Army Regulation 870-20

11 January 1999

Effective date: 11 February 1999

UNCLASSIFIED

Historical Activities

Army Museums, Historical Artifacts, and Art



SUMMARY of CHANGE

AR 870-20
Army Museums, Historical Artifacts, and Art

This revision--

* Completely revises AR 870-20.

* Incorporates AR 870-15 , Army Art Collection.

* Realigns accountability policy with chapter 2, AR 710-2 , Inventory Management Supply Policy below the Wholesale Level.

* Adds policy for demilitarization requirements for items on static display to Federal and non-Federal entities.

* Defines the process for section 2572, title 10, United States Code transactions; loans and gifts to non-Federal entities; and exchanges (2572 (b)), known as the Army Exchange Program.

* Defines the duties and responsibilities of the Army Chief Curator.

* Identifies statutory responsibility and authority.

* Establishes new terms including certified museum, museum activity, and historical collection.

* Establishes new controls on historical artifacts loaned to Army museums.

* Establishes the Army Museum Information System as the central historical artifact accounting program for the Army.

* Establishes a Central Control Number for each artifact in the Army Historical Collection.

* Updates preservation and conservation standards for historical artifacts.

* Changes the requirements for photographing historical artifacts.

* Establishes procedures for handling hazardous and radioactive materials found in historical artifacts and equipment.

* Changes the requirements for fire suppression systems in museum buildings.

* Defines the mission and management of the U.S. Army Historical Clearinghouse.

* Establishes responsibility for the storage of Army flags, colors, guidons, and associated material.

* Establishes requirements for systematic collection of historically significant materiel during combat and contingency operations.

* Includes the Center of Military History policy: Code of Ethics for Employees at Army Museums.

* Includes turn-in procedures for organizational historical property from inactivating units.

* Includes the Minimum Requirements Listing when developing a Command Supply Discipline Program evaluation.

* Changes the Center of Military History, Museum Division, address from Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 1099 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20005-3402 to Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, Building 35, 103 3d Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058 effective 1 August 1998.



Chapter 1
General Information

1-1. Purpose

This regulation prescribes policies, procedures, and assigns responsibilities for governing the collection, preservation, storage, accountability, demilitarization, and valuation of historical artifacts and art used for training, research and development, and interpretation of the Army's military and cultural heritage. Also, it prescribes policies and procedures for the establishment and effective administration of museums and historical collections within the Army Museum System.

a. Commanders, civilian supervisors, and managers at all levels will ensure compliance with applicable policies prescribed by this regulation.

b. All government and contractor employees will properly use, care for, and safeguard government property. They will seek the most efficient and economical means of accomplishing assigned tasks and will limit requests for and use of materiel.

1-2. References

Required and related publications and prescribed and referenced forms are listed in appendix A .

1-3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms

Abbreviations and special terms used in this regulation are explained in the consolidated glossary .

1-4. Responsibilities

a. The Chief of Military History (CMH), is the Commander, U.S. Army CMH, which is a field operating agency (FOA) with general staff supervision provided by the DAS. The CMH will--

(1) Be the principal adviser for material culture and organizational historical artifact matters to the Secretary of the Army (SA), the Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army (AASA), the Chief of Staff, Army (CSA), DAS, and Army component commanders in combat and military operations other than war.

(2) Control and ensure accountability of all Army historical artifacts and art per statutory requirements as follows:

(a) Designates representative examples of historical artifacts, including obsolete and contemporary military equipment and objects that document daily soldier life.

(b) Provides for the designation and recovery of historical artifacts required to document combat and military operations other than war, including joint and multinational operations in which the Army is an active participant, through the appointment and deployment of a historical property recovery coordinator and recovery teams from the CMH.

(c) Provides, through the Army Artists Program, for the creation of works of art for the Army Art Central Collection, including examples of locally produced soldier art, that document Army life, training, combat, and operations other than war, including joint and multinational operations in which the Army is an active participant.

(d) Provides staff supervision of the Army Museum System, establishing and enforcing standards, issuing guidelines, and coordinating the execution of matters relating to Army museums and historical collections.

(e) Supervises the Army Museum Certification Program.

(f) Controls and ensures accountability of historically significant unit property, Army flags, colors, and guidons that have been retired or from units during periods of inactivation or while at zero strength. This includes their storage, identification, valuation, preservation and conservation, registration, loan, transfer, disposition, or disposal per AR 840-10 and this regulation.

(g) Provides guidance and support to the SA, the AASA, the CSA, the DAS, Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA) principal officials and their staffs, HQDA FOAs, Major Army Commands (MACOMs), installation commanders, and other Army organizations and agencies on issues relating to the use of Army historical artifacts, art, and museum management.

(h) Promotes the use of Army material culture and art in training, research, and the teaching of military history.

b. The Chief Curator will--

(1) Be the principal adviser to the CMH for all matters relating to Army material culture, and is the Chief, Museum Division, U.S. Army Center of Military History. The Chief Curator is responsible for all matters pertaining to the daily management of the Army Historical Collection, the Army Art Central Collection, and the Army Museum System.

(2) Manage the automated and manual programs designed to provide daily tracking and visibility of all historical artifacts, unit historical artifacts, and art within the U.S. Army. This includes all processes for the collection, identification, valuation, designation, preservation and conservation, registration, cataloging, receipt/issue, loan, transfer, disposition, storage, or disposal of all historical artifacts, unit historical artifacts, and art works.

(3) Serve as the Artifact Accountable Officer (AAO) for the Army Historical Collection, and will subsequently appoint in writing all the individuals that will serve as the Artifact Responsible Officer (ARO) at the Army museums, museum activities, provisional museums, historical collections, and at the Clearinghouse.

(4) Manage the Army Museum Certification Program.

(5) Manage the Army Artists program.

(6) Manage the control and accountability of Army flags, colors, and guidons that have been retired or are from inactivated or zero strength units, which includes their storage, identification, preservation and conservation, registration, loan, transfer, disposition, or disposal per AR 840-10 .

(7) Promote the use of Army material culture and art in training, research, and the teaching of military history.

(8) Provide for the designation and recovery of historically significant artifacts that document combat and military operations other than war, including joint and multinational operations in which the Army is an active participant, by coordinating the appointment and deployment of a historical property recovery coordinator and recovery teams from the CMH.

c. The MACOMs and Operational Commanders, including those with overseas commands will--

(1) Provide supervision and support to Army museums and historical collections within their commands and coordinate Army art activities.

(2) Ensure accountability of all Army historical artifacts and art in the custody of museums or organizations within their commands by:

(a) Establishing and publishing policy defining the duties and responsibilities of their individual museums and historical artifact programs.

(b) Ensuring that Major Subordinate Commands (MSCs) and Major Subordinate Units (MSUs) with historical artifacts appoint AROs so that all regulatory guidance is followed.

(c) Ensuring that Command Staff Inspections or Command Logistics Review Programs (CLRPs) of MSCs or MSUs require compliance with regulatory requirements in regard to the care and accountability of historical artifacts and art.

(3) Provide for the designation and recovery of historically significant artifacts that document combat and military operations other than war, including joint and multinational operations in which the Army is an active participant, through the appointment and deployment of a historical property recovery coordinator and recovery teams from the CMH.

(4) Ensure procedural matters such as those concerning the establishment, closure, funding, and personnel resources of museums, historical collections, art activities, and the Clearinghouse are transmitted through command channels to the CMH.

(5) Promote the use of Army historical artifacts and art in technical study, training, research, and the teaching of military history within their commands.

(6) Publish guidance to ensure that all regulatory requirements are followed so that inactivating units properly transfer their historical property to the Army Historical Clearinghouse. Appendix G provides guidance for the transfer of organizational historical property.

d. The Commander, Army Materiel Command (AMC), will--

(1) Support the CMH upon request in identifying available excess, obsolete or condemned Army equipment by serial number and value. Also, the AMC will ensure that demilitarization is accomplished as required only on obsolete or condemned equipment to be exchanged outside of Army control in accordance with section 2572, title 10, United States Code, (10 USC 2572) and forward the applicable demilitarization certificate to the CMH. Specifically, the U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command (TACOM) will qualify recipients of Army equipment for static display; authorize appropriate MSCs to execute donation and/or loan transactions; and identify obsolete or condemned equipment by serial number and dollar value necessary for static display or in support of the CMH exchange program. The TACOM will also account and track all materiel transferred outside Federal control and will subsequently conduct site inspections at non-Army agencies and civilian museums. The TACOM will also process all CMH requests for Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) issues.

(2) Control and manage the U.S. Army Historical Clearinghouse buildings located at the Anniston Army Depot (ANAD), Anniston, AL. Management will consist of providing a Clearinghouse manager to lead in the logistics efforts in operating the warehouse to ensure that all artifacts are properly received, screened, inventoried, accounted for, cared for, and made available for issue as stated in the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the AMC and the CMH.

e. Installation Commanders will--

(1) Report to the CMH, through installation museum directors, those objects or works of art that have been designated as being significant. If no museum exists on the installation, the commander will appoint an ARO to accept responsibility and care for historical artifacts. A copy of the appointment will be sent to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058.

(2) Provide support for museums and historical collections under their control, and coordinate Army art activities on their installations.

(3) Ensure that the museums under their control are used for training, education, and public enlightenment.

(4) Accept responsibility for and care for all items issued by the CMH for training, education, display, and public enlightenment.

f. Unit Commanders will--

(1) Notify the CMH of any historically significant and lineage-related objects or works of art, identified as being of particular significance to their organization, which they wish to exhibit or display, that has been acquired through service, including captured enemy equipment. (Note: captured enemy equipment is U.S. Government property.)

(2) Identify, secure, maintain, preserve, and accept responsibility for historical artifacts and art in their custody as an organizational collection that is part of the Army Historical Collection.

(3) Appoint an ARO and provide a copy of the appointment to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058. Upon change of Unit Commanders, if the same ARO is to continue, then that individual will be reappointed by the Unit Commander.

g. Museum Directors will--

(1) Be the principal adviser to their commander, for all matters relating to Army material culture and museum operations. Authority is delegated to the Museum Directors for all matters pertaining to the daily management of their Army museum. Museum Directors are authorized direct communication with the CMH and the Chief Curator on all matters pertaining to their museum.

(2) Control and ensure accountability of all Army historical artifacts and art placed within the custody and care of the museum, including their identification, designation, preservation and conservation, registration, cataloging, loan, or transfer. This includes serving as the ARO.

(3) Perform historical research to identify objects, develop the museum story line, and support special projects.

(4) Develop and maintain mission-related technical research collections of artifacts used by branch, unit, or installation as appropriate. As the technical repositories for their branch, branch-related museums would acquire examples of branch-specific materials.

