Army Regulation 670-1

31 March 2014

Effective date: 31 March 2014

UNCLASSIFIED

Uniform and Insignia

Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia



SUMMARY of CHANGE

AR 670-1
Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia

This administrative revision, dated 10 April 2014—

* Changes effective date from 30 April 2014 to 31 March 2014 (title page).

* Makes administrative changes (paras 3-2 a (3)(l), 3-3 i (6), 21-17, 21-29 a (12) and (13), and 21-31 c (4)).

* Cancels DA Form 5344 (Honorary Sergeant Major of the Regiment Appointment Certificate), DA Form 5345 (Honorary Colonel of the Regiment Appointment Certificate), DA Form 5346 (Regimental Adjutant Appointment Certificate), DA Form 5347 (Distinguished Member of the Regiment), DA Form 5348 (Honorary Member of the Regiment Appointment Certificate), and DA Form 5880 (Honorary Warrant Officer of the Regiment) (throughout).

This major revision, dated 31 March 2014—

* Notifies Soldiers of which portions of the regulation are punitive and violations of these provisions may subject offenders to adverse administrative action and/or charges under the provisions of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (paras 1-5a, 3-2, 3-3, 3-4, 3-5, 3-7, and 3-10).

* Removes Army Ideas for Excellence Program (para 1-6a).

* Updates Responsibilities for The Institute of Heraldry (para 2-3), Program Executive Officer, Program Executive Office Soldier, and U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center (para 2-4).

* Updates the hair and fingernail standards and grooming policies for males and females (para 3-2).

* Updates tattoo and brand policy (para 3-3).

* Updates jewelry policy to limit gauging size to 1.6mm (para 3-4(d)) and adding prohibited dental ornamentation (para 3-4f).

* Updates policy of the wear of Army uniforms at national, regional, and local events (para 3-5).

* Updates policy on use of electronic devices while in uniform (para 3-6).

* Updates policy on wear of combat uniform on commercial flights (para 3-7c).

* Updates policy on hand carried and shoulder bags (3-7f).

* Updates policy on eyeglasses, sunglasses, and contact lenses (para 3-10).

* Updates the policy on wear of identification tags (para 3-11a).

* Adds the combat uniform (para 4-1).

* Adds the aircrew uniform (para 6-1).

* Updates service uniforms (chaps 13, 14, and 15).

* Updates policy on umbrella use (para 20-27).

* Adds wear of shoulder sleeve insignia-former wartime service for Operation New Dawn, Operation Enduring Freedom-Philippines, and future operations (para 21-17).

* Updates criteria for overseas service bar (para 21-29).

* Adds the gold star lapel button (para 22-6).

* Deletes all procedural guidance regarding uniforms, insignia, and other uniform accessories (see DA Pam 670-1 (throughout)).

* Supersedes AR 600-82, The U.S. Army Regimental System, dated 5 June 1990 (throughout).

* Updates policy to remove the battle dress uniforms, white service uniform (to include white service cap), and black mess and evening mess uniforms from authorized wear (throughout).

* Makes additional administrative changes (throughout).

* The following all Army activity messages have been superseded by this revision: ALARACT 445/11 Wear of Army Uniform at National, Regional, and Local Events, dated 7 December 2011; ALARACT 435/2011 Units Authorized to Wear the Airborne Tab with the Shoulder Sleeve Insignia, dated 30 November 2011; ALARACT 362/2011 Changes to Wear of the Army Combat Uniform (ACU) Items, dated 22 September 2011; ALARACT 315/2011 Authorization to Wear the Universal Camouflage Patterned (UCP) Flame Resistant (FR) Army Combat Uniforms (ACU) (FR ACU) Upon Redeployment, dated 22 August 2011; ALARACT 241/2011 Modifying Wear of Improved Physical Fitness Uniform (IPFU) dated 23 June 2011; ALARACT 239/2011 Request for Exception to Policy to Publish ALARACT Modifying Wear of Improved Physical Fitness Uniform(IPFU), dated 23 June 2011; ALARACT 230/2011 Changes to Wear of the Army Combat Uniform (ACU) Items, dated 17 June 2011; ALARACT 173/2011 Combat Service Identification Badge (CSIB), dated 26 April 2011; ALARACT 099/2011 Update ALARACT Message 202/2008 Army Service Uniform, dated 16 March 2011; ALARACT 002/2011 Shoulder Sleeve Insignia-Former Wartime Service and Overseas Service Bars-Operation New Dawn, 5 January 2011; ALARACT 332/2010 Service Dress Tropical (Class B with Ribbons) Uniform, dated 28 October 2010; ALARACT 203/2010 Changes to the Wear Policy for the Identification Badges Outlined in AR 670-1, paragraph 29-18, dated 1 July 2010; ALARACT 199/2010 Shoulder Sleeve Insignia-Former Wartime Service (SSI-FWTS) Wear Policy, dated 29 June 2010; ALARACT 183/2010 Directorate of Evaluation and Standardization (DES) Brassard, dated 17 June 2010; ALARACT 178/2010 Changes to the Wear Policy for Other Services Logo Patches Worn as Shoulder Sleeve Insignia-Former Wartime Service (SSI-FWTS), dated 17 June 2010 (Continued).

* The following additional all Army activity messages have been superseded by this revision: ALARACT 177/2010 Army Aircrew Combat Uniform (A2CU) Wear Policy, dated 11 June 2010; ALARACT 178/2010 Changes to the Wear Policy for Other Services Logo Patches Worn as Shoulder Sleeve Insignia-Former Wartime Service, dated 11 June 2010; ALARACT 283/2009 Changes to the Wear Policy for the Chaplains Branch Insignias Worn on the Army Combat Uniform (ACU), 14 October 2009; ALARACT 302/2008 Wear Policy for the Generation III Extended Cold Weather Clothing System (ECWCS), dated 17 December 2008; ALARACT 252/2008 Temporary Wear Policy for the Shoulder Sleeve Insignia (SSI)-Current Organization for the Sustainment Brigades, dated 27 October 2008; ALARACT 220/2008 Exception to Policy for Wear of the Enhanced Hot Weather Battle Dress Uniform (EHWBDU), Aviation Battle Dress Uniform (ABDU), Aviation Flight Suit, and Accessory Items, dated 12 September 2008; ALARACT 202/2008 Army Service Uniform (ASU) Wear Policy, dated 20 August 2008; ALARACT 195/2008 Request Change to AR 670-1 For Wear Of The Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) Insignia, dated 11 August 2008; ALARACT 154/2008 Woodland and Desert Aircrew Battle Dress Uniforms (ABDU(S)) and Green and Tan One-Piece Flight Suits, dated 23 June 2008; ALARACT 149/2008 Changes to the Military Police (MP) Brassard Wear Policy Outlined In AR 670-1, paragraph 28-29b(9)(A) and (B), dated 17 June 2008; ALARACT 138/2008 Request to Deviate from Current Policies Governing Wear and Furnishing of Civilian Uniforms as Outlined in AR 670-1, chapter 30, dated 3 June 2008; ALARACT 100/2008 AR 670-1, Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia (Gold Star Lapel Pin), dated 22 January 2008; ALARACT 008/2008 AR 670-1, Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia (Gold Star Lapel Pin), dated 4 April 2008; ALARACT 004/2008 Military Uniforms and Accessories Wear Out Dates, dated 8 January 2008; ALARACT 286/2007 AR 670-1 Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, dated 14 December 2007; ALARACT 226/2007 AR 670-1 Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, dated 16 October 2007; ALARACT 186/2007 Uniform Wear Policy Changes for Soldiers Assigned to the Warrior Transition Units, dated 23 August 2007; ALARACT 140/2007 AR 670-1 Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, dated 19 June 2007 (Continued).

* The following additional all Army activity messages have been superseded by this revision: ALARACT 055/2007 AR 670-1 Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, dated 28 March 2007; ALARACT 041/2007 U.S. Army Logo Patch, 7 March 2007; ALARACT 220/2006 AR 670-1 Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, dated 16 November 2006; ALARACT 164/2006 Wear Policy for Flags Worn on Army Combat Uniform, the Army Combat Uniform Patrol Cap, and the Beret, dated 21 September 2006; ALARACT 136/2006 100 Percent Cotton Foliage Green T-Shirt, dated 12 July 2006; ALARACT 030/2006 Shoulder Sleeve Insignia (SSI) and Shoulder Sleeve Insignia-Former Wartime Service (SSI-FWTS); dated 6 February 2006; ALARACT 007/2006 Army Combat Uniform (ACU), dated 12 January 2006; ALARACT 17/2006 AR 670-1, 3 FEB 05, Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia (Chapter 1-8, paragraph e, Tattoo Policy), dated 25 January 2006; ALARACT 007/2006 Army Combat Uniform (ACU), dated 25 January 2006; ALARACT 164/2006 Wear Policy for Flags Worn on the Army Combat Uniform (ACU), the ACU Patrol Cap, and the Beret, dated 6 September 2006; ALARACT 136/2006 100 Percent Cotton Foliage Green T-Shirt, dated 12 July 2006; ALARACT 030/2006 Shoulder Sleeve Insignia (SSI) and Shoulder Sleeve Insignia-Former Wartime Service (SSI-FWTS), dated 06 February 2006; ALARACT 030/2006 Shoulder Sleeve Insignia (SSI) and Shoulder Sleeve Insignia-Former Wartime Service (SSI-FWTS), dated 06 February 2006; ALARACT 017/2006 AR 670-1, 3 FEB 05, Wear and Appearance Of Army Uniforms and Insignia (Chapter 1-8, Paragraph E, Tattoo Policy), dated 25 January 2006; ALARACT 007/2006 Army Combat Uniform (ACU), dated 12 January 2006; ALARACT 218/2005 Change to the Army Combat Uniform (ACU), Battle Dress Uniform (BDU), and Desert Battle Dress Uniform (DBDU) Wear Policy, dated 26 October 2005; ALARACT 127/2005 Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, AR 670-1, paragraph 29-60, dated 28 June 2005; and ALARACT 078/2005 Army Combat Uniform (ACU) Ensemble, dated 22 April 2005.



Chapter 1
Introduction

1-1. Purpose

The Army is a profession. A Soldier's appearance measures part of his or her professionalism. Proper wear of the Army uniform is a matter of personal pride for all Soldiers. It is indicative of esprit de corps and morale within a unit. Soldiers have an individual responsibility for ensuring their appearance reflects the highest level of professionalism. Leaders, at all levels, have a responsibility for implementing and applying the standards contained in this regulation to ensure the best interests of the Army, including our shared traditions and customs. This regulation prescribes the authorization for wear, composition, and classification of uniforms, and the occasions for wearing all personal (clothing bag issue), optional, and commonly worn organizational clothing and individual equipment uniforms. It prescribes the uniforms, awards, insignia, and accouterments authorized for wear. It also provides general information on the authorized material and design of uniforms and the uniform quality control system.

1-2. References

See appendix A .

1-3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms

See the glossary . The descriptive definitions for the following terms are in the glossary and provide aid in the understanding of this regulation: eccentric, fad(dish), exaggerated, conservative, inconspicuous, unsightly, extreme, braids/plaits (hair).

1-4. Responsibilities

See chapter 2 for responsibilities.

1-5. Statutory Authority

a. Portions of this regulation are punitive. Violation of the specific prohibitions and requirements of specific portions by Soldiers may result in adverse administrative action and/or charges under the provisions of the UCMJ.

b. Only uniforms, accessories, and insignia prescribed in this regulation, or in the common table of allowance (CTA), or as approved by Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA), will be worn by personnel in the U.S. Army. Unless specified in this regulation, the commander issuing the clothing and individual equipment will establish wear policies for organizational clothing and individual equipment. No item governed by this regulation will be altered in any way that changes the basic design, or the intended concept of fit, as described in Technical Manual (TM) 10-227 and Army Regulation (AR) 700-84 , including plating, smoothing, or removing detailed features of metal items, or otherwise altering the color or appearance.

c. AR 70-1 prescribes Department of the Army (DA) policies, responsibilities, and administrative procedures by which all clothing and individual equipment used by Army personnel are initiated, designed, developed, tested, approved for acquisition, fielded, and modified.

d. AR 385-10 prescribes DA policies, responsibilities, and administrative procedures and funding for protective clothing and equipment.

e. In accordance with Section 771, Chapter 45, Title 10, United States Code, no person except a member of the U.S. Army may wear the uniform, a distinctive part of the uniform, or any part of which is similar to a distinctive part of the U.S. Army uniform, unless otherwise authorized by law. Soldiers are not authorized to wear distinctive uniforms or uniform items of the U.S. Army or of other U.S. Services with or on civilian clothes, except as authorized by this regulation.

1-6. Recommending changes to Army uniforms

See DA Pam 670-1 for recommending changes to Army uniforms.

1-7. Classification of service and combat/utility/field uniforms

See DA Pam 670-1 for classification of uniforms.

Chapter 2
Responsibilities

2-1. Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1

The DCS, G-1 will —

a. Develop and publish the following Army policies:

b. Function as a member of the Army Uniform Board, which is established in accordance with AR 70-1 .

c. Coordinate with Army and Air Force Exchange Service and the DCS, G-4, as required, to incorporate uniform changes or additions to this regulation and/or DA Pam 670-1 .

2-2. Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4

The DCS, G-4 will —

a. Be responsible for the life cycle management of clothing and individual equipment, in accordance with AR 70-1 .

b. Coordinate the Army Uniform Board meetings in accordance with AR 70-1 .

2-3. The Institute of Heraldry

TIOH will —

a. Monitor the Heraldic Quality Control Program in accordance with AR 672-8 , to ensure heraldic items are manufactured according to Government specifications or purchase descriptions.

b. Provide manufacturers with Government-loaned tools and specifications for heraldic items.

c. Authorize the manufacture of heraldic items and issue certificates of authority to manufacture items in accordance with the provisions of AR 672-8 .

d. Approve designs for distinctive unit insignia (DUI), regimental distinctive insignia (RDI), shoulder sleeve insignia (SSI), flags, and badges, as authorized by this regulation.

e. Prepare and maintain specifications, manufacturing drawings and purchase descriptions for insignia worn on the Army uniforms.

2-4. Program Executive Officer, Program Executive Office Soldier and U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center

PEO Soldier and Project Manager, Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment, in conjunction with the NSRDEC, are responsible for the Uniform Quality Control Program (UQCP). PEO Soldier and NSRDEC will —

a. Prepare and maintain military specifications, purchase descriptions, and master patterns for optional uniform items, as recommended by the Army Uniform Board and approved by the Chief of Staff, Army in accordance with AR 70-1 .

b. Publish and disseminate periodic bulletins to industry that provide guidance and information regarding changes in military specifications, testing and certification requirements, uniform regulations, or adoption of new optional uniform items.

c. Furnish specifications, purchase descriptions, master patterns, shade standards, and other information about optional uniforms to industry, when required.

d. Receive and examine laboratory test reports, manufacturer certifications, and samples from commercial manufacturers, custom tailors, military tailors, and other suppliers of optional uniform items, as required. Require manufacturers to provide requested laboratory test reports, manufacturer certifications, and samples of optional uniform items at no cost to the Army.

e. Issue certificates of authority to manufacturers whose samples meet or exceed standards established by specifications of purchase descriptions. Certificates will be supplemented by documents showing the specific optional uniform items that the manufacturer is authorized to produce. Provide a list of certified manufacturers and products that will be furnished to the U.S. Army and Air Force Exchange Service and posted on appropriate Army Web sites. Revoke or suspend certificates when the certificate holder has violated any of the expressed conditions under which the certification was granted, as determined by PEO Soldier.

f. Conduct inspections and otherwise monitor manufacturers for compliance with certificate terms and conditions. Review optional uniform items to verify compliance with, or appropriate exemption/waiver from, applicable domestic source requirements as set forth in Section 2533a, Chapter 148, Title 10, United States Code (10 USC Chapter 148, Section 2533a).

g. Coordinate with designated service points of contact to ensure that outside continental United States produced optional uniform items are evaluated and approved prior to being sold within theater to Soldiers. Outside continental United States Army service component commands will establish service points of contact to direct local textile and uniform producers desiring to sell optional uniform items to Soldiers to NSRDEC for coordination.

h. Ensure manufacturers and suppliers of optional uniform items do the following:

(1) Obtain certification required under the UQCP from NSRDEC or Project Manager (Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment) before manufacturing any optional uniform items for sale.

(2) Affix a label with the following information certifying the optional uniform items were manufactured in accordance with the UQCP prior to offering the items for sale: This item is warranted to meet or exceed the standards of specification number and was produced under certificate number from basic material warranted by the manufacturer as having been produced in accordance with the sample under current certification. This item is not authorized for turn-in to central issue facilities.

(3) Familiarize themselves with Army specifications, purchase descriptions, testing/certification requirements, shade standards, and other pertinent information for optional uniform items, and submit required samples and information to NSRDEC or Project Manager (Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment) for approval.

(4) Comply with all terms of the certification. Certificates may be revoked or suspended if the certificate holder has violated any of the expressed conditions of the certification.

2-5. Director and Chief Executive Officer, U.S. Army and Air Force Exchange Service

Director and Chief Executive Officer, U.S. Army and Air Force Exchange Service will —

a. Operate, manage, and supervise the Military Clothing Stores (MCS) Program worldwide, in accordance with the terms of a memorandum of understanding between DA and U.S. Army and Air Force Exchange Service, Dallas, Texas.

b. Be responsible for the control, storage, and distribution of "issue" MCS inventories and optional-wear military clothing items from certified manufacturers, according to DA specifications and as developed by PEO Soldier, 5901 Putnam Road, Building 328, Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5852, in conjunction with the textile technology team at the Natick Soldier Center, Natick, MA 01760. (Optional-wear items are those not considered "issue" items.) Responsibility does not include war reserve stock management.

2-6. Commanders

a. Commanders of Army commands (ACOM)/Army service component commanders (ASCC)/direct reporting units (DRU) will thoroughly evaluate all submitted proposals (with a significant proposed change) to change or add uniforms, accessories, or wear policies for uniforms, insignia, and awards.

b. Senior Commanders may prescribe the uniform for wear in formations. When not prescribed by the senior commander, unit commanders will prescribe the uniform for wear in formation. Commanders will not establish seasonal wear dates for uniforms.

c. Senior Commanders, the Chief, Army Reserve for U.S. Army Reserve (USAR) and State Adjutants General for the Army National Guard (ARNG) may publish, in writing, restrictions on the wearing of utility and organizational uniforms off military installations.

d. The commander in charge of units on maneuver may prescribe the uniform for wear within the maneuver area.

e. Commanders of ceremonial units or with ceremonial details.

(1) Members of honor guards, color guards, and similar details will wear the prescribed Army service, dress, or utility uniforms with authorized accouterments. These members may wear accessories authorized in CTA 50-900 (such as individual equipment, belts, white gloves, and slings) when authorized by the commander. Commanders will prescribe uniform wear policies for these items.

(2) Only those units authorized to wear a distinctive uniform in accordance with CTA 50-900 for ceremonial duties, such as the Old Guard and the U.S. Army Band, are exempt from the policy to wear the Army service, dress, or utility uniforms in the performance of ceremonial duties. Commanders of special units will prescribe the wear policy for all distinctive uniform items and accouterments.

f. Commanders will not require individuals to purchase optional uniform items. Likewise, they will not restrict or discourage them from wearing optional uniform items authorized by this regulation, except in those instances where uniformity is required, such as parades or formations.

g. Commanders will ensure that the Soldiers assigned to their unit are aware of the grooming and appearance provisions of this regulation and will ensure compliance with the provisions of DA Pam 670-1 within their unit.

h. Commanders will conduct periodic inspections to ensure that all personnel under their command comply with the following:

(1) Soldiers possess the minimum quantities of uniforms prescribed in this regulation, AR 700-84 , and CTA 50-900 (tables 1, 2, and 3). Uniforms must fit properly and be in serviceable condition.

(2) Soldiers wear only authorized insignia and awards, as prescribed in this regulation.

(3) Soldiers wear only uniform and heraldic items produced by certified manufacturers, and they meet the specifications for quality and design.

i. Commanders will promptly submit quality deficiency reports on uniforms and individual equipment, in accordance with AR 702-7-1 regarding those items that do not meet the requirements in paragraphs 2-6g(1) through (3).

j. Commanders will ensure that only those controlled heraldic items that are of quality and design covered in the specifications, and that have been produced by certified manufacturers or procured through the military supply system, are worn by personnel under their command. Commanders procuring controlled heraldic items, when authorized by local procurement procedures, will purchase only from manufacturers certified by TIOH. Commanders may forward a sample insignia to TIOH for quality assurance inspection if the commander feels the quality does not meet standards.

2-7. Soldiers

a. Soldiers purchasing uniforms, uniform items, or heraldic items from establishments other than the MCS must ensure that the items are authorized for wear and that they conform to appropriate military specifications or are manufactured in accordance with the UQCP or the heraldic quality control system. When items appear deficient, Soldiers should submit a Standard Form (SF) 368 (Product Quality Deficiency Report) through their servicing MCS, where forms are available. Commercially purchased items that are authorized for wear in lieu of military-issued items must conform to the basic specification of the military-issued item, unless otherwise specified in this regulation.

(1) All Army uniforms, uniform items, and heraldic items procured by the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support and sold in the MCS are produced in accordance with appropriate military specifications and are authorized for wear. However, in those MCS with multi-Service support agreements, some items are sold that are authorized for wear by members of other Services, but not by Army personnel. Soldiers are responsible for verifying with their chain of command which items are authorized for wear by Army personnel. Uniform items with defects in workmanship or material should be returned to the MCS for replacement or repair.

(2) Optional uniforms and other uniform clothing items sold in the MCS, in exchanges, or by commercial sources will contain a label, stamp, or certificate issued by the textile technology team at the Natick Soldier Center. Components of some optional uniforms (such as men's commercial white shirts, studs, and cuff links) are not included in the UQCP.

