pam 420-1-1. Termination of housing assignment shall be in accordance with guidance set forth in paragraph 3-16h(3)(b).

(b)    Exceptions may be made and the housing cleaned at Government expense when major M&R work is scheduled between occupancy, and a complete cleaning will be required after the work is completed.

(2) Contract cleaning at resident expense.   Garrison commanders may establish a procedure to allow residents to prepay a Government-approved custodial contractor for cleaning. Residents electing to use the services of a cleaning contractor will be advised that—

(a)    The Government will not be a party to any contract or agreement between the resident and contractor (repository for funds excluded.)

(b)    When a copy of the signed contract between the resident and the Government-approved contractor is accepted by the housing manager, the resident has met his or her cleaning responsibility. The contractor is then responsible for completing all of the items listed in DA Pam 420-1-1.

(c)     for the purpose of starting housing allowances, the termination of housing assignment shall be in accordance with guidance set forth in paragraph 3-16h(3)(b). For housing office administrative purposes only, the DU will be considered occupied until the date of the final cleaning inspection, but not more than 3 working days beyond the end of the contract cleaning period.

(d)    The use of a Government-approved contractor, other than an AAFES concessionaire, requires that a responsible agent be designated to secure the cleaning fee until the housing has been satisfactorily cleaned and any liquidated damages owed to the Government have been paid. Government-approved custodial contractors must either be bonded or have an account which the Government can draw against in case of default.

(e)     No Government-approved custodial contractor for cleaning can be associated with the Housing Office.

(f)    When housing is cleaned by individual contract and the housing is not cleaned satisfactorily by the date specified in the contract (normally 1 to 3 days), the cleaning contractor will be assessed liquidated damages in an amount per day equal to the housing allowances of the former resident. Liquidated damages will be remitted to the OPLOC/FAO as a cash collection. If the housing has not been satisfactorily cleaned within a reasonable period, the housing manager will take necessary action to have the housing cleaned by other means and the contractor will be required to pay any additional costs above the original contract amount that are incurred by the Government for cleaning.

(3) Contract cleaning at Government expense (outside continental United States only).   The IMCOM Regions (OCONUS) will establish a Family housing contract cleaning program at Government expense using AFH maintenance funds.

(a)    Only personnel on PCS, separation, or retirement orders or personnel who are directed to move at the convenience of the Government are authorized to receive contract cleaning at Government expense.

(b)    The TLA will be limited to three days for outgoing personnel who occupy Government-controlled Family housing. Exceptions to the 3-day limit will be documented and approved by the garrison commander on a case-by-case basis.

(c)    As a minimum, residents will be responsible for conforming to the standards for residents receiving contract cleaning (DA Pam 420-1-1). The IMCOM may increase the minimum cleaning standards requirements for residents set forth in DA Pam 420-1-1 as necessary due to fiscal constraints. Residents will not be given the option of cleaning the housing in return for monetary remuneration or authorization of TLA beyond three days.

(d)    Termination of housing will be effective when the resident physically clears the housing or on the Soldier's departure date from the command, whichever is sooner.

(e)    Cleaning contractors will adhere to the established cleaning requirements.

(f)    Residents not authorized Government contract cleaning are responsible for cleaning their own housing (paras 3-54e(1) and 3-54e(2)).

(4) Liability.   

(a)    Residents have—

1.    Responsibility and/or liability for damage to housing or furnishings exceeding fair wear and tear (para 3-65).

2.    Responsibility for the level of cleaning required of the resident by the cleaning procedures identified in paragraphs 3-54e(1), 3-54e(2), or 3-54e(3) .

(b)    When a resident fails to clean, or contract with an approved custodial contractor for cleaning, assigned housing prior to a PCS or ETS, the Government must arrange to have the housing cleaned. In such cases, the resident is liable to the Government for costs incurred.

f. Restoration of damaged or destroyed dwelling units.  

(1)    A DU damaged or destroyed by fire or natural disaster may be restored when there is a need for the unit. Restoration costs up to 50 percent of replacement cost will be funded with M&R funds. Where restoration costs exceed 50 percent of the replacement cost, a determination will be made by HQDA as to the funds (either M&R or construction) that will be used to assure expeditious accomplishment of required work. Except for GFOQ, the cost to repair or restore a DU damaged or destroyed by fire, flood, or other disaster does not count against the major M&R limitation of $30,000 per DU per FY (see para 3-54f(3) ).

(2)     foreign source units provided for U.S. Government use, which are insured as evidenced by annual AFH insurance premium payments, will not be restored with AFH funds.

(3)    Restoration costs of less than $30,000 per DU shall be approved by the approval authority level to which delegated. Costs of $30,000 or more per DU and costs for other real property facilities exceeding 50 percent of replacement cost require HQDA (ACSIM/OASA (IE&E)) approval (see para 3-14).

(4)    Requests for restoration projects which require HQDA approval will be submitted by the most expeditious means but in no case later than within 30 days of the fire or disaster. The request will include the information and use the procedures specified in paragraphs 2-19b(1) through (11) of this regulation. See DA Pam 420-1-1 for a suggested format for a Family housing DU restoration project approval request.

(5)    When a DU is damaged or destroyed, a financial liability investigation of property loss must be initiated in accordance with AR 735-5. If the report of survey finds that the Soldier was negligent, he or she will be charged for damages in accordance with the findings (see para 3-65).

(6)    In the event that the damage to or destruction of the DU results from resident abuse, misconduct, or neglect, the resident may be offered the opportunity to perform the repair or replacement. Should the resident elect to perform the repair or replacement, work will conform to the standards and criteria prescribed by the DPW. Completed work must have DPW approval. When repair or replacement is done at the resident's expense, a request for a restoration project may not need to go forward from the installation. Should the Government perform the repair or replacement, the resident will reimburse the Government.

g. Maintenance and repair projects.  

(1) Design cost.   Maintenance and repair project design cost is an unfunded project cost. Architectural and engineering services (direct costs) cannot exceed 6 percent of the estimated project cost for design, drawings, and specifications (see para 3-81d(2)).

(2) Concurrent work.   The M&R performed concurrently with a construction improvement project can be funded with post acquisition construction funds. Construction improvement projects, however, may not be funded with M&R funds.

(3) Major maintenance and repair projects exceeding $30,000.    

(a)    Any major M&R project within the 5-foot building line, including concurrent incidental improvements and including costs for asbestos and lead-based paint removal, which is expected to be $30,000 or more (absolute, that is, not adjusted by area cost factor) per DU per fiscal year (FY) must be sent to HQDA (DAIM-ISH).

(b)    Major M&R projects include work necessary to provide adequate Family housing DUs by repairing or replacing deteriorated building components, that is, kitchen counters and cabinets, floors, walls, windows, mechanical, electrical, AC and plumbing systems, kitchen and bath fixtures, roofing, exterior siding, and abatement of LBP, asbestos materials, and mold. Major M&R does not include SOs; routine maintenance, including interior and exterior painting (except where painting is included in a major M&R project); and work done outside the 5-foot line.

(c)    Project documentation will include the documents listed below—

1.    DD Form 1391.

2.    Detailed cost estimate.

3.    Installation Management Command transmittal memorandum or message requesting approval.

4.    An EA, where total program amount (PA) exceeds $50,000 per DU, documenting 25 year life cycle costs of at least the following alternatives- replacement/new construction, Government lease, private rental using BAH, and Government purchase.

5.    The total post acquisition construction and non-routine maintenance for the DU or set of DUs over the past 5 years.

6.    An indication as to whether the project is identified as concurrent M&R on a DD Form 1391 for a post acquisition construction project.

7.    Identification of costs for asbestos removal, LBP abatement, and mold abatement, if any.

(d)    Project documentation for major M&R projects costing $30,000 or more must be provided on each such project for the current FY + 2 and the current FY + 3. Project documentation will be submitted concurrent with each year's POM/BES data input. For example, submit FY 2006 and FY 2007 project documentation in FY 2004. Unforeseen requirements will be forwarded to HQDA (DAIM-ISH).

(4) Cost increases.   

(a)    Approved major M&R projects (less than $30,000). If the estimated funded cost of a project increases after approval, project execution may be continued without further approval when all of the following conditions have been met:

1.    The revised funded cost does not exceed $30,000 per DU or $1,000,000 per project.

2.    The increase does not exceed 25 percent of the approved funded cost.

3.    The increase does not bring the revised funded cost over 50 percent of the replacement cost of any DU affected by the increase.

(b)    Congressionally-approved M&R projects ($30,000 or more). Should the estimated funded cost of a project increase after congressional approval, project execution may be continued without further approval when all of the following conditions have been met:

1.    HQDA (DAIM-ISH) has been notified through IMCOM.

2.    The increase does not exceed 25 percent of the approved funded cost.

3.    The increase does not bring the revised funded cost over 50 percent of the replacement cost of any DU affected by the increase.

(c)    If the conditions specified in either paragraph 3-54g(4)(a) or 3-54g(4)(b) as appropriate, are not met, project execution will be halted until re-approval is obtained.

(d)    Where unforeseen asbestos, lead-based paint, and/or mold costs cause the $30,000 threshold to be exceeded after approval, HQDA will provide Congress with after-the-fact notification.

(5) Out-of-cycle/emergency requests.   

(a)    The cumulative total of all major M&R work, including incidental improvements, may not exceed $30,000 (absolute) per DU in a FY without HQDA approval.

(b)    Emergency requirements and requirements necessary to ensure the health and safety of residents will be submitted expeditiously to HQDA (DAIM-ISH) for processing to the Congress.

h. Maintenance standards.  Qualitative standards of maintenance for Family housing real property assets are set forth in paragraph 3-57.

i. Incidental improvements.  

(1)    Certain minor improvements, within the limits cited in paragraph 3-14 may be approved using Family housing O&M funds. However, where incidental improvements plus M&R work done concurrently with a construction improvement project exceed the statutory post acquisition construction dollar limitation per DU (as adjusted by the area cost factor (ACF)), congressional approval must be obtained.

(2)    Incidental improvement authority will not be used to increase the size of any DU, increase the number of rooms in any DU, add A/C to any space not presently air conditioned, or add new or alter existing exterior appurtenances such as garages, carports, detached facilities, patios, decks, porches, rear yard fencing, or lawn sprinkler systems.

(3)    Under normal circumstances, incidental improvements will be done concurrently with M&R work, except for security, health, and/or safety improvements that should not be delayed.

(4)    Incidental improvements will not be accomplished on a specific DU when maintenance and repair has been deferred on the DU unless the work is for security, health, and/or safety improvements which should not be delayed.

(5)    Incidental improvements will be accomplished fairly among all residents irrespective of grade.

j. Support for exceptional Family members.  To accommodate Family members with disabilities, appropriate modifications may be made to a DU on a case-by-case basis. These modifications will be accomplished as follows:

(1)    Modifications costing less than $30,000 per DU can be approved by the IMCOM region and will be accomplished using incidental improvement funds. Modification costing more than the statutory dollar limit per DU for a post acquisition construction project will require congressional approval.

(2)    The funding source for modifications which are estimated to cost $30,000 or more will be determined by HQDA after reviewing the documentation submitted and considering congressional notification requirements. Requests for approval will be sent to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

(3)    The project file will contain a statement from the medical activity supporting the installation (not a private physician) that the requirement is valid and the modification will meet the needs of the Family member.

(4)    Documentation supporting the request must clearly describe the work to be done and show that the proposed work is the most cost-effective approach to satisfying the requirement. Documentation must include an explanation of why other on-post housing cannot meet the need (for example, why a ground-floor DU cannot be used in lieu of an above-ground DU in an apartment building).

(5)    Documentation will also include the following:

(a)    A floor plan showing the proposed modifications.

(b)    Description of the DU including type, grade of resident, number of stories, single- or multiunit, and number of bedrooms.

(c)    Statement that the DU is the best available for modification in terms of location, interior configuration, and access from the street.

(d)    Statement as to whether this DU will be permanently retained for use by Families which have Family members with disabilities.

(e)    Indication as to whether there have been or are scheduled additional major M&R projects on this DU in this FY which, when combined with the project for an exceptional Family member, will exceed $30,000. In such cases, contact HQDA (DAIM-ISH) for appropriate congressional notification.

(f)    DD Form 1391 for projects costing $30,000 or more.

(6)    All equipment directly supporting the DU to be modified must be considered when evaluating costs. The cost of portable equipment supporting a single DU cannot be prorated among several units to lower the per-unit costs; however, if the equipment is subsequently used to support another DU, its cost is not included when considering costs to modify the second dwelling unit.

(7)    Normally, a DU modified to accommodate Family members with disabilities should not have to be altered a second time to make it suitable for normal reassignment. However, each case must be considered individually. The costs for any such realterations are subject to normal M&R project approval limitations.

(8)    The determination as to what modifications for Family members with disabilities can be incorporated in an approved whole house improvement project is dependent upon the description of the project in the DD Form 1391 and the language of any contract that has been awarded. If a contract has been awarded, the Contracting Officer must determine whether such modification can be made.

k. Change of occupancy.  

(1)    Interior painting, floor refinishing, and major repair, if required, will normally be performed between occupancies. The scope of work to be done will be determined at the time of the inspection incident to departure of the outgoing resident.

(2)    Involvement of the outgoing resident in the change of occupancy process can be helpful in achieving a cost effective occupancy change. The departing resident can identify needed work and is encouraged to allow work that does not compromise habitability to be performed prior to vacating. This should help screen out work not required and ensure the turnover of the DU to the next resident as quickly as possible.

l. Director of public works support for Family child care homes.  

(1)    The DPW is responsible for the following Life Safety Code requirements of AR 608-10 and National Fire Protection Association Standard 101 (NFPA 101):

(a)    Providing "slip resistant" treads per exterior/general area stair tread requirements contained in NFPA 101 and "reasonably slip resistant" treads for all interior stairs in Family housing. The use of anti-slip paint, carpeted treads, or any roughened surface is considered acceptable.

(b)    Prohibiting FCC homes above the fourth floor in Government-provided Family housing.

(c)    Providing two means of escape from every bedroom and living area (one exit must be a door or stairway to the outside whereas the other may be a window).

(d)    Installing a hard-wired smoke detector between the bedroom and living areas, on each additional level of the living units, and in stairwells of multi-story Family housing in accordance with chapter 25.

(e)    Making any additional modifications required to meet the NFPA 101 standard for a 1-hour fire barrier between mixed occupancies.

(f)    Conducting fire inspections per chapter 25.

(2)    The FCC provider must provide the following:

(a)    A portable, hand-held, multipurpose fire extinguisher to include the provision of appropriate training on its use.

(b)    Any additional modifications required by insurance companies that are not covered by the Life Safety Code.

(3)    Safety inspection of FCC homes must be conducted per AR 385-10 and AR 608-10. Identified safety deficiencies must be corrected. However, the DPW is not authorized to use AFH funds to provide more stringent FCC fire safety features than required by current fire and life safety standards for single and multiplex Family housing.

(4)    FCC homes will receive priority for the elimination of possible health hazards caused by LBP and lead in drinking water.

m. Use of resident-owned window AC units and ceiling fans in existing dwelling units.  

(1)    Residents may install their own window A/C units or evaporative coolers, or ceiling fans, where no Government-provided units exist subject to the following:

(a)    Design criteria authorize AC or evaporative cooling at that installation.

(b)    The resident is responsible for cost of placement including electrical work, removal of units, restoration of openings, required inspections, and maintenance of the A/C unit.

(c)    Approval of the DPW is obtained before installation of A/C units or electrical work. Completed work will be inspected by the DPW and must meet the requirements established by the DPW.

(d)    Maximum electrical load of proposed window units for the DU will be prescribed by the DPW and will not exceed that of a properly sized A/C unit for that DU.

(e)    Electrical work will be done only by qualified electricians upon approval of the DPW.

(2)    Capacity of the exterior and interior electrical distribution system must be sufficient to carry the added load of the units.

(3)    Only low amperage, high efficiency window units will be installed as prescribed by the DPW.

(4)    Resident-owned equipment abandoned in place by the resident or accepted by the Government will become Government-owned property. Electrical circuits and outlets installed at resident expense and abandoned in place will become part of the real property. Abandoned window A/C units that are not authorized will not be replaced regardless of source of funds.

n. Replacement of heating, ventilating, and AC systems in older dwelling units.  Many older Family housing buildings require improvement or major repairs or both including the upgrading or replacement of the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. These early buildings were constructed before the advent of AC and the present day concept of central heating. A uniform method for preparation of projects to upgrade HVAC systems in older buildings has been developed and is outlined in Office of the Chief of Engineers (OCE) Technical Note No. 83-2 (Repairs to the HVAC systems in Older Family Housing Units). DD Form 1391 requiring HQDA approval must address the EA requirements outlined in the Technical Note.

o. Maintenance and repair of master/community antenna television and Government-provided TV antenna systems for Family housing.  The garrison commander shall be responsible for maintaining any M/CATV and Government-provided TV antenna systems identified on the Family housing real property records from antenna to wall outlet. The M&R funds will be used as prescribed in paragraph 3-53.

p. Telephone wiring and Internet service for Family housing.  

(1)    Conduit, wiring, and outlets will be installed and maintained by the Government. Telephone and internet service instruments and service are a resident responsibility (para 3-52).

(2)    If an official telephone is installed in a Family housing DU for mission reasons, the resident must maintain a separate private telephone service for personal calls at his or her expense.

q. Maintenance downtime.  The time during which DUs are out of service due to M&R must be minimized. paragraph 3-33 provides policy for minimizing downtime due to M&R work.

r. Approval authorities and limitations.  The M&R approval authorities and cost limitations are contained in paragraph 3-14.

3-55. Unaccompanied personnel housing

a. General.  

(1)    Operating services and M&R will be accomplished per chapter 2.

(2)    All UPH will compete equally for operating services and M&R.

b. Operation and maintenance responsibilities.  

(1)    Garrison commanders will ensure that—

(a)    Ensure housing is in good condition at time of assignment.

(b)    Instruct residents in writing and on assignment on their responsibilities.

(c)    Protect the Government's investment in the housing and ensure that residents fulfill their responsibilities. This includes participation by residents in the Self-help Program (see chap 5).

(d)    Ensure maintenance of facilities is timely, effective, and economical so as to provide the best service to the resident at optimum energy efficiency and cost effectiveness for the Government.

(e)    Ensure that a continuing program for conserving utilities is enforced.

(f)    Ensure that action is taken per AR 735-5 when loss or damage of Government-owned property occurs.

(g)    Clean or replace building components which are unsafe for residents.

(h)    Main grounds.

(2)    Housing managers will—

(a)    Identify requirements to the DPW to support planning, programming, and budgeting actions for operating services, nonrecurring maintenance, and repair.

(b)    Monitor and review operating services and M&R provided by the DPW or by contract.

c. Custodial service in unaccompanied personnel housing (permanent party).  

(1)    Custodial services may be provided in common use areas per chapter 5 of this publication.

(2)    Housekeeping services within individual living areas will be paid from service charges collected from personnel who receive maid service (see para 3-9c and DA Pam 420-1-1). Personnel who elect to not receive in-room maid service will be responsible for the cleanliness of their rooms.

d. Cleaning incident to vacating unaccompanied personnel housing (permanent party).  

(1) Resident cleaning.   Residents are responsible for cleaning their own housing and will leave the housing in a condition suitable for immediate reassignment. Assignments will be terminated when the housing has been properly cleaned as determined by the housing office, or on the service member's departure from the command, whichever is sooner. Exception may be made per paragraph 3-54e(1)(b).

(2) Contract cleaning at resident's expense.   Provisions of paragraph 3-54e(2) apply. However, the liquidated damage rate for UPH (PP) will be the BAH at "without dependent" rate, that is, if the resident is married but unaccompanied by Family members, use the BAH rate for an unmarried Service member of the same grade.

(3) Contract cleaning at Government expense (outside continental United States only).   A UPH contract cleaning program may be established for SOQ, OQ, and SEQ using O&M funds when a TLA cost savings can be realized as determined by IMCOM regions. Provisions of paragraph 3-54e(3) apply. In addition—

(a)    Government-contract housing cleaning will be provided only to bona fide bachelors and those serving "all others" tours.

(b)    Housing cleaning will be limited to SOQ, OQ, and SEQ located in buildings separate and apart from troop barracks buildings.

(c)    Cleaning standards will be adjusted as necessary to accommodate requirements for cleaning UPH (PP).

(4) Minimum cleaning standards.   Minimum cleaning standards will be the standards identified in DA Pam 420-1-1.

(5) Liability.   A UPH (PP) resident's liability is essentially the same as that for a Family housing resident (see para 3-54e(4)).

e. Telephone wiring and service for unaccompanied personnel housing (permanent party).  

(1)    The Government will install and maintain conduit, wiring, and outlets for one telephone per UPH (PP) sleeping room. Residents are responsible for telephone instruments and service (see AR 25-1; TI 800-01; and para 3-52).

(2)    Class "C" (official restricted) and pay telephones will be installed in common use areas.

(3)    Should an official telephone be installed in a UPH (PP) space for mission reasons, the resident will maintain a separate private telephone service for personal calls at his/her expense.

f. Maintenance and repair of master/community antenna television and Government-provided television antenna systems for unaccompanied personnel housing (permanent party).  Any M/CATV and Government-provided TV antenna systems that support UPH (PP) will be maintained by the garrison commander. M&R funds will be used per paragraph 3-52.

g. Resident-owned equipment, appliances, and improvements.  The garrison commander will establish policies for the installation and use of resident-owned equipment, appliances, and built-in improvements which are compatible with applicable Army and IMCOM policies.

3-56. Priority system for service order maintenance

a. Requirement.  All installations will establish and publicize a formal priority system for the accomplishment of minor maintenance. This system should enhance communication and understanding between the customer and the DPW/housing manager and, simultaneously, ensure responsive, efficient accomplishment of high priority work. The system will be established regardless of the type of workforce employed (contract or in-house) and will address the maintenance of non-housing facilities as well as Family housing, UPH (PP), and Army lodging facilities. (A separate policy may be developed for each fund type.) The priority policy will be developed at installation level to ensure that local factors such as contractual agreements, unique supply response times, travel distances, and coordination with similar policies at nearby installations are considered.

b. Policy content.  To ensure Soldiers some degree of continuity as they relocate from one installation to another, the policy will incorporate, as a minimum, the following features:

(1)    Location and telephone number of office accepting SO requests.

(2)    Three major categories of priority service-emergency, urgent, and routine-as described in the sample policy statement provided in DA Pam 420-1-1. Appropriate consideration will be given to the needs of EFMP enrollees.

(3)    Target time limits in hours or days for response to SO in each category.

(4)    Target time limits in working days for completion of SO in each category.

(5)    Documentation, in written form, for dissemination to all appropriate units/individuals. Housing residents will receive a copy upon initial acceptance of their housing.

c. Service order priority system responsibilities.  

(1) Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management.    The ACSIM will—

(a)    Issue Armywide policy on the establishment of a formal priority system for accomplishing real property SO type maintenance work.

(b)    Monitor implementation of this policy during staff visits.

(2) Installation Management Command Region directors.    The IMCOM Region directors will—

(a)    Ensure implementation of this policy.

(b)    Issue guidance for establishing this policy at installation level.

(c)    Review and evaluate installation priority policies to ensure implementation in accordance with HQ, IMCOM guidance.

(d)    Monitor implementation of this policy during staff visits.

3-57. Maintenance standards for Family housing

a.  All Family housing real property assets including DUs, garages, carports, grounds, and other facilities identified on the Family Housing Property Account are to be maintained to a general standard that—

(1)    Prevents deterioration beyond that resulting from normal wear and tear.

(2)    Corrects deficiencies in a timely manner to ensure the full life expectancy of the facilities and their components.

(3)    Ensures that all Family housing facilities are free of missing components or defects which would affect the safety, appearance, or habitability of the facilities or would prevent any electrical, mechanical, plumbing, or structural system from functioning in accordance with its design.

(4)    Includes appropriate consideration of the special needs of EFMP enrollees.

(5)    Requires the following:

(a)    The quality of the work and the repaired areas shall be compatible with adjacent areas. Replacements shall match existing components in dimensions, materials, quality, finish, color, and design.

(b)    During the performance and upon completion of the work, debris shall not be allowed to spread unnecessarily into adjacent areas or accumulate in the work area itself. All such debris, excess material, and parts shall be cleaned up and removed at the completion of the job or at the end of each day work is in progress.

(c)    Upon completion of work any fingerprints, stains, or other unsightly marks shall be removed.

b.  Specific maintenance standards for housing real property are the condition standards identified in DA Pam 420-1-1.

c.  Landlord approval is required for installation of window guards in leased housing.

d.  Wall-to-wall carpeting installed as a primary floor finish will—

(1)    Be maintained in accordance with locally established standards.

(2)    Before replacement, require an EA that considers normal carpet cleaning methods.

Section VIII
Resident Relations

3-58. Scope

This section establishes policy, defines responsibilities, provides guidance, and sets forth procedures for resident-related programs and for occupancy and termination inspections.

3-59. Policies on resident-related programs

a.  Garrison commanders will be responsive to the needs of housing residents.

b.  Residents of housing will satisfy normally accepted obligations and abide by local regulations so as to promote an amicable relationship among residents and between residents and the housing manager.

c.  Applicants for and residents of Army housing will be treated in a prompt, courteous, and professional manner at all times by housing office personnel.

d.  Residents will be clearly advised of both their and the Government's responsibility for the care and cleaning of housing.

e.  Inspections will be conducted prior to the assignment of and departure from housing.

f.  Housing inspections will be conducted with consistency and without regard to rank of resident.

g.  Housing residents will be made aware of resident liability policies and procedures.

3-60. Shared responsibilities

By its nature, housing must entail a shared responsibility involving both the provider and the user. The garrison commander, or a duly designated representative, upon reasonable notice to the resident and at reasonable times, may enter the premises in order to inspect the property. If the resident is not home when premises are to be entered on behalf of the garrison commander, the housing representative will have (in decreasing order of preference) a representative from the resident's command or unit, a security officer, or a disinterested third party accompany him or her when entering the DU (see also para 3-21b).

a. Garrison commander.  The garrison commander will—

(1)    Develop and issue clear and precise local regulations governing conditions of occupancy.

(2)    Provide residents of housing (both Family and UPH (PP)) with a resident handbook or information booklet. Include information and guidance on fire protection, precautions, and reporting.

(3)    Provide each resident with a memorandum that explains his/her potential for pecuniary liability and recommends the resident consider securing personal insurance coverage (paras 3-64 and 3-65 and ).

(4)    Develop and implement a Family housing resident orientation plan (para 3-61).

(5)    Ensure that all Government housing is safe, decent, and sanitary at the time of assignment of resident.

(6)    Maintain suitable and attractive living conditions in Army housing.

(7)    Ensure that all personal information contained in housing office files is maintained in strict accordance with the provisions of the Privacy Act.

(8)    Ensure that disruptions to housing residents resulting from M&R work are kept to a minimum.

(9)    Advise residents of Government-leased housing of any special requirements they may be subject to under the provisions of the lease.

(10)    Make necessary repairs, alterations, or improvements.

(11)    Supply necessary or agreed upon services.

b. Resident permanent party.   residents will—

(1)    Be familiar with the contents of the Family housing residents' handbook or UPH (PP) housing information booklet.

(2)    Ensure that housing is returned in good condition, less normal wear and tear, upon termination of occupancy.

(3)    Perform routine housekeeping functions including minor maintenance and simple repair necessary to keep their assigned housing and any assigned Government-provided furnishings in good condition.

(4)    Be responsible for their actions and those of their Family members and guests.

(5)    Comply with local regulations regarding the care and control of pets.

(6)    Secure approval before soliciting within a housing facility or area or conducting a private business in a Family housing unit, UPH facility, or housing area.

(7)    Record the possession of dangerous weapons with the Provost Marshal and use them only in designated areas in accordance with local regulations.

(8)    Notify the housing maintenance office or billeting office, as appropriate, promptly whenever the housing structure, components, equipment, furnishings, or fixtures contained therein become defective, broken, damaged, or malfunction in any way.

(9)    Refrain from installing or using any equipment that will overload any structural, gas, water, heating, electrical, sewage, drainage, or AC systems of the assigned housing.

(10)    Be familiar with fire precaution, prevention, and reporting measures.

(11)    Be potentially liable for damages to or loss of Government property (para 3-65).

(12)    Cooperate with area, building, and/or stairwell coordinators on common area responsibilities.

(13)    In foreign areas, secure DPW approval to use outdoor cooking equipment, such as grills, or to display flower boxes in multistory buildings.

c. Residents Government-leased housing.  Residents living in Government-leased housing will comply with the requirements in paragraph 3-60b above.

d. Residents private rental housing.  Residents living in private rental housing will be subject to the provisions of the leases for their housing units.

3-61. Resident orientation

a.  Installations will conduct an orientation for residents of Family housing within 30 days of assignment to housing. This orientation will include the following:

(1)    Distribution of the resident's handbook and local regulations.

(2)    Indoctrination into the self-help program.

(3)    Introduction to the local community and the services provided.

(4)    Discussion of local procedures and points of contact in housing.

(5)    Discussion of living conditions for Government-leased and private rental housing (in foreign areas only).

b.  Residents of UPH will receive their "orientation" via rules posted and/or information booklets located in their housing facilities.

3-62. Community associations

Garrison commanders will ensure wide dissemination of information about the existence of local community associations and installation policies concerning their formation. Upon request, the garrison commander will provide assistance to residents interested in forming such an association. For additional guidance concerning community associations, see DA Pam 420-1-1.

3-63. Mediation of resident complaints

a.  The housing manager has the responsibility for mediating resident complaints regarding housing. Complaints that can be resolved quickly without extensive investigation, and to the satisfaction of all parties concerned, may be handled informally. All other complaints must be made in writing, signed by the complainant, and submitted to the housing manager.

b.  Complaints must be handled with the strictest impartiality. Comments implying guilt or responsibility must be avoided until a thorough inquiry has been made and a firm basis exists for a conclusion.

c.  Where a complaint requires an investigation, the investigation will be conducted in accordance with AR 15-6. Experienced civilian professional housing managers in grade GS-13 and above, or National Security Personnel System grade equivalent, may be appointed as investigating officers to investigate complaints regarding housing.

(1)    An investigation or inquiry will not be initiated until the initial information has been received, screened, and evaluated.

(2)    In cases involving more than one resident, the positions of all residents involved must be understood.

(3)    Where cases cannot be resolved between or among the individuals concerned, it may be advisable to discuss the problem with all parties involved and the garrison commander.

d.  Belligerent residents who are unwilling to settle problems and who are a continual source of conflict, disturbing the peace and harmony of the housing facility, housing area, or neighborhood, should be considered for termination from housing.

e.  A report of any investigation or inquiry, results, and actions taken will be retained in the housing office in accordance with the ARIMS records retention schedule.

3-64. Insurance

The Government does not provide insurance for the resident's personal property or for the personal liability needs of the resident. To protect themselves, residents will be strongly encouraged to secure both personal property and personal liability insurance coverage.

3-65. Resident's potential pecuniary liabilities

a.  Residents are responsible and may be held liable for damage to assigned housing, or damage to or loss of related equipment or furnishings, caused by their abuse or negligence or that of their Family members or guests. This includes loss or damage caused by pets. Loss or damage due to normal wear and tear, as determined by a qualified technical inspector, is excepted.

b.  Housing residents will be informed of and shall acknowledge in writing their responsibilities and potential for liability at the time of assignment to Government housing. Also, the condition of the housing unit shall be validated at both assignment and termination.

c.  AR 735-5 sets forth Army policy guidance and procedures to be followed in the investigation and adjudication of cases involving damage to assigned housing and related equipment and furnishings.

d.  paragraph 3-21 provides a formal statement of liability policy and contains formats for acknowledgement of occupancy responsibilities and potential liability.

3-66. Government's liability to resident

Claims may be considered for damages to or loss of personal property due to fire, flood, hurricane, or other unusual occurrence not caused by the resident. The loss must be incident to service, and possession of the property must be reasonable, useful, or proper under the circumstances. Claimants should consult AR 27-20 and contact the nearest OSJA, Claims Division.

3-67. Housing inspection program

This program is designed to ensure that the resident is provided with clean and decent living accommodations, to familiarize the resident with the installation's and resident's responsibilities, to instruct the resident in equipment operation, and to maintain equitable treatment of all residents. The inspection program for shall consist of at least two inspections-check-in and termination-to ensure protection of the interests of the resident and the Government. The IMCOM Region Director may require pre-termination inspections or delegate the option to the installations.

a. Family housing.  

(1) Check-in inspection.   Occupancy of the DU is contingent upon completion of a mutual inspection of the DU, its grounds, and its furnishings by the prospective resident and the housing manager's representative. Conditions at check-in will be noted on the check-in portion of the condition report which is developed locally. During the check-in inspection, the housing representative will accomplish the following:

(a)    Complete the condition report. If at any time during the first 15 days after accepting the DU, a condition is noted that differs from the entries recorded on the condition report, the resident must submit discrepancies in writing to be received by the housing office within 15 days.

(b)    Define resident responsibilities regarding maintenance.

(c)    Brief the resident on energy conservation.

(d)    Demonstrate operation of electrical and mechanical equipment, including range, refrigeration, and any other appliance.

(e)    Inform the resident of various programs and services, such as self-help, emergency service, and trash collection.

(f)    Advise the resident that housing will be inspected prior to termination of assignment.

(g)    Provide telephone numbers for points of contact in the housing office and the maintenance service desk.