(5) Exhibit and interpret U.S. Army history and accomplishments, effectively utilizing the museum's collections, art, archives, and other sources in support of the museum's mission statement.

(6) Develop appropriate educational/training programs.

(7) Be guided by this regulation and by the standards of the museum profession.

(8) Inspect and account for all historical property to include historical static displays on the installation.

h. The AMC Clearinghouse Manager will--

(1) Control and manage the Clearinghouse facilities and maintain the accountability records for items issued from the AAO as stated in this regulation.

(2) Take the lead in the efforts to accomplish the logistics requirements; for example, safety, security, receiving, storage, inventory, move, issue, turn-in, package, and shipment of the artifacts stored at the Clearinghouse facilities as stated in the MOA.

(3) Assist curatorial staff in the accomplishment of their mission.

i. The Clearinghouse Supervisory Curator will--

(1) Ensure that all curatorial functions are completed, to include accurate identification, assessment, triage, registration, cataloging, and preservation of the historical artifacts at the Clearinghouse.

(2) Assist logistical staff in the accomplishment of their mission.

1-5. Statutory authority

a. The Army Historical Collection is part of the National Collection of the United States of America. The preservation for public use of historical objects of national significance for the inspiration and benefit of the people of the United States is governed by sections 431 through 433, and 470, title 16, United States Code (16 USC, 431-433, and 470), as amended.

b. The use of civilian volunteers in Army museums is governed by section 1588, title 10, United States Code (10 USC 1588).

c. The control and disposition of colors, standards, and guidons of inactivated organizations of the United States Army and those taken by the Army from enemies of the United States is governed by sections 4565 and 4714, title 10, United States Code (10 USC 4565 and 10 USC 4714).

d. The loan, donation, or exchange of books, manuscripts, works of art, historical artifacts, drawings, plans, models, and condemned or obsolete combat materiel is governed by 10 USC 2572, as amended.

1-6. Request for clarification or deviation

a. The CMH is tasked by the DAS to develop, implement, and maintain this regulation. The CMH will also respond to field inquiries concerning this regulation.

b. Send requests for clarification through command channels to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058.

c. Deviation from accounting policy in this regulation will be made only with prior approval from the DAS. Send deviation requests through command channels to Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058.

1-7. Waivers

Waiver to accounting requirements will be handled per AR 735-5, paragraph 8-3.

1-8. Command Supply Discipline Program

a. Mission. The Command Supply Discipline Program (CSDP) is a review of supply responsibilities by the command immediately superior to the unit or activity being inspected to determine compliance with Department of the Army regulatory guidance.

b. Policy. The U.S. Army Center of Military History, as prescribed by AR 710-2 , paragraph 1-13, will monitor all supply operations performed per this regulation.

c. History. The CMH is responsible for providing staff assistance visits and ensuring that all CSDP evaluations of historical material management are conducted by all museums and museum activities, including those belonging to the USAR and ARNGUS, historical collections, and the Army Historical Clearinghouse. These CSDP evaluations will be conducted using the standards outlined in AR 710-2, appendix B. Appendix H of this regulation provides minimal requirements for developing local CSDP checklists.

1-9. Inspections

Commanders and supervisors of Army museums, museum activities, or historical collections will conduct physical security inspections using the standards in AR 190-11 , AR 190-13 , and AR 190-51 .

1-10. Inventories

Commanders and supervisors must:

a. Conduct inventories of historical items in accordance with this regulation. Validate serial numbers and the central control number assigned by the Central Site Artifact Management System (CSAMS) during the inventory process.

b. Report all historical items and property that are lost, damaged, or destroyed in accordance with AR 735-5 , chapter 13.

c. Conduct research per AR 735-5, paragraph 14-27, to determine the reason for the inventory discrepancy.

1-11. Accountability for historical artifacts

a. Obligation. Accountability deals with the obligation to keep records of items, documents, or funds such as identification data, gains, losses, dues-in, dues-out, and balances on hand or in use.

b. Policy. All historical artifacts acquired by the Army, regardless of source, whether a donation, issue, transfer, or loan, will be accounted for as prescribed by this regulation, AR 870-5 , AR 710-2 , paragraph 1-11, and other applicable regulations.

(1) All historical artifacts, whether on permanent display on Army installations, held by Army units, or in Army museums are part of the Army Historical Collection property account and will be reported, hand receipted, and maintained as U.S. Army property on the CMH property book. Employees of the Army, both military and civilian, will report all found historical property to the CMH through the Universal Site Artifact Management System (USAMS) or through manual procedures as described in paragraph 2-8 .

(2) Supervisory responsibility for the care, use, and safekeeping of historical artifacts is inherent in supervisory positions.

1-12. Filing

Documents created because of this regulation will be filed and disposed of in accordance with AR 25-400-2 , Modern Army Record Keeping System (MARKS), and DA Pam 25-400-2, MARKS for TOE and Certain Other Units of the Army. Source of acquisition and historical property jacket files referred to in this regulation will be maintained indefinitely.

1-13. Implementation

a. These policies apply to and will be implemented in both automated and manual systems. Manual systems used to account for historical artifacts will be automated upon availability of USAMS. USAMS and CSAMS are the approved automated systems of the Army Museum Information System (AMIS). The AMIS is the automated system used for accounting of all Army historical artifacts/equipment. The LookAT is the approved automated system used for accounting of all Army organizational historical artifacts stored at the U.S. Army Historical Clearinghouse. Museums with the USAMS will not continue to update the manual records that duplicate information available from the automated system (such as the DA Form 2609 (Historical Property Catalog).

b. DA Pam 710-2-1 provides manual procedures that implement the accountability policies in this regulation. Museums, activities, collections, or USAR and ARNGUS units, and so on, performing manual accounting/supply operations will use the procedures in this regulation augmented by those in above pamphlet.

c. Museums, museum activities, the Clearinghouse, or units operating under or supported by an approved automated accounting system will use the appropriate automated procedural publication for the system.

1-14. Performance standards

Performance standards are management tools used to assess the effectiveness of the historical artifacts accountability system.

a. Commanders having control of museums, museum activities, historical collections, and the Army Clearinghouse will make sure the performance measures set in this section are understood, consistently applied, and accurately calculated. Commanders will be alert for any emphasis given to a performance standard that decreases or has the potential to degrade the museum's accounting posture or program support.

b. The performance standards in this section are applicable to Army museums, museum activities, historical collections, including those belonging to the USAR and ARNGUS, and the U.S. Army Clearinghouse. They are designed for internal control of the historical artifact accountability system. Commanders/supervisors will monitor the performance of their accountability system and take appropriate action to maintain effective historical artifact accountability.

c. Adequate property controls at Army museums, museum activities, historical collections, and the Army Clearinghouse requires timely and accurate processing of requests, receipts, and updating of accounting records. The commanders should periodically assess the museum's accountability posture against these objectives.

(1) Inventory accuracy. All performance standards (objectives and management levels) will remain consistent with AR 710-2, table 1-1.

(a) Change of AAO or ARO inventories. Conduct inventories per AR 710-2, paragraphs 2-5 and 2-12.

(b) Biennial/cyclic artifact inventory. The AAO will direct a scheduled cyclic inventory of all artifacts identified on the USAMS as prescribed by this regulation.

(c) Inventory of weapons. This inventory is conducted per AR 710-2, paragraph 2-12. Small arms and other applicable sensitive items will be reported and tracked as Refer to AR 710-3 .

(d) Sensitive items inventory (other than weapons). This inventory is conducted per AR 710-2, paragraph 2-12.

(2) Processing time (calendar days).

(a) CMH response time. The number of days it takes the CMH to process a request from the day of receipt to the day the completed action is sent out. The CMH management level is 5 working days.

(b) Receipt time. The number of days it takes the ARO to process an artifact from day of receipt (acceptance of possession) until the item is registered into the USAMS (LookAT) system. The CMH management level is 5 working days. Extensions may be requested in writing from the CMH in cases of large collections received at one time (see para 23e).

(c) Disposition time. The number of days it takes the ARO to process an artifact identified for disposition, from the day that the transaction approval and document number is received to the day that the signed receipt document for the completed action is obtained. The CMH management level is 15 working days.

(3) Location accuracy. This measurement indicates how well the inventory location records compare with the actual physical location of the artifacts. It is expressed as the percentage of all inventory locations surveyed that were correct. The formula for location accuracy is: total number of correct locations divided by the total locations surveyed, times 100, equals the location accuracy. The CMH management level is 95 percent.

(4) Transferring manual data (DA Form 2609) to the USAMS. This indicates how well the organizations are transitioning to, and maintaining the accuracy of, the automated USAMS. Report the total number of historical artifacts maintained in the facility. Report total number of artifacts posted in USAMS and the total number of DA Forms 2609 . The CMH management level is 100 percent. Individuals posting artifact information from manual DA Forms 2609 need to strive for accurate and complete transposition of data.

1-15. Safety Program

a. Policy. Activities conducted within the purview of this regulation will comply with applicable Federal, Army, and installation/support activity safety regulations and directives. Refer to AR 385-10 , The Army Safety Program, for specific program guidance.

b. Scope of duties.

(1) The CMH is responsible for:

(a) Ensuring that a viable safety program exists at museums and Clearinghouses to provide for the protection of personnel and equipment under his or her command in accordance with AR 385-10, Army Safety Program.

(b) Designating an individual at the command level to monitor safety program at CMH activities and advise the CMH of any issues requiring resolution.

(c) Providing resources to establish, or obtain through support agreements, the appropriate level of safety support for CMH museums, activities, historical collections, and the Clearinghouse.

(2) Museum/Activity Directors are responsible for:

(a) Supervising the safety program within the museum/activity to ensure compliance with pertinent regulations and directives.

(b) Formulating and seeking approval of support agreements with the host installation to obtain safety program management expertise when such expertise is not available on the museum/activity staff.

(c) Maintaining a safe and healthful workplace and be responsible for accident prevention within their organization to the same extent they are responsible for production or services.

(3) Installation/Support Activity Commanders are responsible for providing safety oversight for the CMH Museum/Activity when the CMH is a tenant on that installation as outlined in a support agreement.

c. Hazard Communication Program. The CMH activities will establish a Hazard Communication Program per 29 CFR 1910.1200. The program will include, but not be limited to:

(1) Training in hazardous materials as outlined in 29 CFR 1910.1200 and AR 385-10 . This training should be obtained through the servicing safety consultant or organization.