(3) All heraldic items purchased from an exchange, MCS, or commercial source will contain a hallmark or label certifying that the item was produced in accordance with the appropriate military specification by a manufacturer certified by TIOH, Department of the Army.

(4) All individuals purchasing uniform or insignia items from commercial sources must ensure that the items conform to the requirements in paragraph 2-7 a (1) through (3).

b. All enlisted personnel will —

(1) Maintain their clothing bag items and any supplemental clothing items they are issued, as prescribed in AR 700-84 or CTA 50-900.

(2) Ensure that their uniforms and insignia conform to this regulation.

c. All officers will —

(1) Procure and maintain the uniforms and accessories appropriate to their assigned duties. See DA Pam 670-1 .

(2) Ensure that their uniforms and insignia conform to specifications in DA Pam 670-1 .

Chapter 3
Appearance and Grooming Policies

3-1. Personal appearance policies

a. Soldiers will present a professional image at all times and will continue to set the example in military presence, both on and off duty. Pride in appearance includes Soldiers' physical fitness and adherence to acceptable weight standards in accordance with AR 600-9 .

b. A vital ingredient of the Army's strength and military effectiveness is the pride and self discipline that American Soldiers bring to their Service through a conservative military image. It is the responsibility of commanders to ensure that military personnel under their command present a neat and soldierly appearance. Therefore, in the absence of specific procedures or guidelines, commanders must determine a Soldier's compliance with standards in this regulation.

c. The Army uniform regulations for standards of personal appearance and grooming are as specific as is practicable in order to establish the parameters with which Soldiers must comply.

d. Portions of this chapter are punitive. Violation of the specific prohibitions and requirements set forth in this chapter may result in adverse administrative action and/or charges under the provision of the UCMJ.

3-2. Hair and fingernail standards and grooming policies

Note: This paragraph is punitive with regard to Soldiers. Violation by Soldiers may result in adverse administrative action and/or charges under the provisions of the UCMJ .

a. Hair.

(1) General. The requirement for hair grooming standards is necessary to maintain uniformity within a military population. Many hairstyles are acceptable, as long as they are neat and conservative. It is the responsibility of leaders at all levels to exercise good judgment when enforcing Army policy. All Soldiers will comply with hair, fingernail, and grooming policies while in any military uniform, or in civilian clothes on duty.

(a) Leaders will judge the appropriateness of a particular hairstyle by the appearance of headgear when worn. Hairstyles (including bulk and length of hair) that do not allow Soldiers to wear the headgear properly, or that interfere with the proper wear of the protective mask or other protective equipment, are prohibited. Headgear will fit snugly and comfortably, without bulging or distortion from the intended shape of the headgear and without excessive gaps.

(b) Extreme, eccentric, or faddish haircuts or hairstyles are not authorized. If Soldiers use dyes, tints, or bleaches, they must choose a natural hair color. Colors that detract from a professional military appearance are prohibited. Therefore, Soldiers must avoid using colors that result in an extreme appearance. Applied hair colors that are prohibited include, but are not limited to, purple, blue, pink, green, orange, bright (fire-engine) red, and fluorescent or neon colors. It is the responsibility of leaders to use good judgment in determining if applied colors are acceptable, based upon the overall effect on a Soldier's appearance.

(c) Soldiers who have a texture of hair that does not part naturally may cut a part into the hair. The part will be one straight line, not slanted or curved, and will fall in the area where the Soldier would normally part the hair. Soldiers will not cut designs into their hair or scalp.

(2) Male haircuts. The hair on top of the head must be neatly groomed. The length and bulk of the hair may not be excessive or present a ragged, unkempt, or extreme appearance. The hair must present a tapered appearance. A tapered appearance is one where the outline of the Soldier's hair conforms to the shape of the head (see scalp line in figure 3-1 ), curving inward to the natural termination point at the base of the neck. When the hair is combed, it will not fall over the ears or eyebrows, or touch the collar, except for the closely cut hair at the back of the neck. The block-cut fullness in the back is permitted to a moderate degree, as long as the tapered look is maintained. Males are not authorized to wear braids, cornrows, or dreadlocks (unkempt, twisted, matted, individual parts of hair) while in uniform, or in civilian clothes on duty. Haircuts with a single, untapered patch of hair on the top of the head (not consistent with natural hair loss) are considered eccentric and are not authorized. Examples include, but are not limited to, when the head is shaved around a strip of hair down the center of the head (mohawk), around a u-shaped hair area (horseshoe), or around a patch of hair on the front top of the head (tear drop). Hair that is completely shaved or trimmed closely to the scalp is authorized. (See figs 3-1 and 3-2 .)

(a) Sideburns. Sideburns are hair grown in front of the ear and below the point where the top portion of the ear attaches to the head. Sideburns will not extend below the bottom of the opening of the ear (see line A of fig 3-1 ). Sideburns will not be styled to taper, flair, or come to a point. The length of an individual hair of the sideburn will not exceed 1/8 inch when fully extended.

(b) Facial hair. Males will keep their face clean-shaven when in uniform, or in civilian clothes on duty. Mustaches are permitted. If worn, males will keep mustaches neatly trimmed, tapered, and tidy. Mustaches will not present a chopped off or bushy appearance, and no portion of the mustache will cover the upper lip line, extend sideways beyond a vertical line drawn upward from the corners of the mouth (see lines C and D of Figure 3-1 ), or extend above a parallel line at the lowest portion of the nose (see line B of Figure 3-1 ). Handlebar mustaches, goatees, and beards are not authorized. If appropriate medical authority allows beard growth, the maximum length authorized for medical treatment must be specific. For example, "The length of the beard cannot exceed 1/4 inch" (see Training Bulletin Medical ( TB Med ) 287). Soldiers will keep the growth trimmed to the level specified by the appropriate medical authority, but are not authorized to shape the hair growth (examples include, but are not limited to goatees, "Fu Manchu," or handlebar mustaches).

(c) Wigs and hairpieces. Males are prohibited from wearing wigs or hairpieces while in uniform, or in civilian clothes on duty, except to cover natural baldness or physical disfiguration caused by accident or medical procedure. When worn, wigs or hairpieces will conform to the standard haircut criteria, as stated within this regulation.

(3) Female haircuts and hairstyles. The illustrations provided in figure 3-3 are intended only to clarify language regarding authorized hair lengths and bulks. The requirements for hair regulations are to maintain uniformity within a military population for female Soldiers while in uniform, or in civilian clothes on duty, unless otherwise specified. Female hairstyles may not be eccentric or faddish and will present a conservative, professional appearance. For the purpose of these regulations, female hairstyles are organized into three basic categories: short length, medium length, and long length hair.

(a) Short length. Short hair is defined as hair length that extends no more than 1 inch from the scalp (excluding bangs). Hair may be no shorter than 1/4 inch from the scalp (unless due to medical condition or injury), but may be evenly tapered to the scalp within 2 inches of the hair line edges. Bangs, if worn, may not fall below the eyebrows, may not interfere with the wear of all headgear, must lie neatly against the head, and not be visible underneath the front of the headgear. The width of the bangs may extend to the hairline at the temple.

(b) Medium length. Medium hair is defined as hair length that does not extend beyond the lower edge of the collar (in all uniforms), and extends more than 1 inch from the scalp. Medium hair may fall naturally in uniform, and is not required to be secured. When worn loose, graduated hair styles are acceptable, but the length, as measured from the end of the total hair length to the base of the collar, may not exceed 1 inch difference in length, from the front to the back. Layered hairstyles are also authorized, so long as each hair's length, as measured from the scalp to the hair's end, is generally the same length giving a tapered appearance. The regulations for the wear of bangs detailed in paragraph (a), above, apply. No portion of the bulk of the hair, as measured from the scalp, will exceed 2 inches.

(c) Long length. Long hair is defined as hair length that extends beyond the lower edge of the collar. Long hair will be neatly and inconspicuously fastened or pinned, except that bangs may be worn. The regulations for the wear of bangs detailed in paragraph (a), apply. No portion of the bulk of the hair, as measured from the scalp, will exceed 2 inches (except a bun, which may extend a maximum of 3 inches from the scalp) and be no wider than the width of the head.

(d) Additional hairstyle guidelines. Faddish and exaggerated styles, to include shaved portions of the scalp other than the neckline, designs cut in the hair, unsecured ponytails (except during physical training), and unbalanced or lopsided hairstyles are prohibited. Hair will be styled so as not to interfere with the proper wear of all uniform headgear. All headgear will fit snugly and comfortably around the largest part of the head without bulging or distortion from the intended shape of the headgear and without excessive gaps. When headgear is worn, hair should not protrude at distinct angles from under the edges. Hairstyles that do not allow the headgear to be worn in this manner are prohibited. Examples of hairstyles considered to be faddish or exaggerated and thus not authorized for wear while in uniform, or in civilian clothes on duty, include, but are not limited to, locks and twists (not including French rolls/twists or corn rows); hair sculpting (eccentric directional flow, twists, texture, or spiking); buns or braids with loose hair extending at the end; multiple braids not braided in a straight line; hair styles with severe angles; and loose unsecured hair (not to include bangs) when medium and long hair are worn up.

(e) Devices. Hair holding devices are authorized only for the purpose of securing the hair. Soldiers will not place hair holding devices in the hair for decorative purposes. All hair holding devices must be plain and of a color as close to the Soldier's hair as is possible or clear. Authorized devices include, but are not limited to, small plain scrunchies (elastic hair bands covered with material), barrettes, combs, pins, clips, rubber bands, and hair/head bands. Such devices should conform to the natural shape of the head. Devices that are conspicuous, excessive, or decorative are prohibited. Some examples of prohibited devices include, but are not limited to: large, lacy scrunchies; beads, bows, or claw or alligator clips; clips, pins, or barrettes with butterflies, flowers, sparkles, gems, or scalloped edges; and bows made from hairpieces. Soldiers may not wear hairnets unless they are required for health or safety reasons, or in the performance of duties (such as those in a dining facility). No other type of hair covering is authorized in lieu of the hairnet. The commander will provide the hairnet to the Soldier at no cost to the Soldier.

(f) Braids. Medium and long hair may be braided. Multiple braiding (defined as more than two braids) is authorized. When worn, multiple braids will be of uniform dimension, small in diameter (approximately ¼ inch), show no more than 1/8 of an inch of scalp between the braids and must be tightly interwoven to present a neat, professional, well-groomed appearance. Foreign material (for example, beads and decorative items) will not be braided into the hair. Braids must continue to the end of the hair in one direction, in a straight line, and can be worn loose per medium hair length guidelines or secured to the head in the same manner as described for medium or long length hair styles. Ends will be secured only with inconspicuous rubber bands. If multiple braids are worn, they must encompass the whole head. When braids are not worn loosely and braided close to the scalp, the braids must start at the front of the head.

(g) Twists. Twists are defined as twisting two distinct strands of hair around one another to create a twisted rope-like appearance. Although some twists may be temporary, and can be easily untwisted, they are unauthorized (except for French twists). This includes twists formed against the scalp or worn in a free-hanging style.

(h) Dreadlocks. Dreadlocks are defined as any matted, twisted, or locked coils or ropes of hair (or extensions). Any style of dreadlock (against the scalp or free-hanging) is not authorized. Braids or cornrows that are unkempt or matted are considered dreadlocks and are not authorized.

(i) Cornrows:. Cornrows are defined as hair rolled (not twisted using two strands) or braided closely to the scalp producing a continuous, raised row of hair. When worn, cornrows must be of uniform dimension, small in diameter (approximately ¼ inch), show no more than 1/8 inch of scalp between the cornrows and must be tightly rolled or braided to present a neat, professional, well-groomed appearance. Cornrows must start at the front of the head and continue in one direction in a straight line and end at a consistent location of the head. Only one cornrow style (braided or rolled) may be worn at one time.

(j) Hair extensions. Hair extensions are authorized. Extensions must have the same general appearance as the individual's natural hair and otherwise conform to this regulation.

(k) Wigs. Wigs, if worn in uniform, must look natural and conform to this regulation.

(l) Physical training. Long length hair, as defined in paragraph 3-2a(3)(c) , may be worn in a pony tail during physical training. A single pony tail centered on the back of the head is authorized in physical fitness uniforms only when within the scope physical training, except when considered a safety hazard. The pony tail is not required to be worn above the collar. When hair securing devices are worn, they will comply with the guidelines set in paragraph 3-2a(3)(e) . Examples of hair accessories not authorized for securing hair during physical fitness are bows, ribbons, and claw or alligator clips.

(m) Physical training in utility uniforms. Pony tails are authorized using guidelines set forth in paragraph 3-2a(3)(l) , above, while conducting physical training in utility uniforms. However, if the helmet is worn during physical training, hair must be secured using guidelines in paragraph 3-2a(3)(a) through (k).

b. Cosmetics.

(1) Standards regarding cosmetics are necessary to maintain uniformity and to avoid an extreme or unprofessional appearance. Males are prohibited from wearing cosmetics, except when medically prescribed. Females are authorized to wear cosmetics with all uniforms, provided they are applied modestly and conservatively, and that they complement both the Soldier's complexion and the uniform. Leaders at all levels must exercise good judgment when interpreting and enforcing this policy.

(2) Eccentric, exaggerated, or faddish cosmetic styles and colors, to include makeup designed to cover tattoos, are inappropriate with the uniform and are prohibited. Permanent makeup, such as eyebrow or eyeliner, is authorized as long as the makeup conforms to the standards outlined above. Eyelash extensions are not authorized unless medically prescribed.

(3) Females will not wear shades of lipstick that distinctly contrast with the natural color of their lips, that detract from the uniform, or that are faddish, eccentric, or exaggerated.

(4) Females will comply with the cosmetics policy while in any military uniform or while in civilian clothes on duty.

c. Fingernails. All personnel will keep fingernails clean and neatly trimmed. Males will keep nails trimmed so as not to extend beyond the fingertip unless medically required and are not authorized to wear nail polish. Females will not exceed a nail length of ¼ inch as measured from the tip of the finger. Females will trim nails shorter if the commander determines that the longer length detracts from a professional appearance, presents a safety concern, or interferes with the performance of duties. Females may only wear clear polish when in uniform or while in civilian clothes on duty. Females may wear clear acrylic nails, provided they have a natural appearance and conform to Army standards.

d. Hygiene and body grooming. Soldiers will maintain good personal hygiene and grooming on a daily basis and wear the uniform so as not to detract from their overall military appearance.



Figure 3-1. Male Grooming Standards





Figure 3-2. Prohibited Male Haircuts





Figure 3-3. Female Hairstyle Standards


3-3. Tattoo, Branding, and Body Mutilation Policy

Note: This paragraph is punitive with regard to Soldiers. Violation by Soldiers may result in adverse administrative action and/or charges under the provisions of the UCMJ .

a. Tattoos and brands are permanent markings that are difficult to reverse (in terms of financial cost, discomfort, and effectiveness of removal techniques). Before obtaining either a tattoo or a brand, Soldiers should consider talking to unit leaders to ensure that they understand the Army tattoo and brand policy. The words tattoo and brand are interchangeable in regards to this policy.

b. The following types of tattoos or brands are prejudicial to good order and discipline and are, therefore, prohibited anywhere on a Soldier's body:

(1) Extremist. Extremist tattoos or brands are those affiliated with, depicting, or symbolizing extremist philosophies, organizations, or activities. Extremist philosophies, organizations, and activities are those which advocate racial, gender, or ethnic hatred or intolerance; advocate, create, or engage in illegal discrimination based on race, color, gender, ethnicity, religion, or national origin; or advocate violence or other unlawful means of depriving individual rights under the U.S. Constitution, and Federal or State law (see AR 600-20 ).

(2) Indecent. Indecent tattoos or brands are those that are grossly offensive to modesty, decency, propriety, or professionalism.

(3) Sexist. Sexist tattoos or brands are those that advocate a philosophy that degrades or demeans a person based on gender.

(4) Racist. Racist tattoos or brands are those that advocate a philosophy that degrades or demeans a person based on race, ethnicity, or national origin.

c. Tattoos or brands, regardless of subject matter, are prohibited on certain areas of the body as follows:

(1) Soldiers are prohibited from having tattoos or brands on the head, face (except for permanent makeup, as provided in paragraph 3-2b(2) ), neck (anything above the t-shirt neck line to include on/inside the eyelids, mouth, and ears), wrists, hands, or fingers. Accessing applicants must adhere to this same policy.

(2) Soldiers may have no more than four visible tattoos below the elbow (to the wrist bone) or below the knee. The tattoos in these areas must be smaller than the size of the wearer's hand with fingers extended and joined with the thumb touching the base of the index finger. The total count of all tattoos in these areas may not exceed a total of four.

(a) A single tattoo is defined as one or multiple tattoos spaced apart that can still be covered by a circle with a diameter of five inches. Tattoos spaced apart that cannot be covered by a circle with a diameter of five inches are considered separate tattoos.

(b) A band tattoo is a tattoo that fully encircles the circumference of the body part. Band tattoos may be no more than two inches in width. Each band tattoo counts as one authorized tattoo (see para 3-3c(2) ). Soldiers may have a total of one visible band tattoo on the body. The band tattoo may either be below one elbow (above the wrist bone) or below one knee.

(c) A sleeve tattoo is a tattoo that is a very large tattoo or a collection of smaller tattoos that covers or almost covers a person's arm or leg. Sleeve tattoos are not authorized below the elbow or below the knee.

(3) Soldiers who have tattoos that were compliant with previous tattoo policies, but are no longer in compliance with paragraph 3-3c(1) through (2)(a) through (c) are grandfathered. Soldiers, who have unauthorized tattoos that were not in compliance with previous policies, are not grandfathered. Tattoos on the face or head (to include on/inside the eyelids, mouth, and ears) are not grandfathered because these locations were never authorized locations for tattoos. Soldiers with tattoos on the head or face must be processed in accordance with paragraph 3-3h , below, unless the Soldier received a written waiver upon entry into the Army.

d. Soldiers may not cover tattoos or brands with bandages or make up in order to comply with the tattoo policy.

e. To protect Soldiers with previously authorized (now grandfathered) tattoos, Soldiers must self identify to their commander current tattoos or brands with locations and descriptions. This only includes tattoos above the neckline, below the elbows, or below the knees. The unit commander will document each tattoo/brand in an official memorandum (with a picture of each tattoo/brand appended as a separate enclosure to the memorandum) and ensure the memorandum and enclosures are uploaded to the Soldier's Army Military Human Resource Record (AMHRR). The memorandum and enclosures remain in the Soldier's record as long as the Soldier continues serving in an active or reserve status. The memorandum and enclosures will serve as an initial documentation of compliance with this policy and may be used by the Soldier or a commander to prove or disprove alleged violations of this policy. The memorandum and enclosures will not be reviewed by promotion boards. Commanders will perform an annual check for new tattoos or brands above the neckline, below the elbows, or below the knees. If any new unauthorized tattoos are found, the Soldier must be processed in accordance with paragraph 3-3h , below. See DA Pam 670-1 for further instructions regarding the memorandum and enclosures.

f. In addition to the tattoo and brand validation in paragraph 3-3e , above, commanders will also conduct a simultaneous check for extremist, indecent, sexist, and racist tattoos. See DA Pam 670-1 for further instructions regarding this check. If such tattoos exist, the Soldier must be processed in accordance with paragraph 3-3h , below.

g. The tattoo restrictions enforced in 3-3c(1) through (3), above, apply equally to officers and warrant officers. Enlisted Soldiers with any tattoos on the body locations listed in paragraph 3-3c(1) or Soldiers exceeding the limit of four tattoos listed in paragraph 3-3c(2)(a) through (c) cannot request commissioning or appointment even if they are grandfathered in accordance with paragraph 3-3c(3) .

h. Commanders will ensure that Soldiers understand the tattoo policy and comply with the requirement to document their tattoos. If a Soldier has any tattoo or brand that is prohibited under paragraph 3-3b , has any tattoo or brand that is not grandfathered because it was not previously authorized such as a tattoo or brand on the face or head, or acquires any new tattoo or brand in violation of paragraph 3-3c(1) through (2), his/her Commander will:

(1) Counsel the Soldier in writing. The DA Form 4856 (Developmental Counseling Form) will state that the Soldier is not in compliance with AR 670-1, paragraph 3-3 , and will explain how the tattoo or brand violates the specific prohibition in the policy (for example, the tattoo is extremist because it is a known symbol for a specific hate group; or the new tattoo is in a prohibited location).

(2) Provide the Soldier with no less than a period of 15 calendar days to seek medical and/or legal advice, fully consider all available options, and respond to the counseling, in writing, by informing the commander that he/she will appeal the finding that the tattoo or brand is in violation of policy, pursue medical procedure(s) to have the tattoo or brand removed, or not have the tattoo or brand removed.

(a) If the Soldier elects to appeal the finding that the tattoo or brand is in violation of policy, the Commander will forward the matter to the first O-6 commander in the chain of command for a final determination.

(b) If the Soldier elects to have the tattoo or brand removed, the Commander will counsel the Soldier on a plan for scheduling the medical procedure(s). Soldiers will receive a reasonable amount of time to schedule the necessary medical procedure(s) and pay for such procedure(s) (if not available at a military treatment facility). Commanders must also determine if operational requirements will delay the medical procedure(s).

(c) If the Soldier declines to have the tattoo or brand removed, the Commander will counsel the Soldier in writing. The DA Form 4856 will state that the Soldier's refusal to remove extremist, indecent, sexist, or racist tattoos or brands anywhere on the body, or refusal to remove any unauthorized tattoo or brand that was not grandfathered in accordance with 3-3c(3) constitutes a violation of a lawful order and will result in adverse action. The Commander will then initiate administrative separation proceedings.