(h)    Advise that the resident will be scheduled for an orientation as soon as possible but within 30 days of date of assignment.

(2) Pre-termination inspection.   

(a)    Residents will notify the housing office upon receipt of PCS orders or 30-45 days before departure, whichever is most appropriate, to schedule termination inspections and, where contract cleaning is done at Government expense, to arrange for contract cleaning.

(b)     A pre-termination inspection may be conducted approximately 30 days prior to the termination inspection. Where a Government-approved custodial contractor is involved, this inspection may serve as a turnover (resident to contractor) inspection. During this inspection self-help repairs that must be completed before the termination inspection will be identified. Detailed cleaning requirements will be noted. The condition of all items covered in the check-in inspection will be noted and compared. Finally, a detailed inspection will be made to determine what between occupancy M&R is required. Required M&R will be scheduled with the DPW immediately following its identification.

(3) Termination inspection.   

(a)    The termination inspection is jointly conducted by the resident and a housing representative using the termination section of the condition report after housing is vacated but prior to formal termination of assignment. It ensures that the appropriate cleaning standards have been met and provides for any necessary action for claims against the resident (see DA Pam 420-1-1). If the DU fails the inspection, a reinspection is scheduled at the earliest mutually acceptable time.

(b)    The resident may opt to clean his or her own housing or have a third party do the actual work. This will not relieve the resident of the obligation to pass the termination inspection unless the third party is a Government-approved custodial contractor, or AAFES concessionaire, and is prepaid by the resident (para 3-54e).

b. Unaccompanied personnel housing (permanent party).  

(1)    Check-in and termination inspections will be jointly accomplished by the resident and a representative of the housing office or unit commander, as appropriate.

(2)    Residents will leave their UPH space suitable for immediate reassignment. Standards consistent with DA Pam 420-1-1 will be established by the garrison commander.

(3)    Orders terminating the assignment of UPH (PP) will specify the date housing was terminated. Termination orders will be distributed in the same manner as for Family housing per paragraphs 3-16h(4)(a) and 3-16h(4)(b).

3-68. Self-help program for Family housing residents

A well run and command supported self-help program in Family housing can accomplish tasks more quickly and save on limited maintenance and repair dollars. These saved dollars can then be used to fund other high priority M&R requirements (see DA Pam 420-1-1).

Section IX
Furnishings

3-69. Management of furnishings

a. Scope.  This section sets forth policy for managing Government furnishings authorized by common table of allowances (CTA) 50-909 and CTA 50-970 for the following:

(1)    Government-controlled Family housing and unaccompanied personnel housing.

(2)    Private rental housing used by eligible personnel as identified in this section.

b. Furnishings management groupings.   for purposes of managing and reporting, furnishings are divided into the following groups:

(1)    Family housing furnishings.

(2)    Unaccompanied personnel housing furnishings.

c. Furnishings management responsibilities.  

(1) Headquarters, Department of the Army.   The ACSIM will develop policy and general procedures for the provision of furnishings and the management of housing furnishings programs.

(2) Installation Management Command.   The commander, IMCOM will—

(a)    Ensure proper furnishings management.

(b)    Develop and justify resource requirements and distribute funds received for furnishings support to their Regions' installations.

(c)    Conduct inspections to ensure that functions are performed per applicable directives and this regulation.

(d)    Ensure that inquiries from HQDA regarding Family and UPH furnishings inventory and cost data are answered in a timely manner and coordinated with the command resource and program managers.

(3) Garrison.   The garrison commander will—

(a)    Approve and submit responses to inquiries from HQDA and IMCOM regarding Family and UPH furnishings inventory and cost data. Responses will be sent in a timely manner to or through the IMCOM to HQDA after coordination with the installation resource and program managers.

(b)    Establish program levels for authorized furnishings items. For calculations related to establishment of program levels, see DA Pam 420-1-1.

(c)    Conduct an annual physical inventory of furnishings not in use and reconcile property on hand receipt and quantities not in use with inventory balances maintained in the Furnishings Management Module of the Enterprise Military Housing (see also DA Pam 420-1-1).

(d)    Maintain accurate and current records of property usage in Enterprise Military Housing as a basis for developing experience factors.

(e)    Ensure that furnishings are used per authorized needs and the policies and procedures established in this regulation and applicable directives.

(f)    Accomplish furnishings maintenance and repair on a sound economic basis.

(g)    Minimize furnishings storage by timely disposition of items excess to authorized needs or uneconomically repairable.

(h)    Ensure that procedures for warehousing authorized furnishings provide for—

1.    Segregation of Family housing and UPH furnishings inventories to include the storage of serviceable like items in one storage area, where possible, and separate storage areas for serviceable, economically repairable, and unserviceable items.

2.    A warehouse locator system.

(i)    Ensure that personnel have met their obligations in regard to the possession, care, preservation, damage, or loss of Government furnishings prior to departure from the housing unit/installation.

(j)    Ensure excess furnishings are not ordered and that funds distributed for the UPH furnishings replacement program are used for that purpose.

(k)    Establish controls to ensure that furnishings accounts are properly cleared before personnel depart on PCS or TDY in connection with a PCS; especially those Soldiers residing in private rentals.

(4) Resident.   Residents will—

(a)    Sign hand receipts for furnishings provided by the Government.

(b)    Exercise reasonable care in using Government-provided furnishings.

(c)    Be liable for loss or damage to Government-provided furnishings caused by the negligence or willful misconduct of the sponsor, the sponsor's Family members, guests, or pets (see para 3-65).

(d)    Be responsible to pay for missed appointments made for delivery or pick up of furnishings.

d. Furnishings authorizations.  Types of furnishings authorized and their bases of issue (BOIs) are identified in CTA 50-909 and CTA 50-970. Authorizations will consist only of those items in CTAs and the nonstandard items approved by HQDA for use on an exception or test basis. All users will be familiar with the "special instructions" paragraph of CTA 50-909 and CTA 50-970 before ordering furnishings. See DA Pam 420-1-1 for the types of furnishings generally authorized.

e. Budgeting and funding.  

(1)    Commanders will budget and fund for the following:

(a)    Initial issue of Family housing furnishings except for items of household equipment initially provided with AFH construction funds.

(b)    Replacement requirements for authorized furnishings for Family housing and unaccompanied personnel housing.

(2)    The ASA (FM&C), through the Army budget office (ABO), HQDA (SAFM-BUO), will budget and fund for initial issue of UPH furnishings except for items of household equipment initially provided with MCA funds.

(3)    All costs of procurement and the O&M for the Family housing furnishings inventory will be budgeted for and funded from the AFH appropriation (see DA Pam 420-1-1 and DFAS-IN Manual 37-100-FY).

(4)    All costs of procurement, except as noted in paragraph (2) above and paragraph (6) below, and all costs of O&M for the UPH furnishings inventory will be budgeted for and funded from the appropriation financing the O&M of UPH (see DA Pam 420-1-1 and DFAS-IN Manual 37-100-FY).

(5)    Costs involving joint use of facilities, vehicles, equipment, and manpower will be shared on a pro rata basis among the financing appropriations.

(6)    UPH furnishings, as part of installation support to Army National Guard (ARNG) and U.S. Army Reserve (USAR) units undergoing training, will be provided on a reimbursable basis. Charges are limited to identifiable cost items when the cost is funded by an appropriation other than OMAR (see AR 37-49). The OMA (PE ****96) funds can be utilized where UPH furnishings are to become station property and are essentially for active Army use. Conversely, if the furnishings are solely for use of the RC, it is inappropriate to utilize OMA resources.

(7)     The OMA-funded tenants located on U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC) RDTE funded installations will continue to receive UPH furnishings support from OMA.

(8)    HQDA will publish an annual list of replacement costs. Cost data from this list will be used for managing furnishings inventories and for budget submission purposes.

f. Acquisition of furnishings.  

(1)    Per Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), the primary source of procurement will normally be through the General Services Administration (GSA). However, Federal Prison Industries, Inc. (FPI), also known by the trade name UNICOR, will be offered first choice for the provision of items they manufacture (18 USC 4124, as iterated in the FAR, Subpart 8.6). The installation's Director of Contracting makes determination as to which organization will provide requested furnishings. To minimize storage, transportation, and handling costs, procurement should be timed to provide delivery when needed.

(2)    Waiver of FAR requirements to procure furnishings through other than GSA/UNICOR will be obtained through procurement channels.

(3)    Procurement actions will be taken only when such action is advantageous to the Government and there are no known excess furnishings which are suitable for use.

(4)    Requisitions for housing furnishings will be processed through normal supply channels unless otherwise directed by HQDA (DAIM-ISH).

g. Maintenance and repair of furnishings.  

(1)    The maintenance and repair of furnishings will be limited to keeping items in a satisfactorily usable condition. Do not perform work that is uneconomical in relation to replacement cost of the items. Generally, the one-time repair cost on authorized items will not exceed 75 percent of replacement cost. Maintenance and repair of excess furnishings is prohibited. The furnishings manager will make the final decision regarding repair versus replacement.

(2)     for a discussion of broad guidelines for the normal life expectancies of furnishings that may be used for planning purposes, see DA Pam 420-1-1. Age, however, is not to be used as the sole basis for planned replacement. Condition, availability of funds, time delays in procurement, availability of spare parts, energy savings devices, urgency of need, and quality differences between old and new items will also be considered in determining items requiring replacement.

(3)    AR 5-20 sets forth policy and procedure to be followed to determine whether to perform maintenance and repair of furnishings by in-house resources or by contract. When it is more economical to perform these functions in-house, maximum use of these facilities will be achieved by use of cross-servicing agreements with other military Services. When requirements exceed the in-house capabilities of an activity or installation or it is otherwise required that outside sources be used, performance of such services will be governed by Part 8, FAR; DOD FAR Supplement (DFARS); and Army Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (AFARS).

(4)    For a procedure that may be used to assist in making decisions on whether furnishings should be repaired or replaced see DA Pam 420-1-1.

h. Excess furnishings.  

(1)    Maximum economical use will be made of existing stocks of Government furnishings per the FAR (Part 8).

(2)    Serviceable and economically repairable items becoming excess to an installation's or activity's needs will be publicized within the IMCOM Region for possible transfer within or between Family housing and UPH furnishings accounts.

(3)    Redistribution of excess furnishings will be undertaken only when such action is determined to be in the best interest of the Government. An economic analysis will be done to determine the fiscal merits of redistribution.

(4)    Excess furnishings may be transferred per the following guidelines:

(a)    At installation level, the housing manager may approve lateral transfer of excess UPH furnishings to the Family housing furnishings inventory (or excess Family housing furnishings to the UPH furnishings inventory). Above installation level, approvals for transfer will be as specified in AR 710-2.

(b)    Items involved must be, and projected to remain, excess to requirements of the losing inventory and within the authorized allowances (CTA 50-909 or CTA 50-970) of the gaining inventory.

(c)    Such transfer must be cost effective.

(d)    All transfers of excess inventory will be auditable.

(5)    Excess furnishings transferred to another property book are not reimbursable but are subject to accessorial and administrative costs incident to transfer action.

(6)    Serviceable Family housing furnishings in excess of allowances and located at CONUS installations will be normally turned-in per AR 710-2. However, such furnishings may be offered to lower grade Soldiers with Families for their use prior to turn in subject to the following:

(a)    Items will be hand receipted to the individual.

(b)    No funds will be expended for cleaning, repair, or maintenance.

(c)    No AFH or UPH furnishings funds will be expended for movement of excess furnishings to and from housing except in cases of bona fide hardship to the resident or where it would be advantageous to the Government as determined by the garrison commander.

(d)    Prompt action will be taken to dispose of excess furnishings subsequently requiring repair.

(7)    Excess serviceable UPH furnishings and excess serviceable Family housing furnishings located in U.S. overseas and foreign areas may be retained in the inventory for use in any Government-controlled housing and in private rental housing in U.S. overseas and foreign areas subject to the conditions in paragraphs 3-69h (6)(a) through 3-69h (6)(d).

i. Warehousing.  The garrison commander, in coordination with the furnishings manager, will make arrangements for adequate storage facilities for furnishings. Items will be labeled and stored separately. Each type of property will be identified in the warehouse, separated by warehouse floor, area, bay, or room. Other types of property (for example, NAF, barracks-type furniture) should be stored separately. Privately-owned household goods are not authorized storage in warehouses used to store APF-funded furnishings.

j. Charges for furnishings in housing for which the Army charges rent.  Charges for the use of Government furnishings in rental housing will be established in accordance with section XV.

k. Property inventory and accountability.  

(1)    Inventories of both Family housing and UPH furnishings will be maintained in the Furnishings Management Module of the Enterprise Military Housing. Maintain the inventories for Family housing and UPH separately in Enterprise Military Housing. Separate inventories will preclude the augmentation of one appropriation with another (a statutory violation) and the circumvention of CTA authorizations.

(2)    Although furnishings items costing less than $2,500 need not be listed in property books, for management purposes all nonexpendable furnishings items will be included in the Enterprise Military Housing inventories regardless of cost. For furnishings items costing $2,500 or more use property books as follows:

(a)    Housing property books will not be consolidated with property books of other activities (for example, installation or DPW property books).

(b)    Property books for Family housing furnishings and UPH furnishings may be maintained separately or consolidated as authorized by IMCOM regions.

(c)    Where consolidated, keep the inventories in separate sections. Separately identify each inventory by furnishings type codes appended to the authorization document description in the "Authority" block of the property record. Use the furnishings type codes "(F)" for Family housing furnishings and "(U)" for UPH furnishings. For example, the authority block may read " CTA 50-909(F)" and " CTA 50-909(U)" respectively for Family housing and UPH furnishings inventory items.

(d)    The consolidation of property books for AFH and UPH furnishings will not be used to augment one appropriation with another (a statutory prohibition) nor to circumvent CTA authorizations.

(3)    Authorized furnishings in support of administrative housing functions, and those items in support of the Self-Help Program may be issued to such activities and subsequently hand receipted to the users. These items include property used for grounds maintenance, in cleaning and storage functions, in housing administration areas, and for Army community service centers. Items will be transferred to the installation property book and sub-hand receipted to the administrative office or the ACS.

(4)    Furnishings inventory items will initially be entered in the property book records at cost, quantity, year of purchase, and serial number (optional).

(5)    Family housing furnishings will be issued on DA Form 2062 (Hand Receipt/Annex Number), or automated equivalent, signed by the sponsor, the sponsor's spouse or an individual having a DA Form 1687 (Notice of Delegation of Authority-Receipt for Supplies) for that purpose on file in the housing office (see para 3-98e(3) for special signature requirements for GFOQ).

(6)    UPH furnishings will be receipted for by the responsible individual whose name appears on DA Form 1687. These furnishings will be issued from the PBO directly to the hand receipt holder, that is, either the person responsible for the facility or to the resident. The responsible person may sub-handreceipt the furnishings to a resident.

(7)    Controls will be established to ensure that furnishings accounts are cleared before personnel depart on a PCS, undergo extended TDY, or are deployed with an entire unit.

(8)    A physical inventory of furnishings which have been turned-in will be done. Where Government property has been lost or damaged through negligence or willful misconduct, the appropriate individual will initiate one of the following for payment at the appropriate disbursing agency:

(a)    Financial liability investigation of property loss.

(b)    Statement of charges.

(c)    Cash collection voucher.

(d)    Other authorized adjustment per AR 735-5.

(9)    On an adverse financial liability investigation of property loss finding, liability for furnishings may be limited to an amount equivalent to one month's basic pay at the time of the loss except where the damage or loss is determined to be the result of gross negligence or willful misconduct (see para 3-65).

(10)    Authorized hand receipt holders held liable for loss or damage of furnishings (in less than new condition at the time of loss or damage) are authorized a depreciation credit. When items are issued in damaged condition, a notation of the damages will be entered on the inventory record or condition report to protect the Family housing sponsor or UPH resident. Refer to AR 735-5 for more information on depreciation.

(11)    Family housing furnishings and those UPH furnishings issued to unaccompanied personnel authorized to reside off-post in U.S. overseas and foreign areas will be jointly inventoried by the sponsor and the housing office's furnishings management representative. The joint inventory will be conducted when furnishings are issued and at termination of occupancy.

(12)    An annual inventory is not required for Family housing and UPH furnishings issued to individuals on permanent hand receipts for use in individual housing units. An annual inventory is required for all other Family housing furnishings and for all UPH furnishings not on permanent hand receipt. The cut off date for annual furnishings inventories is the end of the fiscal year.

l. Potential pecuniary liability for furnishings.  Residents of Family or unaccompanied personnel housing who have been provided furnishings may be held liable for damage or loss caused through their abuse or negligence (see para 3-65).

m. Furnishings reports.  There are no recurring upward reporting requirements for furnishings. However, installations must be prepared to respond to inquiries regarding Family housing and UPH furnishings inventory and cost data. Inventory and cost data will be entered into the Furnishings Management Module database of the HOMES.

3-70. Family housing furnishings

a. Provision of furnishings.  

(1)    Furnishings include furniture, household equipment, and miscellaneous items necessary to provide a reasonable degree of livability in personnel housing. Except for special command positions and the SMA, the term "furnishings" does not include household goods, such as linens, cutlery, silverware, dishes, and kitchen utensils (see paras 3-71b and 3-100b). Garbage disposals, AC units, and permanently installed dishwashers are not considered to be furnishings.

(2)    The provision of Government furnishings is determined by the category of housing (for example, representational housing) and location of the housing (CONUS, U.S. overseas, or foreign).

b. Representational housing.  

(1)    Furnishings for housing units designated and used for general and flag officers and for special command positions are addressed in paragraph 3-100. That paragraph also covers the special allowances for special command positions. Eligibility for furnishings for General Officers residing in privatized GFOQs are addressed in paragraph 3-111n.

(2)    Both installation and garrison commanders in the grade of colonel (O-6) are authorized residential housing with the same amenities authorized general and flag officers. Authorized amenities are identified in paragraph 3-100.

(3)    The SMA, Senior Enlisted Advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and incumbents of special CSM positions may be provided furnishings in accordance with paragraph 3-71.

(4)    Furnishings provided in representational housing will be included in the Enterprise Military Housing Family housing furnishings inventory.

(5)    Furnishings for privatized representational housing are addressed in paragraph 3-111n.

c. Furnishings policy.  

(1)    Residents of AFH will provide their own furniture unless otherwise authorized by this regulation.

(2)    Government furniture may be provided only in specifically authorized instances (see para 3-70d).

(3)    Ranges and refrigerators will be provided in all AFH.

(4)    Ranges and refrigerators will be provided for private rental housing OCONUS when they are not provided by the landlord as part of the housing.

(5)    In foreign areas, where there are no built-in kitchen cabinets and closets, free standing kitchen cabinets and wardrobes will be provided.

(6)    Where CTA authorization for a furnishings item is canceled or rescinded or a specification for an item is changed, that item may be retained in the inventory until no longer serviceable but will not be replaced. Serviceable items located in a DU may remain in use in that DU except where an authorized, but unsatisfied, need exists elsewhere.

(7)    Where representational housing (see para 3-70b, and para 3-100b) is redesignated for other use or is assigned to a resident who is not eligible for Government-provided supplementary furnishings, the following applies:

(a)    Supplementary furniture will be removed from the housing unless the items are excess and available to other residents of the same grade.

(b)    Supplementary household equipment (that is, second refrigerators, freezers, clothes washers, and dryers) will be removed from the housing.

(c)    Custom fitted supplementary furnishings, classified as equipment-in-place (EIP) will remain in the housing and will be maintained until no longer serviceable, but will not be replaced. Examples are wall-to-wall carpeting and draperies (see para 3-70l and 3-70m).

d. Eligibility for Family housing furnishings.  

(1)    Personnel residing in Government-controlled Family housing are eligible for furnishings support (see para 3-6b(2)).

(2)    Personnel assigned to foreign areas are eligible for furnishings support if in the following categories:

(a)    Personnel with command-sponsored Family members.

(b)    Appropriated and nonappropriated fund DOD U.S. citizen civilian personnel recruited in the United States.

(3)    Personnel limited to an administrative weight allowance for HHG are authorized full furniture support.

(4)    Military and civilian personnel listed in paragraph 3-70d(2), traveling under full JFTR or JTR weight allowance, respectively, may be provided temporary furniture support (loaner sets) at their overseas station when their household goods (HHG) are in transit (that is, in- and out-bound). Types and amounts issued may be limited and may not consist of a complete furniture set as authorized by CTA 50-909. Maximum time for use of loaner sets is 90 days for in-bound personnel and 60 days for out-bound personnel. The furnishings manager may extend this period if in-bound HHG shipments are delayed beyond 90 days.

(5)    Personnel who placed a portion of their HHG in CONUS nontemporary storage will not receive a like item from the Government furniture inventory.

(6)    Contractor personnel have no entitlement to and are not eligible for housing furnishings support.

e. Customer service.  

(1)    The furnishings issuing office will provide information on the installation furnishings situation to interested personnel. Such information will be posted prominently or available for viewing and will include the following:

(a)    Current list of furnishings authorized and available for issue.

(b)    Waiting list of customers who have requested unavailable furnishings items.

(c)    List of furniture items that may be included in loaner sets where such sets are authorized.

(d)    Pictures or displays of standard items issued.

(e)    Copies of appropriate furnishings regulations.

(f)    Fact sheet, updated periodically, summarizing the local furnishings situation.

(2)    Customer service personnel will ensure that sponsors and their Families are given prompt, courteous explanations of furnishings authorizations, issue and turn-in procedures, pick up and delivery requirements, and estimated waiting time for unavailable items.

f. Furniture for continental United States and full Joint Federal Travel Regulations overseas areas.  

(1)    Government furniture will not be procured for support of Army-controlled Family housing or private rental housing in CONUS or in overseas areas where personnel travel under full JFTR household goods weight allowances except as shown below.

(a)    Supplemental Government furniture may be provided in—

1.    Representational housing (see para 3-70b).

2.    Student housing (desk, chair, lamp, and bookcase only).

(b)    Government furniture may be provided to fully support—

1.    CONUS housing occupied by foreign personnel who are in this country on an exchange basis. This includes clothes washers and dryers.

2.    Short-tour housing.

3.    In overseas areas on a temporary loan basis for use by personnel who have traveled under full JFTR weight allowances and have not received personal furniture.

4.    Where only specially designed or built-in furnishings can be used, for example, in manufactured (mobile) homes.

(c)    Free-standing wardrobes and kitchen cabinets may be provided when these storage facilities are not built-in.

(2)    Initial procurement of Government furniture for the usages in paragraph 3-70f(1), requires the approval of HQDA (DAIM-ISH).

g. Furniture for other than full Joint Federal Travel Regulations overseas areas.  

(1)    Government furniture may be procured for Government-controlled housing and for private rental housing occupied by eligible personnel. This would depend upon determining whether it is more advantageous for the Government to provide furniture instead of shipping personal furniture. Final determination is based on overall economy, equity, and personal preference of eligible military personnel and civilian employees.

(2)    Where Government furniture is provided, the shipment weight of personal furniture to and from the area is limited. An increase in an individual's administrative weight restriction may be authorized where there is a shortage of Government furniture.

(3)    Where Government furniture is not provided, procurement of furniture is restricted to the provisions of paragraph 3-70f above. However, where not built-in, free standing wardrobes and kitchen cabinets will be provided in economy housing occupied by eligible personnel (see CTA 50-909).

(4)    All personnel entitled to the shipment of HHG are authorized furniture on a temporary loan basis while their HHG are in transit.

h. National flags for Family housing at Forts Myer and Fort McNair.  

(1)    Family housing residents at Forts Myer and Fort McNair will be issued national flags (NSN 8345-00-656-1434) to be displayed on six-foot aluminum flag poles appropriately attached to the front of their DUs.

(2)    Flags will be affixed to DUs and displayed per installation directives.

(3)    Installation housing offices will establish procedures for issue and accountability of flags and requests for replacements.

i. Special support.  Garrison commanders may provide excess items of Family housing furniture to reception areas in housing offices, HS offices, and ACS centers. Furniture need not be new, but should be clean and serviceable. Sufficient furniture may be provided to present an inviting and comfortable atmosphere for customers. When such furniture is provided, it will be transferred from the housing furnishings inventory property records to installation property records. Vendor loaner furniture is not authorized for the public areas of housing offices (see AR 210-7 and DOD 5500.7-R).

j. Provision of household equipment.  

(1) Ranges and refrigerators.   

(a)    Government-procured ranges and refrigerators will be provided in Army-controlled Family housing and in private rental housing in foreign areas occupied by eligible personnel.

(b)    Ranges will be free standing or slide-in, and white in color. Ranges not conforming to sizes authorized in CTA 50-909 may be procured only when space is inappropriate for the specified sizes.

(c)    Refrigerators will be free standing and white in color.

(2) Clothes washers and dryers.   

(a)    Clothes washers and dryers will not be provided in CONUS Family housing except for CONUS housing occupied by foreign personnel who are in this country on an exchange basis and for special command positions (see para 3-100d).

(b)    In overseas areas, clothes washers and dryers are authorized for Army-controlled housing and private rental housing occupied by eligible personnel when determined by economic analysis to be more cost effective than shipment of personally-owned washers and dryers. Commercial-type washers and dryers will be procured for use in structures having common laundry rooms. Stacked washer/dryers or dryers may be procured and installed in those laundry rooms where space is restricted.

(3) Portable dishwashers.   Portable dishwashers may be provided in housing instead of installed dishwashers where it is considered impractical to provide permanently installed dishwashers.

(4) Household equipment.   Items of household equipment currently in use but not authorized under the above criteria may be retained until no longer serviceable but will not be replaced.

(5) Ancillary items for utility support in foreign areas.    

(a)    When not provided by the landlord, issue and installation of necessary light fixtures and other components of utility systems are authorized for Government-leased housing occupied by eligible personnel. Costs associated with the procurement, installation, removal, and maintenance and repair are chargeable to AFH maintenance or leasing funds, as appropriate. These costs include expenses for installing and removing light fixtures provided by eligible personnel.

(b)    Portable electrical transformers necessary to allow the operation of personal appliances on foreign electrical power systems will not normally be provided by the Government. However, an IMCOM region may authorize their provision in hardship cases subject to the availability of funds.

(6) Microwaves and freezers.   In USAREUR, commanders in the grade of lieutenant colonel (O-5) and above, CSMs and all general officers are authorized microwaves and freezers.

k. Window Coverings.  

(1)    Window coverings should be provided on all windows within a housing unit. This may be accomplished with draw curtains, window shades, or Venetian blinds. If draw curtains are used on sliding glass doors and there are one or more adjacent windows, matching curtains may be provided for the windows.

(2)    Draw curtains will be unlined and made of fire retardant synthetic cloth. They will be washable, shrink-safe, and designed to control radiant heat, light, and glare. Material will be heavy enough to provide privacy when closed, day or night.

(3)    Draw curtains may be cleaned at Government expense every 12 months or on change of occupancy. Draw curtains may be replaced when they become unserviceable.

(4)    Cost of material, fabrication, and installation of draw curtains will be comparable to that normally expended for Venetian blinds or shades.

(5)    Draw curtains when installed to replace existing window coverings which are beyond economical repair are chargeable to maintenance funds. In cases, where there is no existing window covering, installation of draw curtains is categorized as an improvement to the DU and the cost of installing draw curtains may be charged as incidental improvements or construction improvements.

l. Wall-to-wall carpeting.  

(1)    Carpeting installed as a prime floor finish is classified as installed real property. As such, initial procurement and installation may be done with construction funds. Replacement may be done with construction improvements or maintenance funds.

(2)    Carpeting will be suitable for the level of traffic expected. It will be of a neutral shade. Bright colors, prominent patterns, white, off-white, pile, and shag carpeting will be avoided.

(3)    Carpeting placed over another prime floor in good condition is classified as EIP. Its use in this manner is reserved for the public entertainment areas of GFOQ and garrison commanders quarters (GCQ) (see para 3-100e).

(4)    Carpeting may be placed over another unserviceable prime floor when an EA justifies this use.

m. Resident-owned equipment.  

(1)    Residents will not replace Government ranges and refrigerators with personal equipment without specific approval of the garrison commander (may be delegated to the DPW).

(2)    Where Government equipment is provided OCONUS, the overseas shipment of similar personal items of household equipment is prohibited.

(3)    Requests for installation of resident-owned equipment must contain information on the type of equipment, make, model, and characteristics pertinent to installation. Requests will be submitted in writing to the housing office.

(4)    Resident-owned items will be installed, maintained, and removed and the premises restored to their original condition at the expense of the resident and subject to inspection by the housing office.

(5)    The installation of resident-owned equipment will not be used as justification for improvements to the utilities distribution systems.

(6)    All work necessary for the installation of resident-owned items will be approved by the garrison commander (may be delegated to the DPW). Payments for any work performed by the installation will be made to the appropriate OPLOC/FAO.

(7)    The following items will not be installed by or for residents:

(a)    AC units which require duct work or fixed water or drain connections.

(b)    Attic or wall-type fans requiring permanent attachment to the building and structural modifications.

(c)    Evaporative coolers requiring duct work.

(d)    Domestic water heaters.

(e)    Electric or gas wall heaters.

(f)    Water beds. Permission must be obtained from the housing office before a resident may install a water bed. Normally, water beds will be installed only on slab-on-grade floors.

(g)    Hot tubs. Permission must be obtained from the housing office before a resident may install a hot tub inside or outside the DU. Hot-tubs may be installed at resident expense when installation would not create a significant increase in utility costs to the Government. The DPW will ensure installation of the hot tub meets all building and safety codes.

(h)    Privately owned satellite dishes.

n. Resident-owned window AC units.  Window AC units are not considered furnishings. Paragraph 3-54m sets forth the policy on the use of resident-owned window AC units.

o. Cost comparison analysis.  

(1)    An EA of the comparative costs of providing Government furnishings instead of shipping personal furniture will be made when the commander believes that the present method of furnishing Family housing is not cost effective. Cost appraisals will consider the following:

(a)    Cost of Government furnishings estimated for use in both Government-controlled and private rental housing for all eligible Families. This cost is based on current replacement price.

(b)    Cost of Government furnishings required to establish "loaner sets". This cost is based on current replacement price.

(c)    Temporary lodging allowance cost due solely to lack of furnishings.

(d)    Initial delivery and installation costs.

(e)    Recurring costs for administration, servicing, repair, transportation, moving, and handling.

(f)    Costs of periodic replacement, less any proceeds from the salvage or sale of replaced furnishings.

(g)    Cost of construction or acquisition of additional warehousing, office, and maintenance facilities and equipment.

(h)    Maintenance and repair of warehouses and handling equipment.

(i)    Cost of utilities services for warehousing.

(j)    Overhead costs.

(k)    Cost of storing residual personal HHG to be left in CONUS.

(l)    Volume of personal HHG being shipped to and from the area as developed by actual experience or from similar situations. This will include related costs such as packing, crating, drayage, port handling, transportation, temporary storage, loss and damage claims, and delivery at destination.

(2)    An EA will be prepared in accordance with OMB Circular A-94. Analysis, to include a survey of eligible personnel as to the preferred method of furnishing Family housing, will be forwarded to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

3-71. The Sergeant Major of the Army and special command sergeant major positions

a. Overview.  

(1)    The CSA is the approval authority for the designation of new special CSM positions and the cancellation of old ones. Approved special CSM positions are listed in table 3-9.

Table 3-9. Special command sergeant major positions
ACOM: AMC
Special CSM position:
CSM, AMC
CSM, U.S. Army Aviation & Missile Command (AMCOM)
ASCC: Eighth U.S. Army (EUSA)
Special CSM position:
CSM, United Nations Command/Combined Forces Command/U.S. Forces. Korea/EUSA
CSM, 2d Infantry Division
ACOM: Forces Command (FORSCOM)
Special CSM position:
CSM, FORSCOM
CSM, 1st U.S. Army
CSM, I Corps & Fort Lewis
CSM, III Corps & Fort Hood
CSM, XVIII Airborne Corps & Fort Bragg
CSM, 1st Cavalry Division
CSM, 1st Infantry Division (Mechanized)
CSM, 3d Infantry Division (Mechanized)
CSM, 4th Infantry Division (Mechanized)
CSM, 10th Mountain Division
CSM, 82d Airborne Division
CSM, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)
CSM, U.S. Army Reserve Command (USARC)
ASCC: U.S. Army Military District of Washington (MDW)
Special CSM position:
CSM, MDW
CSM, District of Columbia National Guard
CSM, U.S. Army Human Resources Command (HRC)
CSM, National Guard Bureau
ASCC: Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command (SDDC)
Special CSM position: CSM, Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command (SDDC)
DRU: U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM)
Special CSM position: CSM, MEDCOM
ACOM:U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC)
Special CSM position:
CSM, TRADOC
CSM, Fort Benning
CSM, Fort Bliss
CSM, Fort Eustis
CSM, Fort Gordon
CSM, Fort Jackson
CSM, Fort Knox
CSM, Fort Leavenworth
CSM, Fort Lee
CSM, Fort Leonard Wood
CSM, Fort Rucker
CSM, Fort Sill
CSM, U.S. Army Ordnance Center & School
CSM, U.S. Army Recruiting Command
ASCC: U.S. Army South (USARSO)
Special CSM position: CSM, 6th U.S. Army
ASCC: U.S. Army Pacific (USARPAC)
Special CSM position:
CSM, USARPAC
CSM, USARAK
CSM, U.S. Army, Japan/IX Corps
CSM, 25th Infantry Division (Light)
CSM, Tripler Army Medical Center
ASCC: U.S. Army Europe (USAREUR)
Special CSM position:
CSM, USAREUR
CSM, Supreme Allied Command Europe (SACEUR)
CSM, U.S. Army Southern European Task Force
CSM, V Corps
CSM, 1st Armored Division
CSM, Europe Regional Medical Command
CSM, 21st Theater Support Command
DRU: U.S. Army Network Enterprise Technology Command/9th Army Signal Command (NETCOM)
Special CSM position: CSM, NETCOM
ASCC: U.S. Army Central (ARCENT)
Special CSM position: CSM, 3d U.S. Army
ASCC: U.S. Army North (ARNORTH)
Special CSM position: CSM, 5th U.S. Army
ASCC: U.S. Army Space & Missile Defense Command (SMDC)
Special CSM position: CSM, U.S. Army Space & Missile Defense Command (SMDC)
ASCC: U.S. Army Special Operations Command (USASOC)
Special CSM position: CSM, 1st Special Operations Command
DRU: U.S. Army Test & Evaluation Command (ATEC)
Special CSM position: CSM, U.S. Army Test & Evaluation Command (ATEC)
DRU: Criminal Investigation Command (CIDC)
Special CSM position: CSM, Criminal Investigation Command (CIDC)
DRU: U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM)
Special CSM position: CSM, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM)
DRU: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)
Special CSM position: CSM, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)
DRU: U.S. Army Reserve Command (USARC)
Special CSM position: CSM, USARC
DRU: U.S. Military Academy (USMA)
Special CSM position: CSM, USMA

(2)    Requests to establish new special CSM positions will be sent with full justification to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600. Justification will include the following:

(a)    Title of position.

