Army Regulation 840-1

19 February 2009

Effective date: 19 March 2009

UNCLASSIFIED

Heraldic Activities

Department of the Army Seal, and Department of the Army Emblem and Branch of Service Plaques



SUMMARY of CHANGE

AR 840-1
Department of the Army Seal, and Department of the Army Emblem and Branch of Service Plaques

This major revision, dated 19 February 2009

* Clarifies responsibilities for control and use of the Department of the Army seal and Branch of Service plaques (para 1-4).

* Establishes restrictions on the use of the Department of the Army seal (para 2-2).

* Clarifies the procedures for the use of the Army emblem in commercial items (para 3-2 b ).

* Establishes procedures for obtaining Branch of Service plaques for display (paras 3-3 and 4-3).

* Adds Branch of Service plaques as authorized procurement and display of all branches (chap 4).

* Makes administrative changes (throughout).



Chapter 1
Introduction

1-1. Purpose

This regulation prescribes general policies, responsibilities, descriptions, and procedures governing the Department of the Army seal, emblem, and Branch of Service plaques.

1-2. References

Required and related publications and prescribed and referenced forms are listed in appendix A .

1-3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms

Abbreviations and special terms used in this regulation are explained in the glossary .

1-4. Responsibilities

a. Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army. The Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army provides oversight of heraldry in the Army, and has responsibility for authorizing the use of the Army seal in authentication or validation of documents.

b. Director, The Institute of Heraldry. The Director, The Institute of Heraldry (TIOH) will

(1) Develop policies and procedures for the use of the Department of the Army Emblem and Branch of Service plaques.

(2) Authorize use of the Department of the Army Emblem in commercial articles.

c. Commanders. All commanders (from units to Army Commands/Army Service Component Commands/Direct Reporting Units) will

(1) Display plaques of prescribed designs only.

(2) Obtain plaques from authorized supply sources.

1-5. Commercial manufacture and sale

The Army plaque and branch plaques manufactured commercial for optional purchase are controlled items under the Department of the Army Heraldic Item Quality Control System (see AR 672-8 ).

a. Authority to manufacture. The Institute of Heraldry is responsible for the certification of individuals, firms, or corporations to manufacture plaques according to applicable specifications. Each plaque will be identified by a hallmark and/or a certificate label certifying that it was produced according to specifications. Procedures governing certifying and monitoring the performance of manufacturers outlined in AR 672-8 are applicable to plaque manufacturers.

b. Authority to sell. No certificate of authority is required to sell plaques; however, vendors are responsible to sell only those plaques which have been manufactured in conformance with Government specifications by certified manufacturers and bearing hallmarks assigned by the Institute of Heraldry, U.S. Army.

Chapter 2
Department of the Army Seal

2-1. Authority

The Department of the Army seal is authorized by law Section 3012, Title 10, United States Code (10 USC 3012). The DAGO 1947-01 announced that, at the direction of the President, the traditional seal used during the since the Revolution was redesignated as the Seal of the Department of the Army according to the provisions of the National Security Act of 1947.

2-2. Use

The seal is an instrument used as authorized by the Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army for the authentication or validation of certain documents and records such as commissions, court papers, appointment certificates, retirement certificates, and award certificates requiring the signature of the Secretary of the Army. The Administrative Assistant authorizes the use of the Army Seal for the Secretary of the Army. The Army Seal may no longer be reproduced in three dimensional form nor is its reproduction in color authorized. Its reproduction for any purpose or in any format without approval of the Office of the Secretary of the Army, is unauthorized. The improper use of the seal, forging, counterfeiting, altering, or the use or possession of a counterfeited or altered seal are prohibited by law (18 USC 1017 and 18 USC 506).

2-3. Description and symbolism

The description and symbolism of the Department of the Army seal ( fig 2-1 ) are as follows:

a. Description. On a disk within a designation band, with small beads on the inner edge and larger beads on the outer edge, the inscription United States of America at top and War Office, in base, are the following elements:

In the center is a Roman cuirass below a vertical unsheathed sword, point up, the pommel resting on the neck opening of the cuirass and a Phrygian cap supported on the sword, all between on the right (left to the observer) an esponton and on the left (right to the observer) a musket with fixed bayonet crossed in saltire behind the cuirass and passing under the sword guard. To the right (left to the observer) of the cuirass and esponton is a flag of unidentified design with cords and tassels, on a flagstaff with spearhead, above a cannon barrel, the muzzle and slanting upward behind the cuirass, in front of the drum, with two drumsticks and the fly end of the flag draped over the drumhead; below, but partly in front of the cannon barrel is a pile of three cannon balls, one and two. To the left (right to the observer) of the cuirass and musket is a national color of the Revolutionary War period, with cords and tassels, on a flagstaff with spearhead, similarly arranged above a mortar on a carriage, the mortar facing inward and in front of the lower portion of the color and obscuring the lower part of it; below the mortar are two bomb shells placed side by side. Centered above the Phrygian cap is a rattlesnake holding in its mouth a scroll inscribed This We'll Defend. Centered below the cuirass are Roman numeral MDCCLXXVIII.

b. Symbolism.