(d) Company-level commanders will make determinations for current Active and Reserve Component Soldiers. This authority will not be delegated further. If a tattoo or brand is discovered to violate this policy after a Soldier self identified his or her tattoos or brands (in accordance with paragraph 3-3e ) or the Soldier wishes to appeal the determination, the commander must submit the Soldier's request to the first O-6 commander in the chain of command for decision.

i. Appropriate authorities for accession determinations are listed in paragraphs (1) through (6) below.

(1) Accessions recruiting battalion commanders (O-5 or above) will make initial entry determinations for new accessions that tattoos or brands comply with this policy for Active Army (AA) and USAR Soldiers. This authority will not be delegated further.

(2) Recruiting and retention managers (O-5 or above) will make initial entry determinations for National Guard Soldiers that tattoos or brands comply with this policy. This authority will not be delegated further.

(3) Commanders (O-5 or above) of Soldiers applying for officer accession programs including Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) and state and federal officer candidate and warrant officer candidate programs will make initial determinations for their Soldiers that their tattoos and brands comply with this policy including the provision listed in paragraph 3-3g , above.

(4) Professors of military science (O-5 or above) will make determinations for ROTC cadets, prior to contracting and prior to commissioning, that tattoos or brands comply with this policy. This authority will not be delegated further.

(5) Superintendant, U.S Military Academy (USMA) will make initial determinations for U.S. Military Academy cadets, prior to enrollment and prior to commissioning, that tattoos or brands comply with this policy. This authority may be delegated further.

(6) The commandants of state and federal officer candidate and warrant officer candidate programs will make determinations for candidates, prior to starting the course and prior to commissioning or appointment, that tattoos or brands comply with this policy. This authority will not be delegated further.

j. Determinations for accessions will be fully documented, in writing. The appropriate accessions determination authority, as identified in paragraphs 3-3 i (1) through (6), above, will document existing tattoos and brands above the neckline, below the elbows, and below the knees in accordance with paragraph 3-3e , above, and ensure the required memorandum and enclosures are uploaded to the Soldier's AMHRR. A copy of the determination, memorandum and enclosures will be provided to the Soldier or applicant.

k. Exceptions to policy for accessing applicants not meeting the criteria outlined in paragraphs 3-3c(1) through (2)(a) through (c) and 3-3 g must be approved by the Director of Military Personnel Management, DCS, G-1. Such exceptions must be documented and uploaded into the Soldier's AMHRR as described in paragraph 3-3 e , above.

l. Soldiers are prohibited from willful mutilation of the body or any body parts in any manner. Examples include, but are not limited to, tongue bifurcation (splitting of the tongue) or ear gauging (enlarged holes in the lobe of the ear, which are greater than 1.6mm).

3-4. Jewelry

Note: This paragraph is punitive with regard to Soldiers. Violation by Soldiers may result in adverse administrative action and/or charges under the provisions of the UCMJ .

a. Soldiers may wear a wristwatch, a wrist identification bracelet, and a total of two rings (a wedding set is considered one ring) with Army uniforms, unless prohibited by the commander for safety or health reasons. Any jewelry worn by Soldiers while in uniform, or in civilian clothes on duty, must be conservative. Identification bracelets are limited to the following: medical alert bracelets, missing in action, prisoner of war, or killed in action (black or silver in color only) bracelets. Soldiers are only authorized to wear one item on each wrist while in uniform, or in civilian clothes on duty.

b. No jewelry, other than that described in paragraph 3-4 a or 3-4 d , below, can appear exposed while in uniform, or in civilian clothes on duty. Pens and/or pencils worn in the pen/pencil slots on the combat uniform coat may be exposed. There are no stipulations on the colors of pens and/or pencils worn in the slots on the combat uniform coat while wearing the uniform. Watch chains or similar items cannot appear exposed. The only other authorized exceptions are religious items described in DA Pam 670-1 and AR 600-20 ; a conservative tie tack or tie clasp that male Soldiers may wear with necktie; and a pen or pencil that may appear exposed on the hospital duty, food service, combat vehicle crewman, or flight uniforms.

c. Attaching, affixing or displaying objects, articles, jewelry, or ornamentation to, through, or under their skin, tongue, or any other body part is prohibited (this includes earrings for male Soldiers). This applies to all Soldiers on or off duty. The only exception is for female Soldiers, who may wear earrings consistent with paragraph 3-4 d . (The term "skin" is not confined to external skin but includes the tongue, lips, inside the mouth, and other surfaces of the body not readily visible.)

d. Females are authorized to wear earrings with the service, dress, and mess uniforms.

(1) Earrings may be screw-on, clip-on, or post-type earrings in gold, silver, white pearl, or diamond. The earrings will not exceed 6 mm or ¼ inch in diameter, and they must be unadorned and spherical. When worn, the earrings will fit snugly against the ear. Females may wear earrings only as a matched pair, with only one earring per ear lobe.

(2) Females are not authorized to wear earrings with any Class C uniform (combat, utility, hospital duty, food service, physical fitness, field, or organizational).

(3) When in civilian clothes on duty, female Soldiers must comply with the specifications listed in paragraph (1), above, when wearing earrings, unless otherwise authorized by the commander. When females are off duty, there are no restrictions on wearing earrings so long as the earrings do not create or support ear gauging (enlarged holes in the lobe of the ear, greater than 1.6mm).

e. Ankle bracelets, toe rings, necklaces (other than those described in AR 600-20 ), faddish (trendy) devices, medallions, amulets, and personal talismans or icons are not authorized for wear while in uniform or in civilian clothes on duty.

f. The use of gold caps, platinum caps, or caps of any unnatural color or texture (permanent or removable) for purposes of dental ornamentation is prohibited. Teeth, whether natural, capped, or veneered, will not be decorated with designs, jewels, initials, or similar ornamentation. Unnatural shaping of teeth for nonmedical reasons is prohibited. Commanders may consider waivers for permanent caps that were applied prior to the effective date of this regulation. Such waivers must be approved by the first O-5 commander in the chain of command and documented in an official memorandum, which must be uploaded to the Soldier's AMHRR. A picture of the permanent caps must be appended as an enclosure to the memorandum.

3-5. Wear of Army uniform at national, regional, and local events

Note: This paragraph is punitive with regard to Soldiers. Violation by Soldiers may result in adverse administrative action and/or charges under the provisions of the UCMJ .

a. When Army participation in a public event has been approved in accordance with AR 360-1 , commanders are responsible for determining the appropriate uniform for the event. Generally, protocol standards dictate standards of dress. For instance, when an invitation calls for business attire, the appropriate Army uniform is the service or dress uniform. However, in some instances, the Class C uniform may be appropriate. Commanders should make use of their protocol or other appropriate supporting staff for a decision regarding the appropriate uniform.

b. Commanders should use their discretion and consider the following when determining the appropriate uniform for the event:

(1) The nature and location of the event (for example, on or off-post).

(2) Whether the event is open to the public or not.

(3) The solemnity of the event.

(4) Who is being recognized at or by the event (is the event recognizing current Soldiers or veterans).

(5) Who is hosting the event.

(6) Who is attending the event.

(7) Whether the media will be present.

c. When attire is listed as "duty uniform," the activities undertaken drive the appropriate uniform. "Duty uniform" does not necessarily indicate Class C uniform wear. When "duty" is listed as the uniform for an event, commanders need to exercise good judgment for participants and attendees.

d. If an event recognizes the service and sacrifice of Soldiers for named operations, then the Army combat uniform may be appropriate. If the event recognizes the shared sacrifice of our veterans on Veteran's Day, then the service uniform is appropriate. In all cases, the Army is on display. Commanders are expected to recognize the difference and prescribe a uniform appropriate for an event.

e. When commanders are in doubt regarding the appropriate uniform, they should seek guidance from their higher headquarters and/or the appropriate public affairs or protocol office.

3-6. Uniform appearance and fit

a. Appearance.

(1) All personnel will maintain a high standard of professional dress and appearance. Uniforms will fit properly; the proper fitting of uniforms is provided in DA Pam 670-1 . Personnel must keep uniforms clean, serviceable, and roll-pressed, as necessary. Soldiers must project a military image that leaves no doubt that they live by a common military standard and uphold military order and discipline.

(2) Consider the following when wearing items on uniforms:

(a) Keys or key chains will not be attached to the uniform on the belt, belt loops, or waistband, unless they are not visible (to include making a bulky appearance under the uniform). When authorized by the commander, Soldiers may attach visible keys or key chains to the uniform when performing duties such as charge of quarters, armorer, duty officer or noncommissioned officer (NCO), or other similar duties.

(b) Soldiers may wear an electronic device on the belt, belt loops, or waistband of the uniform. Only one electronic device (for example, cell phone) may be worn. The body of the device may not exceed the size of a Government-issued electronic device, and the device and carrying case must be black; no other colors are authorized. If security cords or chains are attached to the device, Soldiers will conceal the cord or chain from view. Other types of electronic devices are not authorized for wear on the uniform, unless medically prescribed. If the commander issues and requires the use of other electronic devices in the performance of duties, the Soldier will carry them in the hand, pocket, briefcase, purse, bag, or some other carrying container.

(c) Soldiers will not wear keys, key chains, or electronic devices on the uniform when the commander determines such wear is inappropriate (such as in formation or during parades or ceremonies).

(d) Soldiers will not walk while engaged in activities that would interfere with the hand salute and greeting of the day or detract from a professional image. Examples include, but are not limited to, walking while eating, using electronic devices, or smoking cigarettes, cigars, or pipes. Soldiers are not authorized to wear wireless or non-wireless devices/earpieces while wearing Army uniforms. Hands-free devices while operating a commercial or military vehicle (to include a motorcycle or bicycle) are allowed if not otherwise prohibited by policy or law in accordance with AR 385-10 .

(3) While in uniform, personnel will not place their hands in their pockets, except momentarily to place or retrieve objects. Soldiers will keep uniforms buttoned, zipped, and snapped. They will ensure that metallic devices such as metal insignia, belt buckles, and belt tips are free of scratches and corrosion and properly polished or properly subdued, as applicable. Soldiers will ensure all medals and ribbons are clean and not frayed. Personnel will keep boots and shoes cleaned and/or shined, as appropriate. Soldiers will replace the insignia listed in AR 700-84 when it becomes unserviceable or no longer conforms to standards.

(4) Lapels and sleeves of service, dress, and mess coats and jackets will be roll-pressed, without creasing. Skirts will not be creased. Trousers, slacks, and the sleeves of shirts and blouses will be creased. Personnel are not authorized to sew military creases into the uniform.

(5) Although some uniform items are made of wash-and-wear materials, or are treated with a permanent-press finish, Soldiers may need to press these items to maintain a neat, military appearance. However, before pressing or roll pressing uniform items, Soldiers should read and comply with care instruction labels attached to the items. Using starch, sizing, and any process that involves dry-cleaning or steam press will adversely affect the treatments and durability of the wash-and-wear uniforms and is not authorized. See DA Pam 670-1 regarding specific guidance pertaining to each uniform.

b. Fit. Instructions for fit of uniforms are contained in DA Pam 670-1 .

3-7. Required or prohibited wearing of the Army uniform

Note: This paragraph is punitive with regard to Soldiers. Violation by Soldiers may result in adverse administrative action and/or charges under the provisions of the UCMJ .

a. All personnel will wear an Army uniform when on duty, unless granted an exception by the commander to wear civilian clothes. Wearing civilian clothing on duty is subject to the provisions of AR 700-84 . The following personnel may grant exceptions:

(1) Commanders of ACOM/ASCC/DRUs.

(2) The Secretary of Defense or designee, the Secretary of the Army, or the Assistant Secretaries of the Army.

(3) Heads of Department of Defense (DOD) agencies.

(4) Heads of DA Staff agencies or HQDA principal officials.

b. Personnel traveling on Air Mobility Command and non-Air Mobility Command flights on permanent change of station orders, temporary duty (TDY), emergency leave, or space-available flights are authorized to wear civilian clothes. Personnel must ensure that the clothing worn is appropriate for the occasion and reflects positively on the Army. (See DOD 4500.54-G for information concerning mandatory wear of civilian clothing in foreign countries. The individual's travel orders will reflect information authorizing wear of civilian clothing.)

c. Personnel on official travel and traveling by commercial travel means will wear the service uniform or appropriate civilian attire. Soldiers may wear the combat uniform on commercial flights only when deploying/redeploying or on rest and recuperation leave to and from the combat theater. However, Commanders may authorize service or utility uniforms for Soldiers when traveling by commercial travel for emergency leave or casualty assistance duties.

d. Soldiers may wear optional uniform items with the service uniform as prescribed in this regulation and DA Pam 670-1 . All uniform combinations are authorized for year-round wear. However, Soldiers should use appropriate discretion based upon weather conditions and duties. Wearing combinations of uniform items not prescribed in this regulation, DA Pam 670-1, or other authorization documents approved by HQDA is prohibited. Commanders will not prescribe seasonal wear dates for uniform items, but may prescribe uniform(s) based on safety reasons (for example, for extreme cold or hot weather based on temperature).

e. Wearing a combination of civilian and military clothing is prohibited, unless prescribed in this regulation or directed by the Secretary of the Army.

f. Bags, handbags, purses, and backpacks are authorized, but must adhere to the following criteria:

(1) Hand carried bags will be conservative and professional in appearance. Bags (to include civilian gym bags, civilian backpacks, or other similar civilian bags) must be carried only in the hand if they do not meet the criteria outlined in paragraph 3-7 f (2) . DA Pam 670-1 provides additional descriptions and wear occasions for handbags.

(2) If Soldiers choose to wear a shoulder bag while in uniform, the bag must be black or match the camouflage pattern uniform being worn, and may not have any commercial logos. The contents of the bag may not be visible; therefore, see-through plastic or mesh bags are not authorized. Soldiers may carry authorized bags by hand, on one shoulder using a shoulder strap, or over both shoulders using both shoulder straps.

(3) Commanders may prescribe the wear of organizational issue rucksacks in garrison and field environments.

g. Soldiers may continue to wear issued uniform items changed in design or material as long as the item remains in serviceable condition, unless specifically prohibited by this regulation or DA Pam 670-1 .

h. Civilian clothing is considered appropriate attire for individuals who are participating in civilian outdoor activities, such as volksmarches, orienteering, or similar activities. Soldiers who are spectators at these activities may wear the service uniform. Soldiers who are participating in, or observing these events, are not authorized to wear utility or field uniforms. However, commanders of participating units or of those units that provide support personnel (such as medical and traffic control personnel) may prescribe appropriate uniforms, to include utility or organizational uniforms, if warranted by the occasion, weather conditions, or activity.

i. Soldiers may wear experimental uniform items while actively engaged in an experimental uniform test program approved by Headquarters, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command; Headquarters, U.S. Army Materiel Command; or the Army Uniform Board, HQDA. Soldiers will not wear experimental items after completion of the test, unless such wear has been approved by HQDA.

j. ARNG technicians, who are also members of the ARNG, will wear the appropriate Army duty uniform while engaged in their civil service status.

k. Wearing Army uniforms is prohibited in the following situations:

(1) In connection with the furtherance of any political or commercial interests, or when engaged in off-duty civilian employment.

(2) When participating in public speeches, interviews, picket lines, marches, rallies, or public demonstrations, except as authorized by the first O-5 in the chain of command.

(3) When attending any meeting or event that is a function of, or is sponsored by, an extremist organization.

(4) When wearing the uniform would bring discredit upon the Army, as determined by the Commander.

(5) When specifically prohibited by Army regulations.

l. Soldiers will wear headgear with the Army uniform, except under the following circumstances:

(1) Headgear is not required if it would interfere with the safe operation of military vehicles. Wearing military headgear is not required while in or on a privately owned vehicle (to include a motorcycle, bicycle, or convertible automobile), a commercial vehicle, or on public conveyance (such as a subway, train, plane, or bus).

(2) Soldiers will not wear headgear indoors, unless under arms in an official capacity, or when directed by the commander, such as for indoor ceremonial activities.

(3) Male and female Soldiers are not required to wear headgear to evening social events (after retreat) when wearing the Army service and dress uniforms or the mess and evening mess uniforms.

(4) Soldiers will carry their headgear, when it is not worn, in their hands while wearing service, dress, and mess uniforms. Soldiers are authorized storage of the headgear, when it is not worn, in the Class C uniform cargo pockets, if applicable. Soldiers must fold the headgear neatly so as not to present a bulky appearance. They may also elect to store it at the small of the back, with the bill tucked in the belt, provided there is no bulky appearance and the headgear remains hidden from view. Soldiers will not attach headgear to the uniform or hang it from the belt.

3-8. Distinctive uniforms and uniform items

a. For purposes of applying the provisions of 10 USC § 771, the following uniform items are distinctive and will not be sold to or worn by unauthorized personnel:

(1) All Army headgear, when worn with insignia.

(2) Badges and tabs (identification, marksmanship, combat, and special skill).

(3) Uniform buttons (U.S. Army or Corps of Engineers).

(4) Decorations, service medals, service and training ribbons, and other awards and their appurtenances.

(5) Insignia of any design or color that the Army has adopted.

b. Individuals will remove all distinctive items before disposing of unserviceable uniform items.

c. Specific instructions regarding uniforms and uniform items are contained in DA Pam 670-1 .

3-9. Civilian clothing

a. Civilian clothing is authorized for wear when off duty, unless the wear is prohibited by the Senior Commander. Commanders down to unit level may restrict the wear of civilian clothes by those Soldiers who have had their pass privileges revoked. Within the confines of a military base or a DoD installation, civilian clothing will be worn subject to local regulations.

b. When on duty in civilian clothes or off duty and outside of their personal dwelling, Army personnel will present a professional image that does not detract from the profession, unless specifically exempted by the commander for specific mission requirements.

c. Soldiers are associated and identified with the Army in and out of uniform, and when on or off duty. Therefore, when civilian clothing is worn, Soldiers will ensure that their dress and personal appearance are commensurate with the high standards traditionally associated with Army service. Commanders are charged with determining and publishing the local civilian clothing policy. When on a military installation, civilian headgear will be removed indoors in accordance with established norms.

d. When civilian clothing has been authorized by competent authority for wear in a duty status in lieu of a uniform, the civilian clothing will be of the same comparable degree of formality as the uniform prescribed for such duty. Standards of dress and appearance will be conservative and meet the same high standards established for personnel in uniform.

e. The wear of clothing articles not specifically designed to be normally worn as headgear (for example, bandannas, do rags) are prohibited while on duty.

f. No part of a prescribed uniform, except those items not exclusively military in character, may be worn with civilian clothing.

g. Uniform items authorized for wear with civilian clothing by males are restricted to the gold cuff links, studs, tie bar, mourning band, footwear, socks, gloves, undergarments, black bow-tie, wool scarf, all-weather coat, fleece caps, and physical training uniforms.

h. Uniform items authorized for wear with civilian clothing by females are restricted to the white shirt without insignia of grade, footwear, gloves, handbag, clutch purse, wool scarf, all-weather coat, fleece caps, and physical training uniforms.

i. Uniform items that have been declared obsolete may be worn with civilian clothing, provided such items contain no distinctive insignia or buttons.

3-10. Eyeglasses, sunglasses, and contact lenses

Note: This paragraph is punitive with regard to Soldiers. Violation by Soldiers may result in adverse administrative action and/or charges under the provisions of the UCMJ .

a. Eyeglasses and sunglasses.

(1) Conservative civilian prescription eyeglasses are authorized for wear with all uniforms.

(2) Conservative prescription and nonprescription sunglasses are authorized for wear when in a garrison environment, except while indoors. Individuals who are required by medical authority to wear sunglasses for medical reasons, other than refractive error, may wear them, except when health or safety considerations apply. Commanders may authorize sunglasses in formations or field environments, as appropriate.

(3) Eyeglasses or sunglasses that are trendy or have lenses or frames with conspicuous initials, designs, or other adornments are not authorized for wear. Soldiers may not wear lenses with extreme or trendy colors, which include, but are not limited to, red, yellow, blue, purple, bright green, or orange. Lens colors must be traditional gray, brown, or dark green shades. Personnel will not wear lenses or frames that are so large or so small that they detract from the appearance of the uniform. Personnel will not attach chains or ribbons to eyeglasses. Eyeglass restraints (to include bands) are authorized when required for safety purposes. Personnel will not hang eyeglasses or eyeglass cases on the uniform and may not let glasses hang from eyeglass restraints down the front of the uniform. Glasses may not be worn on top of the head at any time.

(4) Soldiers are authorized to wear ballistic spectacle eye protection issued by the Army, including lens colors or logos that do not comply with paragraph 3-10 a (3) , above, in garrison or field environments unless otherwise directed by their chain of command. See the Army Combat Readiness Center for a list of currently approved protective eyewear.

b. Restrictions on contact lenses. Tinted or colored contact lenses are not authorized for wear with the uniform. The only exception is for opaque lenses that are prescribed medically for eye injuries. Clear lenses that have designs on them that change the contour of the iris are not authorized for wear with the uniform. Contact lenses may be restricted by the commander for safety or mission requirements.

3-11. Identification tags and security identification badges

a. Identification tags. Wearing identification tags is governed by AR 600-8-14 .

(1) Soldiers will wear identification tags at all times while on duty in uniform unless otherwise directed by the commander.

(2) Personnel will wear identification tags around the neck, except when safety considerations apply (such as during physical training).

b. Security identification badges. In restricted areas, commanders may prescribe wearing security identification badges, in accordance with AR 600-8-14 and other applicable regulations. Personnel will not wear security identification badges outside the area for which they are required. Personnel will not hang other items from the security identification badge(s). The manner of wear will be determined by the organization that requires wearing the badges.