(b)    Normal grade for position.

(c)    Present incumbent of position.

(d)    Identification of DU proposed for such designation.

(e)    Reason for special CSM position requirement. (Include magnitude of official entertainment responsibilities.)

(f)    Impact if not approved.

(3)    The appropriate garrison commander will—

(a)    Permanently designate a specific DU for the SMA, Senior Enlisted Advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and for each special CSM position approved by HQDA. HQDA (DAIM-ISH), ACSIM, 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600 will be informed of such designations and has the authority to approve changes in designated SMA, Senior Enlisted Advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and special CSM position DUs.

(b)    Maintain a permanent file on each special CSM position DU. Each file will contain approvals and replacement authorizations so that an audit trail is maintained.

b. Furnishings.  

(1)    The SMA and Senior Enlisted Advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff are authorized residential housing with the same furnishings amenities authorized general/flag officers occupying special command positions. Authorized amenities are identified in paragraph 3-100.

(2)    To enhance the prestige of special CSM positions, certain furnishings amenities may be provided in the public entertainment areas of Army-controlled housing designated for and occupied by the incumbents of special CSM positions.

(a)    Carpeting and drapes.

1.    Wall-to-wall carpeting may be installed in designated special CSM position housing when existing floors are in a failed or failing condition and where carpets compare favorably with the life cycle costs of other floor covering. High quality area rugs will be authorized in lieu of carpets when existing hard wood floors are serviceable or can be economically restored.

2.    High quality drapes may be authorized as a CTA furnishings item.

3.    The garrison commander should make these improvements on an as-needed basis.

(b)    Household equipment. Higher quality appliances may be provided against CTA authorized items.

(c)    Furniture. Higher quality furniture may be provided where Government furnishings are authorized by CTA.

(3)    Policy concerning furnishings provisions for privatized representational housing is set forth in paragraph 3-111n.

3-72. Disposition of furnishings in excessed and transferred housing

a. Disposition policy.  

(1)    Both DOD and GSA have agreed that Family housing at installations that will be closed or undergo mission reductions will be made available to GSA as intact as possible where this will assist in the disposition of the housing.

(2)    Excess housing will be made available for other DOD use or transferred to GSA for disposal with all installed equipment intact.

b. Action upon transfer of housing.  

(1)    Retention, removal, redistribution, or transfer of equipment and appliances in Family housing transferred to GSA for disposal will be governed by guidance from HQDA (DAIM-ISH). The HQDA (DAIM-ISH) will dictate required actions as the need arises.

(2)    A listing of serviceable (Code B or better) excess AFH or UPH furnishings will be forwarded to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

3-73. Unaccompanied personnel housing furnishings

a. Unaccompanied personnel housing furnishings policy.  

(1)    Government furnishings will be provided in Government-controlled housing and may be provided the following unaccompanied Soldiers occupying private rental housing in Hawaii and Alaska and OCONUS:

(a)    Unaccompanied staff sergeants (E-6) and above in Hawaii and Alaska; sergeant first class (E-7) and above OCONUS, who opt to live in private rental housing.

(b)    Unaccompanied Soldiers of all grades who reside in private rental housing due to the nonavailability of Government-controlled UPH.

(2)    Unaccompanied personnel occupying private housing per paragraph 3-73a(1) may be provided the same furniture and equipment that is offered to accompanied personnel with the following added requirements:

(a)    Sergeants (E-5) and below in CONUS including Hawaii and Alaska; staff sergeants (E-6) and below OCONUS must provide the issuing officer a copy of their CNAs of on-post housing.

(b)    Furnishings will be procured with OMA base operations (.9 account) funds and issued per allowances prescribed in CTA 50-909 and CTA 50-970.

(3)    Exceptions to CTA 50-909 and CTA 50-970 will be submitted to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600 to obtain approval to purchase nonstandard barracks items (for example, special application designed-to-space or modular furnishings) for use in newly constructed or modernized facilities. As a minimum, the IMCOM will provide the following information with narrative justification for waiver consideration:

(a)    Specifications for requested nonstandard item.

(b)    Area gain allotted per man (if applicable), and number to be assigned per bedroom or cubicle.

(c)    Floor plan displaying furnishings placement.

(d)    Quantity and estimated unit price of nonstandard items being requested to include cost variance to GSA schedule contract for furnishings items.

(4)    If an exception to CTA 50-909 or CTA 50-970 is granted from HQDA, then the garrison commander or IMCOM Region will be responsible for obtaining an exception to the FAR/DFARS/AFARS through the local procurement activity. Procurement must be accomplished per the laws and regulations governing the expenditure of Federal funds. This regulation will not be construed as authority for sole source procurement for such nonstandard items. When applicable, the above procedures may be utilized to obtain exception to CTA for replacement furnishings.

(5)    When authorized by the garrison commander, personal furnishings may be used in UPH (PP) in place of Government furnishings. Normally, water beds, if authorized, will be installed only on slab-on-grade floors.

b. Draperies for unaccompanied personnel housing.  

(1)    Draperies procured for UPH will conform with the fabric and color range described in CTA 50-909 and CTA 50-970.

(2)    Drapery requirements for construction and modernization projects will be identified by installations with their DD Form 1391 submissions (see Interior Design Manual (IDM) for Single Soldier Housing for guidance/instruction on ordering draperies for barracks MCA construction and renovation).

(3)    Draperies may be replaced when they have become unserviceable.

c. Carpeting for unaccompanied personnel housing.  

(1)    Carpeting is considered—

(a)    A floor finish when installed as a prime floor finish within the scope of a construction or repair project. Such carpeting is classified as installed real property, not as a furnishing. Requests for carpeting considered a prime floor finish are processed per chapter 5 of this regulation.

(b)    A furnishing when placed over another prime floor finish in good condition. Such carpeting is classified as EIP. Requests for carpeting considered to be EIP are processed per this regulation.

(2)    Carpeting available for Government purchase is described in the GSA Federal Supply Schedule, FSC Group 72. Refer to the applicable index for guidance in determining the type of carpet suitable in relation to traffic and soil. Pile construction of carpet will be made of nylon, acrylic, or a combination of nylon and acrylic. Bright colors, white or off-white, prominent patterns, deep pile, or shag carpeting will be avoided in living areas. Tight-loop carpeting (small pattern) with a print or intricate pattern is recommended for common use or public areas. For factors influencing carpet performance, see DA Pam 420-1-1.

d. Clothes washers and dryers.  

(1)    Washers and dryers in UPH facilities may be concessionaire-owned or concessionaire-leased, or Government-owned. The most economical method of supplying and servicing authorized equipment will be determined by comparative cost analysis and cyclic evaluation of ongoing methods conducted in accordance with AR 5-20.

(2)    Cost analyses will be approved at installation level.

(3)    Laundry facilities provided in UPH (PP) will be at no cost to the individual.

e. Unaccompanied personnel housing initial issue furnishings program.  

(1)    This program provides for the purchase of furnishings for newly constructed or modernized UPH facilities.

(2)    The program is centrally managed by HQDA to ensure that new furnishings will be available when the UPH facility is released to the Army.

(3)    HQDA (DAIM-ISH) will program funds for initial issue furnishings on the basis of the approved UPH construction Future Years Defense Program (FYDP).

(4)    The ABO (SAFM-BUO) will issue a Funding Authorization Document (FAD) to the Office of the Secretary of the Army (OA 22) to be used for the purchase of the initial issue furnishings.

(5)    HQDA (DAIM-ISH) will provide—

(a)    The approved UPH construction FYDP during development of the POM/BES.

(b)    The expected beneficial occupancy date (BOD) and scope of occupancy for new and renovated UPH facilities during development of the Army's POM/BES.

(c)    The furnishings information contained in Tab E, Furnishings and Equipment, of the DD Form 1391. Provide this information for UPH MCA projects for the budget years. This may be done automatically using the DD Form 1391 processor.

(6)    Headquarters, USACE will issue to the supporting USACE district a design directive for the UPH MCA project. The USACE district will design the building-related finishes and assist the installation Furnishings Management Officer (FMO) in the selection of coordinated furniture, furnishings, and equipment based on the guidelines contained in the IDM for Single Soldier Housing to achieve a comprehensive interior design package. The installation housing manager and FMO will closely work with the USACE design district to ensure all requirements are met.

(7)    The installation FMO will—

(a)     Approximately 14 months prior to the estimated BOD, prepare and finalize all procurement documentation and coordinate the package with the USACE design district. The FMO should assume that items will be procured from UNICOR; however, this will not be determined until the order is actually received by UNICOR. Therefore, duplicate procurement documentation must be prepared selecting similar, coordinated items from the GSA Schedules, in the event that UNICOR cannot provide the items requested.

(b)    Submit the procurement documentation to the U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville (CEHNC-CT-B), P.O. Box 1600, Huntsville, AL 35807-4301 one year prior to the estimated BOD. An information copy of this package, along with the final cost estimate, will also be provided to DAIM-ISH. Procurement documentation and cost estimates will address items, services, and costs.

f. Unaccompanied personnel housing replacement furnishings program.  

(1)    This program addresses replacement furnishings for existing UPH.

(2)    The program is decentralized to the IMCOM Regions and installations.

(3)    Headquarters DA (DAIM-ISH) will program OMA (.9 account) funds based on POM/BES data input.

(4)    The ABO will—

(a)    Budget funds on the basis of POM/BES input data.

(b)    Ensure that all .9A funds (replacement issue and handling of furnishings) are sent to the IMCOM via FAD.

(5)    The IMCOM will ensure funds set aside for the acquisition of replacement furnishings are used for that purpose. Controls will be established to ensure that excess items are not requisitioned.

(6)    Installations will initiate funded requisitions for replacement furnishings through the Supply Support Activity, verify price and authorization data, and ensure that funds are available in the appropriate furnishings account. Military standard requisitioning and issue procedures (MILSTRIP) will be used.

Section X
Construction

3-74. Scope

This section provides the objectives and policies for housing construction to include both new and replacement construction and construction improvements to existing facilities. Modernization, renovation, rehabilitation, revitalization, expansion, and Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) projects fall within the purview of construction improvements. Also, the Army's housing privatization program-the Residential Communities Initiative (RCI)-equity contributions and subsidies are funded through AFHC.

3-75. Objectives

The Army's housing construction programs are intended to enhance the Soldier's quality of life. The objectives of the various construction programs are to—

a.  Construct new housing facilities where total requirements exceed available and adequate on-post and off-post facilities.

b.  Improve livability, correct deficiencies, and conserve energy.

c.  Provide adequate community facilities and infrastructure.

3-76. Establishing requirements

a.  Before selecting a construction alternative to satisfy housing deficits, a clearly defined need must be identified and other nonstructural alternatives must be considered.

b.  The need will be based on plans and analyses completed in accordance with the housing justification and supporting documentation requirements set forth in section XIV.

c.  Among the nonstructural alternatives which must be examined are the following:

(1)    Reliance on off-post housing in civilian communities.

(2)    Leasing of privately-owned housing to include third party contracted housing.

(3)    Privatization.

(4)    Management actions relative to facilities utilization, conversion, and diversion.

(5)    Purchase of existing housing facilities.

(6)    Transfer of DOD or other Government agency facilities.

3-77. Impact on local housing markets

a.  All reasonable precautions will be taken to avoid harmful impact of military Family housing construction on local housing markets.

b.  Military housing normally will not be programmed, built, or leased at an installation when, in consideration of total assets (both on-post and off-post), the following thresholds are exceeded:

(1) Family housing.   New construction or leasing-up to 90 percent of the long-range programmable housing deficit (see paras 3-81b(2) and 3-87c(3)).

(2) Unaccompanied personnel housing.   

(a)    The UPH (PP)-up to 95 percent of the UPH (PP) programmable deficit (see para 3-82a(3)(a)).

(b)     Trainee barracks-the billeting load identified in the ASIP (see para 3-82a(3)(b)).

(3) Exceptions.   The Secretary of the Army may waive the limitations in paragraphs 3-77b(1) and 3-77b(2) on a case-by-case basis.

c.  Normally, housing will be programmed and built on an incremental basis per housing master plans to allow for possible increases in community support.

3-78. Intergovernmental coordination

a.  Pertinent command levels will coordinate with appropriate Federal, State, regional, and local governmental agencies to assess the impact of military housing construction on area and community development. Such coordination will be made in accordance with the IMCOM Intergovernmental Coordination Plan (see AR 210-20). Additionally, commanders must comply with the coordinations required by AR 200-1, AR 405-10, and AR 405-90.

b.  All AFH and UPH projects will be properly sited on the installation RPMP, conform with designated land use areas, comply with the real property master planning guidance and requirements prescribed in AR 210-20, and be accurately reflected in the RPI.

c.  Consultation will also be made with other organizations cognizant of local housing conditions, such as local housing authorities, real estate boards, home builders associations, chambers of commerce, planning agencies, zoning offices, and building permit issuing agencies.

d.  The Military Services shall coordinate housing requirements with local school districts. Budget justification for each construction request shall indicate whether additional public school facilities are required to accommodate an increase in students.

3-79. Construction program cost limitations and approval authorities

To meet the Army's housing needs there are several housing construction programs; each with its unique set of dollar limitations and approval authorities.

a. Family housing.  paragraph 3-14 addresses the limits and authorities for AFH construction and incidental improvements.

b. Unaccompanied personnel housing.  The MCA, minor MCA (MMCA), and the OMA minor construction account are addressed in chapters 2 and 4 and of this publication.

3-80. Design criteria

a.  New and replacement construction and, to the maximum extent possible, construction improvements to existing facilities will comply with DOD UFC and, as appropriate, the Technical Instructions (TIs) listed below (see TIs at the USACE Web site http://www.hnd.usace.army.mil/techinfo/ti.htm).

(1)     UFC 4-721-11.1, Unaccompanied Enlisted Personnel Housing (UEPH) Complexes; UFC 3-120-10, Interior Design; and UFC 3-400-01, Energy Conservation.

(2)     UFC 4-721-01A, Barracks Upgrade Program

(3)     TI 801-02, Family Housing.

(4)     UFC 4-711-01, Family Housing.

b.  The Army Criteria Tracking System (ACTS) is the Army's official repository of consolidated space planning and utilization criteria. The ACTS is an automated application found on the following Web site: https://www.acts.hqda.pentagon.mil/.

c.  The Army has developed a series of standard design/criteria products under the auspices of the Army Facilities Standardization Program. Where available, standard designs/criteria are mandatory for use (see app F).

d.  Improvement projects will be developed to restore deteriorating and failing facilities. Such restoration will bring the facility into conformance with the latest design criteria. However, improvement projects will not be used merely to bring a facility into conformance with the most current new construction design criteria.

e.  Installation design standards (IDS) and IDGs will be used in developing facility designs.

f.  Design must be in accordance with the approved installation RPMP.

g.  Both the design and construction of a facility must comply with design criteria. A request for variance from design standards must be submitted prior to execution through the IMCOM to HQDA (DAIM-ISH).

h.   for Family housing, design criteria requires—

(1)    Providing a minimum of three bedrooms.

(2)    Meeting the GOLD standard of the current sustainability project rating tool (SPiRiT/LEED-H).

(3)    Complying with the applicable IDG for the new housing location.

3-81. Family housing construction

a. Construction program.  Both new construction and improvement projects will include the requirement that 5 percent of the DUs in the project will be accessible, or readily and easily modifiable, for use by persons with disabilities. This requirement must be addressed in all such projects until at least 5 percent of the installations total DU inventory meets accessibility requirements (see para 3-6c(5)).

b. New construction (Budget Program 10000000).  

(1)    The type, category, and quantity of Family housing to be programmed for construction or replacement at an installation will be determined by the following:

(a)    Army Stationing and Installation Plan (ASIP) strength projections.

(b)    Adequacy both of current and projected support in local communities and of existing Government-owned and Government-controlled housing.

(c)    The analyses completed using the procedures outlined in section XIV, and reflected in the DD Form 1523 (Military Family Housing Justification).

(d)    Current and projected plans for housing construction under the jurisdiction of various HUD programs (see para 3-81b(6)).

(2)    The authorized programming limits for the construction of new or replacement Family housing is up to 90 percent of the long-range programmable housing deficit (that is, the authorized projected Family housing requirement minus Family housing assets-both on and off post, both Government-controlled and private market).

(3)     Title 10 (10 USC 2824) put in place the requirement that, in the construction, acquisition, and improvement of military Family housing, the room patterns and floor areas of military Family housing in a particular locality shall be similar to room patterns and floor areas of similar housing in the private sector in that locality. See DA Pam 420-1-1 for a summary of programming guidelines that were jointly developed by the Military Services for the sizing of Family housing new construction.

(4)    The maximum number of bedrooms per DU that may be programmed for Family housing is four.

(5)    A survey of the local housing market will be made within the 12 months prior to initial design release. Where substantive changes occur in the local housing market the survey will be updated prior to advertisement for bids with a view toward the acquisition of adequate housing facilities instead of construction.

(6)    At locations within the United States where construction of Family housing is planned, the Secretary of the Army will consult in writing with the HUD Secretary to determine the availability of suitable alternate housing before entering into a contract for such construction (see 10 USC 2824).

c. Post acquisition (or improvement) construction (Budget Program 60000000).  

(1) Program coverage.   This program encompasses all improvement projects. For a description of program coverage and general improvement projects, see DA Pam 420-1-1. For policy on ECIP projects, see paragraph 3-81c(3).

(2) Dwelling unit limitations.   

(a)    Development of a post acquisition construction project is not arbitrarily constrained by DU cost limitations if it is economical in comparison to other options. Projects will be developed using the Planning Guide: Whole Neighborhood Revitalization Program which focuses the planner on considering all required work. Users will request resourcing necessary to meet their needs. Congress must approve both the total program amount for improvements and those individual dwelling unit improvement projects whose cost per FY, inclusive of concurrent M&R and incidental improvements (as adjusted by the ACF except for foreign source dwelling unit) will equal or exceed the statutory limit (see para 3-14).

(b)    Two or more DUs to be diverted or converted (combined) into or used as a single DU may not exceed this individual DU statutory limit (see para 3-28e).

(c)    HQDA (DAIM-IS) may reprogram post acquisition construction projects (except for GFOQ per para 3-102b) when—

1.    Cumulative costs of projects reprogrammed are equal to or less than the funds appropriated and authorized annually for post acquisition construction.

2.    Individual DU project costs are less than or equal to the statutory limitation (as adjusted by the ACF except for foreign source units).

(d)    Non-emergency projects which exceed statutory cost limitations must be planned for, programmed, and included as individual line items (that is, separate DD Form 1391) in the budget submitted to Congress.

(3) Energy Conservation Investment Program projects.   These are premised on future savings in energy by virtue of current capital investment. To be accepted for consideration, an ECIP project must have a savings-to-investment ratio equal to or greater than 1.25 and must be amortized in 10 years or less. Congress approves a total program amount for ECIP but limits that total program amount to ECIP projects only. Thus, HQDA may reprogram ECIP funds internally only among ECIP projects within the annual appropriation and authorization.

d. Cost of construction projects.  

(1)    The approval levels for projects apply only to the funded cost (see DA Pam 420-1-1). Project funded costs include the following:

(a)    All funded costs for construction.

(b)    Cost financed from contingency funds.

(c)    Government furnished items required by the construction.

(d)    Supervision and administration (S&A).

(2)    Unfunded costs are not part of the project cost. Examples of unfunded costs are design costs and military labor.

(3)    Replacement of unserviceable household equipment is charged to operations funds. Examples include ranges, refrigerators, and portable dishwashers.

(4)    All costs connected with master planning, programming, budgeting, and feasibility studies are excluded from the project cost. Use appropriate O&M funds for these costs.

(5)    Repair work that could not be reasonably discovered prior to initiating a post acquisition construction project is chargeable to M&R accounts, not to the construction project. However, if an improvement project includes concurrent M&R, both the total cost and the cost of the M&R added are constrained to the cost limitations in paragraph 3-14.

3-82. Unaccompanied personnel housing construction

a. General.  

(1) Requirements.   The UPH construction requirements are based on strength projections from the ASIP and valid requirements documentation prescribed in section XIV.

(2) Unaccompanied personnel housing programming criteria.    

(a) Permanent party personnel.   MCA projects for personnel will be based only on requirements. The UPH will not be programmed for the following:

1.    Those for whom Family housing is programmable.

2.    Sergeants First Class (E-7)-staff sergeants (E-6) in the United States-and above and officers unless community housing is not available or on-post housing is required due to military necessity. If military necessity dictates, it must apply equally to accompanied Soldiers assigned like duties. Indicate in the requirements documents that the only sergeants first class (E-7)-staff sergeants (E-6) in the United States-and above and officers identified as UPH deficits are those for whom community housing is not available or who are required to live on-post because of military necessity.

3.    A Soldier married to a Soldier, both of whom are assigned to the same installation or within commuting distance.

4.    Soldiers authorized BAH at the "with dependent" rate assigned duty in CONUS, Alaska, or Hawaii.

(b) Permanent party students.   Students attending a course of instruction of 20 weeks or longer, to include personnel attending AIT, are considered students. Students in TDY status attending a course of instruction of less than 20 weeks are considered transient requirements. These figures are in the ASIP.

(c) Unit integrity allowance.   

1.    Although a management allowance is recognized for the unit integrity concept at the battalion level or higher, the allowance will not cause the installation's utilization/occupancy rate to fall below 95 percent (para 3-20d).

2.    The unit integrity concept will not be used when it would require a CNA to be issued.

3.    There is no allowance for unit integrity in the programming of UPH.

(d) Trainees.   MCA barracks for trainees will be based only on trainee requirements.

1. Initial entry training and initial military training (IMT) trainees.   Personnel attending initial entry training, to include OSUT, are considered trainee requirements. Enlisted personnel attending IMT, including BCT, OSUT, AIT, and ASI, are considered trainee requirements.

2. NCO Academy, airborne, and ranger trainees.   Trainee barracks may be programmed for other students, such as NCO Academy, airborne, and ranger students, at installations where these Soldiers are permanently assigned and required to live in UPH at a centralized training location. The requirement for these Soldiers will be based on the daily average number of students required to reside in UPH.

3. Unaccompanied personnel housing programming levels.    

(a)     for UPH (PP) the authorized programming level is up to 95 percent of the UPH (PP) programmable deficit (that is, the authorized projected unaccompanied personnel requirement minus UPH (PP) assets).

(b)     for trainee barracks, the authorized programming level is the ASIP billeting load.

4. Construction criteria.   Current UPH construction requirements will be obtained by contacting the appropriate Army Corps of Engineers Center of Standardization identified in DA Pam 420-1-1.

b. Unaccompanied personnel housing revitalization.  

(1)    The key element in the provision of excellent UPH facilities for unaccompanied Soldiers is the ongoing UPH revitalization effort. It consists of the following programs:

(a)    The Whole Barracks Renewal Program (WBRP) which is an MCA funded program primarily for new construction.

(b)    The Barracks Upgrade Program (BUP) which is a centrally-funded OMA program predominantly for major revitalization of VOLAR era barracks and other barracks where it is more cost effective to renovate than replace.

(2)    The UPH facilities that require revitalization will be programmed at the earliest opportunity in accordance with the Army's Barracks Master Plan (BMP) (see para 3-110 for specifics on the BMP).

(3)    New construction will comply with the Army Barracks Standards (see para 3-82a(2)(d)(4)). Revitalization will incorporate these same standards and criteria to the maximum feasible extent.

(4)    Revitalization planning and programming for UPH will include consideration of the following:

(a)    Where there is a UPH deficit, program new construction and dispose of or convert substandard UPH (not upgradeable) as appropriate.

(b)    Where substandard UPH (upgradeable) exists and there is a programmable need for the UPH, program modernization to bring the UPH inventory up to or as close as reasonably possible to, current construction design standards and/or program new construction. When the only deficiency in the UPH building is lack of semi-private bath for sergeants (E-5)/staff sergeants (E-6), who routinely occupy the building in numbers which reflect the unit's grade mix, the building will continue to be carried as upgradeable in the installation's records and will be so noted in the requirements documentation. These assets will be considered as adequate for assignment of all Soldiers in grades corporal/specialist (E-4) through private (E-1).

(c)    Where there is excess adequate UPH, modernization/upgrade will not be programmed unless a plan has been clearly defined which will outline inactivation or conversion actions. This plan must be part of the official installation RPMP, per AR 210-20. The RPMP will clearly define the utilization of the UPH assets (present and future) by building, condition of the UPH buildings to be occupied and those earmarked for inactivation or conversion, and projected time table for completion of all actions. Inactivation means mothballing; control transferred to USAR, ARNG, or ROTC training; or other actions which would preclude use as AD UPH. This inactivated and converted UPH would not be modernized until such time as it could be shown that the installation's UPH requirements have increased. Final disposition of excess UPH facilities will be determined on a need basis over time.

3-83. Construction planning and programming

a. General.  

(1)    Planning and programming for Family housing construction will be accomplished per this chapter and chapter 4 of this publication.

(2)    Planning and programming for UPH construction and modernization will be done per chapters 2 and 4 and of this publication.

b. Planning.  

(1)    The installation housing manager will—

(a)    Participate in the master planning of housing projects and related facilities on the installation.

(b)    Be a member of the installation Real Property Planning Board.

(2)    Environmental, historical, archaeological, economic, and/or market studies will be started early in the planning process to accommodate long lead time requirement and so as not to incur unnecessary delays in timely programming, design, and execution of construction.

c. Programming, designing, and execution monitoring procedures.   for a discussion of programming, designing, and execution monitoring procedures, see DA Pam 420-1-1.

Section XI
Leasing

3-84. Scope

This section sets forth policies for administering and executing housing leasing programs.

3-85. Leasing policy

a.  Housing leasing programs pertain to the Army's leasing of privately-owned housing for assignment as Government housing to eligible military and DOD civilian employees.

b.  Once leased units are accepted, they are assigned and operated like other adequate housing units.

c.  Since leased housing units will be designated as Government housing, military residents will forfeit all housing allowances upon occupancy of the leased housing.

d.  Leasing programs will be administered within the criteria and cost limitations established by law.

3-86. Responsibilities for leasing

a.  The Commander, USACE, will locate, negotiate, and execute housing leases in the United States.

b.  The ACSIM will—

(1)    Establish management procedures, controls, and reports associated with the housing leasing program.

(2)    Allocate Family housing lease authorizations (that is, the number of leases) to the IMCOM Regions.

(3)    Obtain congressional clearance as required.

c.  The IMCOM Region Directors manage the leasing programs within their respective geographic areas of responsibility. They will—

(1)    Determine requirements and develop justification for leasing.

(2)    Ensure that criteria are fully met.

(3)    Comply with statutory and administrative limitations.

(4)    Locate, negotiate, and execute leases in foreign countries within the authority of host nation agreements.

(5)    Plan and program for the O&M of leased housing.

(6)    Maximize use of Family housing lease authorizations.

d.  Garrison commanders participate in the management of the leasing program. They will—

(1)    Determine leased housing requirements and program accordingly.

(2)    Prepare and submit requests for required leases.

(3)    Counsel prospective residents on their obligations, responsibilities, and entitlements upon assignment to leased housing.

(4)    Assign and operate leased housing units.

(5)    Establish damage reimbursement and repair procedures.

(6)    Act as contract administrator when requested.

(7)    Prepare utilization reports for occupancy.

e.  Residents will meet the responsibilities set forth in section VIII of this chapter.

3-87. Family housing leasing

a. General criteria for leasing.  

(1)    Family housing may be leased for occupancy by eligible personnel only in areas where—

(a)    Adequate private rental housing is not available.

(b)    Government-controlled housing within reasonable commuting distance of the duty station (1-hour driving time) is not available.

(2)    Authority to approve leases or renewals will not exceed the number of lease authorizations and funds appropriated annually.

(3)    Acquisition and disposal of Family housing leases will be per AR 405-10 and AR 405-90.

(4)    Leased Family housing will be adequate as to location, condition, size, and additional criteria as outlined in section IV.

(5)    The criteria for Family bedroom needs and the sizing benchmarks addressed in DA Pam 420-1-1 will be used as guides for leasing for all grades.

(a)    Deviations from these space limitations may be approved by the ASA (IE&E) where housing of such size is unavailable due to local construction patterns.

(b)    The ASA (IE&E) may approve increases in the sizing benchmarks on a case-by-case basis when such approval is in the best interest of the Government.

1.    The ASA (IE&E) may increase sizing benchmarks by up to 5 percent provided that such increase when combined with another authorized increase does not exceed a cumulative increase of 10 percent.

2.    The ASA (IE&E), in foreign areas, may waive sizing benchmarks if there are no alternative DUs.

3.    A request for alterations, improvements, and repairs must be submitted with valid justification on DD Form 1391 to HQDA (DAIM-ISH) for ASA (IE&E) approval. These requests must be submitted early enough to allow sufficient time to program BP 194000 leasing funds in the Budget Estimate Submission. Normally, work will be limited to that necessary to provide adequate living accommodations.

4.    All existing leases desired to be retained and requests for additional leasing authority will be justified by completing the appropriate housing support documentation as outlined in section XIV. Any requests for leasing to meet unforeseen needs not provided for in the program also must include such supporting data, if applicable.

b. Domestic leasing.  

(1) Authority.   Leasing of individual Family housing units in the United States is accomplished under the authority of 10 USC 2828.

(2) Requirement.   Domestic leasing may be undertaken where there is a shortage of adequate housing at or near a military installation and one or more of the following prevail:

(a)    The requirement for such housing is temporary.

(b)    Leasing would be more cost effective than construction or acquisition of new housing.

(c)    Family housing is required for personnel attending Service school academic courses on PCS orders.

(d)    Construction of Family housing at such installation has been authorized by law but is not yet completed.

(e)    A military construction authorization bill pending in Congress includes a request for authorization of construction of Family housing at such installation.

(3) Constraints.   

(a)    Domestic leasing is a temporary solution to meeting housing needs. As such, domestic leasing—

1.    Will be carefully controlled to preclude adversely affecting the local economy.

2.    Is limited to areas with large deficits of Family housing for Soldiers.

3.    Will be used only until a permanent solution is available, that is, until Government housing programs or the local economy can provide sufficient housing at reasonable cost.

(b)    Leasing may be used when the lease cost to the prospective resident would exceed his or her BAH plus the current maximum out-of-pocket costs above allowance. However, the Government leasing agent is permitted to negotiate a Government lease agreement below that amount.

(c)    A lease may not be made when the average estimated annual rental for Family housing facilities or related real property exceeds $750,000 during the term of the lease until the Senate and House Armed Services Committees of Congress are given a notification of the facts. A waiting period of 30 days must elapse after the notification.

(d)    The Secretary of the Army will provide the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and House of Representatives a quarterly report on the details of all new and renewal domestic leases entered into during the previous quarter which exceed $12,000 per unit per year, including certification that less expensive housing was not available for lease.

(4) Special programs.   

(a) Title 10 USC 2835 (formerly 10 USC 801) housing.   

1.     Title 10 USC 2835 (originally authorized by Section 801, Public Law (PL) 98-115) permits each of the military departments to enter into long-term domestic build-to-lease contracts with third parties for a limited number of housing units. These contracts will provide housing units, either newly constructed or rehabilitated to rental use, built to DOD specifications, near military installations. These contracts may provide for the contractor to operate and maintain the housing facility during the term of the lease. Contracts will not exceed 20 years and the Government has the first right of refusal to acquire the housing.

2.     Title 10 Section 2835 housing is limited to places where a substantial deficit exists and EA shows build-to-lease the most economic alternative. Analysis setting the cost ceiling must be submitted to the Congress prior to advertising for proposals. Prior to entering into a lease, an EA which shows the build-to-lease alternative most economic must be forwarded to Congress and a period of 21 calendar days elapsed following the date on which the EA is received by the appropriate committees of Congress.

3.     A 10 USC 2835 lease may include provision for the lease of a child care center, civic center building, and similar type buildings constructed for the support of Family housing.

4.     Since 10 USC 2835 housing is Government-controlled, BAH and other housing allowances will be forfeited. Assignment policy is specified in section III.