(2) Use of Material Safety Data Sheets in the course of handling hazardous materials.

d. Ergonomics Program. An ergonomics program will be established to ensure that employees minimize undue stresses on the body while performing their duties.

e. Industrial and Production Operations, as applicable to CMH activities, will be monitored and evaluated. Museum Directors and Activity Chiefs will ensure Protective Clothing and/or Equipment (PCE) is utilized where appropriate (hearing protection, eye protection, lifting/back injury prevention, hardhat use, and other safety protection programs as applicable are in place).

f. Employee education and training. CMH employees will receive such safety/risk management training as is required by 29 CFR 1910 and AR 385-10.

g. Safety evaluations. All CMH Museums and activities will be evaluated for safety deficiencies not less than once a year. The evaluation may be conducted by the CMH staff safety representative or by the organization providing safety support to the activity.

h. Employee Reports. Procedures for employee reports of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions will be established IN ACCORDANCE WITH 29 CFR 1960.28 and 29 CFR 1960.46. Reports under these procedures will be completed on DA Form 4755 (Employee Report of Alleged Unsafe or Unhealthful Working Conditions). Such hazards, once documented, will be tracked until resolution and supplemented by abatement plans, as appropriate.

1-16. Hazardous Materials Management Program

a. Army managers are responsible for controlling hazardous materials to minimize hazards to public health and damage to the environment. Army policy regarding the Hazardous Materials Management Program (HMMP) is to establish and maintain a proactive program and to implement procedures to preclude or reduce the use of, and the level of toxicity in, hazardous materials used. The least hazardous material that is still effective for its intended purpose will be used to accomplish the mission.

b. The current Army policy is to comply with Federal, state, and local laws governing the use of and reporting requirements for hazardous materials. All Army managers will fully comply with DOD and DA Policy concerning receipt, storage, issue, and disposition of hazardous materials.

c. Hazardous Materials (HM) are those materials defined in 29 CFR 1910.1200, and/or those substances designated as hazardous in 49 CFR 172.101.

(1) Procurement. Museums, museum activities, historical collections and the Clearinghouse will minimize the procurement of HM. This is because of the potential toxicity to employees or members of the public, as well as the difficulty in storing and disposing of HM when no longer needed.

(2) Storage. The HM will be stored as outlined in governing regulations or directives. When necessary, special storage areas (for example, flammable cabinets or diked facilities) will be utilized. The use of host installation HM storage areas should be pursued because of the cost of constructing and maintaining such facilities.

(3) Use. Use of HM will be minimized. Inventories will be maintained and verified no less frequently than annually. The PCE will be worn as prescribed by applicable regulations and directives. The CMH employees should consult with the servicing Installation Safety Office, Environmental Office, or Industrial Hygienist for assistance with PCE.

(4) Disposal. The HM will be disposed of only through authorized channels. Museums, museum activities, historical collections, and the Clearinghouse will work through the supporting installation/activity and the servicing Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office to properly dispose of HM. Records will be kept of all HM disposal transactions for examination by regulatory agencies, as appropriate.

(5) Incidents. Incidents will be handled and reported as required. Activities should have spill plans or be familiar with the supporting installation's HM spill response plan and act accordingly. Contact the supporting installation/activity environmental office for assistance. Coordination and follow-up with Federal, state, or local officials may be required after an incident occurs.

(6) Employee training. Employees handling HM will be trained IN ACCORDANCE WITH 29 CFR 1200.

d. Radioactive Materials (RM) that will be found in a museum, museum activity, historical collection, and at the Clearinghouse may require a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

(1) The vast majority of Army artifacts requiring licensing are:

(a) Licensed to the AMC by the NRC as commodities, in which case the CMH activity requires a copy of the license to have on file at the activity. Activities should contact their servicing safety office for copies of these licenses.

(b) Require no NRC licensing, but, because of the nature of the RM, are controlled by an internal Army permit system through an Army Radiation Authorization (ARA). In this case, museums, museum activities, historical collections or the Clearinghouse should contact their servicing installation for assistance in obtaining a Department of the Army Radiation Authorization.

(2) Licensed Radioactive Items require a Radiation Protection Officer (RPO) and a radiation protection program. This individual may be a government employee (if an organic safety program) or may be contracted. The museum, museum activity, or historical collection may also utilize the services of the supporting installation/activity RPO if it desires. An RPO must be properly trained in accordance with AR 385-11 and current DA policy.

(3) RM, other than those already in selected artifacts, will not be procured for use by museum, museum activities, historical collections or the Clearinghouse. The museum director will routinely decide whether RM will be brought into the museum. In the case of a highly visible or significant artifact or item, then the matter will be referred to the Chief Curator or designated representative for decision.

(4) RM in storage in museums, museum activities, historical collections or at the Clearinghouse will be monitored as required by the applicable license or permit. Inventories of RM will be verified at least annually or in accordance with CMH guidelines. Routine radiological surveys of the artifacts or areas in which they are stored may be required. If required, surveys will be conducted by the RPO per the conditions of the license or permit. Reports should be maintained by the CMH staff and the supporting installation/activity RPO.

(5) As with HM, RM may only be disposed of by special means. No disposal in ordinary trash is permitted. The museum, museum activity, historical collection or the Clearinghouse director/manager should contact the supporting installation RPO for assistance in disposing of unwanted items containing RM. Alternately, the museum, museum activity, historical collection, or the Clearinghouse director/manager may contact the HQ, AMC Safety Office for guidance.

(6) All RM incidents or spills will be reported immediately to the servicing installation RPO. If an organic safety program, contact the HQ, AMC Safety Office for assistance. The museum, museum activity, historical collection and the Clearinghouse will have a radiation incident response plan or be familiar with the servicing installation's plan. Decontamination of personnel or areas may be required. Follow-up may be required after the incident is closed.

(7) Employees will receive such training as required by AR 385-11 and NRC licenses or ARAB, as appropriate.

e. The CMH Museum Division is responsible for:

(1) Ensuring that all directors and curators of museums, museum activities, collections, and the Army Historical Clearinghouse strictly adhere to Army HMMP policy as defined in AR 200-1 .

(2) Providing guidance to subordinate elements on the identification, receipt, handling, storage, use, disposition, and required reporting of hazardous materials.

(3) Assisting subordinate elements in coordinating efforts with the supply, information management, and environmental activities at the local level to facilitate both the management of hazardous materials and compliance with Federal, state, and local hazardous materials reporting requirements.

(4) Providing necessary information to meet HQDA, Federal, state, and local hazardous materials reporting requirements, such as inventory reporting under the authority of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) (Community Right-To-Know), Title III, and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) (40 Code of Federal Regulation, 700-series.) (See AR 200-1.)

f. Museums, museum activities, collections, and the Army Historical Clearinghouse is responsible for:

(1) Identifying hazardous material received to ensure proper handling, storage, use, and disposal.

(a) Minimize procurement of HM.

(b) During the use of HM, material safety data sheets will be on-hand.

(c) Use special storage areas (for example, flammable storage cabinets) where necessary.

(d) Use protective clothing and equipment when handling HM.

(e) Dispose of HM through the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service.

(2) Establishing procedures to provide personnel with accurate and timely information and requisite training on the handling, storage, and use of hazardous materials in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1200 and other regulations and directives.

(3) Identifying and handle hazardous material residue/waste in compliance with procedures established by the supporting environmental office.

(4) Providing necessary information to respond to hazardous materials reporting requirements, as well as to any other CMH requirement.

Chapter 2
Accountability of Historical Artifacts

Section I
Basic Principles

2-1. Scope

Commanders are urged to preserve the material culture of the United States Army and enhance the military educational and operational value of museums, not only for himself or herself, but for his or her successor as well. A commander who acquires and/or assembles a historical collection acquires an obligation under the law (16 USC 470) to preserve and interpret the collection in the interest of history, the U.S. Army, and the American people. This chapter provides policy on property accountability for Army historical artifacts, art, and the storage of flags, guidons, and associated items. It also assigns responsibility for logistic operations within the Army Museum System.

2-2. Accounting requirements

a. Accountability for historical artifacts and works of art will be maintained per this regulation, AR 710-2 , ch2, AR 735-5 , AR 710-3 , and AR 870-5 , chapter 7.

b. Accountability for appropriated-fund museum property other than historical artifacts and works of art will be maintained as Refer to AR 710-2 and AR 735-5 .

c. All historical artifacts and works of art procured by nonappropriated funds for an Army museum or museum activity will be donated utilizing a DA Form 5572-R (Gift Agreement). A copy of this form is located at the back of this regulation. This form is also available on the Army Electronic Library CD-ROM and the USAPA website. Accountability for museum property, other than historical artifacts, procured by nonappropriated funds will be as prescribed by AR 215-1 .

d. The CMH is accountable for all Army historical property. The Chief will delegate property book responsibility to the Chief Curator to maintain the formal artifact accountability records. The appointment of the Chief Curator as AAO will be in the form of a written memorandum. This appointment memorandum must include the Unit Identification Code (UIC) assigned to the CMH as prescribed by AR 710-2, paragraph 2-5, and AR 735-5, paragraph 2-10.

e. The AAO will appoint, in writing, hand receipt holders known as AROs. The AROs will assume responsibility for all artifacts and works of art identified as part of the Army Historical Collection and subsequently issued to Army museums, museum activities, provisional army museums, and historical collections (including those belonging to the USAR and ARNGUS), and the Army Clearinghouse. The AAO remains accountable for the historical artifacts and items, but the ARO assumes direct responsibility for the care and safekeeping of all the historical artifacts and items assigned to his or her custody. The historical artifacts and items that have not been issued remain the direct responsibility of the AAO. The supervising director/curator of the Army museum, museum activity, provisional army museum, or historical collection will be appointed as the local ARO. The AMC facility manager at the Clearinghouse will be appointed as the local ARO. The AAO must formally approve any exceptions to this policy.

2-3. Accountability of organizational historical artifacts

a. Historical artifacts held in custody by any Army agency, organization, or unit, including those held overseas, are part of the Army Historical Collection and will be accounted for, cataloged, preserved, transferred, and disposed of in accordance with this regulation and AR 710-2, chapter 2. Organizational Historical Artifacts are defined as objects relating to and in the custody of a particular Army organization and subject to the requirements of this regulation (Athletic trophies, plaques, awards, and other items of transitory significance are not generally considered to be historical artifacts within the meaning of this regulation). The Unit Commander will appoint a responsible individual (officer or senior noncommissioned officer) as ARO and provide a copy of the appointment to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058. It is recommended that commanders use their property book officer or supply personnel instead of assigning a separate ARO. If the same ARO is to continue after the Unit Commander changes command, that individual will be reappointed by the new Unit Commander.

b. Organizational historical artifacts for regiments organized under the U.S. Army Regimental System (USARS) will be held in custody at the designated regimental headquarters or, if no headquarters has been established, at the lowest numbered battalion in the Continental United States (CONUS). Artifacts held at the regimental headquarters may be hand-receipted for exhibit to subordinate units of the regiment. Transactions will be documented on a DA Form 2062 , and the subordinate unit will appoint an ARO for accountability purposes.