3-12. Personal protective or reflective clothing

a. Protective headgear. Soldiers are authorized to wear commercially designed protective headgear while in uniform when operating motorcycles, bicycles, or other similar vehicles and are required to do so when installation regulations mandate such wear. Personnel will remove protective headgear and wear authorized Army headgear upon dismounting from the vehicle.

b. Protective and/or reflective clothing. Soldiers may wear protective and/or reflective outer garments with uniforms when required IAW AR 385-10 , when safety considerations make it appropriate, or when authorized by the commander.

3-13. Organizational protective or reflective clothing

When required by AR 385-10 or when safety considerations apply, commanders may require Soldiers to wear organizational protective or reflective items, or other occupational health or safety equipment, while in uniform (such as during physical fitness training). If required by law or DOD or Army policy, commanders will furnish necessary protective or reflective clothing to Soldiers at no cost.

3-14. Heraldic items

a. The heraldic items listed below are authorized for purchase and possession IAW AR 672-8 . Variations from the prescribed specifications for these heraldic items are not permitted without prior approval of TIOH.

(1) All insignia approved by HQDA.

(2) Appurtenances and devices for attachment to decorations, service medals, and ribbons.

(3) Miniature replicas of decorations, service medals, and ribbons.

(4) Oversized replicas of decorations and service medals for grave markers only. These replicas must be at least twice the size prescribed for the decoration or service medal.

(5) Ribbons pertaining to decorations and service medals.

(6) Unit award emblems, fourrageres, and the orange lanyard.

(7) Combat, special skill, and marksmanship badges, including miniatures and dress miniatures.

(8) Identification badges.

(9) Rosettes and lapel buttons.

b. The heraldic items listed below are not authorized for purchase.

(1) Medal of Honor.

(a) Medal of Honor service ribbon.

(b) Medal of Honor rosette.

(c) Medal of Honor flag.

(2) Items incorporating designs or the likeness of decorations, service medals, and service ribbons.

c. The possession, wear, and other uses of heraldic items are addressed below.

(1) The possession of any of the items listed in paragraph 3-14 a , above, or elsewhere in this regulation is authorized. Wearing of any HQDA-prescribed decoration, service medal, badge, service ribbon, lapel button, or insignia by persons not authorized to do so, or the use of such items to defraud or misrepresent their identification or status, is prohibited. Persons violating this provision are subject to punishment under the provision of 18 USC 701, 18 USC 704, or the UCMJ .

(2) No organization, society, or other group of persons may use any of the articles or imitations specified in paragraph 3-14 a , above or elsewhere in this regulation without written approval of the Secretary of the Army or his designee.

d. The incorporation of designs or likenesses of approved designs in commercial articles is addressed below.

(1) DA policy restricts the use of military designs. The manufacture of articles for public sale that incorporate designs or likenesses of decorations, service medals, service ribbons, and lapel buttons is prohibited. Certain designs or likenesses of insignia, such as badges or organizational insignia, may be incorporated in articles manufactured for sale, provided that permission has been granted, in writing, as specified below.

(2) The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) is responsible for granting permission for the incorporation of certain Army designs in articles manufactured for sale through the Army Trademark and Licensing and Program IAW AR 27-60 .

Chapter 4
Combat Uniform

4-1. Authorization for wear

The combat uniform is authorized for year-round duty wear by Soldiers, when prescribed by the commander. Some combat uniforms are classified as utility uniforms, while others are designed for a specific function. See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as combat uniforms.

4-2. Composition

The combat uniform consists of:

a. Coat.

b. Trousers.

c. Undershirt.

d. Undergarments.

e. Belt.

f. Socks.

g. Boots.

h. Headgear.

4-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. Some versions of the combat uniform are not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform. The combat uniform is designed to be worn under body armor.

b. Approved wear. The combat uniform is prescribed for year-round wear for all Soldiers, unless otherwise directed by the commander. Soldiers may wear the combat uniform off-post, unless prohibited by the commander.

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) Soldiers may not wear the combat uniform for commercial travel unless authorized IAW paragraph 3-7 b through c , above.

(2) Personnel may not wear the combat uniform in off-post establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the off-post establishment sells alcohol and food, Soldiers may not wear the combat uniform if their activities in the establishment center on the drinking of alcohol.

(3) The combat uniform is not normally considered appropriate for social or official functions off the installation, such as memorial services, funerals, weddings, inaugurals, patriotic ceremonies, and similar functions.

(4) Commanders may further restrict wear of the combat uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c .

d. Organizational and equipment. The commander may prescribe organizational and individual equipment items in accordance with CTA 50-900 when the combat uniform is prescribed for parades, reviews, and ceremonies.

Chapter 5
Maternity Work Uniform

5-1. Authorization for wear

The Army maternity work uniform is authorized for year-round wear by pregnant Soldiers, when prescribed by the commander. See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as maternity work uniforms.

5-2. Composition

The maternity work uniform consists of:

a. Coat, maternity.

b. Trousers, maternity.

c. Undershirt.

d. Undergarments.

e. Socks.

f. Boots.

g. Headgear.

5-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. The maternity work uniform is issued as an organizational utility or field maternity uniform and is not intended for wear when other maternity uniforms are more appropriate.

b. Approved wear. The maternity work uniform is worn on duty when prescribed by the commander. Females may wear the maternity work uniforms off-post, unless prohibited by the commander.

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) Soldiers may not wear the maternity work uniform for commercial travel unless authorized IAW paragraph 3-7b through c.

(2) Personnel may not wear the maternity work uniform in off-post establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the off-post establishment sells alcohol and food, Soldiers may not wear the maternity work uniform if their activities in the establishment center on the drinking of alcohol.

(3) The maternity work uniform is not normally considered appropriate for social or official functions off the installation, such as memorial services, funerals, weddings, inaugurals, patriotic ceremonies, and so forth.

(4) Commanders may further restrict wear of the maternity work uniform IAW paragraph 2-6c .

d. Organizational equipment items. The commander may prescribe organizational and individual equipment items in accordance with CTA 50-900 when the maternity work uniform is prescribed for parades, reviews, and ceremonies.

Chapter 6
Aircrew Uniform

Section I General

6-1. Authorization for wear

The aircrew uniform is authorized for year-round wear by aircrew members, as specified in CTA 50-900, when prescribed by the commander. See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as aircrew uniforms.

6-2. Composition

The aircrew uniform consists of:

a. Coat.

b. Trousers.

c. Undershirt.

d. Undergarments.

e. Belt.

f. Socks.

g. Boots.

h. Headgear.

6-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. Soldiers may wear the aircrew uniform on duty when prescribed by the commander for flight operations. The aircrew uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform when other uniforms are more appropriate.

b. Approved wear. The aircrew uniform is prescribed for year-round wear for all Soldiers, unless otherwise directed by the commander. Soldiers may wear the aircrew uniform off-post, unless prohibited by the commander.

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) Soldiers may not wear the aircrew uniform for commercial travel unless authorized IAW paragraph 3-7 b through c . However, Commanders may authorize the wear of the aircrew uniform in lieu of the combat uniform when deploying/redeploying or on rest and recuperation leave to and from the combat theater.

(2) Personnel may not wear aircrew uniforms in off-post establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the off-post establishment sells alcohol and food, Soldiers may not wear the aircrew uniform if their activities in the establishment center on the drinking of alcohol.

(3) Aircrew uniforms are not normally considered appropriate for social or official functions off the installation, such as memorial services, funerals, weddings, inaugurals, patriotic ceremonies, and similar functions.

(4) Commanders may further restrict wear of the aircrew uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c .

(5) The aircrew uniform is not appropriate for parades, reviews, and ceremonies.

Chapter 7
Hospital Uniform-Male

7-1. Authorization for wear

The male hospital uniform is authorized for all male officers in the Army Nurse Corps and the Army Medical Specialist Corps and by enlisted males with medical, dental, or veterinary military occupational specialty (MOS). See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as male hospital uniforms.

7-2. Composition

The male hospital uniform consists of:

a. Smock.

b. Trousers.

c. Undershirt.

d. Undergarments.

e. Footwear.

f. Headgear.

7-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. The male hospital uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform when other uniforms are more appropriate.

b. Approved wear. The male hospital duty uniform is worn on duty in Army health care facilities, as prescribed by the medical commander. The commander may authorize medical personnel to wear this uniform off-post when providing support, such as medical support, for an activity in the civilian community.

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) The hospital duty uniform is not authorized for travel or for wear off military installations, except when in transit between an individual's quarters and duty station.

(2) Commanders may further restrict wear of the male hospital uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c .

(3) The male hospital uniform is not appropriate for parades, reviews, and ceremonies.

Chapter 8
Hospital and Maternity Uniforms-Female

8-1. Authorization for wear

The female hospital uniform is authorized for all female officers in the Army Nurse Corps and the Army Medical Specialist Corps, and by enlisted females with a medical, dental, or veterinary MOS. The term "female hospital uniform" used throughout this chapter refers to both the female hospital and hospital maternity uniforms. See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as female hospital uniforms.

8-2. Composition

The female hospital uniform consists of:

a. Dress.

b. Slacks.

c. Tunic.

d. Smock (physicians).

e. Undershirt.

f. Undergarments.

g. Footwear.

h. Headgear. Note: Not all components are worn together. Either the dress or the slacks are worn (see DA Pam 670-1 ).

8-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. The female hospital uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform when other uniforms are more appropriate.

b. Approved wear. The female hospital uniform is worn on duty in Army health care facilities, as prescribed by the medical commander. The commander may authorize medical personnel to wear this uniform off-post when providing support, such as medical support, for an activity in the civilian community.

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) The female hospital uniform is not authorized for travel or for wear off military installations, except when in transit between an individual's quarters and duty station.

(2) Commanders may further restrict wear of the female hospital uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c .

(3) The female hospital uniform is not appropriate for parades, reviews, and ceremonies.

Chapter 9
Food Service Uniform-Male

9-1. Authorization for wear

The male food service uniforms are authorized for year-round wear by all enlisted Soldiers in career management field (CMF) 92 who hold a food service MOS, when prescribed by CTA 50-900 and the commander. See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as male food service uniforms.

9-2. Composition

The male food service uniform consists of:

a. Smock.

b. Trousers.

c. Undershirt.

d. Undergarments.

e. Footwear.

f. Headgear.

9-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. The male food service uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform when other uniforms are more appropriate.

b. Approved wear. Enlisted Soldiers in CMF 92 who hold a food service MOSs wear a male food service uniform on duty, when prescribed by the commander.

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) The male food service uniform is not authorized for travel or for wear off military installations, except when in transit between an individual's quarters and duty station.

(2) Food service uniforms are worn only in a garrison environment and are not authorized for wear in the field.

(3) Commanders may further restrict wear of the male food service uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c .

(4) The male food service uniform is not appropriate for parades, reviews, and ceremonies.

Chapter 10
Food Service and Maternity Uniforms-Female

10-1. Authorization for wear

The female food service uniforms are authorized for year-round wear by enlisted Soldiers in CMF 92 who hold a food service MOS, when prescribed by CTA 50-900 and the commander. The term "female food service uniform" used throughout this chapter refers to both the female food service and food service maternity uniforms. See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as female food service uniforms.

10-2. Composition

The female food service uniform consists of:

a. Dress.

b. Tunic.

c. Slacks.

d. Pantsuit.

e. Skirt.

f. Footwear.

g. Headgear.

h. Undershirt.

i. Undergarments. Note: Not all components are worn together. Either the dress, trousers, or pantsuit are worn (see DA Pam 670-1 ).

10-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. The female food service uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform when other uniforms are more appropriate.

b. Approved wear. Enlisted Soldiers in CMF 92 who hold a food service MOS wear female food service uniforms on duty, when prescribed by the commander.

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) The female food service uniform is not authorized for travel or for wear off military installations, except when in transit between an individual's quarters and duty station.

(2) The female food service uniforms are worn only in a garrison environment, and are not authorized for wear in the field.

(3) Commanders may further restrict wear of the female food service uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c .

(4) The female food service uniform is not appropriate for parades, reviews, and ceremonies.

Chapter 11
Combat Vehicle Crewman Uniform

11-1. Authorization for wear

Combat vehicle crewman uniforms are authorized for year-round wear by combat vehicle crewmen, when issued in accordance with CTA 50-900 and prescribed by the commander. See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as combat vehicle crewman uniforms.

11-2. Composition

The combat vehicle crewman uniform consists of:

a. Coverall.

b. Jacket.

c. Undergarments.

d. Socks.

e. Boots.

f. Headgear.

g. Undershirt.

h. Vest

11-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. Soldiers may wear the combat vehicle crewman uniform on duty when prescribed by the commander for combat vehicle operations. The combat vehicle crewman uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform when other uniforms are more appropriate.

b. Approved wear. The combat vehicle crewman uniform is prescribed for year-round wear for all Soldiers, unless otherwise directed by the commander. Soldiers may wear the combat vehicle crewman uniform off-post, unless prohibited by the commander.

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) Soldiers may not wear a combat vehicle crewman uniform for commercial travel unless authorized IAW paragraph 3-7 b through c .

(2) Personnel may not wear a combat vehicle crewman uniform in off-post establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the off-post establishment sells alcohol and food, Soldiers may not wear a combat vehicle crewman uniform if their activities in the establishment center on the drinking of alcohol.

(3) Combat vehicle crewman uniforms are not normally considered appropriate for social or official functions off the installation, such as memorial services, funerals, weddings, inaugurals, patriotic ceremonies, and similar functions.

(4) Commanders may further restrict wear of the combat vehicle crewman uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c .

(5) The combat vehicle crewman uniform is not appropriate for parades, reviews, and ceremonies.

Chapter 12
Physical Fitness Uniform

12-1. Authorization for wear

The physical fitness uniforms are authorized for year-round wear by all personnel, when prescribed by the commander. See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as physical fitness uniforms, and for authorized variations of the uniform.

12-2. Composition

The physical fitness uniform consists of the following components:

a. Jacket.

b. Pants.

c. Trunks.

d. T-shirt.

e. Undergarments.

f. Footwear.

g. Socks.

12-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. The physical fitness uniform is authorized for wear on and off duty, on and off the installation, unless restricted by the commander. Soldiers may wear all or part of the physical fitness uniform with civilian attire off the installation, unless restricted by the commander. The physical fitness uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform when other uniforms are more appropriate.

b. Approved wear. The physical fitness uniform is prescribed for year-round wear for all Soldiers, unless otherwise directed by the commander. Soldiers may wear the physical fitness uniform off-post unless prohibited by the commander.

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) Soldiers may not wear the physical fitness uniform for commercial travel.

(2) Personnel may not wear a physical fitness uniform in off-post establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the off-post establishment sells alcohol and food, Soldiers may not wear a physical fitness uniform if their activities in the establishment center on the drinking of alcohol.

(3) Physical fitness uniform are not considered appropriate for social or official functions off the installation, such as memorial services, funerals, weddings, inaugurals, patriotic ceremonies, and similar functions.

(4) Commanders may further restrict wear of the physical fitness uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c .

(5) The physical fitness uniform is not appropriate for parades, reviews, and ceremonies.

Chapter 13
Service/ Dress Uniform-Male

13-1. Authorization for wear

The male service/dress uniform is authorized for year-round wear by all male personnel. When prescribed by CTA 50-900, the service/dress uniform is worn as an organizational item. See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as male service/dress uniforms and for authorized variations of the uniform.

13-2. Composition

a. The male service/dress uniform consists of:

(1) Coat.

(2) Trousers.

(3) Shirt.

(4) Necktie.

(5) Undergarments.

(6) Belt.

(7) Headgear.

(8) Footwear.

(9) Socks.

(10) Undershirt.

b. The male service/dress uniform has multiple variations:

(1) Service Class A: All components are worn.

(2) Service Class B: All components are worn, except the coat; the neck tie is optional if the short-sleeve shirt is worn.

(3) Dress: All components are worn; the bow tie is substituted for the necktie.

13-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. The male service/dress uniform is authorized for wear on and off duty, on and off the installation, unless restricted by the commander. The male service/dress uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform when other uniforms are more appropriate.

b. Approved wear. The male service/dress uniform is prescribed for year-round wear for all Soldiers, unless otherwise directed by the commander. Soldiers may wear variations of the male service/dress uniform:

(1) On duty when prescribed by the local commander.

(2) At social functions of a private or official nature, either before or after retreat, and while in transit to and from such functions. The male service/dress uniform is normally considered appropriate for social or official functions off the installation, such as memorial services, funerals, weddings, inaugurals, patriotic ceremonies, and similar functions.

(3) When designated by the host of an event.

(4) On other appropriate occasions, as desired by the individual.

(5) Soldiers may wear the male service/dress uniform for commercial travel IAW paragraph 3-7 b through c .

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) Personnel may not wear male service/dress uniform in off-post establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the off-post establishment sells alcohol and food, Soldiers may not wear the male service/dress uniform if their activities in the establishment center on the drinking of alcohol.

(2) Commanders may further restrict wear of the male service/dress uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c .

Chapter 14
Service/ Dress Uniform-Female

14-1. Authorization for wear

The female service/dress uniform is authorized for year-round wear by all female personnel. When prescribed by CTA 50-900, the female service/dress uniform is worn as an organizational item. See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as female service/dress uniforms, and for authorized variations of the uniform.

14-2. Composition

a. The female Army service/dress uniform consists of:

(1) Coat.

(2) Trousers.

(3) Skirt.

(4) Shirt.

(5) Neck tab.

(6) Undergarments.

(a) Belt.

(b) Headgear.

(c) Footwear.

(d) Hosiery.

b. The female service/dress uniform has multiple variations:

(1) Service Class B: The coat is not worn. Female Soldiers may elect to wear either the trousers or the skirt. The neck tab is only required if wearing the long sleeve shirt.

(2) Service Class A: All components are worn; subject to election of either the trousers or the skirt.

(3) Dress: All components are worn; the skirt must be worn, trousers are not authorized for wear.

14-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. The female service/dress uniform is authorized for wear on and off duty, on and off the installation, when authorized by the commander. The female service/dress uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform when other uniforms are more appropriate.

b. Approved wear. The female service/dress uniform is prescribed for year-round wear for all Soldiers, unless otherwise directed by the commander. Soldiers may wear variations of the female service/dress uniform:

(1) On duty when prescribed by the local commander.

(2) At social functions of a private or official nature, either before or after retreat, and while in transit to and from such functions. The female service/dress uniform is normally considered appropriate for social or official functions off the installation, such as memorial services, funerals, weddings, inaugurals, patriotic ceremonies, and similar functions.

(3) When designated by the host of an event.

(4) On other appropriate occasions, as desired by the individual.

(5) Soldiers may wear the female service/dress uniform for commercial travel IAW paragraph 3-7 b through c .

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) Personnel may not wear the female service/dress uniform in off-post establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the off-post establishment sells alcohol and food, Soldiers may not wear the female service/dress uniform if their activities in the establishment center on the drinking of alcohol.

(2) Commanders may further restrict wear of the female service/dress uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c .

(3) The female service/dress uniform is normally appropriate for parades, reviews, and ceremonies.

Chapter 15
Maternity Service Uniform

15-1. Authorization for wear

The maternity service uniform is authorized for year-round wear by pregnant Soldiers as a service or dress uniform, when prescribed for wear by CTA 50-900 (table 5), AR 700-84 , and the commander. The maternity service uniform is a supplemental issue item for Enlisted Soldiers; it is a personally procured item for Officers. See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as maternity service uniforms, and for authorized variations of the uniform.

15-2. Composition.

The maternity service uniform consists of:

a. Tunic.

b. Slacks.

c. Skirt.

d. Shirt.

e. Undergarments.

f. Neck tab.

g. Headgear.

h. Footwear.

i. Hosiery.

15-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. The maternity service uniform is authorized for wear on and off duty, on and off the installation, when authorized by the commander. The maternity service uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform when other uniforms are more appropriate.

b. Approved wear. The maternity service uniform is prescribed for year-round wear for all Soldiers, unless otherwise directed by the commander. Soldiers may wear variations of the maternity service uniform:

(1) On duty when prescribed by the local commander.

(2) At social functions of a private or official nature, either before or after retreat, and while in transit to and from such functions. The maternity service uniform is normally considered appropriate for social or official functions off the installation, such as memorial services, funerals, weddings, inaugurals, patriotic ceremonies, and similar functions.

(3) When designated by the host of an event, pregnant Soldiers may wear appropriate civilian maternity attire in lieu of the uniform for social functions.

(4) On other appropriate occasions, as desired by the individual.

(5) Soldiers may wear the maternity service uniform for commercial travel IAW paragraph 3-7 b through c .

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) Personnel may not wear the maternity service uniform in off-post establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the off-post establishment sells alcohol and food, Soldiers may not wear the maternity service uniform if their activities in the establishment center on the drinking of alcohol.

(2) Commanders may further restrict wear of the maternity service uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c . The maternity service uniform is normally appropriate for parades, reviews, and ceremonies.

Chapter 16
Blue Mess Uniforms-Male

16-1. Authorization for wear

The male blue mess uniforms are authorized for year-round wear by all male personnel. See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as male blue mess uniforms and for authorized variations of the uniform.

16-2. Composition.

The male blue mess uniform consists of:

a. Coat.

b. Trousers.

c. Shirt.

d. Necktie, bow.

e. Vest.

f. Cummerbund.

g. Undergarments.

h. Footwear.

i. Socks.

j. Undershirt.

16-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. The male blue mess uniform is authorized for wear on and off duty, on and off the installation, when authorized by the commander. The male blue mess uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform. The male blue mess uniform is worn for black-tie functions and corresponds to a civilian tuxedo. The blue evening mess uniform is the most formal uniform worn by Army personnel and corresponds to the civilian "white tie and tails."

b. Approved wear. The male blue mess uniform is prescribed for year-round wear for all Soldiers, unless otherwise directed by the commander. Soldiers may wear variations of the male blue mess uniform:

(1) On duty when prescribed by the local commander.

(2) At social functions of a general or official nature, held after retreat, and while in transit to and from such functions.

(3) At private, formal social functions, held after retreat.