(b) Title 10 USC 2836 (formerly 10 USC 802) housing.   

1.     Title 10 USC 2836 (originally authorized by Section 802, PL 98-115) permits each military department to enter into a limited number of agreements which guarantee rentals to a third party, that is rental guarantee housing (RGH). These agreements will provide housing units, newly constructed or rehabilitated to rental use. The housing units will be built to local codes and criteria or, at the Government's discretion, to DOD specifications, on or near military installations. An agreement may not assure the occupancy of more than 97 percent of the units constructed under the agreement. An agreement may not be for a term in excess of 25 years. The agreement may not be renewed unless the project is on Government-owned land, in which case the renewal period may not exceed the original contract term. Priority of renters is military Families, single Service members, eligible DOD civilians, and other civilians. Rental rates must be in the affordability range of potential renters and may be permitted to escalate.

2.    Should the owner not be able to sustain the agreed to percentage occupancy rate, the Government will pay the difference between the shelter rents collectable at the agreed to percentage and those collected at the actual occupancy percentage. The Government will not assure more than an amount equivalent to the shelter rent of the housing units determined on the basis of amortizing initial construction costs.

3.    Prior to entering into an agreement, an EA, demonstrating that the proposed agreement is cost-effective when compared with alternatives, must be sent to the appropriate committees of Congress and a period of 21 calendar days must have expired following the date on which the EA was received by those committees.

4.     A 10 USC 2836 agreement may provide for the rental of a child care center, civic center building, and similar type buildings constructed for the support of Family housing.

5.     A 10 USC 2836 agreement may only be entered into if existing military-controlled housing at all installations in the commuting area (except for a new installation or an installation for which there is projected a significant increase in the number of Families due to an increase in the number of authorized personnel) has exceeded 97 percent use for a period of not less than 18 consecutive months immediately preceding the date on which the agreement is entered into, excluding units temporarily inactivated for major repair or improvements.

6.     A 10 USC 2836 agreement will provide for priority of occupancy for military Families.

7.    Since these are private rentals, Soldiers will receive BAH and other authorized housing allowances. Also, all applications for RGH are voluntary; there are no mandatory assignments to RGH.

c. foreign leasing.  

(1)    Leasing of Family housing in foreign countries is accomplished under the authority contained in 10 USC 2828.

(2)     foreign leasing may be undertaken—

(a)    Where there is a shortage of adequate housing at or near a military installation and one or more of the following prevail:

1.    The requirement for such housing is temporary.

2.    Leasing would be more cost-effective than construction or acquisition of new housing.

3.    Construction of Family housing at such installation has been authorized by law but is not yet completed.

4.    A military construction authorization bill pending in Congress includes a request for authorization of construction of Family housing at such installation.

(b)     for incumbents of special command positions (as determined by the Director of Administration and Management (OSD) (see para 3-99b).

(c)    In countries where excessive costs of housing or other lease terms would cause undue hardship on DOD personnel.

(d)    Where local restrictions preclude individual leases to U.S. military or civilian personnel.

(3)    The programming limit for foreign leasing is set at up to 90 percent of the long-range programmable housing deficit.

(4)    An EA using the standardized set of assumptions and formats in DA Pam 210-6 must show that it is more beneficial to lease than to construct. When leasing is the only alternative for acquisition of housing, submit an EA fact sheet (see DA Pam 420-1-1).

(5)    Leasing of housing units in foreign countries may be for any period not in excess of 10 years (15 years in Korea). The costs of such leases for any year may be paid out of annual appropriations for that year.

(6)    Buy-out clauses must be included in all lease agreements for newly constructed facilities of 10 units or more.

(7)    A lease cap must be established for each location where high-cost leased units exist. The highest cost leasehold in the area is the cap that is reported to Congress annually. Requests for new or renewal leases that do not exceed the cap established for that country will be submitted to HQDA (DAIM-ISH) for approval.

(8)    A lease may not be made where the average estimated annual rental for Family housing facilities or related real property exceeds $500,000 during the term of the lease until the appropriate committees of Congress are given a notification of the facts and a period of 21 calendar days elapses after the notification is received by those committees.

(9)    Any alterations, repairs, or additions to foreign leased units will be limited to that work necessary to provide adequate living accommodations. The cost of such work will not exceed 25 percent (absolute) of the first year's annual rental. Requests for alterations, improvements, and repairs must be submitted with valid justification on DD Form 1391 to HQDA (DAIM-ISH) for OASA (IE&E) approval. Allow sufficient time to program BP 194000 leasing funds in the Budget Estimates Submission.

(10)    Where it is in the best interest of the U.S. Government, advance rental payments may be made in foreign areas as necessary to comply with law or local custom (10 USC 2396).

(11)    All requests for new, renewed, or canceled high cost foreign leases must be accompanied by a DD Form 2643 (High Cost Foreign Lease) (see DA Pam 420-1-1).

(12)    All leased units designated for or occupied by general or flag officers must meet the criteria and reporting conditions of section XIII.

d. Department of State housing pools.  

(1)    The Secretary of the Army and the Secretary of State may agree to house Soldiers in Department of State provided housing (Embassy housing) in foreign areas on a reimbursable basis.

(2)    Leases entered into under these agreements will not be counted against the Army' s high-cost foreign lease limitations.

e. Limitations on leasing.  

(1) Statutory.   Congress has established by law certain limitations on leasing. These limitations, which pertain to costs and numbers of housing units, are subject to being changed by public laws.

(a)    Maximum annual rental for a domestic Family housing unit (including the cost of utilities, maintenance, and operations) is $12,000. Rental costs between $12,000 and $14,000 are considered "high cost" domestic leases and require special authorization. The domestic lease limitations are adjusted on an annual basis by the percentage by which the national average monthly cost of housing (as calculated for purposes of determining BAH rates under 37 USC 403) for the preceding FY exceeds the national average monthly cost of housing (as so calculated) for the FY before such preceding FY.

(b)    The Secretary of the Army may lease not more than eight housing units in the vicinity of Miami, Florida for key and essential personnel, as designated by the Secretary, for the United States Southern Command for which the expenditure for the rental of such units (including the cost of utilities, maintenance, and operation, including security enhancements) exceeds the expenditure limitations in paragraph (3-87a), above. The maximum aggregate amount for these leases is adjusted annually by the percentage by which the annual average cost of housing for the Miami Military Housing Area (as calculated for purposes of determining BAH rates under 37 USC 403) for the preceding FY exceeds the annual average cost of housing for the Miami Military Housing Area (as so calculated) for the FY before the preceding FY. The total amount for all such leases may not exceed the amount per year set forth in 10 USC 2828 and the term of any such lease may not exceed 5 years.

(c)    Maximum annual rental for a foreign Family housing unit (including the cost of utilities, maintenance, and operations) is $20,000 as adjusted for currency fluctuation as of 1 October 1987 and by the percentage by which the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for All Urban Consumers for the prior FY exceeds such CPI for the FY preceding the prior FY. Those which exceed this amount are classified as "high cost" foreign leases and require special authorization.

(d)    Maximum rental per year for Family housing facilities, or for real property related to Family housing facilities, leased under a single lease contract without prior notification to the Congress is as follows:

1.     for domestic leases, $750,000 (10 USC 2662).

2.     for foreign leases, $500,000 (10 USC 2828).

(e)    Report to appropriate congressional committees annually on all individual transactions for real property in the United States costing between $250,000 and $750,000 (10 USC 2662(b)).

(f)    Administrative. Congress has also issued the following administrative instructions which are directive in nature:

1.    Provide to Congress, semiannually, a list of countries in which the Army has high cost leaseholds, identifying the highest cost lease in each country by city and cost. When a proposed lease in a country exceeds the highest cost lease reported for that country, notify the appropriate congressional committees 21 calendar days prior to entering into the lease.

2.    Perform an EA of all new foreign lease and build-to-lease agreements for more than 25 units and make it available to the appropriate committees.

3.    Include a buy-out provision in any newly constructed foreign build-to-lease agreement for 10 or more units.

(2) Costing guidance.   To adhere to statutory cost limitations on leasing, the following applies:

(a)    Include costs as follows:

1.    Basic shelter rent.

2.    Maintenance when not provided by the lessor.

3.    M&R of Government-owned furnishings.

4.    Utilities when not provided by the lessor.

5.    Services, such as refuse collection, if separately contracted by the Government.

(b)    Exclude costs as follows:

1.     Initial make-ready costs, including provision of Government-owned furnishings. (These start-up costs will not exceed 25 percent of the first year's annual rental.)

2.    Any pro rata share of costs for installation services such as refuse collection and fire and police protection.

3.    Administrative costs such as assignment, travel, and inspection by installation personnel.

4.    Costs above installation level such as costs attributable to USACE engineer districts and other command levels for personnel, travel, inspection, and so forth.

5.    Reimbursements to the Department of State for Foreign Affairs Administrative Support costs.

(3) Private supplementation of lease costs.   Military sponsors are not permitted to supplement the amount paid by the Government to the lessor for a leased unit.

f. Build-to-lease.  

(1) Concept.   Developers will construct Family housing on the basis of an agreement with the U.S. Government to lease such housing when it is completed. The Army will assign the leased units as Government housing to eligible personnel who will forfeit all housing allowances. Build-to-lease will be pursued only when there is no other housing, existing or being developed, available for use as Government housing.

(2) Domestic.   Build-to-lease contracts may be approved when build-to-lease is shown to be more cost effective than military construction (see para 3-87b(4)(a)).

(3) foreign.   Build-to-lease is a means of meeting Family housing requirements in foreign countries. While procedures for securing approval for build-to-lease are essentially the same as for leasing existing units, great care must be taken in developing a build-to-lease solution. Build-to-lease requires new construction on the local economy. Thus, exploratory actions are necessary to develop information on the potential for build-to-lease as a basis for recommending a program. Caution must be exercised to ensure that developers do not construe such exploratory action as being based on an approved project, to the point that the housing development is started solely in anticipation of authority for the U.S. Government to lease the resulting Family housing.

g. Leasing process.  The leasing process entails several steps. These steps are generally as follows:

(1)    Identify a need and substantiate it to HQDA (DAIM-FDH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600 with housing support documentation as described in section XIV.

(2)    Program and budget for lease requirement.

(3)    Initiate Title 10 action (see para 3-87h), if required, and notify congressional committees as necessary.

(4)    Ensure lease request is within statutory limits.

(5)    Execute when all previous steps are favorably concluded. (HQDA approves for execution; IMCOM Regions and installations participate with USACE in execution.)

h. Congressional notification.  

(1)    Lease proposals for either new leases or lease renewals whose average estimated annual rental exceeds $750,000 for domestic or $500,000 for foreign leases require prior congressional clearance under Title 10. This involves submitting to the Senate and House Armed Services Committees acquisition reports (commonly called Title 10 reports) for both foreign and domestic proposals and to the Appropriations Committees of the House and Senate for foreign proposals.

(2)    Leases will not be split or incrementally executed for the purpose of avoiding the congressional reporting requirement. Further, several leases with the same lessor, in the same vicinity, offered within a reasonably close period of time, for accomplishment of the same objective, will be combined for the purpose of congressional reporting. Congressional reports will not be submitted for the entire community deficit unless they meet these same conditions.

(3)    To permit for timely processing (to include review, ASA (IE&E) approval, preparation for testimony, and congressional clearance), draft congressional reports will be submitted to Commander, USACE (CERE-AM), 441 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20314-1000, together with full justification at least 6 months (for new leases) and 9 months (for renewal leases) in advance of the date when approval is required. Full justification must include an economic analysis. However, where leasing is the only alternative, submit an EA fact sheet (see DA Pam 420-1-1.

(4)    A lease proposal may not be cleared by the appropriate committees unless the actual lease rental is within the parameters established by the sensitivity portion of the EA. Where the actual rental exceeds 15 percent of the estimated rental set forth in the relevant congressional report or where there is substantial deviation in other material factors, such facts are to be reported to the Commander, USACE (CERE-AM), 441 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20314-1000, for a determination as to whether a revised congressional report should be submitted.

3-88. Unaccompanied personnel housing leasing

a.  Leasing considerations.

(1)    Process lease requests per AR 405-10.

(2)    The authority to lease will not be used to circumvent proper planning for construction or other acquisition alternatives.

(3)    Factor the space adequacy criteria in table 3-7 into the decision-making process. Use multiple occupancy if possible and appropriate.

(4)    Leased housing supplements Government-owned housing and will have the same status with respect to its assignment to individuals. Assignment orders to leased housing will be published using the same procedure as for assignment to Government-owned facilities.

(5)    To the extent possible, furnished UPH will be acquired. If unfurnished units are secured, Government-owned or Goverment-leased furnishings will be provided.

(6)    Leased housing will not exceed DOD construction criteria except housing units may include kitchens or kitchenettes.

b.  Lease costs.

(1)    Lease costs will include the following:

(a)    Basic rent for the housing, including furnishings.

(b)    Utilities such as water, gas, sewage, and electricity (excluding telephone) and services such as trash collection when not included in the rental fee. When it is not feasible to include utilities and services in lease costs and these charges are billed separately to the Government, an estimate of the expected monthly charges for each utility and service will be used to calculate total costs.

(2)    Costs for leases are chargeable to the base operations account if the financing is by the host installation. Leasing costs financed by a tenant are mission costs. The functional category of expense is described in DFAS-IN Manual 37-100-FY.

Section XII
Mobile Home Parks

3-89. Scope

a.  This section establishes policy for mobile home park (MHP) facilities on Army installations. It applies to—

(1)    Government-owned MHP.

(2)    Government-owned, contractor-operated MHP.

(3)    Contractor-owned and contractor-operated MHP on Government land.

b.  The term "mobile home" is synonymous with the term "manufactured home" (see glossary).

3-90. Mobile home park policy

a.  The MHP provided for mobile homes not owned by the Government will not be considered to be quarters (37 USC 403(k)).

b.  The MHP requirements will be determined by housing needs identified in accordance with the procedures and analyses described in section XIV.

c.  If required, Government-owned MHP will be programmed in the Family housing future years construction program.

d.  An MHP facility must amortize its construction costs over a 25-year period beginning with the completion of such construction (37 USC 403(k)).

e.  All installation costs associated with MHP will be included in the established rental rates.

f.  The MHP space assignments will be on a first- come first-served basis, irrespective of grade.

g.  Maintenance standards will be established to ensure an attractive appearance of MHP immediate and surrounding areas.

h.  A mobile home is a mobile dwelling constructed and intended for use as a permanent residence and designed to be moved overland by towing. For purposes of this regulation, a mobile home does not include—

(1)     A privately-owned or -leased bus or rail car converted for use as a residence.

(2)    A boat which is used as a place of residence.

(3)    Recreational vehicles or travel trailers, truck campers, or 5th wheels, either self-propelled or designed to be moved overland by towing.

3-91. Moving expense guidance

a.  Moves between Government-controlled housing and MHP during the same tour of duty may be authorized by the garrison commander. The sponsor will bear the costs of voluntary moves; the Government, the costs of Government-directed moves.

b.  Allowable costs for Soldiers incident to PCS (for example, temporary storage costs and local moves) are contained in the JFTR.

3-92. Government-owned mobile home parks

a. Eligibility.  

(1)    All Soldiers with accompanying Family members and key and essential DOD civilians with accompanying Family members are eligible for assignment to available MHP spaces.

(2)    Unaccompanied Soldiers and DOD civilians who are not key and essential may be assigned to MHP facilities on a space available basis.

(3)    Personnel occupying adequate Government housing will not terminate such occupancy to reside in an on-post MHP if this will result in Government housing remaining vacant.

b. Responsibilities for mobile home parks.  The garrison commander and the MHP resident share responsibility for the MHP.

(1)    The garrison commander will ensure that—

(a)    Mobile Home Park spaces are in good condition and fully livable at the time of assignment.

(b)    Maintenance activities conform to the AWP and, to the extent practicable, contribute to environmental enhancement and installation attractiveness.

(c)    Residents receive written instructions on their responsibilities and fulfill their responsibilities to include participation in the self-help program for the MHP space and other real property (ORP). Self-help does not extend to privately-owned or privately-leased mobile homes.

(d)    The Government's investment in the MHP is protected.

(e)    A pest eradication and control program is in force for MHP areas external to the resident-owned mobile homes.

(f)    A continuing program for conserving utilities is enforced.

(g)    Action is taken when loss or damage of Government-owned property occurs as a result of resident negligence or willful misconduct.

(h)    Boundaries are set which clearly mark the extent of grounds assigned to each resident for use and maintenance. The boundaries correspond generally to the limits of the logical yard for each MHP space, but will extend normally not more than 50 feet from the mobile home. The installation will maintain the grounds outside these boundaries.

(i)    Mobile Home Park spaces are assigned, reassigned, and terminated.

(j)    Waiting lists are established and maintained.

(k)    Mobile Home Park spaces are inspected. This includes assignment, termination, resident maintenance of grounds, installation, utility connections, and other special inspections as required.

(l)    Spouses and Family members are counseled concerning standards of conduct, care of property, and availability of assistance in resolving complaints.

(m)    Records of MHP activities required by this regulation are maintained. This includes—

1.    Leases and notices of revocation and termination.

2.    Records of rental, utility, and operating service charges billed and collected.

(2)    Residents will—

(a)     Accomplish self-help tasks of the kind normally expected of tenants in private housing. These include—

1.    Maintenance and repair of resident-owned mobile home.

2.    Pest control for interior of mobile home.

3.    Related servicing for the resident-owned or resident-leased mobile home.

4.    Care of Government property.

5.    Maintenance of grounds within assigned area.

6.    Placement of refuse containers at curbside or other stated place for pickup on collection day.

7.    Repairing all damage caused by pets.

8.    Taking necessary action to prevent and report fires.

9.    Blocking, leveling, anchoring, and skirting of resident-owned or resident-leased mobile home. The mobile home will be anchored when it is blocked and leveled. Skirting must be done within 30 calendar days of assignment. The resident will provide any materials necessary to accomplish these tasks.

10.    Connecting utilities to existing facilities (at resident expense).

(b)    Obtain approval of the DPW prior to installing any additions or accessories exterior to the mobile home and within the MHP space.

(c)    Return, upon clearing an MHP, the MHP space and immediate area in a clean, orderly, undamaged condition per the standards set by the garrison commander.

c. Application procedures.  Applications for assignment to MHP space will be made through the housing office. Procedures established in section III apply.

d. Waiting list.  

(1)    A separate waiting list will be maintained for MHP spaces.

(2)    Eligible personnel occupying an MHP space may keep their names on the appropriate Government housing waiting list at the same installation. Their position on this waiting list will be according to their original eligibility date as established per paragraph 3-16g.

(3)    Personnel may be placed on the MHP space waiting list even if an individual does not currently own a mobile home. However, the individual must be ready to accept assignment of and use a space when offered or be placed at the bottom of the waiting list. When the individual reaches the top of the list the second time, the applicant must move a mobile home onto the space or have his or her name removed from the list for 90 days.

e. Assignment policies and procedures.  

(1)    The garrison commander grants and revokes leases for use of MHP spaces for privately-owned or privately-leased mobile homes.

(2)    Each MHP rental space will be supported by a DA Form 373-R (Department of the Army Lease of Trailer Site) executed by the garrison commander and the MHP space lessee. The lease will cover a specified period of time and will contain renewal options. The period of each lease or lease renewal will not exceed one year.

(3)    The housing office will prepare and file the original lease. One copy will be given to the lessee.

(4)    The lessee will indicate the choice of mid-month or end-of-month payment options on the lease.

(5)    Multiple occupancy, sub-renting, or sub-leasing is prohibited. Should the mobile home be sold, removal from the MHP may be required depending upon the length of the waiting list and the status of the purchaser. The garrison commander will make the determination.

f. Retention and termination.  

(1)    Personnel occupying MHP spaces are permitted to retain those spaces when any of the conditions listed in paragraphs 3-18b and c prevails.

(2)    The garrison commander may revoke a lease on a minimum of 30 days prior notice for any of the following reasons:

(a)    Nonpayment of rent.

(b)    Breach of any conditions of the lease.

(c)    Extended absence from the mobile home for reasons other than leave, TDY, participation in field exercises, and so forth.

(d)    Base closure.

(e)    Where any of the conditions listed in paragraphs 3-18a or d exists.

(3)    The housing office will retain the original notice of revocation (written letter) and give one copy to the lessee.

(4)    A lessee who intends to terminate his or her lease will give one copy of advance termination notice to the housing manager and keep one copy for personal records. This termination notice should be given as early as possible but under normal circumstances not later than 30 days prior to expected termination date.

(5)    A Soldier who is officially directed by the garrison commander concerned to vacate for cause the premises on which the mobile home is located is entitled to reimbursement for the expenses incurred in moving the mobile home to another site in the vicinity of the installation. Reimbursable expenses include those necessary to prepare the mobile home for transportation and the move itself. Hook-up costs at the new site will be at resident's expense.

g. Rental and operating service charges.  

(1) Rent for the MHP space.   

(a)    The cost for construction of MHP facilities must be amortized from rental charges over a period of 25 years beginning with the completion of construction.

(b)    The cost of subsequent improvement and major repair projects must also be included in the rent for the MHP space. The costs of such projects will be divided by 300 (25 years X 12 months per year) and added to the existing monthly space rent.

(c)    The requirement to amortize the cost of construction and subsequent improvements and major repairs expires at the end of the 25-year period regardless of the percent of occupancy or the amount of rent collected.

(d)    Where a portion of an MHP is inactivated, no adjustment will be made in the rents of the remaining residents.

(e)    When an installation with an existing MHP acquires additional spaces or improves existing spaces, separate rental fees amortizing new construction and improvement costs must be established.

(f)    The housing manager must retain records for amortizing new construction, improvement, and major repair costs until disposal of the MHP. During the life of the park, the housing manager must be able to demonstrate that all costs are recovered from MHP users.

(g)    See DA Pam 420-1-1 for the formula used to calculate monthly space rent.

(2) Operating service charges.   

(a)    Monthly charges will recoup the cost to the Government for utilities, services, operations, management, and maintenance including common grounds, streets, and other real property serving the MHP exclusively.

(b)    Utilities for new MHP spaces will be individually metered. Utilities for existing MHP spaces will be area metered at the MHP boundary (until individual meters are installed) and prorated to residents based on cost to the Government. Individual meters should be programmed for installation as early as practicable using either maintenance or construction improvement funds as appropriate.

(c)    The service charge for MHP O&M represents a pro rata share to each lessee of projected charges for the next fiscal year. This charge is based on actual cumulative prior year O&M charges.

(d)    The installation will make a detailed review of existing charges and projected costs at least annually to ascertain their adequacy. Coincident with the annual POM/BES data input submission, a recommendation for continuance of existing charges or a request for increases or decreases will be submitted to the IMCOM. When a rate increase has been approved, the lessee will be given a minimum of 30 days advance written notice prior to the effective date of the rate increase.

(e)    See DA Pam 420-1-1 for the formula used to calculate monthly operating service charges.

(3) Total rents and charges.   See DA Pam 420-1-1 for the formula used to calculate total monthly costs to be billed users of MHP spaces. Total costs will be rounded to the next highest dollar.

(4) Maintenance and repair.   Maintenance and repair associated with MHP are confined to care of common areas, upkeep of utility lines, repair of roads and paved areas, and repair and upkeep of structures associated with the MHP.

(5) Repair and improvement projects.   Procedures for the submission of repair and improvement projects are as set forth in sections VII and X, respectively. The whole site concept must be used in the formulation of these projects. The cost limitations and approval authorities prescribed in paragraph 3-14 apply to MHP facilities.

(6) Rental payments for departing personnel.   The housing manager will establish procedures for MHP lessees departing the installation to ensure payment of monthly rent and charges prior to installation clearance. Procedures will also address departing lessees whose Families are to remain in the MHP.

(7) Disposition of collections.   Rents and charges will be collected by the local OPLOC/FAO and transferred into the AFH account (see para 3-12b).

h. Programming.  

(1)    MHP facilities are classified as Family housing other real property.

(2)    Guidance for programming both construction of new MHP and improvements to existing MHP is outlined in section X.

(3)    Guidance for programming maintenance and repair projects is outlined in section VII.

(4)    Enlargement of MHP may be programmed as new construction or major improvement.

(5)    MHP may be improved through projects accomplished using improvement funds or incidental improvement funds.

(6)    A proposal to construct or expand an MHP must be assessed for potential environmental impact.

i. Construction.  

(1) Engineering standards.   The DPW prescribes criteria pertaining to MHP, including roads and grounds, pads, blocking, bracing, anchoring, other supporting facilities, installed utilities, fixtures, and equipment in MHP and adjacent areas.

(2) Local governing bodies and standards.   The garrison commander must consider local codes and standards. Government-owned MHP will be of a standard equal to or better than privately-owned parks in the community.

(3) Utilities.   Aerial utilities detract from the residential appearance of the MHP. To the extent feasible, all utilities will be underground.

(4) Construction criteria.   Construction criteria applicable to new construction of and improvements to MHP are as follows:

(a)    Mandatory criteria—

1.    Roadways designed for wheel loading of trucks pulling mobile homes.

2.    Individual meters for utilities (new construction and major upgrades).

3.    Patio (one per MHP space).

4.    Trash receptacles, except dumpsters.

5.    Central gang mailboxes (lockable).

6.    Individual storage facility (one per MHP space).

7.    Landscaping.

8.    Parking (two vehicles per MHP space).

9.    Anchors.

10.    Sidewalks.

11.    CATV or M/CATV, where commercial television reception is unavailable.

12.    Exterior telephone service.

(b)    Authorized items—

1.    Picnic areas.

2.    Playground and tot lots.

3.    Recreation area (without swimming pool).

4.    Bicycle and walking paths.

5.    Perimeter fencing (enhancement only, not security).

(c)    Unauthorized items—

1.    Swimming pools.

2.    Self-help facility.

3.    Laundry facility.

4.    Master meters.

j. Standards.  

(1)    MHP spaces and associated ORP are subject to inspections in the same manner as are DUs (see sec VIII).

(2)    Prospective MHP residents will be advised that—

(a)    Privately-owned and -leased mobile homes must meet the criteria set forth in paragraph 3-93.

(b)    Mobile homes must be maintained in a good state of repair and appearance.

(c)    Mobile homes are subject to periodic inspections for compliance with health and safety standards per the terms of the lease dealing with inspections.

(3)    Occupancy may be denied if MHP spaces have size or utility system limits that preclude setting certain types of mobile homes.

(4)    Utility company or installation personnel will perform utility connections at the expense of the resident.

(5)    Any connection, installation, or inspection charges or other expenses associated with setting up the mobile home are the responsibility of the resident.

(6)    Special instructions or handbooks for MHP space residents will be provided to residents upon assignment of an MHP space. Instructions will cover tie-down requirements, skirting, privately-owned storage sheds, patios, screened porches, fencing, grounds care, recreation areas, parking, maintenance, services, pets, self-help, and so forth. Residents will also be informed of the procedures governing the collection of rents and charges, the services included in the rent, and the services which may incur additional charges such as telephone installation.

k. Enforcement of standards.  

(1)    The garrison commander is responsible for the enforcement of the standards for mobile homes located in the installation's MHP. Mobile homes not meeting the appropriate code (see para 3-93b) and installation standards and requirements will not be assigned MHP space. No exceptions will be granted.

(2)    The garrison commander may impose additional reasonable requirements.

l. Inactivation of mobile home parks.  

(1)    Inactivation of an MHP must be approved by HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

(2)    When approval is given to inactivate an MHP, the following procedures will be observed:

(a)    Set an initial date for beginning the closure action.

(b)    Make no new assignments after that date.

(c)    Set a final date for completion of the closing action.

(d)    Vacate all spaces, using attrition as much as possible, on or before the final closing date.

3-93. Resident-owned or resident-leased mobile homes

a. Policy.  Resident-owned or -leased mobile homes will meet minimum health and safety standards to qualify for space assignment in Army MHP. The garrison commander will establish inspection procedures to ensure compliance with standards in paragraph b below.

b. Construction and safety standards.  

(1)    Singlewide mobile homes must contain a minimum of 400 square feet (37.2 square meters) and not exceed 16 feet (4.88 meters) in width.

(2)    Doublewide mobile homes must contain a minimum of 1100 square feet (102.2 square meters) and not exceed 32 feet (9.75 meters) in width.

(3)    Mobile homes manufactured prior to 15 June 1976 must comply with the standards established by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the NFPA.

(4)    Mobile homes manufactured on or after 15 June 1976 are required to be built to the National Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards (HUD code) in effect on the date of manufacture. All construction and safety standards included in the HUD code preempt state and local regulations.

(5)    Mobile homes must be provided with ground anchors and tie-downs to protect units, awnings, storage sheds, and other accessories from high winds.

(6)    Mobile homes must be equipped with smoke detectors.

(7)    Standards listed above will be checked during the MHP space assignment check-in inspection. Failure to meet standards will result in a denial for occupancy until standards are met.

3-94. Contractor-owned and contractor-operated mobile home parks on Government land

a. Policy on contractor mobile home park.  

(1)    Contractor-owned and contractor-operated MHP are not Government housing for assignment or housing allowance purposes.

(2)    The garrison commander may refer personnel on housing waiting lists to contractor-owned and contractor-operated MHP for possible rental on a voluntary basis.

(3)    The Government will not be a party to any lease, rental agreement, or purchase contract between the contractor and the tenant.

(4)    The Government has the right to review and approve the contractor's standard rental agreement and any changes thereto prior to the initial leasing of any MHP spaces under the agreement or any change thereto.

b. Responsibilities for contractor mobile home park.  

(1)    The USACE District Engineer will—

(a)    Execute the land lease and monitor compliance with its terms.

(b)    Review and approve the standard rental agreement between the contractor and tenant.

(c)     Approve contractor-proposed rental rate increases.

(2)    The garrison commander will—

(a)    Receive applications, maintain waiting lists, and certify eligibility of prospective tenants to the contractor. In the event no military personnel are referred to the contractor within 30 days after receipt of written notice from the contractor that a unit or units are available, the contractor may lease to other than military personnel as specified in the contract agreement with the Government.

(b)    Monitor the appearance of the MHP facility and the conduct of the residents.

(c)    Assist the District Engineer in the formulation of the land lease and the execution of the District Engineer's responsibilities.

(d)    Develop, in conjunction with the District Engineer and the contractor, appropriate contractual agreements, memorandums of understanding or agreement, or Joint standing operating procedures (SOP) concerning the operation, maintenance and repair, appearance, settlement of tenant disputes and problems, evictions, and any other items of mutual beneficial interest.

(3)    The contractor will provide, maintain, and operate an MHP facility on the installation as specified in the terms of the land lease and any contractual agreements, memorandums of understanding or agreement, or Joint SOP.

(4)    The resident will comply with the terms of the rental or purchase agreement with the contractor and with the terms of any contractual agreements, Joint memorandums, or joint SOP between the garrison commander and the contractor.

c. Controls.  Resident, contractor, and Government satisfaction with the contractor-owned and contractor-operated MHP can be ensured by proper controls. These include—

(1)    A well prepared land lease.

(2)    Accurate and mutually understood contractual agreements, memorandum, or Joint SOP (see para 3-94b(2)(d)).

(3)    Strict adherence to and enforcement of the provisions of paragraphs 3-94c(1) and 3-94c(2).

Section XIII
General/Flag Officer's Quarters

3-95. Scope

While the provisions of other sections of this chapter also pertain to GFOQ, this section prescribes policies that apply uniquely to furnishing, operating, maintaining, repairing, and improving GFOQ. GFOQs include all quarters that are occupied by general officers and require expenditure of APF. All GFOQs are subject to statutory spending thresholds and reporting requirements. GFOQs can be Government-owned and Government-operated, Government-leased, or Privatized RCI Executive Homes with APF expenses.

3-96. Background

a.  Many GFOQ are older and larger than the vast majority of the Army's Family housing inventory. Many are also historic or architecturally significant, or both. These factors tend to drive up the costs of operating and maintaining these units. GFOQ are the most expensive Family housing units in the inventory. The average annual cost of operating and maintaining a set of GFOQ is generally more than three times the worldwide DU average for the total Family housing inventory.

b.  The GFOQ cost reports are closely scrutinized. Congress has expressed a special interest in the matter and is requiring more detailed reviews of GFOQ costs in the budget approval process. Costs are reported annually to Congress. These reviews are intended to ensure that Family housing funds are being put to best use.

3-97. General policies for general/flag officer's quarters

a.  The GFOQ will be managed economically considering the age and condition of the housing and the representational responsibilities of the residents. In general, decisions will be made using the prudent landlord concept; that is, would a prudent landlord in the private sector accomplish the proposed action? This policy applies to the maintenance, repair, and improvement of the DU and associated grounds and other real property, and to the provision, maintenance, repair, and replacement of furnishings.

b.  The high O&M costs associated with GFOQ demand special attention to assure all reasonable economies. While an alternative to high cost is replacement, the criteria for replacing such housing are restrictive. Thus, it is essential that all who have a role in the operation and maintenance of such housing exert maximum effort on preserving these housing facilities, particularly those linked to our heritage.

c.  Self-help by GFOQ residents is in concert with the "prudent landlord" concept. It is strongly encouraged.

d.  The O&M costs will be monitored. Where such costs are consistently above the average for all GFOQ, alternatives such as disposal, diversion, reallocation, conversion, redesignation, major repair, modernization, upgrade, improvement, or replacement will be considered. An EA will be used to aid in determining the preferred alternative. The recommendations accompanying the analysis will discuss considerations given to non-economic factors such as size, location, and historic or architectural significance.

e.  GFOQ reports will be prepared for those DUs which meet the requirements set forth in paragraph 3-7b.