(1) The central element of the Department of the Army Seal is a Roman cuirass, a symbol of strength and defense. The United States Flag (of a design used in the formative years of the Nation) and the other flag emphasize the role of the Army in the establishment of and the protection of the Nation.

(2) The sword, esponton (a type of half-pike formerly used by subordinate officers), musket, bayonet, cannon, cannon balls, mortar bombs are representative of traditional Army implements.

(3) The drum and drumsticks are symbols of public notification of the Army's purpose and intent to serve the Nation and its people.

(4) The Phrygian cap (often called the Cap of Liberty) supported on the point of the unsheathed sword and the motto This We'll Defend on a scroll held by a rattlesnake is a symbol depicted on some American colonial flags and signifies the Army's constant readiness to defend and preserve the United States.

(5) The date MDCCLXXVIII and designation War Office are indicative of the origin of the seal. The date (1778) refers to the year of its adoption. The term War Office used during the Revolution and for many years afterward, was associated with the Headquarters of the Army, primarily because of the familiarity of the Americans with the British military system.



Figure 2-1. Department of the Army Seal


Chapter 3
Department of the Army Emblem and Plaque

3-1. Authority

The Secretary of the Army approved the emblem design on 29 January 1974.

3-2. Use

a. The plaque is an officially authorized three-dimensional rendition of the Army emblem. It is used by Army organizations and individuals as authorized by this regulation. It is a symbol which not only emphasizes the Army's heritage but also the relationship of the modern professional Army to the Nation.

b. The reproduction of the Army emblem is authorized (either in reduced or enlarged form) in publications, and other printed matter of an official or quasi-official nature, in Army-approved films and in official Army motion picture and television programs. The design may not be modified in any manner. It must be reproduced in either its proper colors ( fig 3-1 ), through the use of a one-color line process ( fig 3-2 ), or as a line drawing ( fig 3-3 ). The use of the Army emblem for any other purposes, including its incorporation in other items, will be only as authorized by the Institute of Heraldry, 9325 Gunston Road, Room S113, Fort Belvoir Virginia, 22060-5579.

3-3. Supply

The Army emblem plaque is available through the Army supply system for distribution by requisitioning commanders to Army units, activities, elements, installations, and offices of officials designated by the commander.

3-4. Description and symbolism

a. The Army emblem design is derived from the Army Seal and is the official emblem to represent the Army. The emblem differs from the seal in several respects, including the following:

(1) The emblem is displayed in color while the seal is not.

(2) The emblem includes the inscription Department of the Army instead of the inscription War Office which is on the seal.

(3) On the emblem, the American flag is on its own right (observers left) to reflect the current custom for display of flags. The Army flag pattern has been added to the other flag.

(4) The Roman numerals MDCCLXXVIII which indicate the date the Army seal was adopted, were replaced with the date 1775 to reflect the date the Army was established.

b. The description and symbolism of the Army emblem ( fig 3-1 ) are as follows:

(1) Description. On a light blue disk within a gold designation band, bordered with small gold beads on the inner edge and larger gold beads on the outer edge, the inscription in dark blue letters Department of the Army at top and United States of America in base, and with phrases separated at each side by a dark dot, are the following elements:

In the center is a gold Roman cuirass below a vertical unsheathed sword, point up, the blade black and the hilt and guard gold, the pommel resting on the neck opening of the cuirass and a red Phrygian cap supported on the sword point, all between on the right (left to the observer) a black esponton and on the left (right to the observer) a black musket with fixed bayonet crossed in saltire behind the cuirass and passing under the sword guard. To the right (left to the observer) of the cuirass and esponton is a national color of the Revolutionary War period, the union dark blue with white five-pointed stars and the stripes alternating red and white, with gold cords and tassels and gold spearhead on flagstaff, above a gold cannon barrel, the muzzle end slanting upward behind the cuirass, in front of a drum, the shell dark blue, the rims gold and the cords white, with two dark blue drumsticks, and fly end of the national color draped over the drumhead; below, but partly in front of the cannon barrel, is a pile of three black cannon balls, one and two. To the left (right to the observer) of the cuirass and musket is the United States Army Flag depicted with gold cords, tassels, and spearhead, similarly arranged above a gold mortar on a gold carriage, the mortar facing inward and over the lower portion of the United States Army Flag and obscuring the lower part of the device on the flag; below the mortar are two black bomb shells placed side by side. Centered above the Phrygian cap is a gold rattlesnake holding in its mouth a white scroll inscribed This We'll Defend in dark blue letters. Centered below the cuirass are scarlet Arabic numerals 1775.