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) Soldiers may not wear the blue mess uniform for commercial travel IAW paragraph 3-7 b through c .

(2) Personnel may not wear the male blue mess uniform in off-post establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the off-post establishment sells alcohol and food, Soldiers may not wear the uniform if their activities in the establishment center on the drinking of alcohol.

(3) Commanders may further restrict wear of the male blue mess uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c .

Chapter 17
Blue Mess Uniforms-Female

17-1. Authorization for wear

The female blue mess uniforms are authorized for year-round wear by all female personnel. See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as female blue mess uniforms and for authorized variations of the uniform.

17-2. Composition

The female blue mess uniform consists of:

a. Jacket.

b. Skirt.

c. Shirt.

d. Undergarments.

e. Neck tab.

f. Cummerbund.

g. Footwear.

h. Hosiery.

17-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. The female blue mess uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform. The female blue mess uniform is worn for black-tie functions and corresponds to a civilian tuxedo. The blue evening mess uniform is the most formal uniform worn by Army personnel and corresponds to the civilian "white tie and tails."

b. Approved wear. The female blue mess uniform is prescribed for year-round wear for all Soldiers, unless otherwise directed by the commander. Soldiers may wear variations of the female blue mess uniform:

(1) On duty when prescribed by the local commander.

(2) At social functions of a general or official nature, held after retreat, and while in transit to and from such functions.

(3) At private, formal social functions, held after retreat.

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) Soldiers may not wear the female blue mess uniform for commercial travel IAW paragraph 3-7 b through c .

(2) Personnel may not wear the female blue mess uniform in off-post establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the off-post establishment sells alcohol and food, Soldiers may not wear the female blue mess uniform if their activities in the establishment center on the drinking of alcohol.

(3) Commanders may further restrict wear of the blue mess uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c .

Chapter 18
White Mess Uniforms-Male

18-1. Authorization for wear

The male white mess uniforms are authorized for optional wear by all male personnel. Personnel normally wear these uniforms from April to October, except in clothing zones I and II, where they may wear them year-round (see CTA 50-900). See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as male white mess uniforms and for authorized variations of the uniform.

18-2. Composition

The male white mess uniform is comprised of:

a. Jacket.

b. Trousers.

c. Shirt.

d. Necktie, bow.

e. Cummerbund or vest.

f. Footwear.

g. Undergarments.

h. Undershirt.

i. Socks.

18-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. The male white mess uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform. The male white mess uniform is worn for black-tie functions and corresponds to a civilian tuxedo. The male white evening mess uniform is the most formal uniform worn by Army personnel and corresponds to the civilian "white tie and tails."

b. Approved wear. The male white mess uniform is prescribed for year-round wear for all Soldiers, unless otherwise directed by the commander. Soldiers may wear variations of the male white mess uniform:

(1) On duty when prescribed by the local commander.

(2) At social functions of a general or official nature, held after retreat, and while in transit to and from such functions.

(3) At private, formal dinners or other social functions, held after retreat.

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) Soldiers may not wear the male white mess uniform for commercial travel IAW paragraph 3-7 b through c .

(2) Personnel may not wear male white mess uniform in off-post establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the off-post establishment sells alcohol and food, Soldiers may not wear the uniform if their activities in the establishment center on the drinking of alcohol.

(3) Commanders may further restrict wear of the male white mess uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c .

Chapter 19
White Mess Uniforms-Female

19-1. Authorization for wear

The female white mess uniforms are authorized for wear by all female personnel. Personnel normally wear these uniforms from April to October, except in clothing zones I and II, where they may wear them year-round (see CTA 50-900). See DA Pam 670-1 for uniforms currently classified as female white mess uniforms and for authorized variations of the uniform.

19-2. Composition

The female white mess uniform is comprised of:

a. Jacket.

b. Skirt.

c. Shirt.

d. Neck tab.

e. Cummerbund.

f. Footwear.

g. Hosiery.

h. Undergarments.

i. Undershirt.

19-3. Occasions for wear

a. All-purpose wear. The female white mess uniform is not intended for wear as an all-purpose uniform. The female white mess uniform is worn for black-tie functions and corresponds to a civilian tuxedo. The female white evening mess uniform is the most formal uniform worn by Army personnel and corresponds to the civilian "white tie and tails."

b. Approved wear. The female white mess uniform is prescribed for year-round wear for all Soldiers, unless otherwise directed by the commander. Soldiers may wear variations of the white mess uniform:

(1) On duty when prescribed by the local commander.

(2) At social functions of a general or official nature, held after retreat, and while in transit to and from such functions.

(3) At private, formal dinners or other social functions, held after retreat.

(4) Trousers/slacks are not authorized for wear by female Soldiers with the white mess uniforms. Female Soldiers are authorized to wear the skirt with this uniform.

(5) There are two versions of the Army white jacket. The older version of the jacket is authorized for wear by officers only. The newer version of the jacket is authorized for wear by all females. Officers may continue to wear the older version jacket as long as it is serviceable.

c. Restrictions on wear.

(1) Soldiers may not wear the female white mess uniform for commercial travel IAW paragraph 3-7 b through c .

(2) Personnel may not wear the female white mess uniform in off-post establishments that primarily sell alcohol. If the off-post establishment sells alcohol and food, Soldiers may not wear the uniform if their activities in the establishment center on the drinking of alcohol.

(3) Commanders may further restrict wear of the female white mess uniform IAW paragraph 2-6 c .

Chapter 20
Uniform Accessories

20-1. General

This chapter lists, in alphabetical order, most uniform accessories referenced in the individual uniform chapters. See DA Pam 670-1 for additional information on composition and wear.

20-2. Belts and buckles

a. Belt, sand, rigger.

b. Belt, black, web waist, brass tip.

c. Buckle, belt, brass.

20-3. Boots

See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-4. Buttons

a. Uniform buttons are clothing bag issue items.

b. There are two types of uniform buttons —

(1) Regular Army.

(2) Corps of Engineers.

20-5. Capes (officers only)

a. Cape, black, female.

b. Cape, blue, female.

c. Cape, blue, male.

20-6. Chaplain's apparel

See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-7. Coats, all-weather (male and female)

The all-weather coat is a clothing bag issue item and is listed in DA Pam 670-1 .

20-8. Cover, cap, rain

The cap cover is an optional purchase item. See DA Pam 670-1 for additional information.

20-9. Cuff links and studs

Cuff links and studs are optional purchase items. See DA Pam 670-1 for additional information.

20-10. Cummerbunds (male and female)

The cummerbund is an optional purchase item. See DA Pam 670-1 for additional information.

20-11. Gloves

See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-12. Handbags

Handbags are an optional purchase item or a one-time cash allowance item. See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-13. Hat, drill sergeant

The hat is an organizational issue item. See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-14. Judge's apparel

Judicial robes are organizational issue items. See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-15. Military police accessories

Military police accessories are organizational issue items. See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-16. Neckgaiter

The neckgaiter is an optional purchase item. See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-17. Neck tabs, female

The dress neck tab is a clothing bag issue item. See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-18. Neckties, male

a. Necktie, bow, dress or mess. The bow tie is an optional purchase item. See DA Pam 670-1 .

b. Necktie, four-in-hand, service. The four-in-hand necktie is a clothing bag issue item. See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-19. Overcoat, ceremonial, blue.

The overcoat is an optional purchase item. See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-20. Overshoes, black

The overshoes are optional purchase items. See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-21. Scarves

See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-22. Shirts, white

a. Shirt short-sleeved, female. See DA Pam 670-1 .

b. Shirt, formal, female mess. The shirt is an optional purchase item. See DA Pam 670-1 .

c. Shirt, long-sleeved, female. See DA Pam 670-1 .

d. Shirt, short-sleeved, male. See DA Pam 670-1 .

e. Shirt, long-sleeved, male. See DA Pam 670-1 .

f. Shirt, semiformal, dress, male mess. The shirt is an optional purchase item. See DA Pam 670-1 .

g. Shirt, formal, male evening mess. The shirt is an optional purchase item. See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-23. Shoes

See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-24. Socks

See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-25. Suspenders

See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-26. Sweaters

See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-27. Umbrella

The umbrella is an optional purchase item. See DA Pam 670-1 .

a. Type. The umbrella is an optional purchase item.

b. Description. The umbrella is black, plain, with no logos or designs, and of a commercial design.

c. How worn. Soldiers may carry and use an umbrella, only during inclement weather, when wearing the service (Class A and Class B), dress, and mess uniforms. Umbrellas are not authorized in formations or when wearing field or utility uniforms. Commanders may further restrict Soldiers' use of umbrellas as appropriate.

20-28. Undergarments

See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-29. Vest, male

The vest is an optional purchase item. See DA Pam 670-1 .

20-30. Windbreaker

The windbreaker is an optional purchase item. See DA Pam 670-1 .

Chapter 21
Wear of Insignia and Accouterments

21-1. General

a. This regulation, DA Pam 670-1 , CTA 50-900, and special authorizations by HQDA specify the only items of insignia that personnel may wear on any of the U.S. Army uniforms.

b. The insignia worn by military personnel designates grade, branch, organization, duty assignments, skill qualifications, and prior Army service.

c. When authorized by the commander, members of honor guards, color guards, and similar details will wear the prescribed uniform with authorized accouterments and those accessories authorized in CTA 50-900 (see para 2-6e ).

d. Personnel will submit all requests for insignia designs to Director, The Institute of Heraldry, Department of the Army, 9325 Gunston Road, Room S112, Fort Belvoir VA 22060-5579.

21-2. General description

Insignia will meet the approved military specifications and conform to proper color designation (gold, silver, or subdued). See DA Pam 670-1 for additional guidance on authorized material and attachment procedures.

21-3. Headgear insignia

See DA Pam 670-1 for where and how worn.

21-4. U.S. Insignia

See DA Pam 670-1 for where and how worn.

21-5. Grade insignia for general officers

See DA Pam 670-1 for where and how worn.

21-6. Grade insignia for other officers

See DA Pam 670-1 for where and how worn.

21-7. Grade insignia for enlisted personnel

See DA Pam 670-1 for where and how worn.

21-8. Other grade insignia

See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-9. Branch insignia

a. General officers follow the guidance below for wear of branch insignia.

(1) The Chief of Staff, former Chiefs of Staff, and generals of the Army (five-star) may prescribe their branch insignia.

(2) All other general officers may wear branch insignia at their option. If they choose this option, general officers will wear the branch insignia for the position to which they are appointed, or for their duty assignment.

b. Unless otherwise indicated in the following paragraphs, all other commissioned and warrant officers serving on active duty will wear the insignia of their basic branch. When detailed to other branches, commissioned and warrant officers will wear the insignia of the branch to which they are detailed.

c. General staff, commissioned officers, and warrant officers, other than general officers, will wear the general staff branch insignia, as indicated below.

(1) When assigned to positions within the Office of the Secretary of the Army, the Under Secretary of the Army, or the Assistant Secretary of the Army, and when authorized by the Secretary of the Army to wear such insignia during their assignment in these offices.

(2) When detailed to duty on the Army General Staff (see AR 614-100 ).

(3) As directed by the Chief of Staff.

(4) When assigned to departmental or statutory tour table of distribution and allowance (TDA) positions in the National Guard Bureau.

(5) When assigned to the ARNG Command chief warrant officer positions within the office of The Adjutant General of each state, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, or the District of Columbia.

d. The Inspector General branch insignia is worn by the inspector general and those officers detailed as inspectors general, under the provisions of AR 614-100.

e. The National Guard Bureau branch insignia is worn by those officers detailed to the National Guard Bureau for 180 days or longer, U.S. Property and Fiscal Office officers, and other ARNG tour officers, as prescribed by the Chief, National Guard Bureau.

f. Officers assigned to the ARNG and the USAR, and who are not on extended active duty, wear staff specialist branch insignia (see AR 140-10 or National Guard Regulation ( NGR ) 600-102 for ARNG)..

g. Civil affairs (CA) reserve officers wear USAR branch insignia as follows:

(1) When assigned or detailed to the CA branch in accordance with AR 140-10, while serving in an inactive duty or active duty for training status.

(2) When assigned to an A-USAR troop program unit that has mobilized.

(3) When serving on extended active duty with CA troop program units.

(4) When assigned to CA mobilization designation positions upon mobilization.

(5) Officers will wear the insignia of the branch in which they are detailed, unless they are on extended active duty with other than CA units.

h. Judge Advocate General's Corps officers detailed to the Judge Advocate General's Corps, who are not yet admitted to practice law before a Federal court or the highest court of a state, will wear their basic branch insignia. They may wear Judge Advocate General's Corps insignia after they are admitted to practice.

i. All enlisted personnel will wear the branch insignia of their primary military occupational specialty (PMOS), with the following exceptions.

(1) Basic trainees will wear the U.S. insignia on both collars; they will not wear branch insignia.

(2) NCOs in authorized Inspector General modification table of organization and equipment (TOE) or TDA positions will wear the Inspector General insignia.

(3) Command sergeants major (CSM) and sergeants major (SGM) will wear designated branch insignia (CSM and SGM serving O-6 and below).

(4) Nominative sergeants major will wear nominative senior enlisted leader collar insignia (previously referred to as CSM insignia); worn by CSM and SGM when in a position rated by a general officer or senior executive service level civilian.

(5) The Sergeant Major of the Army will wear Sergeant Major of the Army insignia in lieu of branch insignia.

21-10. Branch insignia-other

a. Regimental collar insignia.

(1) Regimental collar insignia is the Soldier's branch insignia on which the numerical designation of the regiment is affixed. Regimental collar insignia is worn in lieu of the branch insignia by officers and enlisted Soldiers affiliated with infantry, armor, field artillery, air defense artillery, cavalry, special forces, or aviation regiments. Soldiers affiliated with these regiments will also wear the regimental collar insignia when not assigned to the regiment, except as provided in paragraph 21-9 . A Soldier affiliated with a regiment but having a branch other than the currently assigned branch will wear the assigned branch insignia without a numeral. Soldiers will not wear numerals designating battalions on regimental collar insignia. Regimental collar insignia is provided at no cost to enlisted Soldiers. Commanders will permit enlisted Soldiers who are affiliated with the regiment to retain regimental collar insignia when reassigned from the affiliated regiment.

(2) See DA Pam 670-1 for additional guidance on positioning of regimental numbers for specific combat arms branches.

b. Other. Branch insignia for Soldiers not affiliated with an infantry, armor, field artillery, air defense artillery, cavalry, special forces, or aviation regiment, except as provided for in paragraph 21-9, wear their assigned basic branch insignia. As an option, Soldiers who are not affiliated with one of the above regiments, but who are assigned to a color-bearing regiment or separate TOE battalion of their branch, may wear the branch insignia with the numerical designation of the battalion or regiment affixed, when approved by the ACOM, ASCC, and/or DRU. All optional branch insignia are authorized for wear only while personnel are assigned to the designated unit. Soldiers will not purchase optional branch insignia using appropriated funds. Commanders will not require Soldiers to purchase optional branch insignia. See DA Pam 670-1 for a list of branch insignia authorized for wear.

21-11. Insignia for aides

See DA Pam 670-1 for guidance.

21-12. Branch insignia-how worn

See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-13. Insignia for U.S. Military Academy staff

See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-14. Branch insignia-officer candidates

See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-15. Insignia for warrant officer candidates

See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-16. Shoulder sleeve insignia-current organization

a. Authorization. SSI of a design approved by TIOH, are authorized and prescribed for wear on the green service uniform and utility uniforms of the following echelons:

(1) ACOM/ASCC/DRU (as defined by AR 10-87 ).

(2) Armies.

(3) Corps.

(4) U.S. Army Reserve Command (USARC), Regional Support Commands.

(5) Divisions.

(6) Corps Support Command.

(7) Separate TOE brigades and brigade combat teams (not organic to divisions).

(8) Separate regiments (not organic to a group, brigade, or division), except training support regiments and/battalions, which will wear the SSI of the training support division to which assigned.

(9) General officer commands, USAR.

(10) U.S. Army element of unified commands.

(11) DA field operating agencies based on the following:

(a) An identifiable command structure.

(b) A valid justification in terms of unit mission, improving unit morale, and degree of unit permanency.

(c) At least 250 military personnel assigned to the organization.

b. Approval of design. Units meeting the criteria established above will submit requests for authorization of SSI through command channels, with a copy of permanent orders activating the unit, to Director, The Institute of Heraldry, Department of the Army, 9325 Gunston Road, Room S112, Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5579. Once the design has been approved and developed, no changes will be made to the insignia.

c. Provisional units. The authorization of SSI will not be granted for provisional units.

d. Authorized wearers. Personnel assigned to units not authorized SSI will wear the SSI of the command to which the unit is assigned. As an exception, personnel assigned to training support regiments and battalions will wear the SSI of the training support division to which assigned or aligned. Soldiers assigned to a Warrior Transition Unit will continue to wear their organizational headgear and SSI authorized from their last unit of assignment. Cadre assigned to U.S. Army Medical Command will wear the U.S. Army Medical Command SSI.

e. The U.S. Army logo patch. The U.S. Army logo is a registered trademark of the Army, visually central to the Army's branding and trademark licensing program administrated on behalf of the Army by the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs). The logo patch may be worn when authorized by the Chief of Staff, Army. The U.S. Army logo patch is authorized for wear as shown in DA Pam 670-1 .

f. Modification. Units are not authorized to make modification to their SSI or shoulder sleeve insignia-former wartime service (SSI-FWTS) without prior approval from the DCS, G-1.

(1) ACOM, ASCC, and/or DRU commanders are authorized to permit, on a case-by-case basis, the wear of corps or separate brigade SSI by members of units attached to specific corps or separate brigades on a permanent basis. The term "permanent" applies to those units that are, have been, or expect to be attached for an extended period of time. Units that are temporarily attached for activation, training, and deployment are not considered permanently attached.

(2) Personnel attached to Headquarters Company, U.S. Army, who are assigned to or performing duty with HQDA staff agencies and offices of the DOD, will wear the Army logo on the Class C uniform.

(3) The DA staff support SSI is worn by personnel assigned to DA field operating agencies, unless the agency is authorized its own SSI.

(4) Personnel assigned to corps artillery and division brigades will wear the SSI of the corps or division.

(5) Army personnel assigned or attached for duty with advisors to foreign governments, except Army attachés, will wear the U.S. Army Mission SSI.

(6) Individuals being transferred from one organization to another may continue to wear the insignia of the former unit until they report for duty at the new organization.

(7) Army personnel assigned to a Joint command, DOD, or Federal agencies will wear the SSI designated for Joint or DOD agencies, unless agencies are entitled to an SSI within their own right.

(8) Army personnel and ARNG and USAR Active Guard Reserve (AGR) personnel assigned as ROTC instructors will wear the Cadet Command SSI.

(9) ARNG Soldiers will wear SSI as follows:

(a) Members of the ARNG not in active Federal service will wear the SSI of the division, separate brigade, or separate cavalry regiment to which assigned, including brigades integrated into AA divisions.

(b) Members of a troop command, recruiting ARNG assigned to the ARNG Element Joint Forces Headquarters, and its detachments and retention, medical detachment, training sites, and support units will wear the ARNG Element Joint Forces Headquarters SSI designed for that state, commonwealth, territory, or district. However, members of the Selective Service System section will wear the Selective Service System SSI.

(c) Assigned and attached staff and faculty members of ARNG activities that are part of the Total Army School System (TASS) will wear the ARNG TASS SSI. These activities include TASS regional training institute, brigades, regiments, battalions, squadrons, companies, batteries and troops; NCO academies, special training sites; the National Guard professional education center; and the National Guard marksmanship training unit.

(d) Members of ARNG units not authorized a distinctive SSI, other than those indicated in paragraphs (a), (b), or (c), will wear the insignia of their ARNG Element Joint Forces Headquarters.

(e) ARNG Soldiers in the ARNG Title 10 AGR Program will wear the SSI of the command, unit, or agency to which attached, when one is authorized, except as indicated in paragraph (7) or (8).

(10) USAR will wear SSI as follows:

(a) Units not authorized an organizational SSI that are assigned to a general officer command authorized an organizational SSI will wear the SSI of the general officer command, even though the general officer command may be assigned to an Operational, Functional, Training, or Support command.

(b) Units that are not authorized an organizational SSI but are under the command of the USARC, will wear the SSI of the USARC.

(c) Units assigned directly to a continental United States (CONUS) Army headquarters that are not authorized an SSI, or units under the command of a general officer command that is assigned directly to a CONUS Army headquarters, will wear the insignia of the appropriate CONUS Army.

(d) Members of the Individual Ready Reserve will wear the Individual Ready Reserve SSI. Individual mobilization augmentees will wear the SSI of the organization to which designated. Personnel participating in the AGR or ROTC simultaneous membership program will wear the SSI of commands, units, and agencies to which attached.

(11) Initial entry training Soldiers in one of the following categories may wear organizational SSI:

(a) ARNG and USAR trainees will wear the insignia of their parent ARNG or USAR organization as soon as they are issued uniforms. Their parent units will provide initial entry training Soldiers with their SSI before they enter initial entry training.

(b) Unit-of-choice trainees are authorized to wear the insignia of the specific unit for which they enlisted.

(12) Reserve Component units with WARTRACE alignments may wear the SSI of the active unit to which they are aligned, in lieu of their peacetime SSI, provided their major Operational, Functional, Training, or Support command or State technical assistance grant, and ACOM/ASCC/DRU commanders agree on such wear.

(13) Soldiers assigned to U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command will continue to wear the SSI approved for U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command on the Class C uniform.

e. How worn. See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-17. Shoulder sleeve insignia-former wartime service

a. General. Authorization to wear a SSI indicating FWTS applies only to Soldiers who are/were assigned to U.S. Army units that meet all the following criteria:

(1) The Secretary of the Army or higher must declare the theater or area of operation as a hostile environment to which the unit is assigned or Congress must pass a Declaration of War.