3-98. Responsibilities for general/flag officer's quarters

a.  The Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management is responsible to the CSA for ensuring that the spirit and intent of this section are fully met. Specifically, the ACSIM will—

(1)    Review all requests for work, services, and furnishings in GFOQ requiring HQDA approval.

(2)    Review and comment on all recommendations for action on high cost GFOQ submitted by the IMCOM.

(3)    Resolve major M&R issues forwarded by the IMCOM for HQDA decision (see para 3-101e).

(4)    Review each GFOQ which has—

(a)    A request for housing revitalization or improvements.

(b)    A major M&R project estimated to cost $30,000 or more (see paragraph 3-54g).

(c)    Incidental improvement projects estimated to cost more than $3,000 ($30,000 for projects which support an exceptional Family member) (see paragraph 3-54i).

(d)    A total M&R which is expected to cost $30,000 or more or a total of O&M which expected to exceed $35,000 in a FY.

(5)    Submit requests to Congress for approval to exceed congressionally-imposed limitations.

(6)    Analyze annually GFOQ O&M expenditures Armywide, formulate explanations for high-cost units and unusual cost trends and provide such information as may be required through the CSA to OSD, OMB, and the Congress.

(7)    Develop and manage a program to reduce the annual O&M costs of high-cost units.

b.  Commander, IMCOM will—

(1)    Ensure that installation and Region actions submitted to higher headquarters conform to this regulation and Army regulations referenced herein.

(2)    Review planning for the O&M and construction associated with all GFOQ in the IMCOM inventory (see paras 3-10b and 3-103a).

(3)    Review the annual budget estimates prepared by the installations for each GFOQ in the IMCOM's inventory (see para 3-103b). Forward those where O&M costs are expected to exceed $35,000 (excluding utilities and lease costs) and those where the M&R component is expected to cost $30,000 or more to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600. Do not exceed these funding limitations without appropriate approval.

(4)    Seek approval from HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600 to carry over congressional approval authority for M&R on a specific GFOQ (see para 3-103b(4)).

(5)    Resolve disagreements between the garrison commander and the GFOQ resident on major M&R projects which are forwarded by the IMCOM Region Director (see para 3-101e). Forward such matters to the ACSIM when a HQDA decision is required.

(6)    Review all requests for work, services, and furnishings which require higher authority approval.

(7)    Review and comment on all recommendations for action on high cost GFOQ.

(8)    Review the requests below and forward with comments to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600 no later than concurrently with the POM/BES input data submission.

(a)    Each GFOQ request for a major M&R project which is estimated to cost $30,000 or more and each GFOQ request where total M&R for that GFOQ is estimated to cost $30,000 or more in an FY.

(b)    Incidental improvements requests exceeding $3,000 per DU ($30,000 per DU for projects which support an exceptional Family member) in a FY.

(9)    Analyze annually GFOQ O&M expenditures by installation and Region, formulate explanations for high cost units and unusual fiscal trends, and provide such information to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

(10)    Have available for review quarterly GFOQ expenditure reports.

(11)    Review early replacement of carpeting requests for special command positions and forward with comments to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

(12)    Review request that require Congressional approval to exceed imposed limitations and forward to HQDA for appropriate action.

(13)    Review M&R costs exceeding $30,000 and forward with comments to HQDA.

c.  Directors of IMCOM Regions will—

(1)    Ensure that installation actions submitted to HQ IMCOM conform to this regulation and Army regulations referenced herein.

(2)    Review planning for the O&M and construction associated with all GFOQ in the IMCOM Region's inventory (see paras 3-10b and 3-103a).

(3)    Review the annual budget estimates prepared by the installations for each GFOQ in the IMCOM Region's inventory (see para 3-103b). Forward those whose O&M costs are expected to exceed $35,000 (excluding utility and lease costs) and those whose M&R component is expected to cost $30,000 or more to IMCOM. Do not exceed these funding levels without appropriate approval. All six year GFOQ plans (SYGPs) (see para 3-103a) for which appropriated fund costs are programmed will be forwarded to HQ IMCOM.

(4)    Seek approval, through IMCOM, from HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600 to carry over congressional approval authority for M&R on a specific GFOQ (see para 3-103b(4)).

(5)    Resolve disagreements between the garrison commander and the GFOQ resident on major M&R projects which are forwarded by the garrison commander (see para 3-101e).

(6)    Review all requests for work, services, and furnishings which require higher authority approval.

(7)    Review and comment on all recommendations for action on high cost GFOQ.

(8)    Review the requests below and forward with comments to HQ IMCOM no later than concurrently with the POM/BES input data submission.

(a)    Each GFOQ request for a major M&R project which is estimated to cost $30,000 or more and each GFOQ request where total M&R for that GFOQ is estimated to cost $30,000 or more in a FY.

(b)    Incidental improvements requests exceeding $3,000 per DU ($30,000 per DU for projects which support an exceptional Family member) in a FY.

(9)    Analyze annually GFOQ O&M expenditures by installation, formulate explanations for high cost units and unusual fiscal trends, and provide such information to HQ IMCOM.

(10)    Review quarterly GFOQ expenditure reports.

(11)    Review—

(a)    Initial issue of supplementary carpeting, draperies, and sheers for both special command positions and non-special command positions.

(b)    Replacement of supplementary carpeting, draperies, and sheers which are less than 7 years of age for all GFOQ, including special command positions.

(12)    Review requests for grounds maintenance waivers and forward with recommendation to higher headquarters.

d.  Garrison commander will—

(1)    Assure that all residents of GFOQ are provided a GFOQ Resident's Guide and a copy or summary of this chapter.

(2)    Provide the GFOQ resident with an orientation per the GFOQ Manager's Guide on his or her GFOQ as soon as possible after occupying the GFOQ.

(3)    Ensure the development and maintenance of comprehensive plans for the operation, maintenance, repair, and improvement of each set of GFOQ in the installation's inventory consistent with prudent management practices (see paras 3-10b and 3-103a).

(4)    Assure adherence to an execution plan which accomplishes the correction of identified deficiencies.

(5)    Review the scope, frequency, and estimated cost of all work in order to provide the resident with recommendations for economically sound alternatives.

(6)    Advise the resident of all work planned and programmed which is determined necessary to preserve the integrity of the property.

(7)    Assure that the GFOQ resident has given written approval prior to initiation of M&R work. (The GFOQ resident's approval is not required for M&R work done by service order (SO) or work contained in the approved six-year GFOQ plan (SYGP).) M&R work on GFOQ performed between occupancies for which no written approval was given by the previous resident will be approved in writing by the garrison commander or designee.

(8)    Accomplish, especially in connection with change of occupancy, only that work consistent with the "prudent landlord" concept.

(9)    Limit construction, alterations, maintenance, repair, and improvements to DOD construction criteria guidelines as set forth in TI 800-01, Design Criteria; TI 801-02, Family Housing; and UFC 4-711-01, Family Housing.

(10)    Plan for the accomplishment of work during change of occupancy without using civilian overtime or contractor premium pay.

(11)    Initiate requests for replacement of area rugs or carpet and draperies if replacement is required during change of occupancy M&R.

(12)    Initiate a recommendation to dispose of, divert, reallocate, convert, redesignate, undertake a major repair on, modernize, upgrade, improve, or replace a DU or associated other real property where O&M costs consistently exceed the average for all GFOQ. Forward such recommendation to the IMCOM Region for appropriate review and action.

(13)    Ensure the development and submission of annual O&M budget estimates for each GFOQ in accordance with paragraph 3-103b. Provide all such estimates to the IMCOM. Submit both those estimates which exceed $35,000 (excluding utilities and lease costs) and those estimates whose total M&R costs are $30,000 or more as a separate approval action to the IMCOM Region. Do not exceed these funding limitations without appropriate approval.

(14)    Seek approval through the IMCOM Region and IMCOM from HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600 to carry over congressional approval authority for M&R on a specific GFOQ (see para 3-103b(4)).

(15)    Resolve disagreements with GFOQ residents who disapprove any major M&R work essential to protect the Government's investment in the DU (see para 3-101e). Forward such matters to the IMCOM region, when necessary.

(16)    Ensure the preparation of accurate individual quarterly O&M expenditure reports for each GFOQ.

(17)    Provide all quarterly O&M obligation reports to GFOQ residents for their personal review and analysis and forward quarterly quarter reports to the IMCOM Region per paragraph 3-7b.

(18)    Ensure that a DD Form 1391 is submitted electronically through the IMCOM to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600 when a single major M&R project for a GFOQ is estimated to cost $30,000 or more.

(19)    Request approval for incidental improvement projects which exceed $3,000 per DU ($30,000 per DU in support of an exceptional Family member) per FY. Send such requests through IMCOM channels to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600. Ensure that such projects are for essential or urgent requirements (see paras 3-54i and 3-54j).

(20)    Maintain permanent GFOQ files to include copies of work requests, contracts, approvals, and other cost control documents applicable to these types of housing and for GFOQ a listing by name of GFOQ residents with their periods of occupancy.

(21)    Analyze annually GFOQ O&M obligations, formulate explanations for high cost units and unusual fiscal trends, and provide such information to the IMCOM Region.

e.  The GFOQ resident will comply with the following:

(1)    Be aware of and familiar with the contents of the GFOQ Resident's Guide and section XIII of chapter 3 of this regulation.

(2)    Be generally familiar with the operations, maintenance, and improvement costs for the assigned DU, associated other real property, and designated grounds.

(3)    Personally sign hand receipts for furnishings provided by the Government. Signatures of the spouse, an aide, or an executive officer are not acceptable. However, in the case of a general officer (O-10), the executive officer may sign for the general officer resident when the Executive Officer is also a general officer.

(4)    Be familiar with cost limitations and approval authority levels.

(5)    Cooperate to allow work to be done so that the accumulation of deferred work will be avoided.

(6)    Conserve utilities by the judicious use of heating and cooling in all rooms including those not used for Family living.

(7)    Refrain from submitting requests for painting solely of a decorative nature or to satisfy personal taste.

(8)    Refrain from submitting requests for procurement of replacement furniture, carpets, or draperies, tiles, wall coverings, or other work on the basis of compatibility with personal furnishings or to suit individual taste and/or color preferences.

(9)    Be liable for damage to assigned housing, or damage to or loss of related equipment or furnishings, as set forth in paragraph 3-65.

(10)    Be familiar with the maintenance, repair, and improvement work planned and programmed for assigned housing.

(11)    Be familiar with the SYGP (see para 3-103a), the annual O&M budget estimate (see para 3-101c(2)(b)), and the quarterly O&M obligation report (see para 3-7b) for assigned housing.

(12)    Concur in the SYGP developed in accordance with paragraph 3-103a. Once IMCOM Region approval is obtained, further approval by the GFOQ resident for work requests included in the plan is not required. Only major changes (see paras 3-101d and 3-103a) to the approved SYGP must be addressed with the GFOQ resident.

(13)    Personally sign the SYGP and any request for the actions and items listed below when not addressed in the approved SYGP. Signatures of the spouse, an aide, or an executive officer are not acceptable. However, in the case of a General Officer (O-10), the Executive Officer may sign for the general officer resident when the Executive Officer is also a general officer.

(a)    Incidental improvements when requested by the resident.

(b)    M&R work (excluding all SO work).

(c)    Disapproval of M&R work considered essential to the continued and long-term use of the DU (see para 3-101e).

(d)    Services in excess of the installation's levels for DUs. An example is a request for 3 weekly trash pickups when the standard is 2 weekly pickups.

(e)    Special allowance items (special command positions only) (see para 3-100h).

(f)    Waivers of limitations on furnishings cost and ages for furnishing replacements.

(g)    Furnishings that require exceptions to policy.

3-99. Designated housing

a. Designation of housing.  

(1)    The garrison commander designates housing by pay grade groups in accordance with paragraph 3-16b The GFOQ are so designated.

(2)    The garrison commander may also designate specific DUs for assignment to the incumbents of specific general and flag officer positions.

b. Special command positions.  

(1)    The Director, Administration and Management, OSD, has the authority to designate new special command positions and cancel old ones. Approved special command positions for which the Army is responsible are listed in table 3-10.

(2)    To the maximum extent possible, a specific DU will be permanently designated for each special command position. HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600 will be informed of such designations.

(3)    The IMCOM has the authority to approve changes in designated special command position DUs except for the National Capital Region (NCR) district. The Director of the Army Staff (DAS) is responsible for allocating and assigning all Government-owned and Government-controlled GFOQ and housing for the Sergeant Major of the Army in the NCR district. The DAS has the authority to approve changes in designated special command position DUs in the NCR district.

(4)    Incumbents of special command positions are entitled to residential housing with amenities appropriate to the level of official entertaining. These amenities include special allowances for table linen, dishes, glassware, silver, and kitchen utensils. Details are contained in paragraph 3-100 and appendix B of this regulation.

(5)    Requests to establish new special command positions will be sent through IMCOM with full justification to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600. Justification will include the following:

(a)    Title of position.

(b)    Normal grade for position.

(c)    Present incumbent of position.

(d)    Identification of DU proposed for such designation.

(e)    Reason for a special command position requirement. (Include magnitude of official public entertainment responsibilities on behalf of the SA and/or the Secretary of Defense (SECDEF).

(f)    Impact if not approved.

Table 3-10. Special command positions
Code : 01
Special Command Position: Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS)
Code: 02
Special Command Position: Director, Joint Staff, JCS (if Army) (See note.)
Code: 03
Special Command Position: Commander, U.S. Europe Command (EUCOM) Supreme Allied Commander in Europe (SACEUR)
Code: 04
Special Command Position: Deputy Commander, EUCOM
Code: 05
Special Command Position: Commander, Southern Command
Code: 06
Special Command Position: Commander, Allied Forces Southern Europe
Code: 07
Special Command Position: Deputy Commander, Allied Land Forces, Southeastern Europe
Code: 08
Special Command Position: Chief of Legislative Liaison, Army
Code: 09
Special Command Position: Director, Defense Security Assistance Agency (if Army) (See note.)
Code: 10
Special Command Position: Defense Advisor, U.S. Mission, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
Code: 11
Special Command Position: U.S. Representative, NATO Military Committee
Code: 12
Special Command Position: Deputy Chairman, NATO Military Committee
Code: 13
Special Command Position: Commander, United Nations Command and Combined Forces Command/Commander, U.S. Forces, Korea
Code: 14
Special Command Position: Chairman, Inter-American Defense Board
Code: 15
Special Command Position: President, National Defense University
Code: 16
Special Command Position: Director, Inter-American Defense College (if Army) (See note.)
Code: 17
Special Command Position: Director, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (if Army) (See note.)
Code: 18
Special Command Position: Director, Defense Information Systems Agency (if Army) (See note.)
Code: 19
Special Command Position: Director, Defense Intelligence Agency (if Army) (See note.)
Code: 20
Special Command Position: Director, Defense Logistics Agency (if Army) (See note.)
Code: 21
Special Command Position: Director, National Security Agency/Chief, Central Security Service
Code: 22
Special Command Position: Director, National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) (If Army) (See note.)
Code: 23
Special Command Position: Deputy General Manager, NATO Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) Program Management Agency
Code: 24
Special Command Position: Chief of Staff, Army
Code: 25
Special Command Position: Vice Chief of Staff, Army
Code: 26
Special Command Position: Commanding General (CG), USAREUR
Code: 27
Special Command Position: CG, TRADOC
Code: 28
Special Command Position: CG, FORSCOM
Code: 29
Special Command Position: CG, EUSA
Code: 30
Special Command Position: CG, AMC
Code: 31
Special Command Position: CG, U.S. Army, Japan (USARJ)
Code: 32
Special Command Position: Superintendent, USMA
Code: 33
Special Command Position: Deputy Chief of Staff, G-2
Code: 34
Special Command Position: Commandant, Command and General Staff College
Code: 35
Special Command Position: Commandant, Army War College
Code: 36
Special Command Position: Chief of Staff, Air Force
Code: 37
Special Command Position: Chief, National Guard Bureau
Code: 38
Special Command Position: AWACS Commander (if U.S.)
Code: 39
Special Command Position: Deputy Defense Adviser for Research, Engineering, and Acquisition, NATO (if U.S.)
Code: 40
Special Command Position: Chief of Engineers/Commander, USACE
Code: 41
Special Command Position:CG, USARPAC
Code: 42
Special Command Position: Director for Strategic Plans and Policy, Joint Staff (J-5), JCS (if Army) (See note.)
Code: 43
Special Command Position: CG, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command (SMDC)
Code: 44
Special Command Position: CG, U.S. Army Network Enterprise Technology Command/9th Army Signal Command
Code: 45
Special Command Position: Director, George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies, EUCOM
Code: 46
Special Command Position: Vice Chairman, JCS
Code: 47
Special Command Position:(Not Used)
Code: 48
Special Command Position: Director, Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA)
Code: 49
Special Command Position: Commandant, National War College
Code: 50
Special Command Position: Commandant, Industrial College of the Armed Forces

Notes:
1. Incumbents who are members of the U.S. Army will be provided appropriate housing by the Army. Responsibility for special allowance items for these positions is assigned to the Department of the Air Force.

c. Diversion of Family housing for unaccompanied GFOQ residents.  

(1)    Diversion of Family DUs for the use of permanently assigned officers entitled to BAH at the "without dependents" rate is addressed in paragraph 3-29a(2). Unaccompanied GFOQ residents who are required to reside on the installation will forfeit their housing allowances during the period of occupancy.

(2)    Costs to maintain and repair a Family housing unit diverted to unaccompanied officer personnel housing (UOPH) use will be charged to AFH. However, operating costs, including utilities, services, and furnishings, will be funded from OMA.

(3)    The cost limitations of Family DUs apply to those Family DUs which have been diverted to UOPH usage but remain in the Family housing inventory.

(4)    Individual cost records will be maintained on Family DUs diverted to housing unaccompanied general and flag officers.

3-100. Furnishings for general/flag officer's quarters

a. Furnishings management.  Policy and procedures for managing furnishings are set forth in section IX. This paragraph covers the pertinent requirements for furnishings in DUs designated and used as GFOQ and garrison commander's quarters (GCQ). Furnishings provisions for privatized representational housing are set forth in paragraph 3-111n.

b. Furnishings.  

(1) General.   Furnishings consist of furniture, household equipment, and miscellaneous items procured under special authority.

(2) Supplementary furnishings.   Supplementary Government furnishings may be provided in Army-controlled housing designated for and occupied by a general or flag officer and those garrison commanders in the grade of colonel (O-6) to augment personally owned furnishings to support mission related official entertainment responsibilities.

(a)    A commanding officer in the grade of colonel (O-6), who commands a unit or activity within the geographic jurisdiction of a military installation and who is not an installation or garrison commander or both will not be provided furnishings associated with command quarters. Installation and garrison commanders below the grade of colonel (O-6) will not be provided furnishings associated with command quarters.

(b)    Supplemental furniture support will be restricted to the public entertainment areas of the DU and will not replace personal furniture normally expected in relation to grade and Family size.

(3) Public entertainment areas.   

(a)    Areas, which are intended to accommodate public as well as private entertainment, include the entrance foyer, living rooms, dining room, and interconnecting stairways and hallways. Upstairs hallways (unless there is no bathroom available for guest use on the first floor) and other areas of the DU are not considered as part of the public entertainment area. Guest bedrooms in the DU of a special command position may be included if overnight accommodation of official visitors is required.

(b)    Garrison commanders will maintain an approved supplementary furnishings plan which defines the approved public entertainment areas for GFOQ and GCQ.

(4) Supplementary furnishings plan.   Each GFOQ and GCQ provided supplementary furnishings will have a current supplementary furnishings plan. This plan will consist of the following:

(a)    A floor plan, with net lineal footage, to scale which—

1.    Depicts the areas designated as public entertainment areas.

2.    Indicates where window treatments will be used. Identify window treatments by their types, for example, drapes, curtains, sheers, Venetian blinds, shades, and so forth.

(b)    A listing of the supplementary furnishings items referenced to their line item numbers in CTA 50-909. Where an exception has been granted for specific furnishings items, reference those items to their approval document.

(5) General flag officer's quarters and garrison commander's quarters diverted to unaccompanied personnel housing.   Restrictions concerning the provision of supplementary furnishings do not apply when the GFOQ or GCQ is diverted to UOPH. In such cases, the DU will be appropriately furnished, if requested, according to size, to include the provision of a washer and dryer.

(6) Supplementary furnishings approval authorities.   Approval authorities and limitations are at table 3-11. Paragraph j below contains waiver guidance.

(7) Disposition of furnishings upon housing redesignation.    Where representational housing is redesignated for other use or is assigned to a resident who is not eligible for Government-provided supplementary furnishings, the provisions of paragraph 3-70c(7) apply.

Table 3-11. Supplementary furnishings approval authorities (see note)
Furnishings:Initial issue of carpeting, draperies, and sheers
Special Command Positions—
Age Limit: NA
Cost Limit: NA
Approval Authority: HQDA
Furnishings:Initial issue of carpeting, draperies, and sheers
Other than Special Command Positions—
Age Limit: NA
Cost Limit: NA
Approval Authority: HQDA
Furnishings:Replacement of carpeting, draperies, and sheers
Special Command Positions—
Age Limit: 7 years or more
Cost Limit: NA
Approval Authority: IMCOM Region Director
Furnishings:Replacement of carpeting, draperies, and sheers
Special Command Positions—
Age Limit: Less than 7 years
Cost Limit: NA
Approval Authority: HQDA
Furnishings:Replacement of carpeting, draperies and sheers
Other than Special Command Positions—
Age Limit: 7 years or more
Cost Limit: NA
Approval Authority: IMCOM Region Director
Furnishings:Replacement of carpeting, draperies, and sheers
Other than Special Command Positions—
Age Limit: Less than 7 years
Cost Limit: NA
Approval Authority: HQDA
Furnishings:Initial issue and replacement of furniture items authorized by CTA 50-909 for use
in approved public entertainment areas
Age Limit: NA
Cost Limit: NA
Approval Authority: HQDA
Furnishings:Initial issue of authorized special allowance items for special command positions (see para 3-100h)
Age Limit: NA
Cost Limit: $16,000
Approval Authority: HQDA
Furnishings:Maintenance, repair, and replacement of authorized special allowance items for special command positions (see para 3-100h)
Age Limit: NA
Cost Limit: $2,000 per FY
Approval Authority: Garrison Commander

Notes:
1. Furnishings (to include special allowance items) not authorized by CTA must be approved by HQDA. Installations may accomplish maintenance and repair of carpeting, draperies, sheers, and furniture as required.

c. Furniture.  

(1)    The procurement, repair, and replacement of furniture for GFOQ and for housing occupied by a garrison commander in the grade of colonel (O-6) are restricted to supplementary furniture for the public entertainment areas. Excepted are the following:

(a)    Those overseas areas where complete furnishings are provided.

(b)    Those overseas areas where shipment of household goods is limited or optional.

(c)    Those GFOQ and GCQ diverted to UOPH (see para 3-100b(5) above).

(2)    The determination of specific supplementary furniture items to be provided by the Government will be made by the garrison commander based on the resident's request and the supplementary furnishings plan for the DU. Such items must be authorized by CTA 50-909 or by an exception obtained in accordance with paragraph 3-100j. Such items may be issued from the installation's current furniture inventory. If unavailable from this inventory, or available but not suitable for their intended use, such items may be procured from GSA sources. Draperies, however, may be procured from local sources.

(3)    When requested and available for issue, quantities of furniture authorized by CTA 50-909 may be increased for DUs of unusual size, design, and layout.

(4)    Where weight limitations on shipment of household goods have been imposed, or shipment of household goods is optional, additional furniture will be provided to the extent applicable for the geographic location. Furniture issued for other than the public entertainment areas will be from the installation's current inventory.

(5)    Generally, one-time repair on authorized items will not exceed 75 percent of current replacement cost. No Government funds will be expended to repair, replace, move, or handle unauthorized furniture except for one-time moving and handling costs to property disposal.

d. Household equipment.  

(1)    The following items are authorized for GFOQ and the housing of garrison commanders in the grade of colonel (O-6):

(a)    One double oven cooking range.

(b)    Two refrigerators (one with icemaker, 17-22 cubic feet).

(c)    One food freezer.

(d)    In the absence of a built-in dishwasher, one portable dishwasher.

(e)    One washer and dryer in those cases where a GFOQ or a GCQ is diverted to UOPH (see para 3-100b(5)).

(f)    One carpet shampooer.

(g)    One microwave oven (only for GFOQ and GCQ in USAREUR and, upon written request, for special command positions in CONUS).

(h)    Fireplace ensemble (per open fireplace).

(i)    One vacuum cleaner (only for special command GFOQ positions in USAREUR, and upon written request, for special command positions in CONUS).

(2)    Installed dishwasher and garbage disposal will be provided as part of the DU, when feasible.

(3)    Procurement, repair, and replacement of clothes washer, dryer, microwave oven, and patio set (consisting of 1 table, dining with umbrella; 4 chairs, dining; 1 table, coffee; 2 tables, end; 2 chairs, rocker; and 1 loveseat) are authorized only for special command positions and for other GFOQ and GCQ in overseas areas.

(4)    Procurement, repair, and replacement of clothes washer, dryer and microwave oven are also authorized for GFOQ and GCQ diverted to UOPH.

e. Area rugs or wall-to-wall carpeting.  

(1)    The provision of suitable area rugs or wall-to-wall carpeting as furnishings is authorized for the public entertainment areas of GFOQ and housing occupied by garrison commanders in the grade of colonel (O-6). The installation of wall-to-wall carpeting is not authorized over existing serviceable hard wood floors, or wood floors which can be restored economically. Instead, area rugs may be issued for those areas where carpeting is authorized, including official guest bedrooms for special command position housing. Area rugs should not normally cover more than 60 percent of the room's floor surface.

(2)    Wall-to-wall carpeting installed over prime floors is considered EIP and is accounted for on furnishings records. Carpeting installed as the prime flooring is considered installed real property (IRP) and is accounted for on real property records. In instances where wall-to-wall carpeting is determined to be the most economical primary floor covering, it will be considered IRP and accomplished using either M&R funds or improvement funds, as appropriate. For additional information, see CTA 50-909.

(3)     Only high-quality area rugs and/or GSA equivalent carpeting will be used. The type of area rugs or carpeting selected will be suitable for the expected level of traffic. It shall be of a neutral shade, such as beige, so as to be acceptable to a succession of residents having furnishings of various decors. Bright colors and prominent patterns shall be avoided. White, off-white, deep pile, or shag carpeting shall not be used.

(4)    Area rugs or carpeting may not be replaced at intervals less than 7 years without the specific approvals cited in table 3-11 and paragraph j below. In no case will age or color be the sole determinant in deciding whether to replace area rugs or carpeting.

(5)    The following information will be included in requests for area rugs or carpeting and submitted to the proper authority (see table 3-11 and para 3-100j).

(a)    Identification of the GSA Federal Supply Schedule special item number or national stock number.

(b)    Color selection.

(c)    Number of square yards required.

(d)    Separate cost for area rug or carpeting, padding, and installation.

(e)    Whether requirement is initial issue or replacement. If replacement, date of previous installation and condition of existing area rug or carpeting. Photographs showing the deteriorated condition may be required for approval authority review. If age of existing area rug or carpeting is less than 7 years, justification for early replacement will be submitted to the proper approval authority identified in table 3-11. Justification will include a copy of the financial liability investigation of property loss, when required, or note that either a statement of charges has been issued or a cash collection voucher completed.

(f)    Floor plan of the DU, as described in paragraph 3-100b(4), indicating public entertainment area, areas to be carpeted, and dimensions of each area.

(6)    Wall-to-wall carpeting may be installed in other living areas as a primary floor finish when EA demonstrates that such carpeting is the most economical primary floor finish. Such carpeting shall be compatible with the standards for the construction of new housing (see para 3-54d(7)).

f. Draperies and sheers.  

(1)    Draperies and sheers are authorized for the public entertainment areas of GFOQ and housing occupied by a garrison commander in the grade of colonel (O-6).

(2)    Draperies and sheers will be of a neutral shade so as to be acceptable to a succession of residents having furnishings of various decors. Draperies of an extravagant or ostentatious nature will be avoided. No more than two window treatments per window are authorized.

(3)    Draperies and sheers will not be replaced at intervals less than 7 years without the specific approvals cited in table 3-11 and 3-100j.

(4)    The following information will be included in requests for draperies and submitted to the proper approval authority.

(a)    Number of yards of materials required. Sheers will be identified separately. Cornices, swags, and other treatments, if applicable, will also be identified separately.

(b)    Separate costs of material, lining, related sub-items and installation.

(c)    Floor plan, as described in paragraph b(4) above, showing public entertainment areas and location and dimensions of each window area. If applicable, also indicate wall areas where draperies are to be used and window and valance treatment.

(d)    Whether requirement is initial issue or replacement. If replacement, date of previous installation and condition of existing draperies. If age of existing draperies is less than 7 years, justification for early replacement is required. Justification will include a copy of the financial liability investigation of property loss, when required, or note that either a statement of charges has been issued or a cash collection voucher completed.

g. Draw curtains.  

(1)    Draw curtains may be provided as an alternative to window shades or blinds and used on sliding glass or glass doors.

(2)    Draw curtains will be unlined and made of fire retardant synthetic cloth, washable, shrink safe, and designed to control radiant heat, light, and glare. Material will be heavy enough to provide privacy when closed, day or night.

(3)    Cost of material, fabrication, and installation of draw curtains will be comparable to that normally expended for the provision of Venetian blinds and shades. The normal life expectancy of draw curtains is 6 years.

(4)    When installed to replace existing window coverings beyond economical repair, draw curtains are chargeable to maintenance funds. In all other cases, installation is chargeable to construction.

h. Special allowances.  

(1)    Incumbents of special command positions are authorized special allowances of table linen, china, glassware, silver, and kitchen utensils. Special allowance items are listed at appendix B.

(2)    Expenditures for these items will not exceed $16,000 for the initial outfitting and $2,000 in any one subsequent fiscal year for maintenance, repair, and replacement for any individual special command position. Where a larger inventory has been acquired under special authority, augmentation is not authorized. Concerted effort should be made to inspect items annually or upon change of occupancy. Annual allowances should be used to the extent necessary to maintain items in usable condition and eliminate large one-time purchases.

(3)    Items of china, glassware, and silver will not be decorated with crests or other insignia and will be selected in accordance with appendix B. Service stocks for other branches of Service will continue in accordance with their established standards.

(4)    Funding for initial issue, replacement, and maintenance of special allowance items will be borne by the military department responsible for operation and maintenance of the housing except for rotational positions in Joint Commands and Defense agencies headquartered in the Washington, DC area where successive incumbents are usually from different military services. These general and flag officers will be housed by their respective services without permanently designating specific DUs.

(5)    Responsibility for the acquisition and management of special allowance items (except china, crystal, and flatware) for Army-controlled, permanently designated special command position housing is assigned to HQDA (ACSIM). The GFOQ Executive Management and Housing Directorate located at U.S. Army Garrison (IMNE-MYR-EM), Fort Myer, VA 22211-5050, is responsible for the acquisition and management of china, crystal, and flatware for all Army-controlled special command position housing. These authorities may not be delegated.

i. Furnishings inventory.  Furnishings provided in representational housing will be included in the Furnishings Management Module database of the Enterprise Military Housing.

j. Waivers.  Requests for early replacement (that is, in less than 7 years) of area rugs, wall-to-wall carpeting, and draperies or issuance of furnishings items that are not authorized by CTA 50-909 or this section should be infrequent. If an exception is deemed necessary, however, requests will be submitted in accordance with the following guidance:

(1) Special command positions.   Requests from incumbents of all special command position housing will be forwarded through the IMCOM Region with appropriate comments. All requests will be sent through IMCOM to HQDA.

(2) Non-special command positions.   Requests will be forwarded through IMCOM Region to HQ IMCOM and then to HQDA.

(3) Justification.   All requests must include a justification signed by the general officer resident. In the case of a General Officer (O-10), however, the Executive Officer may sign the request if the Executive Officer is a general officer.

3-101. Operation and maintenance for general/flag officer's quarters

a. Priorities.  All DUs will compete equally for maintenance, repair, and services (see also paras 3-39 through 3-54). The GFOQ residents should make an effort to discourage well-meaning but overzealous subordinates from requesting maintenance or services beyond that which is clearly essential or from seeking unreasonable response time to routine requests for their superior's GFOQ.

b. High-cost housing.  Many GFOQ units are large and/or old and have systems and components that are energy inefficient, are wearing out, or failing, and need to be replaced. High-cost housing is defined as those GFOQ whose combined annual O&M costs exceed $60,000 in a fiscal year for 3 consecutive FYs. Proactive measures will be taken to provide special attention to and prudent management directed toward optimizing the use of scarce resources expended on O&M of high-cost GFOQ units.

c. Special maintenance and repair requirements.  Congress requires the Services to assure that effective management controls are utilized for GFOQ (see para 3-14 and app S).

(1) Maintenance and repair for general flag officer's quarters.   

(a)    By congressional mandate, the total of all O&M obligations, including costs for asbestos and lead-based paint removal, on each GFOQ is limited to $35,000 (excluding utilities and lease costs) per FY unless specifically reported to and approved by the Congress. Such reporting will be done by including detailed justification material with the annual AFH budget submittal. For purposes of ensuring that funding limitations are not exceeded, all costs directly associated with the GFOQ including associated other real property (ORP) intended for the exclusive use of the GFOQ resident, must be captured for inclusion in the quarterly expenditure report (see para 3-7b).