(2) Symbolism.

(a) The central element of the Department of the Army Emblem is a Roman cuirass, a symbol of strength and defense. The United States Flag, of a design used in the formative years of the Nation, and the United States Army Flag emphasize the role of the Army in the establishment of and the protection of the Nation.

(b) The sword, musket, bayonet, cannon, cannon balls, and mortar bombs are representative of traditional Army implements. The date 1775 refers to the year of the Army's establishment.

(c) The drum and drumsticks are symbols of public notification of the Army's purpose and intent to serve the Nation and its people.

(d) The Phrygian cap (often called the Cap of Liberty) supported on the point of the unsheathed sword and the motto, This We'll Defend on a scroll held by a rattlesnake signify the Army's constant readiness to defend and preserve the United States.

(e) The colors of the design elements are those traditionally associated with the ideals of the United States and of the Army. The flags are in proper colors. Blue is symbolic of loyalty, vigilance, perseverance, and truth. Red denotes courage, zeal, and fortitude. White alludes to deeds worthy of remembrance. Black is indicative of determination and constancy. Gold represents achievement, dignity, and honor.



Figure 3-1. Department of The Army Emblem, Proper Colors





Figure 3-2. Department of The Army Emblem, One-Color, Line Process





Figure 3-3. Department of The Army Emblem, Line Drawing


Chapter 4
Branch of Service Plaques

4-1. Authority

Branch of Service plaques are authorized for all branches of the Army and for designated career fields which have separate collar insignia approved by the Department of the Army.

4-2. Use

Commanders may authorize procurement and display of the Branch of Service plaques as a means of fostering esprit within a branch and identifying the branch affiliation or mission.

4-3. Supply

The Institute of Heraldry will, upon request, provide a master mold of the plaque to the branch proponent if the proponent desires to procure and stock the plaque for resale to individuals and commands. The master mold may be provided to the contractor for use in production.

4-4. Description

a. Adjutant General's Corp. The plaque design ( fig 4-1 ) has the branch insignia in proper colors (blue chief with silver stars with 13 stripes alternating seven, silver and six red). The background of the plaque is white with the branch designation in silver letters.

b. Air Defense Artillery. The plaque design ( fig 4-2 ) has the branch insignia, letters, and border in gold. The background is scarlet.

c. Armor. The plaque design ( fig 4-3 ) has the branch insignia, letters, and border in gold. The background is green.

d. Army Medical Specialist Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-4 ) has the branch insignia in gold with the letter "S" in black, outlined with gold. The letters and rim are gold and the background is maroon.

e. Army Nurse Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-5 ) has the branch insignia in gold with the letter "N" in black, outlined with gold. The letters and rim are gold and the background is maroon.

f. Aviation. The plaque design (fig 4-6) has the branch insignia in proper colors (gold wings with silver propeller). The letters are golden orange and the rim is gold. The background is ultramarine blue.

g. Cavalry. The plaque design ( fig 4-7 ) has the Cavalry insignia and border in gold. The background is white and the letters are scarlet.

h. Chaplain Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-8 ) has the emblem of the Chaplain Corps in proper colors. (The rays and sun are yellow; the dove is white; the olive branch is green; and the book has gold-edged white paper with gold brown binding, brown binding straps with gold buckles and tips. The letters on the book are brown). The background of the plaque is medium blue and the letters and border are gold.

i. Chemical Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-9 ) has the branch insignia in gold with the benzine ring in cobalt blue, outlined in gold. The letters and border are gold and the background is cobalt blue.

j. Civil Affairs. The plaque design ( fig 4-10 ) has the branch insignia in gold, letters, and border in white and the background in purple.

k. Corps of Engineers. The plaque design ( fig 4-11 ) has the branch insignia and border in gold and the letters are white. The background is scarlet.

l. Dental Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-12 ) has the branch insignia in gold with the letter "D" in black, outlined with gold. The letters and rim are gold and the background is maroon.

m. Field Artillery. The plaque design ( fig 4-13 ) has the branch insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The background is scarlet.

n. Finance Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-14 ) has the branch insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The background is silver gray.

o. Infantry. The plaque design ( fig 4-15 ) has the branch insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The background is light blue.

p. Inspector General. The plaque design ( fig 4-16 ) has the Inspector General insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The motto lettering and background are dark blue.

q. Judge Advocate General's Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-17 ) has the branch insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The background is dark blue.

r. Logistics Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-18 ) has the branch insignia and rim in gold with star, motto lettering and background in soldier red. Designation band is white with letters in soldier red.

s. Medical Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-19 ) has the branch insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The background is maroon.