Section II
Registration and Cataloging

2-4. Receiving Historical artifacts and associated items

a. The policy for receiving, storage, and turn-in of all historical property will be in accordance with this regulation and the basic policy outlined in AR 710-2 and other applicable DOD and DA regulations.

b. The ARO may delegate receipt authority for all historical artifacts received by their museum or museum activity to the appropriate staff members. As a minimum, the following is required:

(1) A copy of the ARO appointment memorandum signed by the AAO or Unit Commander.

(2) A DA Form 1687 (Notice of Delegation of Authority-Receipt for Supplies) authorizing the staff members to receipt for all incoming property on behalf of the ARO.

c. Historical items received will be counted by quantity and compared to the receipt or shipping document. Discrepancies will be documented and reported to the appropriate sender within 5 working days (30 days for Reserve Components) of receipt.

2-5. Acquisition of historical artifacts

a. Unconditional gifts of historical artifacts, without limit as to value, may be accepted by the CMH. A gift is unconditional if it is offered with no limitations on its ownership, expenditure, or disposition. AR 1-100 , AR 215-1 , and this regulation prescribe procedures for acquisitions. Historical artifacts may also be acquired by the CMH, through issue (purchase or designation, including items acquired during combat and military operations other than war), exchange, or by loan. Title documents such as the DA Form 5572-R (Gift Agreement) and the DA Form 5573-R (Loan Agreement) used in transactions are located at the back of this regulation. These forms are also available on the Army Electronic Library CD-ROM and the USAPA website.

b. The AAO at CMH may delegate in writing to the ARO of a certified Army museum authority to acquire historical artifacts through gifts, issue, or loan. This authority may be revoked at any time, if justified in writing.

c. The acquisition of historical artifacts by noncertified museum activities and historical collections (including agencies, organizations, and units) must be approved in writing by the CMH on a case-by-case basis. Requests, to include written justification, will be forwarded to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058 for approval.

d. Each acquisition approved by the CMH will have a document number assigned. The AAO at CMH will maintain a document register for all transactions involving historical artifacts. The AAO will also maintain a supporting document file in document number sequence to establish an audit trail. The AAO will review and validate all open supply transactions on this document register monthly.

e. Army museums, museum activities, and historical collections should normally decline proffered donations when the items offered are outside their scope of collection and mission statement. Donors of such materials will be referred to the appropriate museum or to the CMH to ensure that potential donations can be appropriately used.

f. Archaeological materials and specimens recovered from Army-controlled lands are the property of the U.S. Government.

(1) Archaeological materials and specimens recovered from Army-controlled lands may be displayed and cared for in Army museums. However, no Army museum will be established for the primary purpose of displaying and caring for such materials.

(2) Army museums normally should refuse donations of such materials where the items offered are outside the mission and scope of the museum.

(3) Questions concerning the care, use, and disposition of archaeological materials and specimens should be referred to Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Humphreys Engineer Center, 7701 Telegraph Road, Alexandria, VA 22315-3865.

g. Army museums and museum activities that accept classified material and/or information must ensure that it is properly marked and safeguarded in accordance with AR 380-5 . Historical collections are not authorized to acquire classified material.

h. Procedures for acceptance of unconditional gifts of money by nonappropriated fund instrumentality and private organizations supporting museums are prescribed in chapter 3 of this regulation.

i. Conditional gifts of money or property, including historical artifacts, will be accepted only in accordance with AR 1-100 . A gift is conditional if it is offered with certain specified limitations on its ownership, use, expenditure, or disposition. No gift offered under a condition likely to hinder an agency or activity in the accomplishment of its mission will be recommended for acceptance. Offers of conditional gifts of any type to Army museums, museum activities, or historical collections must go through command channels and the Commander, CMH, to the Commander, U.S. Army Community and Family Support Center (USACFSC) for Secretary of the Army approval.

j. Condemned or obsolete Army equipment/materiel may be designated as historical artifacts. Current equipment items may also be designated as historical artifacts if operations would not be impaired thereby. These designations must be coordinated with TACOM, ATTN: AMSTA-IM-OER, Warren, MI 48397-5000, before accession to the Army Historical Collection. Contaminated equipment (radiological, biological, chemical, and HM) will be decontaminated before adding to USAMS or manual property record. Foreign or captured enemy equipment will be added to the USAMS or manual property record only as authorized by the Chief Curator.

k. AROs of certified Army museums with delegated authority to collect (see subpara 2-7b , below), may acquire historical artifacts with appropriated-funds. The CMH must approve any purchase request of a single item in excess of $5,000 from appropriated-funds. The DD Form 1348-1A (Issue Release/Receipt Document) or other appropriate documentation will be used to document the transfer of artifacts from the supply activity to the museum. Purchased items will be registered in USAMS as an "issue." A copy of the property transaction documentation will be placed in the appropriate historical property jacket file.

l. Certified Army museums, (and museum activities with prior CMH approval) may receive gifts of historical artifacts purchased with nonappropriated or private funds. A DA Form 5572-R , will be used to record the donation transaction of artifacts obtained in this manner.

m. As Refer to AR 710-2 , subparagraph 2-6.l.(1), the CMH Museum Division must approve all requests for historical artifacts under the control of the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO). The CMH will forward the request to TACOM, ATTN: AMSTA-IM-OER, Warren, MI 48397-5000 for further processing and subsequent issue from the DRMO. This requirement also applies to USAR and ARNGUS organizations.

n. As required by the Congress, a dollar value will be applied to all historical artifacts and art in the custody of Army museums, museum activities, historical collections, the Clearinghouse, and the Army Art Central Collection, and will be reported to the CMH annually. The dollar value will reflect the fair market value (FMV) and will be updated on the loss, damage, or destruction of an artifact or its involvement in a donation or exchange transaction.

o. Appraisals of artifacts and art for internal purposes by independent appraiser(s) are authorized but not required. The CMH is responsible for approving the use of a noncertified appraiser.

p. Appraisals of historical artifacts and works of art accepted into the Army Historical Collection (including the Army Art Central Collection) will not be made by museum personnel. Appraisals for tax purposes are the responsibility of the donor in accordance with Internal Revenue Service guidelines.

q. Army art may be acquired for the Army Art Central Collection or by an Army museum through gift, issue (designation, purchase or commission), exchange, or by loan. The acquisition of Army art by a noncertified museum activity or historical collection must be approved in writing by the CMH on a case-by-case basis.

(1) Works of art are a part of the Army Historical Collection and will be registered and cataloged in accordance with paragraph 2-3 above.

(2) The CMH will establish accountability for all works of art produced under the Army Artist Program.

(3) All captured foreign works of art will be forwarded to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058, for review and processing.

2-6. Incoming loans

a. AROs of certified Army museums with delegated authority to collect (see subpara 2-7b below) are authorized to receive historical artifacts and art on loan. The DA Form 5573-R will be used to document all incoming loan transactions. All loan items will be registered and entered as "loaned" in the USAMS.

b. The CMH will be informed of all loans.

(1) Incoming loans may not be extended beyond a period of 5 years. In the case of any existing indefinite loans, attempts will be made to contact the lender and have the loan converted to a donation or to return the material to the owner.

(2) No indefinite loans of historical artifacts or works of art may be accepted or held by an Army museum, museum activity, provisional museum, historical collection, the Clearinghouse, installation, unit, or agency.

(3) Incoming loans to Army museum activities, and historical collections, no matter what the length, must be approved in writing by the CMH. Historical artifacts on loan to any Army agency, organization, or unit, including those overseas, will be accounted for, cataloged, preserved, and returned in accordance with this regulation.

(4) The CMH will not approve loans to an Army museum, museum activity, or historical collection from a private organization or association whose primary purpose is to support that museum, activity, or collection. Items provided to the museum, activity, collection, or Clearinghouse from such organizations will be documented as gifts.

(5) Once the loan is approved and an authorizing document number assigned, a DA Form 5573-R will be completed and signed, along with any additional documentation required by the lending institution or individual. Copies of the signed documentation will be sent to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058.

(6) When the loan expires and the item is returned to the owner, the borrowing museum will send a copy of the signed documentation showing that the item was returned to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058.

2-7. Automated accountability -- The Army Museum Information System

a. The Army Museum Information System (AMIS) is established as the central accounting and management program for Army historical artifacts and art. AMIS is administered by the CMH and consists of the USAMS and the CSAMS.

(1) The USAMS is a computer software application used by Army museums, museum activities, historical collections, and the Clearinghouse to register, catalog, manage the collection, and provide a variety of standard forms and reports.

(2) The CSAMS is a computer software application used by the CMH to centrally manage the Army Historical Collection, the Army Art Central Collection, as well as to provide a variety of reports on the status of the artifacts within these collections.

b. For historical artifacts and works of art, the USAMS record serves as both the museum catalog and the property accounting record. The local ARO will establish accountability for all historical artifacts and art on-hand or on loan. The ARO is responsible for submitting the USAMS record to the CMH for all-historical artifacts and works of art. Items held in temporary custody for the CMH pending transfer or on loan for less than 1 year do not require cataloging; however, accountability is mandatory and a registration number must be assigned to every object.

c. To establish initial accountability, each museum, museum activity, historical collection, and the Clearinghouse will assign a registration number to all-historical artifacts, organizational historical artifacts, and works of art within 24 hours of receipt. A bound register will record all assigned registration numbers with a brief description of the historical artifact or work of art. Record the transaction on the DA Form 2064 (Document Register for Supply Actions). Place a copy of the receipt document in the supporting document file as well as in the historical property jacket file.

Note. All items, historical or not, received as gifts from a non-government source will be recorded.

d. All items will be registered in USAMS within 5 working days of receipt. All items received as gifts from a non-government source will be registered. Extensions may be requested from the CMH in cases of large collections received at one time. The receipt document for all items acquired by direction of the CMH will be sent to the AAO.

e. Each historical artifact or work of art retained will be cataloged in USAMS within 30 days. The USAMS record will be transmitted electronically or sent by disk to the central site computer. The completed USAMS registration and catalog process constitutes the historical property record of all-historical artifacts and art, requiring accuracy, consistency, and thoroughness.

f. All Army museums, museum activities, historical collections, and the Army Clearinghouse will register all historical artifacts and works of art, including items on loan for longer than 1 year, in a complete, accurate, consistent, and thorough fashion.

g. Each object will have a unique CCN assigned by CSAMS in addition to its local registration number.