(b)    After the budget submittal has been congressionally approved, Congress must receive prior notification for out-of-cycle work when repair costs for a GFOQ due to an emergency or act of nature will exceed $35,000 O&M (statutory) for a DU not previously reported.

(c)    Requests for out-of-cycle requirements must be submitted over the signature of the Secretary of the Army.

(d)    Emergency requirements and those necessary to ensure the health and safety of residents must be submitted by the most expeditious means to HQDA (DAIM-ISH) for processing through the ASA(IE&E) to Congress.

(e)    When a single major M&R project for a GFOQ is estimated to cost $30,000 or more, send a DD Form 1391 for the project to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600. Prior congressional approval is not required provided the total O&M costs for the GFOQ do not exceed $35,000 (excluding utility and lease costs), including costs for asbestos and lead-based paint removal, for the FY. Design costs for M&R projects involving GFOQ are chargeable to the GFOQ. Where a major M&R project addresses multiple units, including one or more GFOQ, a pro rata share will be assessed for each GFOQ (design cost divided by number of DUs equals pro rata share). The same criterion applies to the cost for supervision and administration (S&A).

(f)    Requests for incidental improvements exceeding a total of $3000 for each GFOQ in the budget year must be submitted to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600. The total O&M cost per GFOQ (excluding utility and lease costs) per FY may not exceed $35,000.

(g)    Where asbestos and/ or lead-based paint removal costs cause the approved threshold to be exceeded after approval, HQDA will provide Congress with after-the-fact notification. These requests must be approved by HQDA before execution.

(h)    Provisions for the maintenance of grounds and landscaping by the GFOQ resident as set forth in paragraph 3-54d(9) apply to GFOQ, except incumbents of special command positions are exempt. However, HQDA may grant exceptions to this policy when GFOQ grounds are constantly exposed to general public view and make a unique contribution to the appearance of the installation. In such cases, maintenance of the grounds and landscaping would be done by the DPW. It will include the immediate assigned grounds and will be consistent with reasonable and prudent practices, avoiding excess services and maintenance. Official records of such exception and funds expended shall be maintained by the installation and shall be reviewed by the GFOQ resident. No other exceptions to this policy will be granted without prior approval by the ASA (IE&E).

(2) Operations and maintenance for general flag officer's quarters.   

(a)    To meet the directives from Congress and the ASA (IE&E), installations will prepare an annual O&M budget estimate for each GFOQ in accordance with paragraph 3-103b. After review by the IMCOM Region, these estimates will be forwarded to IMCOM. IMCOM will send those estimates where O&M (excluding utilities and lease costs) exceeds $35,000 to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600.

(b)    The budget estimate will include all O&M costs to the DU, appurtenant structures, and all other related areas and facilities intended for the exclusive use of the GFOQ resident.

(c)    Changes to budget estimates will be done in accordance with paragraph 3-103b(3).

d. Work authorization.  

(1)    M&R work for GFOQ may be authorized for accomplishment per paragraph 3-43.

(2)    GFOQ resident approval is not required for SOs.

(3)    GFOQ resident approval in writing is required for all IJOs when the work covered by the IJO is not included in the SYGP (see para 3-103a).

(4)    The M&R projects initiated for GFOQ must be submitted either as individual projects independent of non-GFOQ projects or as separate bid items in an omnibus project. In either case, each GFOQ must be specifically identified with its own separate cost estimate.

e. Disagreements on maintenance and repair work.  Where the GFOQ resident disapproves any major M&R work essential to protect the Government's investment in the DU, they will be required to sign a formal disapproval. When the GFOQ resident disagrees with the scope of work or disapproves the project and the matter cannot be resolved at the installation, it will be forwarded to the IMCOM Region for resolution. Should the IMCOM Region not resolve the matter, the issue will be forwarded to HQ IMCOM for resolution. Should the matter remain unresolved, HQ IMCOM will forward the issue to the HQDA (DAIM-ISH) for resolution.

3-102. Construction for general/flag officer's quarters

a. New construction.  

(1)    The number of general and flag officers authorized is relatively constant. Many are assigned to key and essential positions which require that they reside on installations. Most of these positions have Government-provided housing designated for their incumbents. Hence, the requirement to construct new GFOQ should occur only infrequently.

(2)    New construction of GFOQ could be expected when—

(a)    A key and essential general or flag officer position is permanently added at an installation.

(b)    Security of a general or flag officer and his or her Family demands housing on a military installation rather than in local communities.

(c)    A decision is made to replace existing high cost GFOQ or GFOQ completely destroyed by fire or other disaster.

(d)    An existing GFOQ can no longer be economically maintained.

(3)    Requests for construction of GFOQ must be accompanied by an EA using life cycle considerations which examine all feasible alternatives. Where redesignation of existing housing among grade categories is not feasible, a strong justification must be submitted with the request.

(4)    See also paragraphs 3-74 through 3-81 and paragraph 3-83.

b. Reprogramming post acquisition construction.  Although HQDA may reprogram (see paras 3-14 and 3-81 and c) a post acquisition construction project within the annual appropriation and authorization except for individual DUs costing $50,000 or more ($60,000 to support the disabled), no such projects will be done for GFOQ through reprogramming action. All such projects must be planned for, programmed, and included in the annual budget submittal to Congress.

3-103. Planning, programming, and budgeting for general/flag officer's quarters

a. Planning and programming.  

(1)    In accordance with paragraph 3-10b, the Family housing inventory at installation level will have a current, integrated series of plans associated with its sustainment. Additionally, each GFOQ will also have an individual 6-year GFOQ Plan.

(2)    The SYGP will be—

(a)    Created, modified, and edited only at the installation.

(b)    Signed by the GFOQ resident.

(c)    Developed for the program execution year plus the 5 subsequent years and updated prior to the start of each fiscal year.

(d)    Synthesized from the AWP, LRWP, FYP, the President's budget and congressional action on the President's budget so as to reflect the most current information on O&M and construction.

(e)    Interrelated with the plans (AWP, LRWP, FYP, and FHMP), identified in paragraph 3-10b. (The SYGP provides opportunities for prudent management decisions and may elicit changes in one or more of the four related plans. The inter-relationship of these plans as well as both budget execution and budget formulation are shown in figure 3-1.





Figure 3-1. GFOQ planning relationships


(f)    Estimated from the O&M costs developed in accordance with allocation guidelines cited in paragraphs 3-104e and 3-104f.

(g)    Used as the basis for preparing the annual budget estimate (see para 3-103b).

(3)    The SYGPs will be filed electronically via Enterprise Military Housing GFOQ module. See DA Pam 420-1-1 for a suggested format for a SYGP.

(4)    A detailed review of the plans discussed in paragraph 3-10b and paragraph (2), above will provide a complete perspective of each GFOQ's funding requirements. This will aid the resident, the housing manager, and the garrison commander in making sound, sensible management decisions on the long-term and immediate requirements for the housing.

(5)    The disposition of the SYGP includes—

(a)    The SYGP will be developed as a coordinated effort with the GFOQ resident and submitted to the IMCOM Region. All SYGP must be concurred with by the GFOQ resident and approved by the installation, the IMCOM Region, IMCOM, and HQDA (DAIM-ISH) on an annual basis prior to the start of the program execution year. Once the plan is concurred with by the resident, further concurrence on individual tasks is not required; only major changes to the plan require resident concurrence.

(b)    The SYGP for those GFOQ whose O&M costs are expected to exceed $35,000 (excluding utility and lease costs) will be forwarded to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600 concurrent with the budget estimate for that GFOQ.

(c)    Only IMCOM Regions, HQ IMCOM, and HQDA (DAIM-ISH) with access authorized may view and print the SYGP. Only installations will have edit rights.

b. Budgeting.  

(1) Requirement.   

(a)    An annual budget estimate will be prepared for each GFOQ to reflect its estimated cumulative AFH O&M costs. An annual budget estimate will be prepared in the first year of the biennial budget cycle for each of the 2 years in that cycle. In the second year of the cycle, an updated budget estimate will be prepared when there is a change to the previously submitted estimate.

(b)    The budget estimate identifies and justifies estimated costs and, where applicable, serves as a request for HQDA approval to exceed the O&M cost limitations set forth in paragraph 3-14.

(c)    Budget estimates for GFOQ will be developed locally in accordance with AFH budget guidance published by HQDA. Estimated costs will be rounded to the nearest hundred dollars. See DA Pam 420-1-1 for a suggested format for a GFOQ budget estimate.

(2) Disposition of budget estimates.   

(a)    All estimates will be reviewed and concurred in by the GFOQ resident (if the SYGP has not been signed by the GFOQ resident), validated by the garrison commander, and submitted to the IMCOM for approval or forwarding to HQDA. Review will be done in conjunction with the SYGP.

(b)    The O&M estimates which exceed $35,000 (excluding utility and lease costs) in a FY and those O&M estimates whose M&R component exceeds $35,000 in a FY will be forwarded by IMCOM to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600. Such estimates will be submitted so as to arrive not later than concurrent with the POM/BES input data submission.

(3) Changes to budget estimates.   

(a)    Every effort will be made to anticipate O&M expenditures far enough in advance so that they can be included in the annual budget estimate. If, during the execution year emergent requirements make it necessary to exceed the previously approved budget estimate, a revised budget estimate will be submitted to the IMCOM. Revised estimates will be submitted as soon as possible after the need for a change has been identified.

(b)    Revised O&M estimates that exceed $35,000 (excluding utility and lease costs) will be forwarded by IMCOM to HQDA (DAIM-ISH), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310-0600, for appropriate approval action.

(c)    When the O&M revised estimate exceeds $35,000 (excluding utility and lease costs) for the first time for a bona fide emergency, prior congressional approval must be obtained for this requirement. Out-of-cycle M&R notifications for M&R requests exceeding $35,000 must be signed by the Secretary of the Army.

(d)    Revised budget estimates will include the following:

1.    The approved budget amount, amount of change, and newly estimated amount for each subordinate detailed cost account.

2.    A complete narrative description and cost of the work and/or service which will cause the cost increase and the reason that the work and/or service must be done in that fiscal year. (This may be done by footnoting the change amounts in the revised budget estimate.)

(e)    Revised budget estimates will also include a statement that all known repairs for the DU are included. If not included, give the reason.

(f)    Approval of an annual O&M budget estimate in excess of $35,000 (excluding utilities and lease costs) constitutes a new O&M limitation for that GFOQ in that fiscal year. Any further increases will require Congressional approval.

(4) Carry over of congressional approval.   

(a)    There may be occasions when, for cogent reasons, the congressionally approved amount of M&R for a specific GFOQ cannot be fully obligated in the FY for which approval was obtained (for example, a programmed change of occupancy did not take place). The amount, approved for an express purpose, which could not be obligated, may be carried over to the following FY, if approved by HQDA.

(b)    Requests to carry over approval from one FY to the following FY must be sent through the IMCOM Region to HQ IMCOM (IMPW-H), 2405 Gunshed Road, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234. Requests will include the amount to be carried over, reasons why funds could not be obligated, and the following FY's M&R/O&M program for the GFOQ. The DA Form 4939 must be annotated to reflect the carry over of congressional approval.

(c)    Approval to carry over will be authorized only for GFOQ that were previously reported to Congress for M&R over $35,000.

(d)    Every effort will be made to complete carry over work within 2 years from the date of the original project authorization by Congress.

3-104. Costing general/flag officer's quarters

a. General.  

(1)    Installations that are responsible for the O&M of GFOQ will maintain separate subordinate cost accounting records at the detail activity and performance level for each GFOQ. These cost records will be maintained for special reporting purposes to provide an analysis of the directly identifiable costs for the O&M of GFOQ.

(2)    Costs will be charged to individual GFOQ to the extent that they are directly and practically identifiable and measurable to the given DU and to that associated other real property which is for the sole use of the general or flag officer who occupies the given DU. Summary costs charged to the Family housing program which cannot be identified or directly chargeable to a specific GFOQ will be allocated to that DU through the use of standards, estimates, or prudent allocation guidelines outlined in this paragraph.

b. Factors influencing costs.  

(1)    The costs of operating and maintaining a specific DU are dependent upon a very large array of factors. These include the following:

(a)    Age.

(b)    Size.

(c)    Design.

(d)    Types of materials.

(e)    Quality of construction.

(f)    Condition.

(g)    Location.

(h)    Weather.

(i)    Climate.

(j)    Topography.

(k)    Site layout.

(l)    Kinds of utilities.

(m)    Family size.

(n)    Ages of Family members.

(o)    Life style of Family.

(p)    Turnover experience.

(q)    Energy efficiency of household equipment.

(2)    Every DU is affected differently by these and other factors. The number of variables makes it impossible to derive a formula that will allocate costs to individual DUs with any degree of accuracy. Hence, simple allocation rules are used to distribute among specified DUs those wider program costs not identifiable directly to them. These allocation rules are addressed below.

c. Operation and maintenance cost account structure.  The O&M cost account structure is set forth in DFAS-IN Manual 37-100-FY. It identifies the cost categories and their immediate subordinate detailed accounts under which costs are chargeable.

d. Direct costs for general/flag officer's quarters.  

(1)    Direct costs for GFOQ are essentially the same as for all other Family housing and are described in paragraph 3-13a thru c and DA Pam 420-1-1.

(2)    Direct costs will be allocated to GFOQ according to the allocation guidelines specified in paragraphs 3-104e and 3-104f for the work and services provided.

(3)     for GFOQ, direct costs will be reported separately from indirect support costs (see para 3-7b for reporting requirements).

e. Operations costs (Budget Programs 191000, 193000, 194000, and 195000).  

(1) General.   The operations account includes management, services, furnishings, miscellaneous, utilities, leasing, and privatization costs. Any direct costs that can be readily identified to GFOQ will be so charged. Costs which cannot be identified as directly chargeable to a GFOQ on a service or job order basis, such as management, services, and utilities, will be allocated to individual GFOQ as indicated below.

(2) Management.   

(a) Housing Office.   Prorate according to the following proportion: total Family housing cost of this account divided by the total number of Government DUs.

(b) Programming and studies.   Charge to GFOQ concerned only where effort was solely and exclusively for one or more GFOQ and of direct benefit to the GFOQ. Prorate among GFOQ affected.

(c) Environmental studies.   (see para 3-104e(2)(b).)

(d) Records.   Records will be established and maintained for the management account.

(3) Services.   

(a) Refuse collection and disposal.   Prorate according to the following proportion: total Family housing cost of this account divided by the total number of Government DUs served.

(b) Fire protection.   Prorate according to the following proportion: total Family housing costs of this account divided by the total number of Government DUs protected.

(c) Police protection.   (see para 3-104e(3)(b).)

(d) Entomology services.   This is a directly identifiable cost. Charge to the specific GFOQ.

(e) Custodial services.   Charge to specific GFOQ only if there is a directly identifiable cost.

(f) Municipal-type services.   (see para 3-104e(3)(a).)

(4) Furnishings.   

(a) Furniture purchase.    Charge to specific GFOQ only if there is a directly identifiable cost.

(b) Equipment purchase.   (see para 3-104f(4)(a).)

(c) Control, moving, and handling, furniture.   (see para 3-104f(4)(a).)

(d) Control, moving and handling, equipment.   (see para 3-104f(4)(a).)

(e) Maintenance and repair, furniture.   (see para 3-104f(4)(a).)

(f) Maintenance and repair, equipment.   (see para 3-104f(4)(a).)

(g) Records.   Records will be established and maintained for each individual furnishings account.

(5) Miscellaneous expenses.   

(a) Permit payments.    Charge to specific GFOQ only if there is a directly identifiable cost.

(b) German land taxes.   (see para 3-104f(5)(a).)

(c) United Kingdom accommodation charges.   (see para 3-104f(5)(a).)

(d) Fire insurance.   Prorate according to the following proportion: total Family housing cost of this account divided by the total number of DUs covered by the insurance.

(6) Utilities (BP 193000).   

(a)    Since not all DUs are individually metered, the following guidelines (designators) have been established for costing utilities to GFOQ:

1. Metered (M).   Where GFOQ are individually metered, use actual consumption and attendant costs.

2. Used (U).   Where fuels (such as oil, coal, liquid propane) are delivered to individual GFOQ, use quantities delivered or consumed and attendant costs.

3. Simple proration (P).   Where master metered housing areas with GFOQ contain like size and type DUs with similar occupants, prorate consumption and attendant costs.

4. Sampling (S).   Where there are no individual or area meters associated with a specific GFOQ, but there are other GFOQ of similar size and type, assign the metered GFOQ consumption rate to the unmetered GFOQ. The consumption rate assigned may be from individually metered GFOQ or from proration based on an area metering system.

5. Comparison (C).   Where there are no reasonably comparable consumption data such as that in paragraphs 3 and 4, above available on an installation, use consumption data for comparable DUs from a nearby installation or local communities. Local utility companies can supply consumption data from local communities. Derive individual GFOQ costs from comparable consumption data and costs per unit measure of the utility.

6. Factored (F).   Where sewage metering or contract provisions do not enable measuring or computing sewage quantities, use the applicable engineering standard (if available) or use 70 percent of the water consumed as the sewage quantity.

(b)    Records will be set up and maintained for each individual utility account. Records will be structured so that both the costs and consumption for each utility are captured.

(7) Leasing (BP 194000).   This is a directly identifiable cost. Charge to specific GFOQ.

(8) Privatization (BP 195000).   Charge to a specific GFOQ only if there is a directly identifiable cost.

f. Maintenance costs (BP 192000).  The maintenance account includes recurring M&R, major M&R, incidental improvements, M&R of exterior utilities, M&R of other real property, self-help, and design costs of M&R projects.

(1) Recurring maintenance and repair.   Charge directly identifiable costs to GFOQ.

(2) Major maintenance and repair.   This is a directly identifiable cost. Charge to specific GFOQ.

(3) Incidental improvements (that is, alterations and additions).   Charge directly identifiable costs to GFOQ.

(4) Maintenance and repair of exterior utilities.   M&R costs beginning at the 5-foot line and ending at a point where the utility system joins a main or terminates are directly identifiable costs and will be charged to GFOQ. Where an exterior utility distribution/collection system exclusively serves a Family housing area which contains one or more GFOQ, prorate the M&R cost (including design costs) according to the following proportion: total Family housing cost of M&R project divided by the number of Government DUs in the area served.

(5) Maintenance and repair of other real property.   

(a)    Other real property costs will be charged to GFOQ only if they can be clearly identified with the DU as associated real property such as garages, driveways, and grounds which are for the exclusive use of the GFOQ resident.

(b)    Costs for common use areas and common facilities will not be charged to individual GFOQ.

(6) Self-help program.   This is a directly identifiable cost. Charge to specific GFOQ.

(7) Design costs.   Charge directly identifiable costs to GFOQ. Design costs may be programmed the year prior to proposed project execution.

g. Approval authorities and cost limitations.  

(1)    Approval authorities are established at various cost levels to ensure appropriate before-the-fact management of those types of actions which contribute to unusually high costs (see table 3-11 and para 3-14).

(2)    The cost for the purchase and installation of security or antiterrorism equipment required for a GFOQ is included in the $35,000 O&M limitation. The cost of the M&R of this equipment shall be included as part of maintenance and repair. These costs must be paid from the AFH appropriation and must be recorded against the GFOQ on the DA Form 4939.

(3)    Communications equipment required by a GFOQ occupant to execute his/her mission is not included in the O&M limitation. These communications equipment costs are excluded from the requirement to fund with the AFH appropriation and must, therefore, be funded with other than AFH funds.

3-105. General/flag officer's quarters review and analysis

a. General.  The O&M costs associated with many GFOQ warrant intensive oversight by those responsible for housing management. A report has been designed for use by management at all levels to assist in management cost analysis, developing standards or norms, and special management and cost studies as necessary. This report, which plays a key role in justifying and defending the Army's resource needs to support GFOQ before OSD, OMB, and the Congress, is prescribed in paragraph 3-7b.

b. Change of occupancy orientation.  The incoming general or flag officer will schedule a housing manager's orientation concerning his or her GFOQ within 10 days after occupying the housing unit. Ideally, this orientation should include the spouse and take place at the GFOQ at the earliest possible time. During the orientation, the housing manager will provide each GFOQ resident an orientation packet. Recommended topic content for the housing manager's orientation and the orientation packet are addressed in DA Pam 420-1-1.

c. Review and analysis.  The objective of the GFOQ review and analysis is to provide managers at all levels with sufficient information and data to serve as a basis for measuring performance and focusing management effort on a priority basis against those areas where performance is weakest.

(1)    Headquarters DA (DAIM-ISH) will—

(a)    Analyze those annual GFOQ O&M budget estimates which exceed $35,000 (excluding utilities and lease costs) and provide to Congress with the annual AFH budget submittal.

(b)    Analyze GFOQ expenditure report data.

(c)    Compare costs worldwide.

(d)    Assess validity of costs.

(e)    Ensure costs are within approval levels and do not exceed cost limitations.

(f)    Ensure necessary waivers/exceptions have been received and are documented.

(g)    Identify cost trends and explain reasons they occur.

(h)    Submit analysis of GFOQ management to OSD as required.

(2)    The IMCOM will—

(a)    Review the SYGP for each GFOQ.

(b)    Analyze annual O&M budget estimates for each GFOQ and forward those which exceed $35,000 (excluding utilities and lease costs) and those whose M&R component is $25,000 or more to HQDA.

(c)    Analyze installations' GFOQ expenditure report.

(d)    Compare costs by IMCOM Region and across the IMCOM.

(e)    Assure validity of costs.

(f)    Ensure costs are within approval levels and do not exceed cost limitations.

(g)    Ensure necessary waivers/exceptions have been requested, documented, and approved.

(h)    Identify cost trends and assess reasons therefore.

(i)    Provide installations with comparative summaries on cost averages and trends.

(3)    Installations will—

(a)    Keep a separate cost data file for each GFOQ. (DPW will provide detailed cost data to the housing manager as costs occur.)

(b)    Prepare a SYGP for each GFOQ.

(c)    Prepare an annual O&M budget estimate for each GFOQ and provide to GFOQ resident and IMCOM.

(d)    Complete GFOQ expenditure report and provide it to GFOQ residents for their information and comment (see DA Pam 420-1-1).

(e)    Provide GFOQ expenditure report to IMCOM and HQDA (DAIM-ISH) each quarter via Enterprise Military Housing GFOQ module (see DA Pam 420-1-1).

(f)    Establish and maintain cost and performance data.

(g)    Measure and analyze performance in each of the GFOQ cost accounts, particularly in the utilities account where quantity consumed is as important, if not more so, than costs.

(h)    Compare costs of goods and services for GFOQ against other Family housing.

(i)    Check validity of charges and accuracy of prorations or assignment of costs.

(j)    Ensure costs are within approval levels and do not exceed cost limitations.

(k)    Ensure waivers/exceptions are approved before proceeding.

(l)    Ensure GFOQ residents have signed hand receipts for furnishings.

(m)    Identify cost trends and evaluate causative factors

Section XIV
Housing Requirements

3-106. Scope

This section establishes policy for determining housing requirements and developing documentation to support housing acquisition and sustainment programs.

3-107. Basic housing acquisition policy

a.  Broad policy regarding the acquisition of housing is set forth in paragraph 3-6c.

b.  In addition to reliance on the civilian community for housing, there are other ways to acquire and/or sustain housing to meet the needs of the Army's Soldiers and their Families. These include—

(1)    New construction (see sec X of this chapter for information on constructing new housing facilities).

(2)    Improvements (that is, upgrades, modernizations, rehabilitations, expansions, additions, or other revitalization initiatives) to existing Government-controlled housing (see secs VII, X, and XIII of this chapter for information on housing facility improvements).

(3)    Major M&R projects for housing (see secs VII and XIII of this chapter for details on M&R).

(4)    Leasing of privately owned housing to include third party contracted housing (see sec XI regarding the leasing program).

(5)    Privatization of housing (see para 3-111).

(6)    Management actions related to facilities utilization, conversion, and diversion (see sec V of this chapter for information on occupancy/utilization management).

(7)    Purchase of existing housing facilities.

(8)    Transfer to the Army of housing excess to the needs of other Services or other Government agencies.

c.  Irrespective of which housing acquisition and/or sustainment strategy is pursued, the Army must document its needs before committing limited resources. This is necessary not only for its own internal decision-making process but also to justify its decisions to OSD, OMB, and Congress in defense of its budget requests. Such documentation must reflect local community housing conditions as fully and accurately as possible (see para 3-109 below) and address Government-controlled housing assets (see para 3-110). It must also consider the privatization initiative alternative (see para 3-111, below). Finally, it must analyze the costs and benefits of feasible alternative acquisition solutions (see para 3-112 and DA Pam 420-1-1).

d.  Housing is an overarching quality of life issue because it is vitally important to the morale and well-being of Soldiers and their Families and hence to the readiness of individual Soldiers and their units and organizations. Commanders must—

(1)    Ensure that documentation to support housing needs (to include requirements associated with the Exceptional Family Member Program) receives command attention at all levels.

(2)    Ensure that close cooperation is given those who prepare the documentation and process the results.

(3)    Ensure that documentation is kept on file for review.

(4)    Ensure that a viable audit trail exists.

e.  The Army Stationing and Installation Plan is the official source document for strength projections. It will identify long-range strength projections for programming purposes, using furthest out-year force level projections. Projects to support approved stationing and restationing actions not yet reflected in the ASIP will be managed off-line on a case-by-case basis.

3-108. Determination of housing requirements

The general approach to determining requirements for housing is as follows:

a.  Data requirements and entries to be made into the Enterprise Military Housing database will be specified in annual guidance from HQDA (DAIM-ISH).

b.  Data available in the Enterprise Military Housing and ASIP databases will be extracted and analyzed by HQDA (DAIM-ISH) in terms of projected personnel requirements for Family and unaccompanied personnel housing facilities and on-post and off-post housing inventories projected to be available.

c.  Based on data available in existing databases, the HQDA (DAIM-ISH) analysis of requirements in the form of housing master plans will be coordinated with the appropriate installations and IMCOM Regions to ensure that planning, programming, and budgeting fully support the solutions proposed for meeting the Army's housing needs.

3-109. Identifying housing assets in the local community

a. Description of program.  

(1)    Housing policy requires the use of a balanced approach to satisfying housing needs of Soldiers and their Families. This includes use of adequate local community housing assets. Each installation must determine the extent to which community housing assets are available to the various segments (pay grade groups) of Army personnel needing housing. The installation must actively solicit housing support for the military mission from the local surrounding civilian communities.

(2)    The objective of a housing analysis is to provide competent analytical processing of present and prospective housing demand and supply relationships in a local housing market. This will more accurately determine the ability of the local community to adequately support the present and programmed future segmented housing needs of locally stationed military personnel and their Families. The principal goal is to comprehensively evaluate the current and prospective dynamic forces affecting economic, demographic, housing condition, and housing inventory trends in order to estimate local demand for housing in quantitative and qualitative terms. The results of the analysis will be integrated into the Army's housing master plans to form the justification for supporting a balanced overall acquisition program.

(3)    Each installation must aggressively pursue off-post housing within its housing market area. The installation staff, in cooperation with local housing authorities, realty boards, financial institutions, real property management firms, and housing construction agents, must actively pursue programs to increase the civilian community's ability to house Soldiers and their Families. The HSO must contact local landlords in order to persuade them to establish and participate in programs such as the Rental Partnership Program and Utility and Security Deposit Waiver Programs (see para 3-37).

b. Housing market analysis.  

(1)    A housing market analysis (HMA) is the vehicle used to conduct a detailed study of housing demand and supply within a defined market area. The HMA determines the ability of a local housing market to meet the needs of military personnel for adequate and affordable housing.

(2)    An HMA will be based on the following criteria:

(a)    Community housing must meet acceptability standards which include—

1.    Location.

2.    Affordability.

3.    Quality.

4.    Number of bedrooms.

(b)    There will be a minimum on-post housing requirement. This is referred to as the "floor".

(c)    The analysis will consider all military personnel (other than personnel comprising the floor) as potential residents of community housing.

(d)    All Soldiers occupying on-post housing will be treated as renters, since they are effectively "renting" their housing when they forfeit their BAH.

(e)    Rented mobile homes are considered to be inadequate for programming purposes.

(f)    Military personnel who own their local residences (including mobile homes) are considered to be adequately housed, regardless of any other criteria.

(3)    Headquarters DA (DAIM-ISH) will provide detailed guidance and procedures for data collection, conducting analyses, and documentation of the HMA.

(4)    An HMA report will include—

(a)    A description of the housing market area (with emphasis on the "effective" area where most military personnel choose to live), its population, and major determinants of regional development. The market area used to collect data will be defined as the local survey area used to establish BAH rates.

(b)    The characteristics of the market area housing stock.

(c)    A description of military Family housing demand and affordability in the market area based on maximum acceptable housing cost (MAHC)-the maximum amount a military member should pay for rent and utilities and still be acceptably housed.

(d)    A description of the requirement for military Family housing by pay-grade and number of bedrooms.

(e)    The military Family housing requirements assessment and conclusions.

(f)    List of persons and organizations contacted during the course of the study.

(g)    Appendices describing key area population and housing indicators used in the study and detailed demographic data.

3-110. Army housing master plans

a. Description.  An Army housing master plan is a consolidated strategy for planning, programming, budgeting, and executing the acquisition and sustainment of housing facilities to meet the Army's housing requirements. The Army has two housing master plans. One master plan addresses Family housing; the other, unaccompanied personnel housing for personnel.

b. AFH Master Plan.  

(1)    The Army's Family Housing Master Plan (FHMP) is a plan for meeting the needs for quality, affordable housing for Soldiers and their Families. It identifies—

(a)    Each installation's Family housing inventory, condition, and requirements as derived, on-post, from real property records and reports, and off-post, from an HMA.

(b)    Associated costs to bring the required Family housing at each installation up to acceptable standards.

(c)    The years in which planned military construction and privatization will be programmed for execution.

(d)    Funds needed to properly operate and maintain housing that remains under Army control.

(e)    Planned disposition of excess housing.

(2)    Inasmuch as the military, social, and economic conditions that influence the FHMP are dynamic, the FHMP will be refined and updated when substantive changes occur. This refinement and updating will be accomplished through installation FHMPs (I-FHMPs) The I-FHMP will use the shortfalls or surpluses identified in the HMA to determine the installation's Family housing requirements, revitalization costs, project phasing, and year-by-year programming schedules. The I-FHMP process will also provide a detailed housing plan and supporting DD Form 1391 to program and budget for construction funds, to include all tabs and a map of the installation that reflects all Family housing by building numbers.

c. Army Barracks Master Plan.  

(1)    The Army's BMP serves as a set of directions for providing quality housing to unaccompanied Soldiers from private (E-1) through sergeant (E-5) in CONUS including Hawaii and Alaska; private (E-1) through staff sergeant (E-6) OCONUS, except Korea. In Korea, the BMP addresses unaccompanied Soldiers from private (E-1) through command sergeant major (E-9). It identifies—

(a)    Each installation's barracks inventory, condition, and requirements as derived, on-post, from real property records and reports, and as derived, off-post, from an HMA.

(b)    Associated MCA and OMA costs to accomplish the barracks modernization program through the WBRP and BUP, respectively (see paras 3-79 and 3-82 and b).

(c)    The year in which planned new barracks complexes and major barracks upgrades will be programmed for execution.

(d)    Planned disposition of surplus barracks facilities.

(2)    The Army recognizes that the military, social, and economic conditions that influence the BMP are continually changing. Accordingly, the Army will update the BMP annually to incorporate changed conditions and the update of investment strategies, requirements, costs, and priorities.

(3)    The Army has statutory authorization for privatizing UPH assets at selected installations using the MHPI authorities. The RCI Program Office will serve as the Army's acquisition agent responsible for executing UPH privatization projects.

3-111. Residential communities initiative

a. Military housing privatization initiative.  

(1)    The National Defense Authorization Act of 1996 established the Military Housing Privatization Initiative (MHPI). The MHPI provides the Military Services with the authorities to leverage scarce funds and assets to obtain private sector capital and expertise to operate, manage, maintain, improve, renovate, and construct military housing (for both Families and unaccompanied personnel) on or near military installations in the United States (see 10 USC 2871 et seq.).

(2)    The Army's housing privatization program, known as the RCI, is an essential component of the Army's overall acquisition strategy for meeting its Family housing needs. It relies on partnership relationships between the Army and the private sector and on dedicated support from the Government, private industry, and the Congress.

(3)    The National Defense Authorization Act of 2000 amended 10 USC 2881 to limit ancillary facilities to those that would not be in direct competition with the provision of merchandise or services provided by AAFES, the DeCA, or any nonappropriated fund activity of the DOD for morale, welfare, and recreation of members of the armed forces.

b. Acquisition process.  The RCI focuses on the total residential community. RCI may use any number of acquisition processes set forth in acquisition regulations. These processes evaluate and award on the basis that the eligible entity selected is the most highly qualified to meet the Army's requirements.

c. Housing market analysis at residential communities initiative sites.  

(1)    A current HMA is critical to planning, programming, and associated fiduciary responsibilities inherent in the privatization process of the Army's Family housing. For those privatization sites utilizing a loan guarantee, the Army must document and retain a record of the AFH requirement.

(2)    The HMAs should be conducted every not less than 6 years and when the installation or community experiences significant changes in demographics, housing supply, regional economics, and/or BAH.