(2) The units must have actively participated in or supported ground combat operations against hostile forces in which they were exposed to the threat of enemy action or fire, either directly or indirectly.

(3) The military operation normally must have lasted for a period of 30 days or longer. An exception may be made when U.S. Army forces are engaged with a hostile force for a shorter period of time, when they meet all other criteria, and a recommendation from the general or flag officer in command is forwarded to the Chief of Staff, Army.

(4) The Chief of Staff, Army must approve the authorization for wearing the SSI for FWTS. Note: Units are not authorized to make modifications to their SSI, or SSI-FWTS without prior approval from the DCS, G-1. A mirror image SSI-FWTS is considered a modification.

(5) Personnel who served in a designated area as a civilian or a member of another Service, but were not a member of the U.S. Army during one of the specified periods are not authorized to wear the SSI-FWTS.

(6) Unless otherwise approved by this regulation, Soldiers attached or under operational control (OPCON) to other services are not authorized to wear their patches as their SSI-FWTS without written approval from DCS, G-1 or a designated representative.

(7) Soldiers of all Army components (Active, ARNG, and USAR) who deploy during periods of service designated for wear of the SSI-FWTS are authorized to wear a SSI-FWTS. There are no time-in-theater requirements for authorization to wear the SSI-FWTS. Soldiers may not earn more than one SSI-FWTS during the same deployment.

(a) A deployed unit (company or higher) will wear its unit SSI as the SSI-FWTS, regardless of the headquarters element deploying and the unit alignment or OPCON during the period of deployment.

(b) A deployed unit will not wear its assigned SSI as its SSI-FWTS when the SSI belongs to a major command, such as an ACOM/ASCC/DRU or State Area Command, or a non-deployable unit. In such cases, the unit will wear the SSI of the lowest echelon Army unit (company or higher) in the deployed chain of command as the SSI-FWTS. When there is no intermediate unit (company or higher) in the deployed chain of command, these deployed Soldiers will wear the SSI of the senior command in the theater as its SSI-FWTS.

(c) When echelons below company level (such as teams or squads) deploy, members of these units will wear the SSI of the lowest echelon deployed Army unit (company or higher) in the deployed chain of command (based on written orders) as the SSI-FWTS. When there is no intermediate unit (company or higher) in the deployed chain of command, these deployed Soldiers will wear the SSI of the senior command in the theater as its SSI-FWTS.

(d) Individual Soldiers who are attached (to include OPCON, cross-leveled, assigned, or augmenting deployed units) will wear the same SSI-FWTS worn by members of the deployed Army unit (company or higher) to which attached by written orders. A Soldier who is further attached (to one or more units) during one deployment will only wear the SSI-FWTS for the first Army unit (company or higher) to which attached by written orders. Soldiers who deploy with their unit (company level or higher) will wear the SSI-FWTS as outlined in paragraph 21-17a(7)(a) , regardless how many times they are further attached to other units as individuals or teams. Members of trial defense and Criminal Investigation Division Command will wear the SSI of their respective commands as their SSI-FWTS.

b. Authorization. Authorization applies only to members of the Army who were assigned to the designated location overseas with U.S. Army organizations during the following periods:

(1) World War II: between 7 December 1941 and 2 September 1946, both dates inclusive. Soldiers who served with the USMC during World War II from 15 March 1943 through 2 September 1946 may wear the SSI-FWTS for the designated Marine Corps unit.

(2) Korea: between 27 June 1950 and 27 July 1954, both dates inclusive. Also between 1 April 1968 and 31 August 1973, for those personnel who were awarded the Purple Heart, combat infantryman badge, combat medical badge, or who qualified for at least one month of hostile fire pay for service in a hostile fire area in Korea.

(3) The Vietnam theater, including Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia: between 1 July 1958 and 28 March 1973, both dates inclusive.

(4) The Dominican Republic: between 29 April 1965 and 21 September 1966, both dates inclusive. Individuals are authorized to wear one of three organizational SSI: XVIII Airborne Corps, 82d Airborne Division, or 5th Logistical Command. Individuals previously attached, assigned, or under the OPCON of these units will wear their respective insignia. A fourth organizational SSI (Office of Economic Adjustment-Spanish equivalent of Organization of American States) is authorized for individuals who were not in one of the three units listed above.

(5) Grenada, to include the Green and Carriacou Islands: between 24 October 1983 and 21 November 1983, both dates inclusive. Personnel are authorized to wear one of the following organizational SSI: XVIII Airborne Corps; 82d Airborne Division; 1st Special Operations Command (Airborne); 1st Corps Support Command; 20th Engineer Brigade; 35th Signal Brigade; 16th Military Police Brigade; 44th Medical Brigade; 1st Battalion (Ranger), 75th Ranger Regiment; 2d Battalion (Ranger), 75th Ranger Regiment; and 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault). Individuals attached to, or under the OPCON of these units will wear their respective organizational SSI. Individuals attached to, or under the OPCON of any unit whose parent organization is not authorized SSI, will wear the SSI of the unit to which attached or the unit that had OPCON.

(6) Lebanon: between 6 August 1983 and 24 April 1984 for Soldiers assigned to the Field Artillery School Target Acquisition Battery or the 214th Field Artillery Brigade, who were attached to the U.S. Marine Corps forces in and around Beirut, Lebanon, for the purpose of counterfire support.

(7) Korea: 23 November 1984, for Soldiers who participated directly in the firefight with North Korean guards at the Joint Security Area, Panmunjom, Korea.

(8) Persian Gulf: between 27 July 1987 and 1 August 1990 for Soldiers assigned or attached to, or under the OPCON of, a unit whose mission was direct support to Operation Earnest Will. Soldiers must have been eligible for the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal and imminent danger pay.

(9) Panama: between 20 December 1989 and 31 January 1990 for Soldiers assigned to the following units who participated in Operation Just Cause: XVIII Airborne Corps; U.S. Army Special Operations Command; U.S. Army South; 7th Infantry Division (Light); 82d Airborne Division; 5th Infantry Division (M); 1st Special Operations Command; 193d Infantry Brigade; 1st Corps Support Command; 16th Military Police Brigade; 18th Aviation Brigade; 35th Signal Brigade; 7th Special Forces Group; 75th Ranger Regiment; 1st , 2d, and 3d Battalions, 75th Ranger Regiment; 470th Military Intelligence Brigade; 525th Military Intelligence Brigade; 44th Medical Brigade; 1109th Signal Brigade; Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command; and Criminal Investigation Command. Soldiers assigned to units not listed above will wear the SSI of the unit to which attached or the unit that had OPCON. Soldiers assigned to units not listed above and not attached to, or under the OPCON of any of the units listed above, will wear the SSI of the U.S. Army South.

(10) The Persian Gulf: between 17 January 1991 and 31 August 1993, both dates inclusive, for Soldiers participating in Operation Desert Storm. Soldiers must have been assigned or attached to, or under the OPCON of, a unit whose mission was direct support to Operation Desert Storm; they must have received imminent danger pay and had been under the command and control of U.S. Army Element U.S. Central Command.

(11) El Salvador: between 1 January 1981 and 1 February 1992, both dates inclusive, for those personnel who participated in El Salvador operations.

(12) Somalia: between 5 December 1992 and 31 March 1995, both dates inclusive, for Soldiers who participated in Operation Restore Hope/Continue Hope/United Shield. Additionally, Soldiers assigned to Joint Task Forces Patriot Defender, Elusive Concept, and Proven Force are authorized to wear SSI-FWTS even though they were not under the command and control of the U.S. Army Element of U.S. Central Command.

(13) Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF): between 19 September 2001 and a date to be determined, for Soldiers assigned to Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan; Between 9 January 2002 and a date to be determined for those Soldiers assigned to the Philippines, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, who were receiving combat zone tax exclusion and imminent danger pay (IDP), and who meet the criteria of paragraph 21-17a . Between 31 July 2002 and a date to be determined, for Soldiers deployed to the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) area of operations in support of OEF authorized combat zone tax exclusion and hostile fire/imminent danger pay (IDP) as identified by CENTCOM Command Center-Joint Staff for Personnel and Administration. Soldiers who were deployed in the area of operations on training exercises or in support of operations other than OEF are not authorized the SSI-FWTS, unless those exercises or operations became combat or support missions to OEF.

(14) Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF): between 19 March 2003 to 31 August 2010, for Soldiers assigned to units participating in OIF. Soldiers must have been deployed in the CENTCOM area of operations, or participated in OIF while deployed in Turkey, Israel, or on Aegis cruisers. Soldiers who served with the 1st Marine Division between 19 March 2003 and 21 April 2003 during combat operations in support of OIF are authorized to wear the 1st Marine Division SSI as their SSI-FWTS. Soldiers who were deployed in the area of operations on training exercises or in support of operations other than OIF not authorized the SSI-FWTS, unless those exercises or operations became combat or support missions to OIF.

(15) Operation New Dawn (OND): between 1 September 2010 and 31 December 2011 for Soldiers assigned to units participating in support of OND. Soldiers must have been deployed in the CENTCOM area of operations or participated in OND while deployed in Turkey, Israel, or on Aegis cruisers. Soldiers who were deployed in the area of operations on training exercises or in support of operations other than OND are not authorized the SSI-FWTS, unless those exercises or operations became combat or support missions to OND.

(16) Future Operations: Combatants Commanders may request wear of the SSI-FWTS for future areas of operation designated and approved by the Secretary of the Army.

c. How worn. See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-18. Wear of U.S. flag embroidered insignia

a. All Soldiers will wear the full-color U.S. flag embroidered insignia on utility and organizational uniforms, unless deployed or in a field environment. Soldiers will wear the subdued tactical flag insignia while deployed or in a field environment.

b. How worn. See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-19. Branch colors

See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-20. Branch scarves

Personnel may wear branch scarves with service and utility uniforms, only when issued and prescribed by the local commander for ceremonial occasions. See DA Pam 670-1 for additional guidance.

21-21. Leaders identification insignia

a. Leaders of all units, regardless of unit category, will wear the leaders identification (LI) insignia.

b. The following specific leaders are authorized to wear the LI insignia:

(1) Commanders.

(2) Deputy commanders.

(3) Platoon leaders.

(4) Command sergeants major.

(5) First sergeants.

(6) Platoon sergeants.

(7) Section leaders

(8) Squad leaders and tank commanders

(9) Team leaders

(10) Assistant Special Forces detachment commanders.

(11) Special Forces operational detachment "A" senior sergeants.

(12) Special Forces operational detachment "B" sergeants major.

c. Personnel will not wear the LI when reassigned from a command position, or from an organization designated above, or when taking an official photo.

d. See DA Pam 670-1 for additional guidance.

21-22. Distinctive unit insignia

a. Authorization. DUI of a design approved by TIOH, are authorized and prescribed for wear on the service uniforms of personnel in the following echelons:

(1) ACOM: one design for each ACOM/ASCC/DRU.

(2) Field Armies: one design for each field Army.

(3) Regional support commands.

(4) Corps: one design for each corps.

(5) Division: one design for each division.

(6) Separate TOE brigades and brigade combat teams (not organic to divisions).

(7) Numbered group: one design for each TOE numbered group.

(8) Color-bearing regiments; training support battalions aligned to color-bearing regiments; and separate battalions, fixed type: one design for each regiment and separate TOE battalion.

(9) Battalions, flexible: one design for each TOE battalion.

(10) Hospitals: one design for each TOE hospital.

(11) U.S. Army Service schools established by DA: one design for each Service school.

(12) U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command training centers: one design for each training center.

(13) U.S. Army medical centers: one design for each center.

(14) U.S. Army medical department activities: one design for each activity.

(15) U.S. Army hospital centers: one design for each center.

(16) U.S. Army dental activities: one design for each activity.

(17) ARNG TASS: one design for all TASS activities.

(18) USAR schools: one design for all USAR schools.

(19) Field operating agencies: one design for each activity based on the following criteria:

(a) An identifiable command structure.

(b) A valid justification in terms of unit mission, enhancement of unit morale, and degree of unit permanency.

(20) Other organizations: one design for each organization, except U.S. Army garrison (active and reserve), meeting the following criteria:

(a) An identifiable command structure.

(b) A valid justification in terms of unit mission, enhancement of unit morale, and degree of unit permanency.

(c) At least 500 military personnel assigned to the organization.

(21) Other.

(a) Organizations not in the categories listed above, which have a DUI by virtue of previous HQDA authority, are permitted to retain that DUI if it was manufactured and worn by members of the subject organization. In each case, such insignia is authorized for wear only after TIOH has determined the propriety and granted approval of the insignia.

(b) Units not authorized their own DUI will wear the DUI of the command to which assigned. Those units not authorized their own DUI and not assigned to a higher echelon that is authorized a DUI may, with the approval of the Army commander concerned, wear the DUI of the Army area in which located. Personnel participating in the AGR and ROTC simultaneous membership programs will wear the DUI of the commands, units, and agencies to which attached.

(c) Personnel assigned to a Joint command, DOD, or Federal agency will wear the DUI designated for Joint or DOD agencies.

b. Approval of design. Units meeting the criteria established above will submit requests for authorization of DUI through command channels, with a copy of the permanent orders activating the unit to: Director, The Institute of Heraldry, Department of the Army, 9325 Gunston Road, Room S112, Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5579. Requests will include three proposed mottoes, if the organization requests a motto with the design. Once approved, no changes may be made in the design of the insignia. The procurement of DUI not approved and developed by TIOH is prohibited. Units may only purchase approved DUIs by using appropriated or nonappropriated funds from TIOH certified manufacturers.

c. Provisional units. The authorization of a DUI will not be granted for provisional units.

d. Authorized wearers. When the DUI is authorized, all personnel assigned to the organization wear the insignia, except general officers and the Sergeant Major of the Army.

e. How worn. See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-23. Regimental Distinctive Insignia

a. Authorization. RDI of a design approved by TIOH are authorized and prescribed for wear by all Soldiers affiliated with a regiment or whole-corps regiment (based on a Soldier's branch/corps/special branch, as determined by PMOS or specialty).

b. How worn. See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-24. Insignia Representing Regimental Affiliation

a. Authorization. Insignia used to represent regimental affiliation consists of either the RDI or DUI of a design approved by TIOH. A Soldier's Regimental affiliation using an RDI is based on a Soldier's branch/corps/special branch, as determined by PMOS or specialty. Soldiers may wear the RDI for their affiliated regiment or they may be approved to wear the DUI for a unit in which they are serving or previously served successfully. See DA Pam 670-1 for approval process to wear the DUI to demonstrate regimental affiliation.

b. How worn. See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-25. Insignia, distinguishing, U.S. Army nametape and nameplate.

See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-26. Aiguillette, service

See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-27. Aiguillette, dress

a. The dress aiguillette is worn only when personnel are performing duties as aides. Army attaches, assistant Army attaches, and aides wear the dress aiguillette with the Army dress uniforms, when prescribed. Personnel may wear the dress aiguillette with the Army blue or white uniform only at formal occasions (when a bow tie is worn).

b. See DA Pam 670-1 for description and wear policy.

21-28. Service stripes

a. Enlisted personnel are authorized to wear service stripes as members of the AA, ARNG, and USAR, when they have served honorably, as indicated below:

(1) In active Federal service as a commissioned officer, warrant officer, or enlisted member of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard.

(2) In active Reserve service creditable for retirement for non-regular service, in accordance with 10 USC 1223, as a commissioned officer, warrant officer, or enlisted member of any reserve component of the Army Forces, including the Womens' Auxiliary Corps.

b. One stripe is authorized for each 3 years of honorable active Federal service; active Reserve service creditable for retired pay for non-regular service; or a combination. There is no limit to the number of stripes worn; however, service stripes will not cover the chevrons. Service need not have been continuous, and the 10th stripe is authorized after 29 ½ years. Individuals authorized more than 10 service stripes may elect whether or not to wear them.

c. See DA Pam 670-1 for description and wear policy.

21-29. Overseas service bars

a. Authorized wearers. Soldiers are authorized to wear overseas service bars as indicated below. Listed beginning dates and ending dates are inclusive.

(1) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service outside CONUS, between 7 December 1941 and 2 September 1946, both dates inclusive. In computing overseas service, Alaska is considered outside CONUS. An overseas service bar is not authorized for a fraction of a 6-month period.

(2) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in Korea, between 27 June 1950 and 27 July 1954. Credit toward an overseas service bar is authorized for each month of active Federal service as a member of the U.S. Army serving in the designated hostile fire area in Korea between 1 April 1968 and 31 August 1973. If a Soldier receives a month of hostile fire pay for a period(s) of service in Korea, then the Soldier may also receive credit for a corresponding month towards award of an overseas service bar.

(3) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in Vietnam, between 1 July 1958 and 28 March 1973. The months of arrival to, and departure from Vietnam are counted as whole months for credit toward the overseas service bar. If a Soldier receives a month of hostile fire pay for a period(s) of TDY service in Vietnam, then the Soldier may also receive credit for a corresponding month towards award of an overseas service bar.

(4) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in the Dominican Republic, between 29 April 1965 and 21 September 1966.

(5) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in Laos, between 1 January 1966 and 28 March 1973.

(6) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in Cambodia between 1 January 1971 and 28 March 1973. Personnel must qualify for hostile fire pay to receive credit for an overseas service bar.

(7) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in Lebanon, between 6 August 1983 and 24 April 1984, for the two units listed in paragraph 21-17b(6) .

(8) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in the Persian Gulf between 27 July 1987 and 1 August 1990, for Operation Earnest Will.

(9) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in the Persian Gulf between17 January 1991 and 31 August 1993, for Operation Desert Storm.

(10) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service who participated in El Salvador, between 1 January 1981 and 1 February 1992.

(11) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in Somalia, between 5 December 1992 and 31 March 1995.

(12) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service participating in Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom-Phillipines, the CENTCOM area of operations, or under the control of the Combatant Commander, CENTCOM, between 19 September 2001 and a date to be determined.

(13) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service participating in Operation Iraqi Freedom, the CENTCOM area of operations, or under the control of the Combatant Commander, CENTCOM, from 19 March 2003 to 31 August 2010

(14) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service participating in Operation New Dawn in the CENTCOM area of operations, or under the control of the Combatant Commander, CENTCOM, between 1 September 2010 and 31 December 2011.

(15) The months of arrival to, and departure from the areas of operations during the periods indicated in paragraphs 21-29a(1) through (14) are counted as whole months only when the period of each deployment is over 6 months. Periods of overseas service of less than 6 months of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service, which otherwise meets the requirements for the award of the overseas service bar authorized in paragraphs 21-29a(1) through (14) may be combined by adding the number of months and days spent in the area(s) of operation. For calculation purposes, thirty days equal one calendar month. When continuous deployment periods are less than 6-month periods, only the number of days in the months of arrival to, and departure from the area of operations are counted. Soldiers must have 6 full months (in addition to any other time counted in paragraphs 21-29a(1) through (14), above) for each additional service bar worn.

b. Computation of World War II service.

(1) Service is computed between the dates of departure from, and arrival to a port in the United States or the boundary of CONUS. The day of departure and the day of return are included. The expression " each 6-month period of Federal service" is interpreted to authorize the wear of an overseas service bar for overseas service of various lengths, performed either continuously or at intervals, when the total service equaled or exceeded 6 months. Thus, an individual who served 4 months and 10 days outside CONUS, returned to CONUS, subsequently departed from the United States to the same or another theater or country outside CONUS, and served an additional 1 month and 20 days in that theater or country, is entitled to one bar. All active duty or service outside CONUS (for example, permanent, temporary, or detached) is included in computing length of service, provided that the official duty of the individual required his or her presence outside CONUS.

(2) Military personnel who served on transport vessels and on aircraft became eligible to wear the bar when their total service outside CONUS equaled or exceeded 6 months.

(3) Service on the Great Lakes and in any harbor, bay, or other enclosed arm of the sea along the coast, and that part of the sea which is within 3 miles of the continental limits of the United States, is not included in computing length of service required.

(4) Periods during which military personnel were absent without leave or were in a desertion status, are not included in computing length of service required.

(5) Periods during which military personnel were in the United States on TDY, detached service, or leave (even though the individual was assigned overseas) are not included in computing length of service required.

(6) Periods during which military personnel were in confinement, which resulted in time lost are not included in computing length of service required.

c. Description and how worn. See DA Pam 670-1 .

21-30. Brassards

Brassards are worn as identification to designate personnel who are required to perform a special task or to deal with the public. For descriptions of current authorized brassards, see DA Pam 670-1 .

21-31. Distinctive items authorized for infantry personnel

a. Cord, shoulder.

(1) Description. See DA Pam 670-1 .

(2) How worn. See DA Pam 670-1 .

(3) Approval authority. The Commanding General, U.S. Army Infantry Center authorizes the award of the shoulder cord to infantrymen who have successfully completed the appropriate training. For ARNG Soldiers, commanders of divisions, separate brigades, infantry regiments, the infantry scout group, and state adjutants general for separate infantry battalions and companies are authorized to award the shoulder cord to ARNG Soldiers who have successfully completed the appropriate training.

(4) Authorized wearers.

(a) Officers and enlisted personnel of the infantry, who hold an infantry PMOS or specialty, and who have been awarded the combat Infantryman badge, the expert infantryman badge, or who have successfully completed the basic unit phase of an Army training program or an equivalent.

(b) Enlisted personnel who have completed one station unit training (OSUT), resulting in the award of an infantry PMOS.

(c) Infantry officers who have graduated from the resident infantry officer basic or advanced course.

(d) Infantry officers who have graduated from the Infantry Officer Candidate Course (during mobilization).

(e) Infantry officers and enlisted personnel in the Reserve Components, who hold an infantry PMOS or specialty.

(5) How worn.