(1) The CCN will be used for central control and movement tracking.

(2) Each artifact and work of art will be numbered separately with the CCN, and care will be exercised in marking the objects to avoid damage.

2-8. Manual accountability

Museum activities, historical collections, provisional museums, and organizations/units including those belonging to the USAR and ARNGUS without access to the AMIS will--

a. Establish initial accountability by assigning a registration number to all historical artifacts and works of art within 24-hours of receipt. This will be accomplished through the use of a bound register to record all assigned registration numbers with a brief description of the historical artifact or work of art. Record the transaction on the document register ( DA Form 2064 ). Place a copy of the receipt document in the supporting document file as well as in the historical property jacket file.

Note. All items, historical or not, received as gifts from a non-government source will be recorded.

b. Establish and maintain a source-of-acquisition file for all-historical artifacts and art.

c. Catalog historical artifacts and works of art within 30 days on a DA Form 2609 (Historical Property Catalog). This form is available on the Army Electronic Library CD-ROM and USAPA website. The activity will retain the DA Form 2609 as the property record and will send a copy to the CMH. The record will be complete, accurate, consistent, and thorough. See figure 2-1 for a completed DA Form 2609.

d. The CMH will enter the information from the DA Form 2609 into CSAMS and return to the activity a printed copy of the computer record, which will have the unique CCN assigned.

e. The CCN will be affixed to each artifact or work of art. Care will be exercised in marking the objects to avoid damage.

2-9. Additional documentation

a. Additional copies of the historical property record or DA Form 2609 are authorized to establish reference files as required.

b. A historical property jacket file will be maintained for each artifact. Included in the property jacket will be all supporting documentation including, title and transfer documents, correspondence, photographs, and research material as appropriate. Every effort will be made to document artifacts that do not have adequate documentation concerning provenance or ownership.

c. A photograph or digital image of all-historical artifacts will be taken, both to identify the object properly in case of loss or theft and to record its description and condition. Photographs may be a high quality, black and white print, color print, color slide, photograph copy, or digital image. Prints will be stored in the historical property jacket file. Slides and digital images will be appropriately stored and accessible. Photographic negatives will be stored separately, and the negative number will be recorded in the catalog portion of the USAMS or on the DA Form 2609.

d. The museum will be able to demonstrate the procedures for the receipt, identification, assessment, registration, cataloging, marking, and storage of historical artifacts. The museum will have an area for segregating noncataloged artifacts and sufficient materials on hand for proper marking and storage.

e. A copy of the CMH approval/authorization for acquiring a historical artifact by noncertified activities, collections, and provisional army museums will be placed in the property jacket file.

f. The museums will maintain the source of acquisition file and the DA Form 2609 catalog record cards used before the implementation of USAMS as a permanent record. The DA Forms 2609 will be arranged in such a manner that individual catalog cards are easily accessible.

g. Each ARO will maintain a DA Form 2064 or appropriate equivalent, to record all transactions and suspense's per AR 710-2 , paragraph 2-6. The ARO will maintain a supporting document file in document number sequence for all transactions. The supporting document file will include copies of all transaction documents, as well as a copy of the approval document from the CMH. The requirement for a supporting document file does not preclude the necessity of placing a copy of all pertinent supporting documents in the appropriate historical property jacket file.

2-10. Temporary transfers and outgoing loans

a. Historical artifacts and works of art may be temporarily transferred between Army-controlled museums, activities, historical collections, and the Clearinghouse if both parties agree and the CMH approves.

(1) A request for temporary transfer along with justification will be sent in writing to the ARO of the historical artifact or art in question.

(2) The ARO will endorse the request with a recommendation in writing to the CMH. Included in the endorsement will be a statement concerning the duration of the temporary transfer and any special conditions required.

(3) If the CMH approves the temporary transfer, an authorizing document number will be issued. Both the lending ARO and the requesting ARO will be notified.

(4) The DA Form 2062 (Hand Receipt/Annex Number), will be used to document the temporary transfer. A copy of the signed document will be forwarded to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058.

(5) Temporary transfers may not be extended beyond a period of 4 years. Transfers that extend beyond that period will be considered permanent. The CMH will be notified when the items are returned.

b. Historical artifacts and works of art may be loaned to Federal agencies outside the Department of the Army if both parties agree and the CMH approves in writing. Loans will not exceed 2 years; extendable to 4 years, when approved by the AAO, as Refer to AR 700-131 , table 2-1.

(1) A request for loan along with justification will be sent in writing to the ARO of the historical artifact or art in question.

(2) The ARO will endorse the request with a recommendation in writing to the CMH. Included in the endorsement will be a statement concerning the duration of the loan and any special conditions required. Materiel requiring special physical security will be identified as such and documented on the request by the ARO.

(3) If the request is approved, the CMH will issue an authorizing document number. Both the lending ARO and the requesting agency will be notified.

(4) The DA Form 5575-R (Loan Agreement (Outgoing)), the DA Form 4881-R (Agreement for the Loan of US Army Materiel) (with applicable attachments), and the DD Form 1348-1A, will be used to document the loan transaction. A copy of the signed documents will be forwarded to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058.

(5) Loans to other Federal agencies may not be extended beyond a period of 4 years. The CMH will be notified by the lending ARO when the loan expires and the items are returned.

c. Loans of historical artifacts to the Smithsonian Institution will be in accordance with AR 700-131, chapter 2.

d. Historical artifacts and works of art may be loaned to non-government museums and similar activities if both parties agree and the CMH, or ASA (IL&E) as appropriate, approves in writing.

(1) A request for loan will be sent in writing to the ARO of the historical artifact or work of art in question. In accordance with Federal statute (10 USC 2572), books, manuscripts, works of art, historical artifacts, drawings, plans, models, and condemned or obsolete combat materiel, may be loaned to a municipal corporation, a soldier's monument association, a museum, historical society, or historical institution of a state or foreign nation, an incorporated museum that is operated and maintained for educational purposes and the charter of which denies it the right to operate for profit, a post of the VFW, the American Legion, or a unit of any other recognized war veterans' association (foreign or domestic), or a post of the Sons of Veterans Reserve.

(2) AR 700-131 , chapter 2, provides information on surety bond requirements.

(3) Before approval of the loan, it must be determined:

(a) That the proposed use of the item(s) is in the public interest and advantageous to the U.S. Army.

(b) The artifacts or art will be available for public view or research.

(c) The Army will retain accountability for the objects and a reasonable degree of supervision. Items on loan will be inventoried at least annually during the loan period, not to exceed 4 years, to ensure the property is properly maintained, protected, and used for the requested and approved purpose.

(d) The objects will be provided the same degree of security as in an Army museum and as required by AR 190-51 , and will be maintained in proper museum conditions as prescribed by this regulation.

(e) The United States may not incur any expense in connection with the loan. Requestor will agree to pay the cost of both receipt and return.

(f) All loaned items remain the property of the Army (Army Historical Collection) and are accountable as such. These items are not subject to alteration or demilitarization without the expressed written consent of the CMH.

(4) The requestor/borrower must meet the recipient authorization criteria outlined in AR 700-131, chapters 2 and 6, before a loan can be approved and executed.

(5) The ARO will endorse the request in writing to the CMH.

(6) If approved, the CMH will issue an authorizing document number.

(7) A DA Form 5575-R , a DA Form 5574-R (Assurance of Compliance), the DA Form 4881-R (with applicable attachments), and the DD Form 1348-1A will be used to document the loan transaction. A copy of the signed documents will be forwarded to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058. DA Forms 5575-R and 5574-R are located in the back of this book. These forms are also available on the Army Electronic Library CD-ROM and the USAPA website.

(8) Items on loan must be inventoried annually. Loans will not be extended beyond the 4-year timeframe. The CMH will be notified of the return of the items.

2-11. Donations

a. The CMH may conduct donations of historical property, other than arms, combat/tactical vehicles, vessels, and aircraft in accordance with the procedures in AR 700-131 . The CMH will maintain accountability for the items and ensure annual reporting.

b. Historical arms, combat/tactical vehicles, vessels, and aircraft that CMH elects to donate must be deaccessed and returned to the appropriate item manager with instructions concerning the donation. The recipient of the donation must be qualified and the transaction completed as Refer to AR 700-131.

2-12. Storage of historical artifacts and associated items

a. The policy for storage of all historical property will be in accordance with this regulation and the basic policy outlined in AR 710-2 , TM 743-200-1, and other applicable DOD and DA regulations.

b. The museum artifact storage area will be used only to store historical artifacts. A separate room, or area within a large storage facility will be designated for this purpose.

c. Noncataloged objects will be stored apart from cataloged artifacts. A separate room, or area within a large storage facility will be designated for this purpose.

d. A separate storage area will be maintained for contaminated artifacts. All items must be inspected for infestation before placed in storage.

e. Unaccompanied access to artifact storage areas will be limited to authorized personnel, and an access roster will be maintained.

f. The artifact storage areas will be large enough to permit storage, without crowding, of objects not currently being exhibited.

g. The artifact storage areas will be large enough to permit growth of the collection and return of materiel from loan or exhibit.

h. Enough museum-quality cabinets, racks, shelves, etc., will be available to adequately store the artifacts.

i. The artifact storage areas will be large enough to permit easy access to cabinets, racks, and shelves, with aisles wide enough for easy maneuvering of artifacts and storage units.

j. All historical artifacts will be stored logically in accordance with good conservation practice and to facilitate retrieval and research.

(1) Storage area will be regularly cleaned without the use of materials or techniques that would cause harm to the artifacts.

(2) Artifacts will be stored in individual containers of inert or acid-free material, or in such a way as to prevent them from touching each other.

(3) Artifacts will be stored in such a way as to prevent damage from abrasion or movement.

(4) Large, two-dimensional textiles, such as flags or tents, will be stored flat or properly rolled on cylindrical supports of museum-safe material and suspended horizontally.

(5) Garments will be hung on padded hangers of a museum-safe material or laid flat with proper support padding as appropriate for their age or condition.

(6) All weapons will be stored in racks or in containers of correct size with padding and support to prevent damage. Weapons will be easily accessible for inventory and removal.

(7) In accordance with AR 190-11 , paragraph 4-13, 19th century or older firearms not requiring metallic cartridges are excluded from the physical security requirements for storage of weapons.

(8) Shelving and cabinets will be elevated to minimize damage in case of flooding.

(9) Boxes containing artifacts will not be overcrowded, and items will be padded with inert material to prevent damage through mishandling.

(10) Boxes will be shelved so that their contents are supported, and the boxes will not be crushed.