(3)    The ACSIM will ensure that a current HMA is available.

d. Construction standards.  The Army's goal is that RCI housing will meet or exceed competitive housing in the local community.

(1) Policy.   The following policy will apply to standards under the auspices of RCI:

(a)    Use local standards and private-sector best practices.

(b)    Establish minimum space standards equivalent to—

1.    The previous MILCON maximum space standards referenced in 10 USC 2826, as one baseline.

2.    The MILCON space benchmarks for Government Family housing in paragraph 3-81bas another baseline.

(c)    Allow the development partner to recommend additional standards for negotiation during Community Development and Management Plan (CDMP) development process.

(d)    Develop incentives to encourage the development partner to exceed minimum/local standards.

(e)    Submit additional standards for review and approval based on lessons learned.

(2) Quality standards for new and replacement residential communities initiatives Family housing.   

(a)    The ASA(IE&E) has issued construction and replacement standards and guidance and instructions for the implementation of these standards. These standards will be reviewed and updated annually NLT 30 September. They will remain in effect until rescinded or revised by OASA (IE&E).

(b)    These standards will be considered as minimum requirements as the CDMP is developed.

(c)    They are applicable to all new or replacement Family housing constructed under RCI.

(d)    These standards should be adapted to accommodate local requirements, health/safety regulations and statutes, economic conditions, existing master planning/DUs, building codes, environmental considerations, requirements related to accessibility and historic preservation, private sector innovations, and/or improvements to the industry standard.

(e)    Where conditions exist that preclude implementation of a standard or a different standard is proposed, the Garrison Commander may request exception through channels to the RCI Program Office, OASA (IE&E).

e. Schools for residential communities initiatives sites.  The following Army policy governs additional school requirements under the auspices of RCI for:

(1) Local school districts.   The Army will—

(a)    Inform the local education agency/school district/school system of additional school requirements resulting from RCI net increases to on-post Family housing inventories.

(b)    Include all stakeholders early-on during the RCI planning process.

(c)    Continue to set aside, offer, and/or provide land for school use, if available.

(d)    Spread out/phase RCI development to track more closely with school construction and/or upgrade.

(e)    Consider exceptions in the future if, for example, the Army constructs large-scale developments in new areas or local education agencies refuse to build new schools regardless of requirements.

(2) Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA) schools.    The Army will fund construction related costs in accordance with an agreement between the DODEA and the Army when necessary to accommodate an increase in student population beyond the existing capacity of a DODEA school where such increase is created by an RCI housing development plan.

f. Residential communities initiatives utility policy and procedures for residents of residential communities initiatives.  Generally, residents will be responsible for their utilities. They will be rewarded for energy conservation and require to pay for energy usage over established reasonable limitations. The project/partnership has utility responsibility for designated common areas and vacant houses. The project documents and agreements will outline the specifics of the RCI utility program. For additional guidance on the RCI Resident Utility Responsibility Program, refer to the Residential Communities Initiative, (ASA (IE&E)), Portfolio and Asset Management Handbook (current version).

(1)    All new and renovated houses will be metered for gas, electricity, and/or heating oil, and all housing units will be metered by the end of the project's initial development period. The costs of metering will be borne by the project/partnership.

(2)    Residents will be responsible for gas, electricity, and/or heating oil costs. The project/partnership will be responsible for all other utilities and all utilities for common areas and vacant houses.

(3)    The project/partnership will administer the resident utility program. Installations will implement/start the RCI utility program by individual housing area once a housing area is renovated/metered. Installations will not wait for the entire housing inventory to be metered.

g. Utility services reimbursement policy for residential communities initiatives partnerships.   Title 10 USC 2872a allows the Secretary of the Army to provide utilities and services to RCI partnerships on Army installations and mandates that the Army will be reimbursed for the cost of any utilities or services furnished.

(1) Reimbursement policy.   

(a)    Reimbursement for utilities and services will be accomplished pursuant to a written agreement.

(b)    Reimbursement will comply with the provisions of FMR 7000.14-R and DODI 4000.19.

(c)    The reimbursement rate used shall include all costs associated with providing utilities and services to RCI housing. The rate shall not include—

1.    Reimbursement for expenses or infrastructure required to support facilities other than RCI.

2.    Costs which the installations would still incur if the RCI project were to obtain the service from another entity (incremental costs).

(2) Reimbursement guidelines.   The RCI project must pay for incremental costs associated with the goods or services. If providing support to RCI results in a cost that would not otherwise be incurred by the Army, the cost incurred must be charged to the RCI project. If the RCI project were to obtain support from another entity and the cost would still be incurred by the Army, then RCI will not be charged. RCI projects will not pay for centrally funded projects to common infrastructure.

(a)    Examples of items that will be included in the rate billed to the RCI project—

1.    The actual cost of any commodity or service provided to the RCI project.

2.    The actual cost of any project completed solely to provide a commodity or service to RCI if required by the RCI project.

3.    The cost of any employee who must be hired or required to work overtime in order to provide a commodity or service to the RCI project.

4.    The cost of any equipment purchased solely to provide a commodity or service to the RCI project.

(b)    Examples of items that will not be billed to the RCI project—

1.    Administrative costs not connected to overtime or additional hiring.

2.    Army capital costs for existing infrastructure.

3.    The costs of projects centrally funded directly by HQDA or otherwise through use of MILCON.

4.    Maintenance and repair of infrastructure that is not exclusively dedicated to supporting the RCI project.

h. Community development and management plan.  

(1)    Once the procurement process is complete, the Army will award a contract to the selected development partner to work with the specified installation in preparing a community development and management plan (CDMP). The CDMP serves as the business plan for each specific RCI project. It sets forth the proposed terms of the developer' s long-term relationship with the Army. The CDMP consists of the following three main components:

(a)    Development Plan.

(b)    Financial Plan and Transactional Instruments.

(c)    Operations, Maintenance, and Property Management Plan.

(2)    After completion of the CDMP, the Army will staff this plan and submit it to the Congress for review and approval. Barring any objection by the Congress, the Army will issue a Notice to Transition and the developer is paid a fixed price for the CDMP. In return for this payment, the Army is granted full and unlimited rights to use of the CDMP. Next, housing assets and operations are turned over by the Army to the partnership which includes the Army and the developer.

(3)    In furtherance of CDMP preparation, the Army will conduct/pay for land surveys.

i. Transfer date for residential communities initiatives assets and operations.  The RCI installation and partner will schedule the transfer date as early as possible during CDMP negotiations by considering the duration of negotiations and the projected 60-day congressional notification period. RCI installations must transfer assets and operations to the developer partner on the first day of the month to initiate BAH payments to Soldiers who in turn pay rent for housing.

j. Installation housing staffs.  Staffing levels should track with private industry standards and also meet military-unique requirements and the commander's inherent responsibilities for the well-being of Soldiers and their Families. Toward that end, the Army will—

(1)    Set staffing levels at one per 1000 on-post Family housing units plus 3.5 man-years of effort for overhead (for example, supervision and administration, and project, financial, and information management) per site.

(2)    Maintain current staffing levels throughout the transition phase from the Army to the development partner.

(3)    Start the personnel ramp down at the end of the transition period.

(4)    Complete the ramp down one year after the end of the transition period.

(5)    Exclude HSO and Deposit Waiver Program manpower spaces from the RCI staffing levels.

k. Occupancy of privatized housing.  

(1) Military.   Military personnel have priority of assignment to RCI housing.

(a)    Soldiers may elect to reside in housing acquired or constructed under the RCI program.

(b)    Occupancy of housing units which are not owned or leased by the Government entitles Soldiers to BAH (see 37 USC 403(h)).

(c)    Soldiers who occupy housing units acquired or constructed under the RCI program are required to make rent payments to the RCI partner. The Army may require Soldiers to make rent payments for such housing by allotments (see 10 USC 2882).

(d)    Military residents may pay rent in arrears.

(2) Civilians.   The development partner may rent to civilians under specific guidelines outlined during the negotiations of the CDMP.

(3) Standard landlord/resident agreement.   The Army RCI Office (OASA (IE&E)), in coordination with the IMCOM Regions/installations, will develop a standard lease agreement and allow addenda to be added by the installations. These addenda are intended to capture requirements unique to each installation, such as binding agreements for historically significant housing units.

(4) Rental payment method for residential communities initiatives installations.   The Army will use an RCI-wide, third-party vendor to provide the services necessary to process rental payments from the residents to the developer partner. Services to be provided include—

(a)    Online allotment starts upon assignment and stops upon termination of occupancy.

(b)    Management of the process, allotments between installations, pro-rata management, and funds reimbursement.

(c)    Funds tracking including online account information, payment identification, lease renewals, and accounting reports.

(d)    Reconciliation of BAH and allotment files.

(5) Surviving spouse residency/rent.   The Army will require the development partner to recognize the right of surviving spouses/Families to remain in RCI housing for up to 365 days. Further, rents will be capped at the BAH level.

(6) Resident security deposits.   The Army will require that the developer partner allow security deposits for civilian residents in the event they are offered RCI housing.

(7) Resident satisfaction surveys.   To assist the Army in validating the viability of the RCI program, in accomplishing its quality assurance functions, and in determining development partner compensation, the Army will conduct surveys. In that regard the Army will—

(a)    Develop and conduct resident satisfaction surveys via third-party specialist consultants in collaboration and coordination with IMCOM and development partners.

(b)    Require the development partnership to finance a portion of the cost of the survey (depending upon the structure of the partnership with the Army).

(c)    Conduct surveys semiannually for the first 5 years.

(d)    Consider the benefit of conducting the surveys at comparable non-RCI sites.

(e)    Require summary results to be forwarded up through command channels to ACSIM and OASA (IE&E).

l. Local moves and non-temporary storage.  

(1)    The Government may continue to pay for local moves of Soldiers from off-post housing to privatized on-post housing and for non-temporary storage of excess HHG, provided such moves are properly authorized in accordance with the applicable provisions of the JFTR.

(2)    Movement of HHG must be directed by competent authority on the basis of a Service requirement as outlined in the JFTR. Commanders retain the authority to ascertain the applicability of this entitlement based on the availability of operating funds.

m. Post award management of residential communities initiatives housing.  

(1)    To sustain effective management and oversight of the Army's housing privatization program, the HQDA RCI management team established the Portfolio and Asset Management program. This program provides instructions to both Government and Private Sector managers at all levels.

(2)    Portfolio and asset management oversight intends to mitigate risks to Government assets and to ensure that the goal for quality housing to Soldiers and their Families is achieved throughout the life of the Family housing privatization program. There are two levels of oversight—

(a)    Portfolio management which includes the information required by HQDA with the objective to assess and assure the overall success of the RCI program.

(b)    Asset management which will focus on the information and/or reports prepared by installations to assess the success of their projects.

(3)    Performance measures established under the portfolio and asset management program will include, as a minimum, the following:

(a)    Proper use of financial reporting and management tools.

(b)    Collection, use, and accountability of funds.

(c)    Adherence to the CDMP.

(d)    Staffing levels.

(e)    Training.

(f)    Direct and indirect support services.

(g)    Landlord-tenant relations.

(h)    Customer service.

(i)    Occupancy and termination inspections.

(j)    Resident complaints.

(k)    Resident responsibilities.

(l)    Disposition of housing units for which the Army has no foreseeable need.

(m)    Quality control.

(n)    Performance of the RCI partners.

(o)    Reporting and ground lease compliance.

n. Funding parameters for privatized representational housing.  The GFOQ, GCQ, and special CSM positions fall under the umbrella of representational housing. As such, they have unique requirements for certain services and amenities. These are addressed in sections IX and XIII. However, where representational housing is privatized, the following provisions will apply:

(1)    The AFH appropriation will fund the purchase and replacement of special allowance items authorized for special command positions, the Sergeant Major of the Army, and the Senior Enlisted Advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. AFH may fund supplemental furnishings, draperies, sheers, and area rugs for official public entertainment areas within privatized GFOQ, GCQ, and special CSM position quarters. The OMA appropriation will fund the purchase and replacement of special allowance items when quarters are occupied by unaccompanied personnel. RCI project funds will not be used to fund special allowance/official entertainment area furnishings.

(2)    AFH will not fund carpeting or window coverings (blinds, drapes, and shades) outside of official public entertainment areas. These items and appliances are the responsibility of the partner. Existing window coverings, furnishings, carpeting, and so forth will convey with the privatized DU. All repair and replacement of those items will be commensurate with the same level of quality as the item(s) being conveyed.

(3)    AFH may fund supplemental furnishings in historic DUs greater than 6,000 gross square feet. Submit requests to HQDA (DAIM-ISH).

(4)    AFH will not fund maintenance, repair, or improvement to the DU or its grounds. Special work or items requested by the resident are not an AFH responsibility. These include, but are not limited to, expansion of the DU; addition of patios, enclosures, lawn sprinkler systems, gazebos, fencing, fixed barbecue grills, carports, and storage facilities; and accessibility modifications.

(5)    Army O&M funds will be used for the placement, maintenance, and repair of security antiterrorism, and mission related communications, equipment and systems for privatized representational homes.

(6)    Table 3-12 identifies furnishings and amenities authorized for privatized GFOQ. Requests for items not identified in table 3-12 or exceeding authorized costs must be approved by HQDA (DAIM-ISH). General provisions of Section IX regarding management of Government furnishings, approval authorities and replacement cycles apply. Senior Executive Services will be provided amenities on equal basis as military of equivalent rank and position.

Table 3-12. Furnishings Authorized for Official Entertainment Areas in Privatized (RCI) GFOQs
 Special Command Positions (US) & SMASpecial Command Sergeants Major (CONUS)Other GFOQ US
Equipment   
Carpet shampooer (1)YYN
Fireplace ensemble (1-per open fireplace)YYN
Vacuum CleanerYNN
Furnishings   
Area rugs not to exceed 60% of floor area (not to exceed $500 per area rug)YYY
Draperies and/or sheers (no more than two window treatments) (not to exceed $500.00 per window) (see note 1)YYY
Lawn/patio furnitureYYN
Beds (mattresses/box springs, as required)YNN
Mattresses (single, double, queen, as required)YNN
Chest of drawers (1-per bedroom)YNN
Dresser (1-per bedroom)YNN
Light, table (2-per night table)YNN
Chair, easy (1-per living room)YNN
Davenport (1-per living room)YNN
Sofa in place of two straight chairs (2-per living room)YNN
Chair, straight (2-per living room)YNN
Table, end (1 set per living room)YNN
Table, dining and chairs (One 12 seat table-per dining room)YNN
Hutch (1-per dining room)YNN
Server (1-per dining room)YNN
Special Allowance Items   
ChinaYNN
CrystalYNN
Silver flatwareYNN
Silver hollowwareYNN
Special utensilsYNN
Engraved Resident Name PlaqueYNN

Note 1: All other window treatments (valances, blinds, shutters, draw curtains) are considered installed real property, and are the responsibility of the Partner

3-112. Economic analysis for housing

a. Installation responsibilities.  Responsibility for conducting an EA rests with the installation.

b. Conduct of an economic analysis.  An EA will be conducted for each of the following:

(1)    New MCA and AFHC project estimated to cost in excess of $2 million.

(2)    Any new construction project for a GFOQ DU.

(3)    Family housing post-acquisition construction project that exceeds either—

(a)    An estimated cost of $50,000 per DU ($60,000 per DU for support of the handicapped) as adjusted by the area cost factor.

(b)    Sixty percent of the DU's current replacement value.

(4)    Family housing M&R project for—

(a)    Major M&R of non-GFOQ DUs when the per DU cost is estimated to exceed $20,000 (absolute).

(b)    GFOQ DUs when the total M&R cost per DU is estimated to exceed $35,000 (absolute).

(5)    Unaccompanied personnel housing. OMA M&R project that exceeds the garrison commander's approval authority.

(6)    Replacement of major building components (such as heating systems, windows, exterior siding/painting, floors).

(7)    Housing privatization initiative concept development (life cycle cost analysis prepared by the ASA (IE&E), RCI, and OASA (FM&C)).

(8)    New and renewal lease acquisition actions.

c. The EA procedures as the relate to Army housing.  See DA Pam 402-1-1 for EA procedures as they relate to Army housing actions.

Section XV
Establishment of Rental Rates for Housing and Related Facilities

3-113. Scope

a.  This section sets forth the principles and general policies for establishing and administering rents for housing and charges for related facilities supplied to—

(1)    Civilian employees of the Federal Government.

(2)    Members of the Uniformed Services.

(3)     Foreign nationals (military and civilian) occupying housing under authorities other than the Arms Export Control Act (AECA) (22 USC 2751).

(4)     All non-Government personnel occupying Army-owned or Army-controlled housing located within the United States where housing is essential to the performance of a DA activity.

b.  This section does not apply to Military Assistance Advisory Group (MAAG) housing or foreign nationals occupying housing under authority of the AECA. (Pricing requirements provided under authority of the AECA are contained in DOD 7000.14-R, vol 15.)

3-114. Rental housing composition

a.  Rental housing includes all of the housing identified under rental quarters in the glossary of this publication.

b.  Rental housing excludes the following:

(1)    Public housing assigned to members of the Uniformed Services in lieu of BAH or to appropriated fund civilian employees in foreign countries in lieu of housing allowances (see 5 USC 5912 and 5923).

(2)    Housing available for occupancy by personnel where forfeiture of a portion of per diem travel allowance is involved.

(3)    Privately owned Wherry housing.

(4)    Government-owned or Government-leased MHP facilities, including utility connections, provided to members of the Uniformed Services for house trailers and mobile homes not owned by the Government.

(5)    Army lodging facilities when used by AD and retired military personnel and Family members, authorized civilian employees and Family members, and spouses or relatives of AD personnel confined to hospitals. Army lodging facilities are considered "rental housing" when occupied by all others.

(6)    Unaccompanied personnel housing occupied by a member of the Uniformed Services on a PCS (that is, from time of official notification until arrival at new duty station to include time it takes to find permanent housing).

(7)    Unaccompanied personnel housing occupied by an AD Soldier in a leave status and retired military personnel, at the discretion of the garrison commander.

3-115. Exceptions to this section

The provisions of this section do not apply in the following instances:

a.  When employees attend training programs at Federal or private facilities and the cost of housing is factored into the program cost to the Army or through other means, so long as the per diem rate (or actual expense allowance) paid the employee is set to reflect the fact that housing is provided at no cost to the employee.

b.  In other than training situations when employees are receiving per diem (or actual expense allowance) and occupying Government housing, the per diem paid the employees is set to reflect the fact that the housing is provided at no cost to the employee.

c.  When employees are receiving a remote work site commuting allowance and housing is provided at no cost to the employees, the allowance paid shall consist of factors other than the housing cost portion of the allowance (see 5 USC 5942).

3-116. Responsibilities for development of rental rates

a.  The Commander, USACE will establish detailed guidelines for—

(1)    Development of rental rates and related charges for Government furnished utilities.

(2)    Processing appeals.

(3)    Monitoring the rental program.

(4)    Furnishing necessary reports.

b.  District Commanders/District Engineers of the USACE will—

(1)    Develop rental rates and charges for utility services for all housing subject to this section.

(2)    Furnish the garrison commander annually adjusted rental rates for each rental unit, based on the percent change in Consumer Price Index (CPI) Rent Series, as identified in OMB Circular A-45. The CPI-based change will be furnished to District Commanders/District Engineers in October or November of each year.

c.  Garrison commanders will—

(1)    Provide and update to appropriate District Commanders/District Engineers accurate lists of housing units subject to this section for establishment of rate schedules for rents and related utilities and service charges. Data provided will include the following as appropriate:

(a)    Number of housing units by type (for example, Capehart, Wherry, Lanham Act, appropriated fund (military construction program (MCP), BOQ, BEQ, VOQ, VEQ, and so forth) and by style (for example, detached single Family; duplex one-story; duplex two-story; multiplex, multistory; BOQ/BEQ/VOQ/VEQ with living room, bedroom, and bath or with living room-bedroom combination and bath). Housing that may be made available to transients will be identified separately, as the need arises.

(b)    Building number or, as appropriate, address of each unit "keyed" to a representative type unit.

(c)    Services provided (by Government and separately by NAF).

(d)    Equipment provided (for example, ranges, cabinets, refrigerators).

(e)    Furniture and furnishings (for example, living, dining or bedroom furniture; drapes, curtains).

(2)    Implement, promptly, new rent schedules upon receipt. Schedules received for Family housing any time from the first through the 20th of the month will require that tenants be notified no later than the first of the succeeding month. Schedules received after the 20th of the month shall be considered as having been received on the first of the following month.

(3)    Make annual adjustments in the basic rental rate and utilities as appropriate. Such adjustments, to be effective on March 1 of each year, or at the beginning of the first pay period which starts on or after March 1 of each year, shall be made according to the revised schedule furnished by the District Commander/District Engineer.

(4)    Adjust, promptly, upon receipt of changes in local domestic utility rates occurring subsequent to receipt of rent schedules from the District Commander/District Engineer, utility charges for housing and notify the District Commander/District Engineer so that correct schedules may be maintained.

3-117. Broad policy

a.  Rental rates for Government housing and charges for other facilities made available in connection with the occupancy of housing on a rental basis shall be based on their reasonable value, in the circumstances under which the housing and facilities are provided, occupied, or made available (see 5 USC 5911).

b.  Although housing operated by the DOD components in foreign countries is not subject to OMB Circular A-45, fair economic charges for all housing rental units owned or controlled by DOD shall be established.

c.  The principle of comparability established by this section shall be followed in establishing housing rents and charges in foreign countries, where appropriate.

d.  An employee or member of the Uniformed Services shall not be required to occupy housing on a rental basis unless necessary service cannot be rendered or that property of the Government cannot adequately be protected otherwise (see 5 USC 5911(e)).

3-118. Basic rate principle

a.  Rental rates for housing, equipment, furnishing, and services provided occupants will be set at levels prevailing for comparable private rental accommodations in the nearest representative year-round community. Seasonal rentals will be discounted or modified appropriately. Rents and other charges may not be set so as to provide a housing subsidy, serve as an inducement in the recruitment or retention of employees, or to encourage the occupancy of existing Government housing (see 5 USC 5536).

b.  Rent determined for housekeeping units will clearly distinguish between charges for basic (or shelter) rent and facility charges, such as ranges, cabinets, and refrigerators, and furnishings, except that charges for equipment will be included in the basic rent if such practice is common in the area.

(1)    Where housing is provided with equipment and furnishings not included in the basic rent, the additional charges will be based on the typical charge for such equipment and furnishings in the area.

(2)    As an exception to paragraph 3-118b(1) where excessive differentials occur in the private rental market between rents for furnished and unfurnished housing, the charge for equipment and furnishings shall be set at the level that will amortize the replacement value of the equipment and furnishings at the time of appraisal over their estimated useful life (For a discussion of broad guidelines for the normal life expectancies of furnishings, see DA Pam 420-1-1.

(3)    The charges for furnishings in non-housekeeping units may be included in rents assigned without distinguishing separately, and may be adjusted as provided in paragraph 3-118b(2).

c.  Rental rates for housing and charges for related facilities supplied by the Army to foreign nationals (military and civilian) will be set as follows:

(1)    In accordance with terms of any agreement between the United States and the foreign Government involved.

(2)     for foreign nationals occupying housing under the AECA, pricing requirements for housing are contained in DOD 7000.14-R, volume 15. When housing is provided under other legal authorities, rates shall be set in accordance with this section unless the applicable authorizing legislation provides for alternative pricing procedure. In that case, document the alternative legal pricing requirement, bill in accordance with it, and retain applicable documentation for audit.

(3)     for foreign military students or trainees and PEP personnel, apply the rental charge guidance set forth in paragraph 3-12e(for Family housing) and in AR 215-1 (for Army lodging).

(4)    When there is no formal agreement as mentioned in paragraph (1), above, rates for foreign nationals other than those identified in paragraphs (2) and (3) above will be set in accordance with this section.

3-119. Utilities principle

a.  Department of the Army charges for utilities for housekeeping units will be set at the local prevailing rates for similar services, in accordance with the principle of equivalence with private housing practice. Charges to occupants of rental units for utilities (such as heat, electricity, gas, water, and ice) will be as follows:

(1)    When furnished by the Government and metered or measured, apply domestic rates for similar services in the locality used for comparison.

(2)    When utilities are not measured, set charges by comparison with the cost of such services to the occupants of comparable private rental housing. Such charges will be clearly identified and distinguished from charges for basic rent.

(3)     For non-housekeeping rooms, the room rent may combine basic rent and utilities without distinction.

b.  When utilities are not metered, consumption will be estimated by the DPW. Charges for such services will be based on the local prevailing rates for comparable private rental housing furnished by the appraiser. Where there is no local DPW, the estimates of quantities consumed will be made by the District Commander/District Engineer.

3-120. Family housing units designated as substandard

When substandard Family housing units are occupied by a member of a Uniformed Service and their Family members, the amount of the fair market rental value of the housing unit shall be charged against the member's BAH except that such charge shall not be in an amount in excess of 75 percent of the member's BAH (see 10 USC 2830). When substandard housing units are occupied by other than members of the Uniformed Services and their Families, full rents and charges shall be collected from the residents (see paras 3-16j and 3-24).

3-121. Instances of personal hardship

In certain hardship cases, continued occupancy of military Family housing may be allowed. Rental charges (or remission thereof) for such occupancies are set forth in paragraph 3-18b.

3-122. Charges for mobile home park spaces

a.  Mobile home park space charges for members of the Uniformed Services and their Families are set forth in paragraph 3-92g.

b.  When MHP facilities are provided to other than members of the Uniformed Services and their Families, full rents and charges shall be collected from the occupants.

3-123. Frequency of rental reviews

Charges for rental housing shall be adjusted periodically in accordance with the following:

a.  Rental rates of Government-furnished housing will be adjusted annually by application of the percent change in the U.S. city average revised CPI for urban wage earners and clerical workers, rent series. This index is maintained by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Department of Labor.

b.  Basic rental rates for rental housing shall be affirmed or adjusted by survey of the private rental market as follows:

(1)    Every fifth year, or when the rental rate for the housing has been increased by 40 percent through application of the CPI Rent Series, whichever occurs first.

(2)    Every third year, if for any reason valid and realistic comparability with private rental rates has not been established.

(3)    Any year when changes in the private rental market in the nearby established community indicate a need to adjust basic rental rates on the basis of a survey or appraisal of the rental market.

c.  Utilities furnished by the Government and metered or measured will be adjusted whenever rate changes occur in the locality used for comparison.

3-124. Establishing rent schedules

a.  A rental rate schedule of reasonable value for each unit type, utilities, and other services will be developed by the District Commander/District Engineer in accordance with ER 405-1-12 and the basic rental rate principle and guidance contained in OMB Circular A-45 (see DA Pam 420-1-1 for a summary of guidance and procedure for rent establishment). A separate schedule will be prepared, if required, for transient housing and will provide a daily rate rather than a monthly rate. Schedules will be prepared by qualified contract fee appraisers for the initial 5-year period and each 5-year period thereafter; however, when it has been determined to be in the best interests of the Army, USACE staff appraisers may be used, in lieu of contract fee appraisers, provided prior approval is obtained from HQ USACE (CERE-E) Washington, DC 20314-1000.

b.  In foreign countries, qualified contract or staff appraisers may be used for appraisal of DA housing as each situation warrants. After an initial appraisal by a contract or staff appraiser, commanders in foreign countries may authorize the use of either contract or staff appraisers or employee representatives, for the subsequent five-year review and reappraisal of rent schedules of all housing within their jurisdiction. Primary reliance will be placed on the staff or contract appraiser when available. If a staff appraiser is not readily available in the area, and a determination is made that securing either a local contract appraiser, if available, or a staff appraiser from the United States is not economical or feasible, employee representatives may be used to establish rental rates. Justification for the determination to use employee representatives will be documented and retained in installation files together with the rent appraisal.

3-125. Appeals and reviews of schedules of charges

Garrison commanders may appeal or request a review of the schedules of charges for rents and utilities for housing subject to this section in accordance with the following:

a.  Any appeal or review will be processed so as to permit a decision by the reviewing authority and returned within 60 days. The appeal or request for a review will be made in writing after receipt of the approved rent schedule and will be addressed to the office from which the rent schedule was received. Every reasonable effort will be made to comply with this requirement. If a request for an appeal or review is made, the tenant(s) involved will be notified that any adjustment of charges, upward or downward, resulting from the review will be made retroactive to the date of the appeal or request for a review. Increased rental rates, will be collected by the OPLOC/FAO pending the decision of the appeal or review. Upon a final determination, the applicable amounts, after any refunds to the housing occupants, will be transferred to the appropriate accounts as provided by DFAS-IN 37-1 regulation, chapter 14, graph 140310.D.

b.  Where the garrison commander considers that rent and utility schedules do not reflect reasonable comparability with local private rentals and are inconsistent with the basic rent principle, the commander may request an appeal or review of the schedule from the office which furnished the schedule. The request must be supported with the facts and circumstances on which the request for the appeal or review is based, indicating specifically which units and rates are considered inequitable and to what extent. The office responsible for establishing the rate schedule will carefully review the facts and circumstances and all data utilized in developing the schedule to insure that no discrepancies exist. Where discrepancies are found or where the evidence furnished by the commander warrants further evaluation, investigation, or adjustment of the schedule, corrective action will be taken. Approval of the corrective action or revised rates will be obtained in the same manner as the original schedule and the resulting schedule submitted to the commander for implementation. Where no corrective action is deemed justified, the commander will be notified with reasons in support of the decision.

c.  If the garrison commander is still dissatisfied with the results of the appeal or review, the commander may submit the action through channels to HQ USACE (CERE-E), Washington, DC 20314-1000.

d.  If an appeal is based on special grounds, such as paragraphs (1) and (2) below, it will be referred through the channels to HQ USACE (CERE-E), Washington, DC 20314-1000, for review and decision.

(1) Space devoted to official use.   Where the use of a portion of a housing unit designated as representational housing is required for the purpose of accommodating official visitors, for official office space or for the general convenience of the public, special consideration may be given to a compensatory adjustment in rent. In such instances, the garrison commander will set forth in full detail the circumstances detracting from the otherwise reasonable value of the housing to facilitate a proper evaluation and recommendation.

(2) Excessive size or quality.   If housing of similar size and/or quality to that which the employee would ordinarily select in the private market, is not available, and the employee is required to accept alternate housing, the housing may not have the same reasonable value to the employee that would otherwise be reflected by comparison with private rental housing. Cases in this category will be considered only if suitable alternate housing is not available to the employee. In such instances, temporary rental adjustments may be made by the USACE, if fully justified by the facts. Occupancy will not continue beyond one month subsequent to the availability of housing on the installation or in private housing similar in size and/or quality to which the employee is entitled.

e.  Appeals of rentals affecting housing pertaining to the Army's National Cemeteries will be made to the Superintendent, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA 22211-5003, for consideration and final decision.

3-126. Records

Complete records of proceedings, findings, recommendations, and other documents relating to the development of rent schedules for housing subject to this section, including any subsequent reviews and appeal actions pertaining thereto, will be maintained in accordance with AR 25-400-2, and may be used for audit and review purposes by the office which furnished the schedule.

3-127. Disposition of collections for rents and charges

Receipts from rents and other charges imposed pursuant to this section shall be credited to the accounts shown in table 3-13.

Table 3-13. Disposition of collections for rents and charges
Type of facility rentedAccount to be credited with receipts
Family housing, including MHP spacesAFH (see 10 USC 2831)
Housing not included in next above- 
Basic rent General Proprietary Receipt Account 3210, "Defense Military Not Otherwise Classified", under a citation that includes the departmental code (a two-digit prefix symbol-"21" for the Army)
Utilities and related services Appropriation reimbursement to the O&M type account financing the cost of utilities
NAF services account Applicable NAF

Section XVI
Installation Housing Planning for Mobilization

3-128. Scope

This section establishes policy for housing managers at installation and higher levels which will enable Army housing organizations to plan for and participate effectively during periods of imminent emergency, declared emergency, or mobilization.

a.  Mobilization occurs in response to an operational contingency or national emergency. A mobilization may be classified selective, partial, full, or total depending on the level of military buildup required to meet specific circumstances.

b.  The policy outlined in this section supplements those set forth in earlier sections and are applied during mobilization.

3-129. Background

for a general discussion of overall mobilization planning and relevant command/agency relationships, see DA Pam 420-1-1.

3-130. General

a.  OACSIM provides guidance, direction, and coordination for construction requirements, facilities engineering, and housing matters to ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs and to IMCOM, its Regions, and installations during premobilization planning.

b.  IMCOM provides base operations (BASOPS) support to all Army installations through the garrison commanders.

c.  Under mobilization, the overall housing objective-to adequately house Soldiers, with or without Family members-remains unchanged. Housing management, its policies, programs, and procedures will be the same as described in earlier sections of this chapter.

d.  Each installation will have specific mobilization mission requirements and a unique array of on-post and off-post housing resources available to it, therefore, each installation will have to plan for and execute its individualized mobilization housing mission.

e.  Policies regarding assignment and termination of, or providing information on, housing remain in effect unless specifically modified by official policy.

f.  Government-controlled housing during periods of mobilization will include units in the installation inventory, and temporary or permanent units acquired through—

(1)    The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).

(2)    The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) or its counterpart organization within each state.

(3)    The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

(4)    Leased housing obtained through any program where the Government, rather than the Soldier, is responsible for lease payments.

(5)    The use of nonindustrial facilities (NIF) (see para g below).

g.  Each Army installation will determine its mobilization requirements for NIF not under Army control that are needed to support military mobilization force levels. Garrison commanders will make application for predesignation of NIF in accordance with AR 500-10.