(a) During the period of assignment to an infantry regiment, brigade, separate infantry battalion, infantry company (including the headquarters and headquarters company of an infantry division), infantry platoon, or infantry TDA unit. In addition, infantrymen assigned to infantry sections or squads within units other than infantry units may wear the cord when authorized by battalion or higher-level commanders.

(b) During the period assigned for duty as an Army recruiter or advisor, ROTC instructor, or member of the staff and faculty of the U.S. Military Academy, as long as the individual retains an infantry PMOS or specialty.

(c) During the period of assignment at brigade- or lower-level BT or advance individual training units, or in OSUT infantry units, as long as individual retains an infantry PMOS or specialty.

(d) Infantry OSUT and Infantry Officer Basic Course graduates may wear the cord en route to their initial follow-on infantry assignment.

(e) Soldiers en route from an assignment where wear of the shoulder cord was authorized are permitted to wear the shoulder cord if they are pending reassignment to another organization authorized wear of the cord, or when assigned to a separation point for discharge purposes.

c. Insignia disk, service cap.

(1) Description. See DA Pam 670-1 .

(2) How worn. See DA Pam 670-1 .

(3) Approval authority. Approval authority is as provided in paragraph 21-31a(3) , above. The insignia is issued at no cost to enlisted personnel.

(4) Authorized wearers. Enlisted infantry personnel who otherwise meet the qualifications provided in paragraph 21-31 b (4) , above.

(5) When worn. Authority to wear is as provided in paragraph 21-31 a (5) , above.

21-32. Distinctive items authorized for other than infantry personnel

a. Organizational flash.

(1) Description. See DA Pam 670-1 .

(2) How worn. See DA Pam 670-1 .

(3) Approval authority. TIOH approves the design for background trimming for organizations designated (by structure, equipment, and mission) by HQDA as "Airborne" or "Air Assault." Background trimming is provided at no cost to enlisted personnel.

(4) Authorized wearers. Personnel authorized to wear the maroon, tan, or green berets wear their distinctive organizational flash. All other Soldiers wear the Army flash on the black beret, unless authorization for another flash was granted before the implementation of the black beret as the standard Army headgear.

b. Airborne/Air Assault background trimming.

(1) Description. See DA Pam 670-1 .

(2) How worn. See DA Pam 670-1 .

(3) Approval authority. TIOH approves the design for background trimming for organizations designated (by structure, equipment, and mission) by HQDA as "Airborne" or "Air Assault." Background trimming is provided at no cost to enlisted personnel.

(4) Authorized wearers. All personnel assigned to an organization authorized a background trimming and who have been awarded the corresponding Parachutist or Air Assault badge, as applicable, are authorized to wear the background trimming with the corresponding badge.

c. Cord, shoulder, marksmanship.

(1) Description. See DA Pam 670-1 .

(2) How worn. See DA Pam 670-1 .

(3) Authorized wearers. All personnel assigned to the U.S. Army marksmanship unit, subordinate marksmanship training units, or the ARNG marksmanship training unit. Personnel who are transferred from these units are not authorized to wear the shoulder cord. Personnel in an attached or TDY status with these units, or the State small arms readiness training teams, are not authorized to wear the shoulder cord. The shoulder cord is issued at no cost the individual.

(4) When worn. Personnel wear the marksmanship cord during the period of assignment to any of the units provided in paragraph 20-32c(3).

Chapter 22
Wear of Decorations, Service Medals, Badges, Unit Awards, and Appurtenances

22-1. General

This chapter covers decorations, service medals, badges, unit awards and appurtenances, both U.S. and foreign, authorized for wear on Army uniforms. The term "award" is an all-inclusive term, covering any decoration, service medal, badge, ribbon, or appurtenance bestowed on an individual or unit. The term "ribbon" is an all-inclusive term covering that portion of the suspension ribbon of a service medal or decoration that is worn instead of the service medal or decoration.

22-2. Authorization

a. Commanders may require the wear of authorized awards on the following occasions:

(1) Parades, reviews, inspections, and funerals.

(2) Ceremonial and social occasions.

b. Unless directed by a commander IAW paragraph 22-2(a) , authorized awards are worn at the option of the wearer, when not prohibited, during normal duty hours. Personnel also may wear authorized awards on appropriate uniforms when off duty. Personnel are encouraged to wear authorized awards on the service, dress, and mess uniforms.

c. Soldiers may wear authorized awards on the Class B version of the service uniform during duty hours and when off duty, at their option.

22-3. When wearing awards is prohibited

Wearing awards is prohibited in the following circumstances:

a. On any uniform other than those authorized in this regulation. (See 18 USC 704 for the penalty for unauthorized wear of the uniform.)

b. When serving a sentence of confinement.

c. When wearing civilian clothing, except for civilian awards, lapel buttons, or rosettes intended for wear with civilian clothing. Soldiers may wear miniature medals on formal civilian attire at formal social functions, when wearing the Army uniform is inappropriate or not authorized.

22-4. Order of precedence by category of medal

The following list indicates the order of precedence, by category, when medals from two or more categories are worn at the same time:

a. U.S. military decorations.

b. U.S. unit awards.

c. U.S. nonmilitary decorations.

d. U.S. service (campaign) medals, and service and training ribbons.

e. U.S. Merchant Marine awards.

f. U.S. nonmilitary unit awards.

g. Foreign military decorations.

h. Foreign unit awards.

i. Non-U.S. service awards.

j. State awards for ARNG Soldiers.

22-5. Order of precedence within categories of medals

See DA Pam 670-1 .

22-6. Wear of service ribbons and lapel buttons

a. Ribbons. See DA Pam 670-1 .

b. Lapel buttons. Lapel buttons are miniature enameled replica awards that are worn only on civilian clothing. Males wear the buttons on the left lapel of civilian clothing; females wear the buttons in a similar location on their civilian attire.

c. Gold Star Lapel Button. Soldiers who have lost an immediate family member in combat are authorized to wear the gold star lapel button on the Army service and dress uniforms. An immediate family member is defined as a spouse, mother, father, stepparent, child, stepchild, sister, stepsister, brother, stepbrother, or a person in loco parentis. See DA Pam 670-1 for wear.

22-7. Full-sized U.S. and foreign decorations and service medals

a. Where worn. All personnel may wear full-sized decorations and service medals on the service uniform.

b. How worn. See DA Pam 670-1 .

c. Medal of Honor. See DA Pam 670-1 .

22-8. Miniature decorations and service medals

a. Miniature medals are replicas of regular-sized medals (made to a scale of one-half the size of the original). Except for the Medal of Honor, for which there is no miniature, only miniature decorations and service medals are authorized for wear on the mess and evening mess uniforms. Personnel will not wear full-sized medals, service and training ribbons, or U.S. and foreign unit award emblems with miniature medals. Only the dress miniature-sized combat and special skill badges are worn with miniature medals.

b. Miniature decorations and service medals are authorized for wear on the following uniforms:

(1) Male personnel. On formal dress and mess uniforms; and on the left lapel of formal civilian attire, when wearing Army uniforms are inappropriate or not authorized.

(2) Female personnel. On formal dress and mess uniforms; and on the left lapel of formal civilian attire, when wearing Army uniforms are inappropriate or not authorized.

22-9. Multiple neck ribbons, broad sashes, and stars

a. An individual awarded more than one decoration that includes a broad ribbon, sash, or star will wear only one broad ribbon or sash, and no more than four stars at one time. The Presidential Medal of Freedom broad ribbon with badge and star has precedence over all other broad ribbons, sashes, or stars. Additional guidance on wear of stars is in DA Pam 670-1 .

b. An individual may not wear more than two decorations with neck ribbons at one time. The decoration with the highest precedence is worn suspended above the other. The Medal of Honor takes precedence over all other decorations with neck ribbons.

22-10. U.S. and foreign unit awards

a. Description. See DA Pam 670-1 . The criteria for permanent and temporary wear of foreign unit awards are contained in AR 600-8-22 .

b. Where worn. See DA Pam 670-1 for additional guidance.

c. Fourrageres and lanyards. Permanent and temporary fourrageres and lanyards may be worn on the service uniform IAW the provisions of AR 600-8-22 . Directions for wear are provided in DA Pam 670-1 . Only one fourragere, lanyard, aiguillette, or cord is authorized for wear on each shoulder.

d. Foreign unit awards. If a foreign unit award is worn, personnel must wear at least one other U.S. decoration, service medal, or unit award. Foreign unit awards are worn after U.S. unit awards, by date of receipt. (See AR 600-8-22 for criteria for acceptance of foreign unit awards.) Foreign unit awards are worn as follows:

(1) French fourragere: when authorized for permanent or temporary wear.

(2) Belgian fourragere: only when authorized for permanent wear.

(3) Netherlands orange lanyard: only when authorized for permanent wear.

(4) The Philippine Republic Presidential Unit Citation is authorized for permanent wear only. See DA Pam 670-1 for directions on proper positioning and accoutrement guidance.

(5) The Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation is authorized for temporary or permanent wear. See DA Pam 670-1 for directions on proper positioning and appurtenance guidance.

(6) The Vietnam Presidential Unit Citation is authorized for permanent wear only.

(7) The Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation is authorized for permanent wear only; only one may be worn.

(8) The Republic of Vietnam Civil Actions Unit Citation is authorized for permanent wear only; only one may be worn.

22-11. Appurtenances

Appurtenances are devices affixed to service or suspension ribbons, or worn in lieu of medals or ribbons. They are worn to denote an additional award, participation in a specific event, or some other distinguishing characteristic of an award. The following appurtenances are authorized for wear on decorations, medals, ribbons and other awards, when authorized by appropriate authority. See DA Pam 670-1 for descriptions and directions for placement of each appurtenance. See AR 600-8-22 for additional information on authority to wear a particular appurtenance.

a. Oak leaf clusters. Bronze oak leaf clusters are worn to denote award of second and succeeding awards of decorations (other than the Air Medal, the Army Reserve Components Achievement Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, and unit awards). A silver oak leaf cluster is worn in lieu of five bronze oak leaf clusters. If the number of authorized oak leaf clusters exceeds four and will not fit on a single ribbon, a second ribbon is authorized for wear. See DA Pam 670-1 for specific guidance.

b. The "V" device. The "V" device is worn to denote an award authorized for acts of heroism involving conflict with an armed enemy. The "V" device is authorized for wear on the Air Medal, Bronze Star Medal, Army Commendation Medal, and the Joint Service Commendation Medal. Not more than one "V" device is worn on a ribbon.

c. Numerals.

(1) Arabic numerals are worn to denote second and succeeding awards of the Air Medal, Army Reserve Components Overseas Training Ribbon, the Overseas Service Ribbon, the Multinational Force and Observers Medal, and with succeeding awards of the "M" device with the Armed Forces Reserve Medal.

(2) Arabic numerals are worn on the NCO Professional Development Ribbon to denote the highest level of NCO development. See DA Pam 670-1.

d. Clasps. Unique clasps are worn on the following medals to signify second and subsequent awards. See DA Pam 670-1 for descriptions and placement.

(1) The Good Conduct Medal.

(2) The Antarctic Service Medal.

(3) All other clasps are worn only on the suspension ribbon of the award and denote battle campaigns and service campaigns; they are not worn on the service ribbon.

e. Service stars.

(1) Service stars are worn to denote an additional award or service in a named campaign. A silver service star is worn in lieu of five bronze service stars; it is worn to the wearer's right of a bronze service star and to the left of an arrowhead. Additional service stars are worn side by side, each with one point upward.

(2) The bronze service star is affixed to the Parachutist Badge and the Military Free Fall Parachutist Badge to denote participation in a combat parachute jump.

f. Arrowhead. The bronze arrowhead denotes participation in a combat parachute jump, combat glider landing, or an amphibious assault landing while assigned or attached as a member of an organized force carrying out an assigned tactical mission. It is authorized for wear on:

(1) The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal.

(2) European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal.

(3) World War II Campaign medals.

(4) The Korean Service Medal.

(5) The Vietnam Service Medal.

(6) The Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal.

g. Berlin Airlift device. The Berlin Airlift device is authorized for wear on the Army of Occupation Medal.

h. Ten-year device. The ten-year device is worn on the Armed Forces Reserve Medal to denote each succeeding 10-year period in addition to, and under the same conditions as prescribed for the award of the Armed Forces Reserve Medal. A bronze device denotes the completion of the first 10-year period (10 years); a silver device denotes completion of the second period (20 years); a gold device denotes completion of the third period (30 years), and a gold device followed by a bronze device denotes completion of the fourth period (40 years).

i. The "M" device. The "M" device is worn on the Armed Forces Reserve Medal to denote service during a mobilization or contingency designated by the Secretary of Defense. If personnel served during more than one mobilization or contingency, a numeral is worn to the wearer's left of the "M" device, to indicate the number of times mobilized.

22-12. Badges authorized for wear on Army uniforms

A badge is awarded to an individual for identification purposes or for attaining a special skill or proficiency. The criteria for the award of Army badges are contained in AR 600-8-22 and in NGR 601-1 for ARNG recruiting and retention identification badges. Most combat and special skill badges are available in full, miniature, and dress miniature sizes. The following badges are authorized for wear on the Army uniform:

a. Military badges awarded by the U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and the Director of Civilian Marksmanship. (See para 22-12g for additional information.)

b. Badges awarded by the Regular Army and Navy Union, and by the Army and Navy Union of the United States.

c. Marksmanship badges pertaining to national matches and approved by HQDA. Marksmanship badges from other U.S. Services are not authorized for wear on the Army uniform.

d. Badges of civic and quasi-military societies of the United States and international organizations of a military nature. These include badges of organizations originally composed of members who served in a U.S. force during the Revolutionary War; the War of 1812; the Mexican War; the Civil War; the Spanish-American War; the Philippine Insurrection; and the Chinese Relief Expedition of 1900. The badges are worn only while the wearer is actually attending meetings or functions of such organizations, or on occasions of ceremony. Personnel will not wear these badges to and from such meetings or events.

e. Badges awarded by friendly foreign nations in recognition of military activities and authorized by AR 600-8-22 .

f. Tabs are authorized for wear on either a permanent or temporary basis.

(1) Permanent wear. Tabs indicating individual marksmanship or special skill are authorized for permanent wear. The tabs authorized for permanent wear are: Sapper, Ranger, Special Forces, and President's Hundred.

(2) Temporary wear. Other tabs are considered an integral part of the SSI and Soldiers are only authorized to wear them while assigned to the organization that prescribed wearing the SSI with the tab. Temporary tab examples include: airborne, honor guard, mountain, and Pershing.

(3) Not all units designated (by structure, equipment, and mission) by HQDA as "airborne" are authorized to wear the airborne tab. The unit SSI must be approved as including the airborne tab by TIOH; wear of the airborne tab with any other SSI is not authorized. Only the following units have the airborne tab incorporated into their authorized SSI:

(a) 18th Aviation Brigade.

(b) 82d Airborne Division.

(c) 95th Civil Affairs Brigade.

(d) 101st Airborne Division.

(e) 173d Airborne Brigade Combat Team.

(f) 360th Civil Affairs Brigade.

(g) 528th Sustainment Brigade.

(h) Joint Readiness Training Center Operations Group and Headquarters Special Forces Group (Airborne).

(i) Special Forces Groups (Airborne).

(j) U.S. Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Command.

(k) U.S. Army Element, Special Operations Command Africa.

(l) U.S. Army Element, Special Operations Command Central.

(m) U.S. Army Element, Special Operations Command Europe.

(n) U.S. Army Element, Special Operations Command Korea.

(o) U.S. Army Element, Special Operations Command Pacific.

(p) U.S. Army Element, Special Operations Command South.

(q) U.S. Army Element, Special Operations Command Joint Forces Command.

(r) U.S. Army Element, Special Operations Command.

(s) U.S. Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center.

(t) U.S. Army Parachute Team.

(u) U.S. Army Special Operations Command.

(v) XVIII Airborne Corps.

(w) 4/25th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne)

g. In accordance with AR 600-8-22 , personnel must obtain authority from HQDA before wearing badges on the uniform that were awarded by other U.S. Services or by the Director of Civilian Marksmanship. The following rules apply when wearing badges from other U.S. Services:

(1) Military combat or special skill badges awarded by other U.S. Services that are similar to U.S. Army combat or special skill badges are worn on the Army uniform in the same manner as U.S. Army combat or special skill badges, only if no Army badges are authorized for wear in the same group. For example, a Soldier who had no group 3 badges (as outlined in DA Pam 670-1 ) could wear aviation badges awarded by the U.S. Air Force as group 3 badges (as Army aviation and aviator badges are worn). However, if the individual was authorized to wear an Army badge in group 3, the Soldier would not be authorized to wear the group 3 badge from the U.S. Air Force.

(2) Skill badges awarded by other U.S. Services that are not similar to Army skill badges are worn as group 4 badges.

(3) Badges from other U.S. Services that indicate career fields are not authorized for wear (such as U.S. Air Force medical insignia or badges used to identify the duty, function, or classification of the wearer). Some examples are U.S. Air Force fire protection, air training command instructor, security police, or the Naval aviation warfare specialist.

(4) Personnel will not wear badges awarded by other U.S. Services that, because of size or configuration, cannot be worn as group 4 badges. Subdued embroidered or metal skill badges authorized for wear by another U.S. Service, and authorized for wear on the Army uniform, may be worn on utility uniforms in the same manner as prescribed for Army badges.

22-13. Badges not authorized for wear on Army uniforms

a. Badges awarded by States and other jurisdictions inferior to the U.S. Government, except as provided in DA Pam 670-1 for ARNG Soldiers in their State status.

b. Badges awarded by jurisdictions inferior to foreign national governments.

c. Badges awarded by foreign civilian organizations.

d. Foreign military badges, except as previously authorized.

e. Marksmanship badges awarded by other U.S. Services.

f. Locally authorized badges.

22-14. Categories of badges authorized for wear on Army uniforms

The following badges are worn on the Army uniform:

a. Marksmanship badges and tab.

b. Combat and special skill badges and tabs.

c. Identification badges.

d. Foreign badges.

22-15. Marksmanship badges and tab

Marksmanship badges and tab are awarded to indicate the degree in which an individual has qualified in prescribed weapons firing courses or events. See DA Pam 670-1 for authorized marksmanship badges and tab, specific placement guidance, order of precedence, and general wear policy.

22-16. Combat and special skill badges

Combat and special skill badges are awarded to denote proficiency in performance of duties under hazardous conditions and circumstances of extraordinary hardship, as well as special qualifications and successful completion of prescribed courses of training. See DA Pam 670-1 for authorized combat and special skill badges and tabs, specific placement guidance, order of precedence, and general wear policy.

22-17. Identification badges

Identification badges are worn as public evidence of deserved honor and distinction to denote service performed in specified assignments. See DA Pam 670-1 for authorized permanent and temporary identification badges, specific placement guidance, order of precedence, and general wear policy.

22-18. Foreign badges

a. Personnel may only wear one foreign badge at a time on the Army service and dress uniforms. Only those badges awarded in recognition of military activities by the military department of the host country are authorized for acceptance and permanent wear on the service and dress uniforms.

b. The only Vietnamese badges authorized for wear are the parachute, ranger, and explosive ordnance disposal badges.

c. Soldiers must obtain approval in accordance with the procedures provided in AR 600-8-22 , to accept, retain, and wear a foreign badge.

d. See DA Pam 670-1 for wear of foreign badges.

Chapter 23
Wear of the Army Uniform by Reserve, Retired, Separated, and Civilian Personnel

23-1. Occasions of ceremony

a. As used in this regulation, the phrase "occasions of ceremony" means occasions essentially of a military character, at which the uniform is more appropriate than civilian clothing. These functions include, but are not limited to: military balls, military parades, weddings, and military funerals; memorial services, meetings, conferences, or similar functions of associations formed for military purposes, of which the membership is composed largely or entirely of current or honorably discharged veterans of the Armed Forces of the United States. Authority to wear the uniform includes wear while traveling to and from the ceremony or function, provided the travel in uniform can be completed on the day of the ceremony or function.

b. All persons wearing the Army uniform will wear awards, decorations, and insignia in the same manner as prescribed in this regulation for active duty Soldiers. For civilian attire, individuals may wear only those awards, decorations, or insignia authorized by this regulation for wear on civilian clothing, in the same manner and approximate location as the equivalent military uniform.

23-2. Army National Guard and U.S. Army Reserve

a. All members of the ARNG and USAR on any form of paid or unpaid inactive duty, active duty, annual training, or full-time National Guard duty, or AGR duty will wear the uniform and insignia prescribed for personnel in the AA. ARNG and USAR personnel are authorized to wear the Army uniform on the following occasions:

b. Within the limits of the United States or its possessions, ARNG and USAR personnel not on active duty may wear the Army uniform only as follows:

(1) When participating in reserve training assemblies (inactive duty training), exercises, conferences, or ceremonies in an official capacity as members of the ARNG or the USAR under appropriate orders.

(2) When engaged in military instruction or attending any school or course of instruction under the auspices of the Armed Forces of the United States or the Reserve Components as a student under appropriate orders.

(3) When instructors at an educational institution conducting courses of instruction approved by the Armed Forces, or when responsible for military discipline at like institutions.

(4) When attending social functions or informal gatherings of a military character. All current and former Soldiers will conform to the wear and appearance standards in this regulation while wearing the uniform under the provisions of this chapter.

(5) When enrolled as undergraduates in educational institutions and participating as a cadet in an active ROTC unit, or as a member in established USAR unit. Individuals may wear the uniforms and insignia of their grade only upon such occasions expressly desired or authorized by the professor of military science or other proper official of the school. Members of the USAR attending institutions at which military training is considered as required curricular activity are authorized, and may be required to wear the uniform prescribed by the institution, including the insignia of any grade or rating held in the student unit.

(6) ARNG military technicians who are required to wear the uniform as a condition of their employment will wear the uniform for their federally recognized grade, as prescribed by the Adjutant General of their State, commonwealth, territory, or district.