2-13. Special inventory and security requirements for weapons and sensitive items

a. All commanders responsible for installations or activities having museums, museum activities, provisional museums, historical collections, and the Clearinghouse are required to ensure all records accounting for sensitive items are complete and accurate. Inventories, accountability, and safeguarding of all weapons and sensitive items will be in accordance with this regulation and AR 710-2, AR 190-11 , and AR 190-51 .

b. Weapons (small arms) stored in banded or sealed containers will be inventoried annually. Containers should be inspected for tampering or damage quarterly. If the container is found damaged or tampered with, perform an immediate inventory. If any weapons are missing, contact the local Provost Marshal for further investigation.

c. Weapons not stored in banded or sealed containers will be counted weekly and a serial or catalog number inventory conducted quarterly. A disinterested officer will conduct a semiannual inventory of all weapons except those in banded or sealed containers. The results of these inventories will be retained for 1 year.

d. Sensitive items will be inventoried annually. The results of these inventories will be retained for 1 year. Sensitive items are defined as follows:

(1) Controlled Cryptographic Items (CCI) identified by Controlled Inventory Item Code (CIIC) 9.

(2) Items identified by CIIC 1-6, 8, $, Q, R, or Y (night vision devices).

(3) Items identified by CIIC $ will have 100 percent causative research conducted for any inventory discrepancies.

e. Special security requirements for the display and storage of weapons will be in accordance with AR 190-11 , paragraph 4-13 and AR 190-51 , appendix B.

2-14. Inventories and adjustments

a. The purpose of a 100 percent inventory is to determine the condition and quantity of items by physical inspection and count. An important part of the inventory is the location survey. The purpose of the location survey is to determine if the location and condition of the materiel is correctly identified on the accountable record and if not, causative research must be performed as prescribed by AR 735-5 .

b. All museums, museum activities, historical collections, and the Clearinghouse, as well as the Army Art Central Collection will schedule and conduct a cyclic (5 percent monthly) biennial inventory of their artifacts and art and resolve discrepancies as they are found. Results of the inventory will be recorded in the USAMS (or the LookAT automated accounting systems in the case of the Clearinghouse), within 3 workdays after completion of the inventory. The establishing of accountability for items found without documentation will be in accordance with AR 710-2 .

c. In every odd-numbered calendar year, a memorandum summarizing the result of the biennial inventory, together with a DA Form 4697 (Department of Army Report of Survey), if necessary, explaining any shortages or damages, will be sent to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058.

d. Organizations or agencies with historical artifacts or works of art on loan from the Army Historical Collection or the Army Art Central Collection will inventory and report the results in accordance with the loan agreement. The ARO will notify each organization having Army historical artifacts or works of art on loan from their area of responsibility to accomplish this requirement.

e. Upon notification of the pending departure of the ARO having responsibility for the historical artifacts and works of art, a responsible individual will be designated in writing by the CMH AAO per AR 735-5 , to be the custodian for the historical artifacts and art until a new permanent ARO arrives.

(1) The departing ARO will complete a joint, 100 percent inventory with the assigned custodian before departure. The museum's supervisor will ensure that this inventory is completed before the departing ARO is allowed to clear the installation. When the museum's supervisor is the ARO, the CMH AAO will coordinate this inventory before the ARO's departure.

(2) In the interim, continuous accountability will be maintained on historical artifacts and works of art, and a joint 100 percent, inventory will be conducted each time there is a change in custodian.

(3) When the new ARO arrives, the assigned custodian will conduct a joint, 100 percent inventory of the collection.

(4) After a joint inventory is completed, send a statement that the inventory was completed, together with a DA Form 4697 explaining any shortages or damages, to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058.

f. Account for loss, damage, or destruction of appropriated-fund property per AR 735-5 . Historical artifacts and art are appropriated-fund property. Upon discovering loss, damage, or destruction of historical items or art, the ARO, custodian, or other responsible person will expeditiously initiate a DA Form 4697 (Department of the Army Report of Survey), and forward it through command channels to the CMH. Reports of Survey (RS) initiated by the Clearinghouse staff will be submitted through the Commander, ANAD, to the CMH as prescribed in the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA).

g. The ARO will ensure the completion of an annual inventory of all small arms, as defined in the AR 710-2 Glossary, before the annual reconciliation with the Department of Defense Small Arms Serialization Program (DODSASP). An annual inventory of all other sensitive items to include CCI must occur before the scheduled reconciliation. Loss or theft of firearms as well as their recovery will be reported in accordance with AR 190-11 and AR 735-5, chapter 13. When the loss, damage, or destruction involves a sensitive item, an AR 15-6 investigation is mandatory; however, do not use the AR 15-6 investigation document as the authority to adjust the USAMS record. The RS is the authorized adjustment document used when dropping accountability for the historical item from the automated USAMS accounting record. As Refer to AR 735-5, an investigation by a survey officer is not necessary when an AR 15-6 investigation is completed.

h. Loss, damage, or destruction of historical artifacts or art loaned or donated by a private individual or organization will be handled in the same manner as appropriated-fund property.

i. The CMH may delegate in writing the appointing authority and approving authority for RSs. The CMH may delegate in writing the appointing authority for an RS involving any museum system property to the appropriate commander. The Deputy Commander of CMH will serve as the approving authority. When the appointment of a survey officer is required, the appropriate commander, as the designated appointing authority, will assign a disinterested individual from the command as the survey officer.

2-15. Asset reporting

a. The AAO and Commanders having responsibility for Army museums, museum activities, historical collections, or organizational historical artifacts will monitor the performance and compliance of all subordinate activities under their command for asset reporting per AR 710-2 and AR 710-3 .

b. All historical weapons will be reported under DODSASP per AR 710-3. The purpose of DODSASP is to maintain continuous visibility over small arms by serial number from procurement through demilitarization and disposal. It is designed to give investigative agencies, within 72 hours, the identification of the last Army activity accountable for a specific serial-numbered small arm.

c. The ARO will request a serial number for all historic weapons that do not have a serial number from the Logistics Support Activity (LOGSA). On assignment of the serial number, append the serial number to the historical weapon. Do not permanently inscribe the number on the weapon. Use a secure but removable tag when attaching the serial number to the weapon (recommend using a metal tag with a nylon tie). Record the serial number in the catalog record in the USAMS or if manual, the DA Form 2609 .

2-16. Excess property and disposition of historical artifacts

a. Army museums, museum activities, historical collections, and the clearinghouse will periodically review their collections for items that are excess to their needs because of condition, duplication, or not being mission related. A written request for the disposition of such items will be sent to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MDC, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058. The request must include the following information:

(1) Catalog Number and/or CCN.

(2) Complete nomenclature of object including country of manufacture, date of manufacture, and any significant association.

(3) Condition and completeness of object.

(4) Reason for disposition.

b. In certain cases, museums may be requested to retain items in storage for the CMH until an appropriate transfer can be made. The holding of reported excess or nonmission-related historical property for the CMH will not be reflected in a certification inspection. Such items will be maintained to the same standards as the other artifacts in the museum.

c. Nonhistorical objects that have been inadvertently cataloged will also be reported to the CMH for removal from the Army Historical Collection. Custodial accountability remains with the ARO until transferred to an appropriate accountable property book officer/representative. Care must be taken to ensure that the object is indeed not an original artifact.

d. Museum support items, including reproductions, in excess to the needs of a museum or historical collection may be reported to CMH to make such items available to other museums, activities, historical collections, and the Clearinghouse. Excess support items will be reported separately from excess historical artifacts.

e. The local ARO is relieved from accounting for historical property when it is formally transferred to another museum, museum activity, historical collection, the Army Historical Clearinghouse, or upon deaccession and transfer to a museum, agency, or activity outside the Department of the Army. The local ARO will ensure that asset reporting requirements comply with AR 710-2, paragraph 2-9, and AR 710-3 .

f. In each case, the disposition of historical artifacts will be as directed by the AAO. An authorizing document number will be provided for each disposition transaction.

g. Historical property will not be considered excess under the same principles as cited in AR 710-2 . Only after a historical item has been deaccessioned may it be declared as excess and disposed of in accordance with AR 710-2.

h. Disposal of artifacts containing radioactive or hazardous materials will be handled in accordance with current guidance.

2-17. Disposition of organizational historical artifacts, flags, colors, and associated items

a. On inactivation of a unit having custody of organizational historical artifacts, the appointed ARO will request, in writing, disposition instructions from the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058.

b. Army agencies, organizations, and units are authorized to store organizational historical artifacts at the CMH Clearinghouse under the following conditions:

(1) During periods of inactivation;

(2) While at zero strength;

(3) While in a combat zone;

(4) When unable to provide proper care and protection.

c. The commander of an organization desiring to store historical artifacts is responsible for:

(1) Submitting a request in writing to the CMH, explaining the circumstances.

(2) Submitting requests immediately on either notification of inactivation or mobilization for a combat or military operations other than war.

(3) Ensuring that containers holding organizational historical property are clearly marked on the outside with the unit's designation and contain a packing list on both the inside and the outside of the container.

(4) Paying for the cost of shipping and transportation.

d. The CMH will respond with an authorizing document number and specific disposition instructions.

e. Items not meeting the criteria for historical artifacts as defined by this regulation will not be stored with historically significant artifacts. (See definition for "historical artifact" in glossary .) Disposition of the following categories will be in accordance with the regulations indicated:

(1) Unit fund property ( AR 215-1 ).

(2) Organizational history files, historical records, and similar documents (DA Pam 25-400-2 and AR 870-5 ).

f. Flags, colors, guidons, streamers, and associated material will be stored as follows:

(1) United States flags, distinguishing flags, streamers, organizational colors, companion-sized U.S. flags, guidons, and associated material from inactivating MTOE units will be reported (not sent) to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058, for disposition instructions. Items must be reported at least 90 days in advance of inactivation with a copy of the inactivating order included.

(2) The CMH will provide disposition instructions to the organization.

(a) Flags, colors, guidons, streamers, and associated material brought into Federal service by an Army National Guard unit of a State may be returned to that state at the request of the governor.

(b) Flags, colors, guidons, streamers, and associated material may, at the request of the governor, be returned to the state that furnished the majority of the men to the unit, in cases of interstate organizations.

(3) The title to colors, standards, and guidons of Army organizations remains with the United States per 10 USC 4565. Therefore:

(a) The donation of colors, standards, and guidons is prohibited.

(b) The donation of national flags, foreign flags, pennants, and streamers may only be for use that will not bring reproach upon the United States Army.

(4) Flags, colors, guidons, streamers, and associated items retained for historical purposes will be designated as historical property and will be accounted for in accordance with this regulation.

(5) Commanders of reactivated units authorized to receive flags, colors, and guidons previously used by their organization may request them from the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058.