(1)    The purpose of the NIF program is to assure that existing NIF not under the control of the DOD will be available for military preparedness purposes in the event of mobilization, thereby quickly providing additional facilities and reducing requirements for new construction.

(2)    Civilian facilities available throughout the United States to help meet requirements for mobilization include hotels, motels, restaurants, and warehouses.

h.  Installation mobilization relationships. The installation is the base of the cross-leveling redistribution system. Although the functions and responsibilities are the same, the variety of organizations, missions, and capabilities at each of the 50 plus mobilization stations results in almost unique procedures at each post. Some of the impacts on planning and command relationships are—

(1)    The garrison commander and his/her housing manager must be responsive to each ACOM, ASCC, and DRU when it has units at their post.

(2)    Housing managers at supporting installations must ensure that mobilization planning provides for expeditious housing management assistance and administrative support of the unit.

(3)    Installations which, during peacetime, have combined division/installation staffs must be prepared to immediately function separately upon mobilization and deployment. Additional mobilization TDA (MOBTDA) positions should be identified to handle the increased workload that is not offset by the mobilization of sustainment units and/or augmentees for the installation.

3-131. Housing mobilization planning

a. Mobilization planning tasks above installation level.  The following tasks are assigned in accordance with the Army Mobilization and Operations Planning and Execution System in order to effectively plan and prepare for requirements associated with stationing, housing, and expanding installations to accommodate mobilization:

(1) Headquarters, Department of the Army.   Headquarters, DA will—

(a)    Provide stationing guidance to the ACOMs, ASCCs, DRUs, and IMCOM.

(b)    Approve stationing plans.

(c)    Direct restationing, if required, to overcome reported facilities deficiencies.

(d)    Manage the authorization and funding of construction support.

(e)    Make the final decision to defer, suspend, or cancel previously approved and funded military construction programs, upon mobilization, and within the constraints of existing legislation, military regulations, and so forth.

(f)    Determine requirements for prisoner-of-war camps and provides guidance to FORSCOM.

(g)    Take action to exercise MOUs to recover and transfer control of former Army controlled real estate in order to support the mobilization.

(h)    Direct establishment of new installations.

(i)    Direct the activities of semi-active installations and activities.

(2) Army Commands, Army Service Component Commands, and Direct Reporting Units.   The ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs will ensure that mobilization plans, continuity of operations plans (COOPs), and emergency action procedures (EAP) are in consonance with Army Mobilization and Operations Planning and Execution System.

(3) U.S. Army Forces Command.   The FORSCOM will—

(a)    Develop a detailed stationing plan for mobilization. This plan should be updated and submitted annually to HQDA (DAIM-OD). This plan will be developed in coordination with other ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs in accordance with priorities and HQDA guidance. The FORSCOM is authorized to plan stationing of deploying units at all installations. This plan will include—

1.    Deployable TOE units.

2.    Base operating TDA and TOE units.

3.    Trainee, transient, and student loads, in coordination with other ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs concerned.

(b)    Develop plans for location and size of prisoner of war camps.

(4) U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command.   The TRADOC will—

(a)    Develop a detailed training base expansion plan, in coordination with other ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs.

(b)    Provide the updated training base expansion plan to FORSCOM for use in preparing stationing plans.

(5) U.S. Army Materiel Command.   The AMC will—

(a)    Develop a detailed industrial base expansion plan.

(b)    Coordinate applicable portions of the plans with FORSCOM for use in preparing stationing plans.

(6) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers/Chief of Engineers.   The USACE will—

(a)    Serve as the proponent for the engineering and construction portion of the mobilization plan.

(b)    Provide advice, support, and coordination during premobilization planning on engineering and construction matters to ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs and installations either directly or through the USACE division/district organization, as appropriate.

(c)    Develop plans, in coordination with other ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs for acquisition (including recapture of excessed property and revocation of outgrants) for real estate required for mobilization.

(7) U.S. Army Medical Command.   The MEDCOM will—

(a)    Develop, in coordination with other ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs, a detailed plan to ensure decentralized execution and delivery of all essential health services to the expanded Army after M-Day for partial, full, and total mobilization.

(b)    Provide assistance to other commands/activities within the MEDCOM area of responsibility.

(8) Installation Management Command.   The IMCOM will—

(a)    Supervise installation mobilization expansion planning and staffing.

(b)    Maintain records of their installations' capabilities to provide facilities in support of mobilization.

(c)    Ensure that requirements for activation or expansion, to include construction of additional facilities and addition of real estate required for support of mobilization, are determined and validated and are provided to HQDA annually.

(d)    Ensure installations make maximum use of NIF. Provide guidance as required to ensure that installations identify appropriate NIF and submit applications through FORSCOM.

(e)    Provide assistance to FORSCOM in development of mobilization stationing plan.

(f)    Provide assistance to TRADOC in development of training base expansion plans.

b. Installation mobilization planning.  

(1) General.   Each installation (to include State-operated installations) with a mobilization mission will prepare detailed mobilization plans. An integral part of these plans is the information contained in the Real Property Master Plan which examines expansion capabilities of and planning requirements for facilities to support projected loads during full mobilization.

(2) Installation planning.   Installation planning will include housing appendices to the engineer annex which will—

(a)    Be based on the installation mobilization missions.

(b)    Be based on the installation daily loads as computed from the FORSCOM Mobilization Troop Basis Stationing Plan (MTBSP), the TRADOC Army Program for Individual Training (ARPRINT), and the MEDCOM-MP (MEDCOM-mobilization plan).

(c)    Include detailed plans within the RPMP for the maximum utilization of existing facilities and expansion required to support projected loads.

(d)    Include a cost-estimate of the repair, rehabilitation, and acquisition, to include associated costs, required to accommodate the predetermined loading.

(e)    Provide details regarding preparation of a housing annex to the Installation Mobilization Plan (IMP) as shown in paragraph 3-132 below.

(3) Guidance.   

(a)    Changes in missions and/or command jurisdictions of installations will be planned only when essential to meet mobilization requirements and coordinated with HQDA (DAIM-OD and DAMO-OD).

(b)    Headquarters, USACE and the ACSIM will manage and coordinate acquisition of State-controlled installations with appropriate , Army Service Component Commands, and Direct Reporting Units, IMCOM, and Chief, NGB. The Chief, NGB will keep state authorities informed of plans involving possible use of these installations.

(c)    Installation expansion will be in consonance with an approved RPMP. The RPMP will include specific plans for accommodating the expected population surge during mobilization (M) to M + 90 using NIF, tentage, and Army approved expedient construction.

(d)    After need for new construction is reviewed, new construction may be deferred.

(e)    In developing mobilization planning standards in the United States, use space criteria established by the USACE. Construction will be based on "M-Drawing" facilities where designs are available and appropriate; or, theater of operations type construction (AR 415-16) using standards and criteria established in TMs 5-301 (series), 5-302 (series), and 5-303. When neither of the above will provide adequate facilities, local designs may be substituted. All local designs will be reported to HQ USACE (CECW-E).

(f)    Anticipate an increased workload in housing management, particularly with respect to HS. Rely primarily on existing housing assets, both on and off post. New construction of UPH either will not occur or will require lead time of one or more years. Therefore, housing needs will be met primarily by increased use of existing housing assets, diversion of Family housing units, and other real property facilities, as well as using site facilities, tents, and so forth.

(g)     Lease off-post housing facilities in accordance with AR 500-10. Identify, and be prepared to use, privately-owned commercial housing facilities for military use. A predesignated listing of validated properties will be identified and reported to FORSCOM. FORSCOM will maintain and publish a pamphlet listing the predesignated properties as NIF properties for U.S. Army mobilization purposes.

(h)    Use minimum adequacy standards, particularly for UPH space, sparingly but as necessary. Installations may house any mobilized Soldier using excess barracks space regardless of rank. Commanders may reduce the 72 square feet/6.7 square meters standard to 54 square feet/5.0 square meters to meet mission requirements. This may be further reduced to 40 square feet (3.7 square meters) with the approval of the senior medical officer. Use space criteria established in section IV.

(i)    Mobilized Soldiers will not be involuntarily housed in substandard quarters for more than 45 days.

(j)    Give priority for occupancy of Family housing to the incumbent Family, rather than to the incoming Family.

(k)    Family members of a deployed sponsor may retain housing or opt to relocate.

(l)    Family members of prisoners of war (PWs) and families of missing in action (MIA) or missing non-hostile personnel may continue to occupy their housing until their status changes.

(4) Category classification.   Section III priorities of assignment to housing apply with the following category classifications:

(a)    Reserve Component sponsors permanently assigned duties at the installation will be housed using the same section III priority as active Army Soldiers.

(b)    Reserve Component sponsors assigned to an installation for training and deployment will be encouraged not to bring Family members to the training/mobilization site. Housing support for these personnel will be limited to HS assistance for private sector housing, if a sponsor elects to bring Family members to the installation.

(c)    Priority "5" housing support will be provided to DOD and U.S. State Department evacuee families referred by DHHS during emergency or non-emergency repatriation operations.

(d)    Unaccompanied families of military personnel assigned overseas will be housed with priority "6."

(5) Furnishings.   Furnishings for Family housing requirements may not be stockpiled. Furniture for excepted UPH mobilization loads may be stockpiled.

(6) Management and resources.   Additional housing management and resource guidance will be issued at the time of mobilization. The thrust of such guidance is expected to be as follows:

(a)    Reduce O&M projects to the minimum level necessary to operate housing facilities and preserve them for continued use.

(b)    Defer nonessential M&R.

(c)    Review new construction and modernization projects and identify those which have not been started but should be constructed, those that have not been started and should be delayed, those that have been started and should be completed, and those that have been started but should be cancelled.

(d)    Identify construction funds available for other use.

c. Installation mobilization and deployment plans.  Each installation with a mobilization mission is required to maintain an installation plan to support mobilization and deployment. These plans must be periodically reviewed and updated to ensure their accuracy and completeness. Housing managers will review the Housing Appendix to the Engineer Annex of the mobilization plan to ensure they encompass all of the housing areas of responsibility and that major requirements are identified and properly coordinated with other staff agencies. Housing plans must not only identify housing policies and procedures but must also identify specific requirements for each area within housing such as Family housing, UPH, HS, Army lodging, and furnishings. Balance requirements for use of housing facilities, between FH, UPH and Army lodging and local community support housing during mobilization. Divert facilities as necessary to achieve balance.

3-132. Preparation of housing appendix

a. Administrative requirements and instructions.  Each mobilization station will prepare a housing plan to support mobilization. Based on the mobilization mission assigned, the installation will prepare a housing appendix to the engineer annex of its mobilization plan. The housing appendix will address the following in defining housing requirements and describing actions for their resolution:

(1)    Mobilization mission.

(2)    Mobilization TDA.

(3)    Number of personnel to be housed during mobilization.

(4)    Unaccompanied personnel housing requirements.

(5)    Medical holdover housing requirements (see para 3-20d(8)).

(6)    Family housing requirements.

(7)    Army lodging requirements.

(8)    Plan to balance the requirements for all types of housing-AFH, UPH, and Army lodging-including a plan to divert facilities necessary to achieve balance.

(9)    Relocation assistance plan.

(10)    Non-industrial facilities plan.

b. Other special requirements.  The housing appendix must ensure that each mobilization station can carry out the following installation responsibilities:

(1)    Support mobilization and repatriation housing to Soldiers.

(2)    Provide representation to the Installation Family Assistance Team for housing issues.

(3)    Support repatriation operations at a port of debarkation (POD) through the Joint Service Processing Support Team in the following areas:

(a)    Provide temporary lodging at the POD.

(b)    Provide installation housing availability data.

(c)    Provide information about housing availability from other sources (FEMA, HUD, State emergency operation centers, excess housing reports from other DOD installations, NIF, and so forth).

(d)    Coordinate with the USACE District or Division Engineer for real estate or lease agreements.

(e)    Notify the responsible DOD installation of evacuees who are—

1.    Programmed to occupy Government housing at their location.

2.    Scheduled to occupy private sector housing within a 30-mile radius (or a 1-hour commute) of their installation.

(f)    Provide Family housing data to STARC for repatriates processed into their areas of responsibility.

(4)    Consider problems unique to OCONUS, in OCONUS areas. Such problems include but are not limited to—

(a)    The installation's Noncombatant Evacuation Operations Plan and its effect on housing operations.

(b)    Coordination with host nation forces for turnover/release of facilities.

(c)    Provision for using local commercial facilities for such tasks as transporting and storing furnishings and equipment.

(d)    Provision for using local national employees on an emergency overtime basis.

(5)    Ensure that the housing appendix (at mobilization stations) of the mobilization plan encompasses all of the housing areas of responsibility, and that major requirements are properly coordinated with other staff agencies. A partial listing of responsible staff agencies is provided below.

(a)    Director of Plans, Training, and Mobilization (DPTM)-mobilization mission.

(b)    Director of Personnel and Community Activities (DPCA)-personnel policy.

(c)    OPLOC/FAO-pay and allowances.

(d)    Director of Public Works (DPW)-leased housing contracts, NIF program, utilization of housing assets, assignment of real property, and furniture and furnishings.

(e)    ACS-community Family support services.

(f)    Director of Logistics (DOL)-tents, cots, rapidly erectable light mobilization structures, and so forth.

c. Participating agencies.  Update the installation RPMP to list agencies (address, telephone number, point-of-contact) that support the mobilization housing effort. Support agencies will include the Regional Office of DHHS, the State emergency coordination office, HUD regional office, adjacent DOD installations, FEMA regional offices, and the STARC. A list of support agencies for repatriation will, similarly, be included in the Installation Support Book.

Chapter 4
Army Military Construction and Nonappropriated-Funded Construction Program Development and Execution

Section I
Introduction

4-1. Overview

a.  This chapter prescribes Army policies, responsibilities, and requirements for the development and execution of the Department of the Army (DA) Military Construction (MILCON) program as well as the DA portion of the Nonappropriated-Funded (NAF) Construction program during peacetime and mobilization. It also prescribes the means for achieving high quality, cost effective military and nonappropriated-funded construction for the Army within schedules that meet the needs of the facility users and attain and maintain compliance with Federal, State, local, and host nation environmental laws and regulations. The term MILCON as used in this regulation is limited to Military Construction, Army (MCA), Unspecified Minor Military Construction, Army (UMMCA), AFH, Planning and Design (P&D), and the Army portion of the Defense Medical Military Construction (MED MILCON) programs.

(1)    The scope includes planning, programming, designing, budgeting, and execution of MCA, UMMCA, MED MILCON, AFH, and NAF projects, acquisition of real estate and demolition requirements related to MILCON, and other supporting activities.

(2)    Additional AFH policy is contained in chapter 3.

(3)    Policy for minor construction projects costing $750,000 or less using funds made available for operation and maintenance is contained in 10 USC 2805(c), and chapter 2 of this regulation.

(4)    Additional policy for non-appropriated fund projects is contained in AR 215-1.

b.  This regulation also sets forth policies and requirements for integrating the planning, programming, and execution phases of the Army MILCON process, with primary emphasis on the programming and execution phases. The planning (project identification) phase is explained in AR 210-20.

c.  Intergovernmental coordination for Army MILCON and NAF programs for installations located in the National Capital Region (NCR) will be accomplished in accordance with AR 210-20 and the published submittal requirements of the National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC) and the Commission of Fine Arts (CFA).

d.  Although this regulation does not govern construction programming funded under Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC), many of the principles and guidelines associated with sound planning, design, and construction apply to the BRAC program.

4-2. Applicability

This chapter applies to the active Army, the Army National Guard/Army National Guard of the United States, and the U.S. Army Reserve, unless otherwise stated. It also applies to tenants on active Army installations. For Army Reserve space requirements and DD Form 1391 and DD Form 1390 (FY_ Military Construction Program) (processing use AR 140-483 (Army Reserve Land and Facility Management) and the Engineering and Base Operations Support (ENBOSS) suite. This chapter does not apply to Civil Works projects as they are funded with non-MILCON appropriations.

4-3. Chapter exponent

The exponent of this chapter is the ACSIM (DAIM-ODC).

4-4. Chapter responsibilities

The following responsibilities are in addition to the general responsibilities identified in paragraph 1-4.

a.  The Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) (ASD (HA)) will provide central management for the MED MILCON program. Guidance for planning and executing the Army portion of the MED MILCON program is contained in para 4-19 and DA Pam 415-15.

b.  The ASA (IE&E) will provide overall policy and program direction for Army construction programs, including the Nonappropriated-Funded Construction Program (NAFCP) (see table 4-1 for project controls).

Table 4-1. Project controls
   
   
AppropriationPOM/BudgetDesign Release
ProgramProject ReviewConstruction
Advertisement Construction Award
Military Construction, ArmyASA (IE&E)DASA (IH)*
AFHASA (IE&E)DASA (IH)
NAFCPASA (IE&E)DASA (IH)
   
 ASA(M&RA)DASA (IH)
 
*(DASA (IH), Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installation and Housing))

Notes:
1. At the time of design release, projects may be flagged by ASA (IE&E) that will require further review before award of design contract, construction advertisement, or construction award.

c.  The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller (ASA (FM&C)) will provide management and policy guidance for Army budgets as provided in AR 1-1 and certify nonavailability of APF for Army lodging construction according to DODI 1015.10.

d.  The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) (ASA (M&RA) will review the NAFCP prior to design release and submission to DASA (IH) and OSD.

e.  The Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4 will—

(1)    Review, approve, and rank in priority Army commissary store surcharge-funded construction projects.

(2)    Chair the Subsistence Review Committee.

(3)    Prioritize the Army Power Projection Program (AP3) projects.

f.  The CIO, G-6 will provide overall policy and program management for Army information management per AR 25-1.

g.  The Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7 will—

(1)    Prioritize the Army MILCON revitalization projects.

(2)    Establish and promulgate for HQDA review and approval, MILCON-funded range and training land projects and non-MCA (OMA) funded range projects.

(3)    Establish policy and guidance for planning, programming, and resourcing major training land acquisition proposals (1000 acres or more, or $1,000,000 acquisition costs or more).

(4)    Convene, chair, and serve as a principal (voting) member of the Range and Training Land Program (RTLP) Requirements Review and Prioritization Board (RRPB) and the RTLP Configuration Control Board (CCB).

h.  The ACSIM will—

(1)     Execute day-to-day MILCON PPBE responsibilities.

(2)    Serve as program manager for MILCON.

(3)    Prepare MILCON guidance for inclusion in The Army Plan (TAP).

(4)    Review and evaluate program submissions for compliance with DA policy and guidance, in coordination with the HQDA facility proponent and ARSTAF representatives.

(5)    Program and prioritize MILCON requirements from the Army Service Component Command (ASCC), and Direct Reporting Units (DRU) and Installation Management Command (IMCOM) Program Objective Memorandum (POM) submission.

(a)    Upon receipt of the prioritized project lists from ACOM, ASCC, and DRUs and HQ IMCOM, and using guidance provided by Senior Army Leadership, build the draft corporate Army prioritized project listing.

(b)    Ensure POM management decision packages (MDEPs) have all related facility requirements identified. Resource within available funding.

(c)     forward the corporate Army prioritized project listing to the (DCS, G-3/5/7).

(d)    Present requirements to HQDA and assist in presentations to OSD and the Congress.

(6)    Insure MDEP managers program for environmental, furnishings, and equipment tails. HQDA (DAIM-ISH) will manage the centrally funded Initial Issue Administrative Furnishings program. They will review the DD Form 1391, TAB E - Furnishings & Equipment, to determine when the common user furnishings will be required, and procure the furnishings to coincide with construction completion dates. This program will not program for, or fund, unit specific furnishings & equipment (that is, SIPRNET equipment). That will be the responsibility of the end user.

(7)    Serve as chairman and voting member of the CRRC.

(8)    Provide executive management oversight of the IMCOM and associated region directors.

(9)    Provide release authority to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for design and construction of MILCON (other than MED MILCON) projects and Real Estate acquisitions, after DASA (I & H) approval.

(10)    Provide MILCON programming guidance based on prioritized projects contained in the Army Master Range Program per the (DCS, G-3/5/7) (DAMO-TR) and the DA Program Coordinator for Army Training Facilities.

(11)    Provide MILCON programming guidance based on prioritized projects contained in the AP3 per the DCS, G-4 (DLAO-FPM).

(12)    Prepare and present MCA, AFH, and NAFCP programs and budget estimates for OSD, OMB, and the Congress, as Army program manager.

(13)    Participate in the Department of the Army (DA) Facilities Standardization Program as chairman of the DA Facilities Standardization Committee.

(14)    Obtain approvals for reprogramming and cost variations.

(15)    Provide authority to the U.S. Army Family Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command (USAFMWRC) and AAFES for design and construction of Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) projects after ASA (IE&E) approval.

(16)    Coordinate NAFCP reports with the ARSTAF. Submit the reports to ASA (IE&E), using the format prescribed by DODI 7700.18.

(17)     Present ARSTAF-approved NAF and AAFES construction projects through the ASA (M&RA) to the ASA (IE&E) for approval.

(18)    Notify OSD of the Army's intent to test the commercial viability of a commercially financed facility (also know as Enhanced Use Leasing (EUL)).

(19)    Notify OSD of the Army's intent to award commercially viable projects no less than two weeks prior to award.

(20)    Exercise executive oversight, configuration control, and resource management of the PAX System, as proponent.

(21)    Consolidate the annual NAFCP congressional report.

(22)    Ensure that physical security requirements are included in the annual NAFCP congressional report, in accordance with AR 190-13.

(23)    Prepare MILCON budget justification books. Ensure the quality, completeness, and accuracy of each DD Form 1391 and DD Form 1390 included in the budget book by making an independent review of those forms at USACE and taking corrective action as required.

i.  Principal officials of other ARSTAF agencies will—

(1)    Review and provide comments on construction issues.

(2)    Serve as the functional proponent for a facilities type—

(a)    Provide a representative to serve as a member of the PRB to analyze MILCON and NAFCP construction requirements to determine if requests meet objectives, policies, and priorities established in the current program guidance.

(b)    Present valid requirements through the programming and budgeting process within Army, OSD, and OMB, as required.

(c)    Provide policy and guidance to USACE regarding standards for facilities (see app E.).

(d)    Participate in the development, implementation, and revision of Standard Design/Criteria for repetitive facilities under the DA Facilities Standardization Program.

(3)    Serve as proponents for those categories of MILCON projects cited in appendix B of DA Pam 415-28, and all appropriate NAFCP program projects.

j.  The Surgeon General will—

(1)    Provide regional medical commands (RMCs), MEDCOM major subordinate commands (MSCs), and installations with annual programming guidance and criteria for development of Army health facility projects and programs as the Army proponent for such projects and programs.

(2)    Review, coordinate, and prioritize all construction and major alterations of Army Facility Activity Code (FAC) 500 (Health Care Delivery Medical Facilities including Fisher Houses), FAC 31060 (Medical Research Laboratories), and FACs 171 and 179 (facilities associated with medical training) for planning, programming, and budgeting consideration by the ASD (HA) Defense Medical Facilities Office (DMFO), Tricare Management Activity (TMA).

(3)    Ensure that approval of siting for all medical facilities has been obtained.

(4)    Develop and maintain the Army Future Years Defense Program (FYDP) for MED MILCON and the medical Long Range Construction Program.

(5)    Perform user reviews of Army health facility designs for medical functionality.

(6)    Review Army health facility designs, together with the USACE Medical Facilities Center of Expertise (CEHNC-MX), for compliance with UFC 4-510-01, Design: Medical Military Facilities and Technical Instructions (TI) 800-01, Design Criteria.

(7)    Present the Army health facility program to the CRRC for coordination.

(8)    Submit the proposed Army health facility program to the TMA - DMFO and Medical Military Construction Office (MMCO) for review, approval, and submission to Congress. Assist DMFO/MMCO in presenting projects before Congress, when requested by OSD.

(9)    Ensure that the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command (USACECOM) and its subordinate commands formulate information systems requirements for, and participate in, the design of all medical facilities.

(10)    Monitor and analyze medical construction program execution.

(11)    Ensure medical facilities located in the NCR accomplish intergovernmental coordination of the Army MED MILCON program, master plans, and construction project designs in accordance with AR 210-20 and the published submittal requirements of the NCPC and CFA.

(12)    Perform economic analyses of feasible operational and facility alternatives as supporting justification for Army MED MILCON projects.

(13)    Provide guidance and assistance to MEDCOM RMCs and MSCs for the development of health facility master plans.

k.  The Commander, IMCOM will—

(1)    Provide executive management oversight of IMCOM region directors, installations, and activities.

(2)    Provide guidance and assistance to IMCOM region directors, installations, and activities in MILCON program development, per Army long range planning guidance, PBG, and TAP, as well as that for the NAFCP.

(3)    Direct preparation of project documentation for the budget years, following review and approval of each installation's Real Property Master Plan (RPMP).

(4)    Direct preparation and completion of NEPA documentation to support execution of the MILCON program.

(5)    Submit prioritized base operations (BASOPS) MILCON requirements in the IMCOM POM Submission to HQDA (DAIM-OD). Ensure POM MDEPs have all related facility requirements identified and resourced. Present requirements to HQDA and assist in presentations to OSD and the Congress.

(6)    Advise, promptly, HQDA (DAIM-OD) of any circumstances that would either cancel a requirement or cause a change in the scope or siting of a proposed MILCON project.

(7)    Serve as a member on the DA Facility Standardization Committee, and ensures IMCOM participation in the Program including appointment of representatives to various subcommittees, groups, and teams.

(8)    Review, validate, and submit to HQDA (DAIM-OD) unforeseen requirements that cannot wait for programming within the normal MILCON cycle and require funding through the UMMCA portion of the MILCON program. (see appendix D.)

(9)    Ensure that new construction requirements and projects meet TAP as well as Army Guidance new mission and new equipment requirements for short and long-term objectives.

(10)    Coordinate and endorse user-requested changes.

(11)    Serve as a nonvoting member of the PRB.

(12)    See also paragraph 4-22d(2) for additional specific responsibilities.

l.  The Commander, USACE will—

(1)    Serve as DOD construction agent responsible for the design and construction of MILCON facilities in accordance with DODD 4270.5.

(2)    Manage design, construction, and real estate activities associated with the MILCON program. Approve cost and technical aspects of those design, construction, and real estate activities.

(3)    Undertake design and construction projects for the organizations listed below (including their authorized representatives), per directives of the SECDEF and agreements with concerned agencies.

(a)    Department of the Air Force.

(b)    DOD.

(c)    Other Government agencies.

(d)     foreign governments.

(e)    Nonappropriated funded agencies, such as the AAFES and the USACFSC.

(4)    Serve as a member on the Department of the Army Facility Standardization Committee.

(5)    Develop, maintain, and distribute policy and criteria for the architectural and engineering design of MILCON and NAF projects, except for AAFES and Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) projects.

(6)    Develop and implement mandatory DA Standard Design/Criteria for repetitive facilities, excluding NAF under the DA Facilities Standardization Program in coordination with the ARSTAF facility proponent and the ACSIM.

(7)    Review construction programs for projects suitable for Standard Design/Criteria, site adaptations, and similar re-use of existing design.

(8)    Ensure that standard designs incorporate appropriate antiterrorism (AT) protection measures and sustainable design principles.

(9)    Establish and maintain a Medical Facilities Center of Expertise to manage concept designs and provide technical support during final design and construction for Army FAC 500 (Health Care Delivery Medical Facilities), FAC 310-60 (Medical Research Laboratories), and FACs 171 and 179 (facilities associated with medical training) in cooperation with the OTSG, ensuring compliance with UFC 4-510-01 requirements and conformance to design procedures prescribed by the ASD (HA) DMFO.

(10)    Provide automation support for MILCON programming activities as required.

(11)    Provide guidance and training for preparation of electronically generated DD Form 1390 (Electronic Format), (FY __ Military Construction Program), and DD Form 1391 (FY __ Military Construction Project Data).

(12)    Provide limited quality assurance checking of DD Form 1391 submitted to HQDA for PRB consideration. Commander USACE representative will attend the meetings of the CRRC to provide comments.

(13)    Review economic analysis supporting documentation for Army MILCON projects.

(14)    Develop, maintain, and distribute policy and criteria for MILCON project management.

(15)    Attend scheduled meetings to discuss projects in design and under construction with ACSIM, IMCOM, and, for mission support projects, ACOM, ASCC, and DRUs.

(16)    Establish and maintain a Force XXI/Army Force Modernization Program Office (FXXI/AFM PO), Combat Readiness Support Team (CRST), and the Range and Training Land Program Mandatory Center of Expertise (RTLP MCX) for standardization, modernization, and centralized program execution management in support of the RTLP.

(17)    Develop and maintain expertise on the policy and criteria for architectural and engineering design of Army facilities, per guidance and direction from USACE. Review construction programs for projects suitable for Standard Design/Criteria, site adaptations, and similar re-use of existing design and sustainable design and development principles.

(18)    Manage assigned portion of Army design, construction, and related real estate activities. Ensure IMCOM region directors, installations, using services, and other agencies are kept informed about the status of design and construction activities.

(19)    Ensure DD Form 1391 for MILCON projects submitted by IMCOM region directors/ACOM, ASCC, and DRUs comply with prescribed standards, criteria, and cost engineering requirements. Review project-siting data for environmental impacts as well as floodplain and wetland concerns, and ensure that site visits to proposed project sites have been made. Provide certification to the IMCOM region director that the requirements addressed in paragraph 4-23a, below, have been met.

(20)    Participate in USACE scheduled conferences with ACSIM and IMCOM region directors to discuss projects in design and under construction.

(21)    Verify that AT requirements are properly incorporated into DD Form 1391 or that their exclusion is consistent with DOD Antiterrorism Construction Standards.

(22)    Execute assigned portions of MILCON design, real estate, and construction programs.

(23)    Ensure projects are designed and constructed to current standards and criteria, and the approved scope and cost of the projects as defined on DD Form 1391.

(24)     Provide value-engineering studies on all projects, excluding NAFCP with an estimated construction cost in excess of $2 million.

(25)    Ensure that AT and sustainable design and development considerations are considered as part of standard design practice.

(26)    Provide, when requested, support to installations for real property master planning activities and project documentation preparation, construction contracting, and other activities, on a reimbursable basis.

(27)    Participate in the DA Facilities Standardization Program as required.

(28)    Review, validate, and approve current working estimates (CWEs) for budget purposes, excluding NAFCP except when requested by NAFCP Program Manager.

(29)    Evaluate and endorse or reject DOIM request to perform installation of IT work associated with MILCON projects.

(30)    Provide current working estimate (CWE) for all changes, mandatory and discretionary.

m.  Commanders of ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs (excluding IMCOM) will—

(1)    Provide guidance and assistance to their senior commanders (SCs) and activities in support of MILCON program development; prioritize mission projects at each installation, and forward those prioritizations to HQDA (DAIM-OD). They may also offer suggested prioritization of base operations projects and forward this suggested prioritization to HQDA (DAIM-OD) and IMCOM. Ensure all mission MILCON facility requirements have been identified in POM MDEPs.

(2)    Assist the IMCOM in the preparation of project documentation for the budget years, following review and approval of installation Real Property Master Plans (RPMPs) by the IMCOM region directors.

(3)    Assist in presentations to HQDA, OSD, and Congress for issues on their installations.

(4)    Provide IMCOM with requirements for RTLP projects and the AP3.

(5)    Review project documentation to ensure that priorities are adequately reflected in the POM; associated requirements are valid; and that such requirements conform to current objectives, policies, and procedures. ACOM, ASCC, and DRUs will coordinate with the Host Services' installation for MILCON projects on other DOD Services' installations.

(6)    Promptly advise the appropriate IMCOM Regional Director and USACE MSC of any circumstances that either cancel a requirement for or would cause a change in the scope or siting of a proposed MILCON project.

(7)    Appoint a representative to the DA Facilities Standardization Program, and participate in the program (see app G).

(8)    Review and comment on the scope and compliance of MILCON project concept or parametric designs, and final design with ACOM, ASCC, and DRU mission objectives. Conduct ACOM, ASCC, and DRU functional and operational reviews of all proposed NAFCP projects (except for exchanges and commissaries).

(9)    Tenant activities; ensure that the activity coordinates their facility needs with its host garrison commander, and that requirements are incorporated into the host installation's RPMP.

(10)    Establish ACOM, ASCC, and DRU policy for range and training land requirements per AR 210-20.

(11)    Program Operation and Maintenance Army (OMA) and Other Procurement Army (OPA) tails for ACOM, ASCC, and DRU mission specific furnishings and equipment to support MILCON projects where subordinate units are user or tenant organizations on an installation. Insure that all common user furnishings are listed in TAB E - Furnishings and Equipment, on the DD Form 1391. This information will be used by HQDA (DAIM-ISH) to program funding for initial issue furnishings.

(12)     for user requested changes on mission projects, coordinate with IMCOM region directors.

(13)    The U.S. Army Chief of Military History (CMH) is the approval authority for policy and regulatory compliance for Army Historical Programs and Army Museums. The CMH will provide information, guidance and concurrence for facility design to provide storage, display, conservation and preservation of Army historical artifacts. The CMH will be consulted during the development of new museum projects, or the renovation of existing museum projects, or on any other project that will directly affect artifacts under the control of the CMH.

n.  Directors of IMCOM regions will—

(1)    Provide guidance and assistance to regional installations and activities in MILCON program development, per Army long range planning guidance, PBG, and TAP.

(2)    Direct preparation of project documentation for the budget years, following review and approval of installation RPMPs.