t. Medical Services Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-20 ) has the branch insignia in silver with the letters "MS" in black, outlined with silver. The letters and rim in silver, background is maroon.

u. Military Intelligence. The plaque design ( fig 4-21 ) has the branch insignia proper (gold with dark blue rose). The letters are dark blue, background is white and rim is gold.

v. Military Police. The plaque design ( fig 4-22 ) has the branch insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The background is green.

w. Ordnance Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-23 ) has the branch insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The background is crimson.

x. Public Affairs. The plaque design ( fig 4-24 ) has the Public Affairs collar insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The background is teal blue.

y. Psychological Operations. The plaque design ( fig 4-25 ) has the Psychological Operations collar insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The background is bottle green.

z. Quartermaster Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-26 ) has the branch insignia proper (gold with ring of wheel in blue, stars and inner hub in white, and hub pin in red). The designation band is blue, the letters and borders are gold. The background is buff.

aa. Signal Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-27 ) has the branch insignia proper (red, white, and gold) with gold letters. The outer rim is gold with a narrow band of orange. The background is white.

bb. Special Forces. The plaque design ( fig 4-28 ) has the branch insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The background is jungle green.

cc. Transportation Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-29 ) has the branch insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The background is brick red.

dd. Veterinary Corps. The plaque design ( fig 4-30 ) has the branch insignia in gold with the letter "V" in black, outlined with gold. The letters and rim are gold and the background is maroon.



Figure 4-1. Adjutant General's Corps





Figure 4-2. Air Defense Artillery





Figure 4-3. Armor





Figure 4-4. Army Medical Specialist Corps





Figure 4-5. Army Nurse Corps





Figure 4-6. Aviation





Figure 4-7. Calvary





Figure 4-8. Chaplain Corps





Figure 4-9. Chemical Corps





Figure 4-10. Civil Affairs





Figure 4-11. Corps of Engineers





Figure 4-12. Dental Corps





Figure 4-13. Field Artillery





Figure 4-14. Finance Corps





Figure 4-15. Infantry





Figure 4-16. Inspector General





Figure 4-17. Judge Advocate General's Corps





Figure 4-18. Logistics





Figure 4-19. Medical Corps





Figure 4-20. Medical Service Corps





Figure 4-21. Military Intelligence





Figure 4-22. Military Police Corps





Figure 4-23. Ordnance Corps





Figure 4-24. Public Affairs





Figure 4-25. Psychological Operations





Figure 4-26. Quartermaster Corps





Figure 4-27. Signal Corps





Figure 4-28. Special Forces





Figure 4-29. Transportation Corps





Figure 4-30. Veterinary Corps


Appendix A
References

The Official Army Publications Web Sites.

Publication Section I
Required Publications

No entries in this section.

Publication Section II
Related Publications

A related publication is a source of additional information. The user does not have to read it to understand this regulation.

AR 672-8. Manufacture, Sale, Wear, and Quality Control of Heraldic Items

10 USC 3012. Department of the Army: Seal (Available at http://www.gpoaccess.gov.)

18 USC 506. Seals of Departments or Agencies (Available at http://www.gpoaccess.gov .)

18 USC 1017. Government Seals Wrongfully Used and Instruments (Available at http://www.gpoaccess.gov .)

Publication Section III
Prescribed Forms

No entries in this section.

Publication Section IV
Referenced Forms

No entries in this section.

Glossary

Section I

Abbreviations

TIOH

The Institute of Heraldry

Section II

Terms

Branch Insignia

A device approved by HQDA for wear on the uniform to indicate branch of service within the Army.

Emblem

A distinctive device symbolically representing the Army.

Master Mold

A three dimensional sculpture of the plaque for use in reproducing duplicate plaques.

Plaque

A three dimensional rendering of an emblem or device for display.

Proper Colors

The colors used to authenticate, confirm or attest to authenticity.

Seal

A design used to authenticate, confirm or attest to authenticity.

Section III

Special Terms

There are no special terms.

Index

This index is organized alphabetically by topic and subtopic within a topic. Topics and subtopics are identified by paragraph number.

Abbreviations and terms, 1-3

Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army, responsibilities of, 1-4 a

Branch of Service Plaques

Authority, 4-1

Description, 4-4

Supply, 4-3

Use, 4-2

Commanders, responsibilities of, 1-4 c

Commercial Manufacturer

Authority to Manufacturer, 15 a

Authority to Sell, 1-5 b

Department of the Army Seal

Authority, 2-1

Use of Seal, 2-2

Description, 2-3 a

Symbolism, 2-3b b

Department of the Army Emblem and Plaque

Authority, 3-1

Description, 3-4 b (1)

Supply, 3-3

Symbolism, 3-4 b (2)

Use, 3-2

Quality Control, 1-5

The Institute of Heraldry, responsibilities of, 1-4 b