(6) Certified Army museums may request from the CMH historic flags, colors, guidons, and associated materials for public exhibition.

(7) The CMH may disapprove any request for items if a review indicates that the items will not be preserved or accounted for, or that the use of the items would not be in the best interest of the Army.

g. Organizations wishing to recover their historical artifacts from storage may submit a request to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058.

h. All items sent to the Army Historical Clearinghouse for storage must be free of chemical, radiological, and hazardous materials. The CMH Chief Curator must approve any request to store historical objects containing any of the above materials before the objects being shipped to the Army Historical Clearinghouse.

i. Before the approved shipment of any items containing radiological/hazardous materials, the sending unit will coordinate all moves with the intended receiving organization. This prior coordination will allow sufficient time for notification of appropriate organization and/or installation agencies to adequately prepare for the receipt and storage of any items containing radiological/hazardous materials. Commanders/ installations/units or other entities sending any items containing radiological/hazardous materials without written approval will be responsible for all fines, return transportation costs, and any other expenses incurred by the CMH or the receiving organization and/or Installation Commander that results from an unauthorized shipment.

j. Live ammunition will not be sent to any museum, museum activity, historical collection, or the Army Historical Clearinghouse, without prior approval by the CMH Chief Curator and prior coordination with the ARO when applicable. All explosive devices will be rendered inert before shipment and will be marked as such, but in a way that will not detract from their historical/display value.

2-18. Shipping of historical artifacts

a. Historical artifacts and works of art to be shipped commercially or by mail and will be packed to preclude any damage. Methods of packing are described in the TM 38-230 series. The same level of care will be taken to protect artifacts and art in transportation as are used in their storage, including the use of museum safe materials. Questions concerning the proper packing of historical artifacts or art may be referred directly to the CMH.

b. Funding of commercial transportation within CONUS will be per AR 37-7 .

c. Historical artifacts and works of art will be sent by registered mail (return receipt requested) when size and weight meet commercial carrier requirements and when it is economically advantageous. For this purpose, splitting of shipments should be considered. Insured mail may be used when the custodian determines that the value of the artifact or art warrants such service.

d. In the case of larger items, the receiving institution is normally responsible for the cost of shipment except in cases of base closure or realignment, unit inactivation or redesignation, or when items are sent to the Army Historical Clearinghouse. In such cases, cost of shipping and transportation will be borne by the sending organization.

e. The ARO is responsible for ensuring that all historical and organizational historical property shipped from their museum, museum activity, historical collection, or the Clearinghouse is properly identified and clearly marked/tagged with the assigned CCN. The ARO will also ensure that prior approval from the Chief Curator is obtained before shipment of any item(s). This approval will be in writing and include a document number assigned by the AAO. The ARO will provide a copy of the written approval, as part of the shipment, to the receiving museum or organization/activity.

f. Shipments of artifacts containing HM or RM will be in accordance with current regulations and directives.

2-19. Ordering/Contracting Officer

As prescribed by the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), the supporting contracting officer may appoint a unit/activity member as an ordering/contracting officer. The ordering/contracting officer acts as an agent for the supporting contracting officer to make authorized local purchase (LPs) under specific charter indicating the scope of authority. Process receipts as prescribed by this regulation and AR 710-2, paragraph 2-8.



Figure 2-1. Sample DA Form 2609 (Historical Property Catalog)


Chapter 3
Museums, Museum Activities, and Historical Collections

3-1. General

a. Commanders of installations, organizations, or agencies are authorized to establish museums or historical collections.

b. All museums and historical collections must be officially recognized/approved by the CMH.

c. The nature of the artifacts or artwork acquired will be based on a CMH-approved mission statement and collections content plan.

d. Museums will be placed within the command, where they will be most effective as training, educational, and research institutions.

3-2. Objective

a. Army museums, museum activities, and historical collections preserve a portion of the material culture of the United States in accordance with Federal law. These artifacts and works of art belong to the people of the United States, and are used to interpret the Army's history for the purpose of military training, education, and research. As a side benefit, Army museums foster morale and esprit de corps, and contribute to informing the American people about the Army's service to the nation.

b. The staff members (whether paid or volunteer) of every Army museum, museum activity, and historical collection have a responsibility to care, preserve/conserve, secure, account for, and properly use the historical artifacts and works of art that fall within their custody.

3-3. Museum activity

a. A museum activity is defined as an organization performing all the functions of a museum without having met the minimum professional standards of a certified Army museum.

b. A museum activity must strive to meet all the requirements of this regulation. Special emphasis will be given to the care and accountability of the artifacts in its custody. However:

(1) A museum activity will not acquire historical artifacts without written approval of the CMH on a case-by-case basis. Acquisition of artifacts is prohibited until the activity meets minimal staffing and storage requirements for handling incoming objects.

(2) Historical artifacts will not be loaned or transferred to a museum activity without the written approval of the CMH.

c. Museum activities will periodically receive CMH inspections and will continue to strive to achieve the professional standards for certification as detailed in its inspection reports. Consistent failure will result in the activity being redesignated as a historical collection or being closed.

3-4. Historical collection

a. A historical collection is defined as:

(1) A collection of artifacts displayed in a regimental room, trophy room, visitor's center, hall of fame, exhibit area, or other type of display (including a former Army museum), not recognized by the Department of the Army as a museum or museum activity.

(2) A collection of historical artifacts including archaeological artifacts secured, preserved, accounted for, and stored at an installation or facility.

(3) A collection of historical artifacts in an officer's club, noncommissioned officers club, community club, chapel, lobby, or headquarters building.

(4) A collection of artifacts such as tanks, artillery, vehicles, or other items displayed in front of buildings, on the parade ground, at the air field, in parks, or at other locations around the installation.

b. Law requires the preservation of historical artifacts held by the Army, therefore:

(1) A historical collection must conform to those requirements in this regulation pertaining to the registration, cataloging, accountability, security, and preservation/conservation of historical artifacts.

(2) The CMH will provide and schedule staff assistance visits, upon request. Commanders responsible for historical collections should seek advice and assistance from local museums and from the CMH to improve the control and accountability of the artifacts.

(3) The acquisition of artifacts by a historical collection is prohibited without written approval of the CMH.

(4) Historical artifacts will not be loaned or transferred to a historical collection without the written approval of the CMH.

(5) Commanders, including those in overseas commands, may not loan, donate, or dispose of a historic artifact without the written approval of the CMH.

c. Commanders will provide the same type of support to historical collections as that authorized to Army museums in regard to the preservation and accountability of the artifacts.

d. Historical collections are not required to be open to the public on a regular basis.

3-5. Establishment of museums

a. Installations, organizations, or agencies desiring to establish a museum must receive approval in writing from the commander under whom the museum will fall.

b. Not later than 30 days from the date of the commander's approval for the establishment of the museum, the CMH will be furnished the following information through command channels:

(1) The commander's letter of approval.

(2) The name of the museum.

(3) The sponsoring agency.

(4) The installation at which the museum will be located.

(5) The purpose for the museum.

(6) The mission of the museum.

(7) The size, scope, and composition of the collection on hand or to be developed.

(8) The nature and extent of interest or support that is pledged or that can be reasonably expected from non-military agencies or organizations.

(9) The type, size, and location of the building, room, or areas to be used for the museum, including an estimate of the amount of space to be used for exhibitions, artifact storage, and administration, as well as the environmental and physical security factors that could effect the preservation of the artifacts.

(10) A description of civilian and military staff, to include the grade and series of the director/curator and the number and grades of all other persons assigned or scheduled to perform museum work.

(11) The name, grade, and position title of the individual designated to have supervisory oversight of the museum.

(12) The average number of hours to be worked per day by personnel assigned or detailed to the museum.

(13) The annual operating budget, including sources of financial support for example, current appropriated-funds budget information, and any available nonappropriated or association funding.

(14) The regularly scheduled visiting hours.

(15) An estimated date of the official opening.

(16) Any technical assistance desired by the museum staff.

c. Based on the above information, the CMH will review the request. Possible actions are:

(1) The CMH may tentatively designate the proposed museum as a "provisional Army museum," with an identifier code. The operation must meet the minimum standards of a certified Army museum within 3 years.

(2) The CMH may inform the commander concerned that the proposed museum does not warrant designation as an Army museum and will note the deficiencies. The proposed museum may be designated as a historical collection until the deficiencies are corrected.

(3) The request may be disapproved.

3-6. Administration

a. Each museum will have the following written documents/records to administer its operations properly. All are subject to approval and inspection by the CMH, and are to be made available to the certification team:

(1) Museum Master Plan to include:

(a) Mission statement approved by the CMH.

(b) Documentary evidence of the museum as an activity of the command, its organizational placement, and its official recognition by the U.S. Army (see para 3-5 ).

(c) Delegation of authority memorandum from CMH to acquire artifacts.

(d) Story line.

(e) Scope-of-collections statement.

(f) Collections content plan.

(g) Conservation/preservation plan and schedule.

(h) Exhibit plan.

(i) Five-year museum development plan.

(j) Table of distribution and allowances (TDA).

(k) Job descriptions.

(l) Vitae of each staff member.

(m) Staff development plan.

(2) Master plan annexes, including, but not limited to:

(a) The museum's last manpower assessment.

(b) Budget (both previous and current).

(c) Disaster plan.

(d) Educational programs.

(e) Volunteer program.

(f) Any other appropriate documents.

(3) Physical security records, including:

(a) Weapons inventories (quarterly and biannually).

(b) Results of last physical security inspections.

(c) Physical security plan.

(d) Results of last biennial inventory of historical artifacts other than weapons.

(e) A copy of memorandum sent to the CMH acknowledging accomplishment of last inventory.

(f) Supporting document files reflecting all transactions involving historical artifacts.

(g) DA Form 2064 , or approved automated equivalent.

(4) Copies of CMH museum memos and policy letters with evidence of review by all museum staff members.

(5) Any outstanding engineer work orders available for review, with expected completion dates.

(6) Visitation records based upon turnstile, electronic, or other accurate counting means.

b. Each museum will have the Universal Site Artifact Management System (USAMS) in operational use, supported by:

(1) Historical property jackets.

(2) Artifact photo image and photo negative files.

3-7. Museum support articles

a. Army museums are authorized to acquire museum support articles, such as exhibit cases, exhibit furniture, display panels, etc., as required to fulfill their mission. Historical collections are authorized such support items such as acid-free boxes, museum-quality storage cabinets, shelves and bins, acid-free tissue, and so on, as required for the protection of the historical artifacts on hand.

b. Accountability for museum support articles will be maintained in accordance with AR 710-2 and AR 735-5 . Items, to include reproductions, will be treated as furniture. Army museums and historical collections will maintain a separate account for museum support articles. Support articles, other than expendable items, will be inventoried annually.

c. When museum support articles are no longer required, consideration should be given to offering such items to other Army museums or historical collections (see subpara 2-14f ).

d. Museums, museum activities, and historical collections are allowed to use reproductions or recreations of original objects for interpretation.