(7) USAR technicians who are also members of the USAR may wear the Army uniform, at their option, while performing in their civil service status.

c. When outside the limits of the United States or its possessions, ARNG and USAR personnel not on active duty and outside the limits of the United States or its possessions will not wear the Army uniform, unless granted authority by HQDA. However, on occasions of military ceremony or other military functions in a foreign country, ARNG and USAR personnel may be granted authority to wear the Army uniform after they have their status accredited by the nearest Army attaché. In a foreign country that does not have an Army attaché, ARNG and USAR personnel must obtain authority to wear the Army uniform for a specific occasion from the military authorities of the country concerned.

d. ARNG personnel also may wear the Army uniform in the performance of State service when authorized to do so by the Adjutant General for their state, commonwealth, territory, or district.

e. For USAR personnel —

(1) Warrant officers and enlisted personnel serving on active duty, who also hold commissions in the USAR, may wear the uniform indicative of their grade in the USAR only as follows:

(a) When undergoing authorized voluntary training designed for reserve officers that they are authorized to take, and while traveling to and from that training.

(b) When attending meetings or functions of associations formed for military purposes, of which membership is composed largely or entirely of officers of the U.S. Army or of former members of the Army.

(2) Warrant officers and enlisted personnel serving on active duty who also hold commissions in the USAR may not wear the uniform indicative of their grade in the USAR:

(a) When in an office of the DOD.

(b) When they will be in association with troops of the AA or of the ARNG when called into Federal service, except when the individual is on active duty as a reserve officer, or as otherwise authorized in paragraph 23-2 e (1) , above.

23-3. Retired personnel

a. Personnel who will be advanced to a higher grade upon retirement have the option of wearing the insignia of that grade thereafter.

b. Retired personnel on active duty will wear their uniform and insignia in the same manner as prescribed for personnel in the AA of corresponding grade and branch.

c. Retired personnel not on active duty may wear either the uniform reflecting their grade and branch on the date of their retirement, or the uniform prescribed for personnel in the AA of corresponding grade and branch, when appropriate, but may not mix the two uniforms. Personnel will wear the grade as shown on the retired grade of rank line on their retirement order.

d. Retired personnel not on active duty are not authorized to wear the Army uniform when they are instructors or responsible for military discipline at an educational institution, unless the educational institution is conducting courses of instruction approved by the Armed Forces.

e. In addition to the occasions for wear listed above, retired personnel are authorized to wear the uniform only on the following occasions:

(1) While attending military funerals, memorial services, weddings, inaugurals, and other occasions of ceremony.

(2) Attending parades on national or State holidays, or other patriotic parades or ceremonies in which any active or reserve U.S. military unit is taking part. Uniforms for these occasions are restricted to service and dress uniforms; the combat uniform and physical fitness uniforms will not be worn. Wearing the Army uniform at any other time, or for any other purpose than stated above, is prohibited.

f. Retirees are authorized to wear the physical fitness uniform under the following provisions:

(1) With civilian attire off the installation.

(2) When wearing the physical fitness uniform as a complete uniform, retirees will —

(a) Wear only authorized accessories corresponding to those worn by personnel of the AA.

(b) Keep the sleeves down on the sweatshirt or jacket, the legs down on the pants, and the T-shirt tucked inside the trunks.

(c) Wear the sleeves and legs of the physical fitness uniform sweatshirt down; may not cuff, roll, or push up the sleeves or legs physical fitness uniform.

(d) Wear the green micro fleece cap pulled down snugly on the head. The bottom edge (a portion of or all) of the cap may be folded, but not rolled. A similar, commercially designed cap is authorized for wear.

g. Pregnant retirees are authorized to wear the T-shirt or sweatshirt outside the trunks or sweatpants.

h. Retirees are authorized to wear the Retired Service ID Badge (see DA Pam 670-1 ).

23-4. Former members of the Army

a. Unless qualified under another provision of this regulation, or under the provisions of 10 USC 772, former members of the Army may only wear the uniform if they served honorably during a declared or undeclared war, and if their most recent service was terminated under honorable conditions. Personnel who qualify under these conditions will wear the Army uniform in the highest grade they held during such war service, in accordance with 10 USC 772.

b. When authorized, the uniform may be worn only for the following ceremonial occasions and when traveling to and from the event.

(1) When attending military funerals, memorial services, weddings, inaugurals, and other occasions of ceremony.

(2) When attending parades on national or State holidays, or other patriotic parades or ceremonies in which any active or reserve U.S. military unit is taking part. Uniforms for these occasions are restricted to service and dress uniforms; the combat uniform and physical fitness uniforms will not be worn. Wearing the Army uniform at any other time, or for any other purpose than stated above, is prohibited.

23-5. Medal of Honor recipients

Personnel awarded the Medal of Honor may wear the Army uniform at their pleasure, except under the circumstances in paragraph 3-7 k .

23-6. Medals on civilian clothes

Retired personnel and former members of the Army (as described above) may wear all categories of medals described in this regulation on appropriate civilian clothing. This includes clothes designed for veteran and patriotic organizations on Veteran's Day, Memorial Day, and Armed Forces Day, as well as at formal occasions of ceremony and social functions of a military nature. Personnel may wear either full-sized or miniature medals. Personnel who wear medals on civilian clothes should place the medals on the clothing in approximately the same location and in the same manner as for the Army uniform, so they look similar to medals worn on the Army uniform.

23-7. Prohibition on uniform wear

Wear of the Army uniform by ARNG, USAR, retired, separated, and civilian personnel is prohibited under the circumstances listed in paragraph 3-7 k .

23-8. Uniform similar to the Army uniform

a. A person, for whom one of the following uniforms is prescribed, may wear the uniform, provided it includes distinctive insignia prescribed by the Secretary of the Army to distinguish it from the U.S. Army uniform.

(1) Instructors or members of an organized cadet corps at a State university, college, or public high school that has a regular course of military instruction will wear the uniform prescribed by the academic organization.

(2) Instructors or members of an organized cadet corps at an educational institution that has a regular course of military instruction in military science with an Army instructor will wear the uniform prescribed by the academic organization.

(3) When authorized by regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the Army, members of a military society composed of persons discharged honorably or under honorable conditions from the U.S. Army may wear the uniform prescribed by the military society.

b. According to 10 USC 773(b), none of the uniforms prescribed in paragraph 23-8 a , above, may include insignia or grade the same, as or similar to, those prescribed for officers of the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps.

c. State Defense Forces (SDF) may adopt the service uniform and the utility uniform, provided all service uniform buttons, cap devices, and other insignia differ significantly from that prescribed for wear by members of the U.S. Army. State insignia will not include "United States," "U.S.", "U.S. Army", or the Great Seal of the United States. Personnel of the SDF may wear a State-designed SDF distinguishing badge or insignia centered on the left pocket flap. The red nametape or nameplate will include the full title of the SDF (for example, "Texas State Guard"). The utility uniforms will contain a State SDF tape in lieu of "U.S. Army" over the left breast pocket. States wishing to adopt the Army service and utility uniforms will register with the Chief, National Guard Bureau.

23-9. Distinctive unit insignia on civilian clothing

See DA Pam 670-1 .

23-10. Uniforms worn by United States civilians

a. U.S. civilian personnel attached to, or authorized to accompany forces of the United States, including DA civilians, are authorized to wear utility uniforms only when required in the performance of their duties and authorized by the ACOM/ASCC/DRU commander. (The procedures for purchasing uniforms, footwear, and insignia are contained in AR 700-84 .)

b. See DA Pam 670-1 for the authorized insignia for wear by civilians.

Appendix A
References

The Official Army Publications Web Sites.

Publication Section I
Required Publications

AR 10-87. Army Commands, Army Service Component Commands, and Direct Reporting Units   (Cited in para 21-16 .)

AR 27-60. Intellectual Property   (Cited in para 3-14 .)

AR 70-1. Army Acquisition Policy   (Cited in paras 1-5 , 2-1 , 2-2 , and 2-4 .)

AR 140-10. Assignments, Attachments, Details, and Transfers   (Cited in para 21-9 .)

AR 360-1. The Army Public Affairs Program   (Cited in para 3-5 .)

AR 385-10. The Army Safety Program   (Cited in paras 1-5 , 3-6 , 3-12 , and 3-13 .)

AR 600-8-22. Military Awards   (Cited in paras 22-10 , 22-11 , 22-12 , and 22-18 .)

AR 600-9. The Army Body Composition Program   (Cited in para 3-1 .)

AR 600-20. Army Command Policy   (Cited in para 3-4 .)

AR 614-100. Officers Assignment Policies, Details, and Transfers   (Cited in para 21-9 .)

AR 700-84. Issue and Sale of Personal Clothing   (Cited in paras 1-5 , 2-6 , 3-6 , 3-7 , 15-1 , 23-10 .)

AR 702-7-1. Reporting of Product Quality Deficiencies within the U.S. Army   (Cited in para 2-6 .)

CTA 50-900. Clothing and Individual Equipment   (Cited in paras 2-6 , 2-7 , 4-3 , 5-3 , 6-1 , 9-1 , 10-1 , 11-1 , 13-1 , 14-1 , 15-1 , 18-1 , 19-1 , and 21-1 .)

DA Pam 670-1. Guide to Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia   (Cited in paras 1-6 , 1-7 , 2-6 , 2-7 , 3-3 , 3-4 , 3-6 , 3-7 , 3-8 , 4-1 , 5-1 , 6-1 , 7-1 , 8-1 , 8-2 , 9-1 , 10-1 , 10-2 , 11-1 , 12-1 , 13-1 , 14-1 , 15-1 , 16-1 , 17-1 , 18-1 , 19-1 , 20-1 , 20-3 , 20-6 , 20-7 , 20-8 , 20-9 , 20-10 , 20-11 , 20-12 , 20-13 , 20-14 , 20-15 , 20-16 , 20-17 , 20-18 , 20-19 , 20-20 , 20-21 , 20-22 , 20-23 , 20-24 , 20-25 , 20-26 , 20-27 , 20-28 , 20-29 , 20-30 , 21-1 , 21-2 , 21-3 , 21-4 , 21-5 , 21-6 , 21-7 , 21-8 , 21-10 , 21-11 , 21-22 , 21-13 , 21-14 , 21-15 , 21-16 , 21-17 , 21-18 , 21-19 , 21-20 , 21-21 , 1-22 , 21-23 , 21-24 , 21-25 , 21-26 , 21-27 , 21-28 , 21-29 , 21-30 , 21-31 , 21-32 , 22-5 , 22-6 , 22-7 , 22-8 , 22-9 , 22-10 , 22-11 , 22-12 , 22-13 , 22-15 , 22-16 , 22-17 , 22-18 , and 23-3 ).

Publication Section II
Related Publications

A related publication is a source of additional information. The user does not have to read a related publication to understand this regulation.

AR 95-1. Flight Regulations  

AR 140-10. Assignments, Attachments, Details, and Transfers  

AR 145-1. Senior Reserve Officers' Training Corps Program: Organization, Administration, and Training  

AR 145-2. Organization, Administration, Operation, and Support  

AR 165-1. Army Chaplain Corps Activities  

AR 190-30. Military Police Investigations  

AR 385-10. The Army Safety Program  

AR 600-8-10. Leaves and Passes  

AR 600-8-14. Identification Cards for Members of the Uniformed Services, Their Eligible Family Members, and Other Eligible Personnel  

AR 600-8-24. Officer Transfers and Discharges  

AR 600-82. The U.S. Army Regimental System  

AR 635-200. Active Duty Enlisted Administrative Separations  

AR 672-8. Manufacture, Sale, Wear, and Quality Control of Heraldic Items  

AR 672-20. Incentive Awards  

AR 702-7-1. Reporting of Product Quality Deficiencies with the U.S. Army  

CTA 8-100. Army Medical Department Expendable/Durable Items  

CTA 50-909. Field and Garrison Furnishings and Equipment  

CTA 50-970. Expendable/Durable Items (Except Medical, Class V, Repair Parts, and Heraldic Items)  

DA Pam 672-3. Unit Citation and Campaign Participation Credit Register  

DA Pam 738-751. Functional Users Manual for the Army Maintenance Management System-(TAMMS-A)  

DAGO 2007-06. Establishment of the United States Army Logistics Branch  

DA Pam 710-2-1. Using Unit Supply System (Manual Procedures)  

DA Pam 738-751. Functional Users Manual for the Army Maintenance Management System-Aviation (TAMMS-A)  

DOD 4500.54-G. Foreign Clearance Guide (FCG)   (Available at https://www.fcg.pentagon.mil/ )

NGR 600-82. U.S. Army Regimental System-Army National Guard   (Available at http://www.ngbpdc.ngb.army.mil/ )

NGR 600-102. Commissioned and Warrant Officers Assigned to Selective Service Sections State Area Commands   (Available at www.ngbpdc.ngb.army.mil/ )

NGR 601-1. Army National Guard Strength Maintenance Program   (Available at http://www.ngbpdc.ngb.army.mil/

TB Med 287. Pseudofolliculitis of the Beard and Acne Keloidalis Nuchae  

TM 10-227. Fitting of Army Uniforms and Footwear  

TM 10-8400-201-23. General Repair Procedures for Clothing   (Available at https://www.logsa.army.mil/ )

10 USC. Armed Forces  

10 USC, Chapter 47. Uniform Code of Military Justice  

10 USC, Chapter 1223. Retired Pay for Non-Regular Service  

10 USC 771, Chapter 45. The Uniform  

10 USC 772. When wearing by persons not on active duty authorized  

10 USC 773(b). When distinctive insignia required  

18 USC 701. Official badges, identification cards, other insignia  

18 USC 704. Military medals or decorations  

32 USC. National Guard  

Publication Section III
Prescribed Forms

This section contains no entries.

Publication Section IV
Referenced Forms

Unless otherwise indicated, DA Forms are available on the Army Publishing Directorate (APD) Web site ( http://www.apd.army.mil ) and Standard Forms (SFs) are available on the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) Web site ( http://www.gsa.gov ).

DA Form 11-2. Internal Control Evaluation Certification  

DA Form 2028. Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms  

DD Form 1610. Request and Authorization for TDY Travel of DOD Personnel  

SF 368. Product Quality Deficiency Report  

Appendix B
Internal Control Evaluation

B-1. Function

The functions covered by this evaluation include conducting uniform inspections for serviceability, proper fitting of all Army uniforms and proper placement of all accoutrements.

B-2. Purpose

The purpose of this evaluation is to assist leaders in evaluating the key internal controls outlined below. It is not intended to cover all controls.

B-3. Instructions

Answers must be based on the actual testing of key internal controls found in this regulation. Answers that indicate deficiencies must be explained and corrective action indicated in supporting documentation. These key internal controls must be formally evaluated at least once every three years. Certification that this evaluation has been conducted must be accomplished on DA Form 11-2 (Internal Control Evaluation Certification).

B-4. Test questions

a. Is uniform serviceability maintained in accordance with this regulation?

b. Are male and female personal grooming policies followed by assigned personnel?

c. Are assigned personnel in compliance with tattoo/brand policy?

d. Do service uniforms for assigned personnel have proper fitting?

e. Are Soldiers' accoutrements placed properly on authorized uniforms?

f. Do unit leaders enforce policy set forth in this regulation?

g. Are assigned personnel starching utility uniforms?

h. Is the black beret worn in the proper manner?

B-5. Supersession

This is the initial evaluation for the Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia.

B-6. Comments

Help make this a better tool for evaluating internal controls. Submit comments to Chief, Command Programs and Policy Division (DAPE-HRI), 300 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 22310-0300.

Glossary

Section I

Abbreviations

AA

Active Army

ACOM

Army command

AGR

Active Guard Reserve

AMHRR

Army Military Human Resource Record

AR

Army Regulation

ACOM

Army command

ARNG

Army National Guard

ASCC

Army service component command

CA

Civil Affairs

CENTCOM

U.S. Central Command

CMF

career management field

CONUS

continental United States

CSM

command sergeant major

CTA

common table of allowances

DA

Department of the Army

DCS, G-1

Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1

DCS, G-4

Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4

DOD

Department of Defense

DUI

distinctive unit insignia

DRU

direct reporting unit

HQDA

Headquarters, Department of the Army

MCS

military clothing store

MOS

military occupational specialty

NCO

noncommissioned officer

NGR

National Guard regulation

OEF

Operation Enduring Freedom

OND

Operation New Dawn

OPCON

operational control

OSUT

one station unit training

PEO Soldier

Program Executive Office Soldier

PMOS

primary military occupational specialty

RDI

Regimental Distinctive Insignia

ROTC

Reserve Officers' Training Corps

SDF

State Defense Forces

SGM

sergeant major

SSI

shoulder sleeve insignia

SSI-FWTS

shoulder sleeve insignia-former wartime service

TASS

Total Army School System

TDA

table of distribution and allowance

TDY

temporary duty

TIOH

The Institute of Heraldry

TM

technical manual

TOE

table of organization and equipment

UCMJ

Uniform Code of Military Justice

UQCP

Uniform Quality Control Program

U.S.

United States

USAR

U.S. Army Reserve

USARC

U.S. Army Reserve Command

USAREC

U.S. Army Recruiting Command

USC

United States Code

Section II

Terms

Accouterment

Items such as medals, ribbons, insignia, badges, emblems, tabs, and tapes authorized for wear on uniforms.

Appurtenances

Devices such as stars, letters, numerals, or clasps worn on the suspension ribbon of the medal, or on the ribbon bar that indicate additional awards, participation in specific events, or other distinguishing characteristics of the award.

Awards

An all-inclusive term that consists of any decoration, medal, badge, ribbon, or appurtenance bestowed on an individual or unit.

Badge

An award given to an individual for ID purposes or that is awarded for attaining a special skill or proficiency. Certain badges are available in full, miniature, and dress miniature sizes.

Braids/plaits (hair)

Three or more portions/bunches of interwoven hair.

Clothing bag

Uniform items and personal clothing issued to initial entry Soldiers which all Soldiers are required to maintain throughout their military career.

Conservative

Traditional in style.

Decoration

An award given to an individual as a distinctively designed mark of honor denoting heroism, or meritorious or outstanding service or achievement.

Dress uniforms

Uniforms worn as formal duty attire, or that are worn at formal or informal social functions, before or after retreat. They include the enlisted Army green dress uniform, and the Army blue and white uniforms.

Eccentric

Departing from the established or traditional norm.

Exaggerated

To make greater or more noticeable.

Extreme

Exceeding the ordinary, usual, or expected; not moderate.

Fad(dish)

A transitory fashion adopted with wide enthusiasm.

Field uniforms

Utility and organizational uniforms, excluding the hospital duty and food service uniforms, that are worn in field, training, or combat environments.

Gold color/gold-colored

Includes gold plated, gold bullion, and synthetic metallic gold.

Lapel button

A miniature enameled replica of an award, which is worn only on civilian clothing.

Local commander

The commander of an installation or equivalent in CONUS, the ACOM commander overseas, and the State Adjutant General for the ARNG, as the individual who may prescribe policy on discretionary wear policies in this regulation. The local commander may delegate this authority to subordinate commanders.

Medal

An award issued to an individual for the performance of certain duties, acts, or services, consisting of a suspension ribbon made in distinctive colors and from which hangs a medallion.

Mess uniforms

Uniforms worn for formal social occasions, when prescribed by the host. They include the blue and white mess and evening mess uniforms for males. For females, they include the blue and white mess and evening mess uniforms, the all-white evening mess, and the black mess and evening mess uniforms.

Miniature medal

A replica of a regular size medal, made to a scale half of the original. The Medal of Honor is not worn in miniature.

Neck

For clarity in regards to grandfathered tattoos, the neck is defined as anything above a crew T-shirt neckline (in a standard uniform T-shirt) and also below the jaw line (in the front of the head) and below a parallel line from the lowest point of where one ear connects to the head to the lowest point of where the other ear connects to the head (in the back of the head).

Optional clothing

A uniform or clothing item which the individual is not required to own or wear but may be worn at the individual's option, as prescribed in this regulation.

Organizational uniforms, clothing, and equipment

The uniforms, clothing, and equipment listed in the CTA, which are issued to an individual on a loan basis and remain the property of the organization. Commanders issue organizational clothing and equipment in accordance with the allowances and directives published in the appropriate CTA. When issued, organizational clothing is worn when prescribed by the commander in accordance with Army regulations, technical manuals, and the CTA. Examples of organizational uniforms are the maternity work uniform, ACU, hospital duty and food service uniforms, and cold-weather clothing.

Personal clothing

Military-type clothing, clothing of a personal nature, and component items listed in CTA 50-900, table I, that are provided to enlisted personnel (specifically, the initial clothing bag issue).

Roll press

To remove substantial wrinkles from clothing without creating creases.

Ribbon or ribbon bar

A portion of the suspension ribbon of a medal, worn in lieu of the medal and made in the form of a bar, 1? inches long by ? inch wide.

Rosette

A lapel device created from gathering the suspension ribbon of a medal into a circular shape. The device is worn on the lapel of civilian clothing.

Service medal

An award made to personnel who participated in designated wars, campaigns, or expeditions or who have fulfilled specified service requirements in a creditable manner.

Service uniform

Worn in garrison environments when the wear of utility or dress uniforms is not required or appropriate. Service uniforms consist of the Army green (Class A and Class B) uniforms.

Unit award

An award made to an operating unit, which is worn by members of that unit who participated in the cited action (permanent unit award). Other personnel serving in the cited unit, but who were not assigned to the unit during the action, may be authorized temporary wear of the award (temporary unit award).

Unsightly

Unpleasant or offensive to look at.

Utility uniforms

Uniforms normally worn in the field, during training, or while performing duties where it is not practical or appropriate to wear a service uniform. Uniforms classified as utility uniforms are found in DA Pam 670-1 .

Section III

Special Terms

This section contains no entries.