(1) A reproduction will accurately portray the object it is meant to represent, using materials and construction techniques that approximate the original.

(2) Reproductions will be indelibly marked to distinguish them from original artifacts. This marking will consist of the word "REPRO/U.S. Government Property," followed by the date of manufacture. The marking will be placed so as not to diminish the exhibit value of the item.

(3) Reproductions used in exhibits will be identified as such to avoid misrepresentation.

e. Original artifacts may not be used as "museum props" or support articles.

3-8. Staffing

a. Staffing of Army museums and historical collections will be in accordance with Department of the Army personnel utilization policies. The CMH is the proponent for GS-1010, 1015, and 1016 series personnel.

b. Manpower requirements for Army museums and historical collections are substantiated by current manpower management policies in AR 570-4

c. Commanders will provide civilian personnel positions for Army museums sufficient to meet mission requirements, which include but are not limited to museum management, research, and curation of artifacts. All curatorial and museum technician (GS-1015 and 1016) positions must meet the requirements of the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) standards and must be filled with trained professionals. Civilian positions will be evaluated in accordance with the Army Civilian Training, Education, and Development (ACTEDS) Plan.

d. Installation commanders are not authorized to contract out those aspects of museum operations, involving historical collections including management, historical research, and curatorial functions. Contract support may be used to provide conservation or restoration of the artifacts, physical security, exhibit production, and training, education and outreach programs.

e. Installation commanders will obtain a recommendation from the Chief Curator before selecting a museum director or supervisory curator. The majority of any panel membership created for the purpose of reviewing the qualifications of applicants for such positions will be from the GS-1015 classification series.

f. At a minimum, a certified museum will be staffed at not less than 75 percent of its recognized required strength for professional (GS-1015, GS-1016, and GS-1010) positions. Military or contract personnel may be used in museums, but not in place of professional civilian positions.

g. The museum must be staffed at a level that allows it to meet its mission demands which include, but are not limited to, administration, physical security, accountability of the artifacts, protection of the artifacts, exhibit production, and training, education, and outreach programs. Museum activities will not have less than two professional staff members. Historical collections will be staffed at a level that will at a minimum ensure proper administration, accountability, and protection of the artifacts.

h. The museum staff may include, but is not limited to:

(1) A museum director/curator ( GS-1015), who is a civilian occupying a supervisory position in a professional grade level appropriate to the level of the museum activity.

(2) A museum curator (GS-1015), who is a civilian assistant employed full time on curatorial, educational, and other museum-related matters.

(3) A museum specialist or technician ( GS-1016), who is a civilian employed full time on the accountability and care of the museum collection and other museum-related matters.

(4) An exhibit specialist ( GS-1010), who is a civilian employed full time on the planning, fabrication, and maintenance of museum exhibits.

(5) A museum specialist (conservator) (GS-1016), who is a civilian employed full time on the preservation, conservation, and restoration of historical artifacts within the museum's collection.

(6) A museum aide (GS-1016) (military or civilian equivalent) to provide adequate administrative, data entry, and typing support and assistance with other museum-related matters. (This is an entry-level position.)

i. All personnel, civilian and military, assigned or detailed to the museum or historical collection must possess qualities of unquestionable honesty, responsibility, and emotional stability and will adhere to professional ethics (see app F ).

j. The museum director has direct and ready access to the military or civilian person designated by the command to provide staff supervision of the museum, as well as to the president of the museum association, foundation, council, or similar type organization, if such exists.

(1) The director plans museum activities in support of the commander's mission.

(2) The director is included in all pertinent discussions of museum matters within the command.

(3) The director is authorized direct contact with the CMH on all matters of a professional or technical nature that affect the museum.

k. The museum director operates responsibly within general guidelines. As the principal adviser to the commander, he or she is consulted on all matters relating to the professional operation of the museum, including recommendations on matters of museum policy. The museum director is responsible to the CMH for the acquisition, disposition, and use of property in the collection. The museum director must inspect and account for all historical artifacts, to include those in historical displays on the installation, if not otherwise accounted for.

l. When appropriate, the museum director is an ex-officio member of the installation or command historical committee and/or society, if such exists.

m. The director also serves in an advisory capacity to the installation commander on preserving monuments, historic structures, and sites (see AR 420-40).

n. The museum director and the other members of the museum staff are strongly encouraged to advance their professional career development through membership and participation in appropriate professional organizations and attendance at professional conferences, seminars, workshops, and museum/historical training. It is highly encouraged that Army Museum Career Program careerists receive training in Army wholesale and retail logistics during their career progression.

3-9. Required support of museums

a. Commanders will support Army museums. Level of support will depend on ownership of the facility, this regulation and any memorandums of understanding and/or memorandums of agreement (MOUs/MOAs) between the installation and tenant organizations. As a public-use facility, the museum should receive priority consideration for support. This support will include, but is not limited to, the following:

(1) Construction, use, renovation, additions, repair, and maintenance of buildings in compliance with Installation Design Guide.

(2) Upkeep of the grounds.

(3) Provision of utilities and telephone service (including Defense Switching Network (DSN), Class A voice, and data transmission dedicated lines).

(4) Preservation/conservation of historical artifacts, including adequate climate controls.

(5) Staff and public rest rooms.

(6) Provision of display or exhibit cases, panels, museum furniture, special lighting, and similar items as required.

(7) Construction of exhibits, including an exhibit support contract or support from Training Aids Support Centers.

(8) Signs to identify the museum and to direct visitors to the facility.

(9) Photographic services and photographic and/or digital imaging equipment.

(10) Coordination of public affairs/information services to local military and civilian communities.

(11) Security of grounds, buildings, and historical collections, including the installation and maintenance of fire alarms and fire suppression systems, installation of intrusion detection systems and the hiring of guards.

(12) Printing support including, but not limited to, color brochures, newsletters, historical information, exhibit support materials and other materials as required.

(13) Employment of curators, technicians, and other museum personnel.

(14) Funds for institutional memberships, participation, and training.

(15) Travel in conjunction with museum activities, professional development, and training.

(16) Insurance on historical artifacts not owned by the government that has been loaned to the museum.

(17) Transportation of historical artifacts and museum related supplies and equipment.

(18) Expendable and nonexpendable supplies and equipment.

(19) Postal, clerical, and secretarial services.

(20) Janitorial services.

(21) Public parking.

(22) Specialized equipment including museum storage cabinets, dehumidifiers, weapons racks, tools, and equipment required for conservation/preservation, tools and equipment required for fabrication of exhibits, exhibit furniture, and mannequins (see CTA 50-909).

(23) Disabled access (as required by law).

(24) Cost of participation in off-post historical activities in support of installation or museum mission.

(25) Assignment of military personnel to the museum.

(26) Authorization and use of nonappropriated funds in support of Army museums, subject to the provisions of this regulation.

(27) Acquisition, by issue (purchase), donation, and transfer of historical artifacts.

(28) Temporary acquisition, by loan or temporary transfer, of historical artifacts (not to exceed 5 years).

(29) Cost of technical and professional training for museum personnel.

(30) Books, periodicals, or audiovisual materials necessary to support museum administration, programs, historical research, and identification of artifacts.

(31) Cost of advertisement to highlight the museum in travel magazines and guides, advertise job vacancies, or to solicit research information.

(32) Other activities and support that contribute to the accomplishment of the museum mission.

(33) Appropriate organizational placement.

b. Installation, agency, or organization historian (if any) and the museum director will cooperate with each other to provide historical research and other mutual support as deemed necessary.

c. Installation commanders are authorized to allocate available buildings or construct facilities for use by Army museums.

(1) Construction of museum facilities will be subject to the provisions of AR 415-35 , AR 415-15 , AR 210-20 , AR 215-1 , AR 190-51 , DA Pam 415-15 , and TM 5-800-1.

(2) Construction will be coordinated with the CMH and other organizations as appropriate. An impact statement on museum operations and collections management will be sent to the CMH before any major alteration to an existing museum facility, such as the installation of a climate control system, or extensive renovation of a major part of the museum facility.

(3) Transfer of the museum to a new facility must be approved by the CMH at least 90 days before implementation.

(4) If the building housing, the museum, and its support functions (such as a warehouse facility) are dedicated to that function, the installation will categorize them as such at the DA level.

3-10. Funding for Army museums

a. Army museums, museum activities, and historical collections are appropriated-fund entities.

b. Appropriated-funds or nonappropriated funds, including those derived from private contributions, may be used to support Army museums and museum activities. The museum will have documentation showing the current budget and those for the previous 2 fiscal years. Funding must be adequate to carry out the museum's mission.

c. A supplemental mission NAFI may be established as a separate fiscal entity or accounted for within the Installation Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Fund (IMWRF), for the purpose of generating nonappropriated fund support of Army museums (see AR 215-1, subpara 4-4d).

3-11. Private organizations

a. Commanders may permit private organizations (POs) to be established to support Army museums as prescribed by the Joint Ethics Regulation (JER), DOD 5500.7-R , chapter 3 (AR 210-1, para 3-1). Commanders may not authorize private organizations to establish private museums on Army installations. Installations must maintain professional standards and avoid conflicts of interest to meet the requirements to establish a museum.

b. Private Organizations may use incidental space in the museum. Museum foundations and POs may be granted exclusive use of space by the installation commander in accordance with AR 210-1, paragraph 4-7, but not in such a manner as to impose space limitations on the operations of the museum.

c. Offers of conditional donations of money or real or personnel property from private organizations will be submitted in writing through command channels, to include the CMH, and the Commander, U.S. Total Army Personnel Command, ATTN: TAPC-PDO-IP, Alexandria, VA 22332-0474, for approval by the Secretary of the Army per AR 1-100 .

(1) Army museums may not accept the loan of historical artifacts or works of art from private organizations when the main purpose of the private organization is to provide support to the museum.

(2) Private organizations may not collect historical artifacts or works of art in competition with the Army museum they are supporting.

(3) Donations of artifacts made to an Army museum by the private organization will be documented on the DA Form 5572-R .

d. When the main purpose of the private organization is to provide support to an Army museum, two MOUs will be prepared:

(1) Between the private organization and the installation commander to establish official recognition of the PO on post.

(2) Between the private organization and the Army museum defining the support. This MOU must be reviewed and approved in writing by the CMH before it can take effect. The CMH may withdraw its approval at any time if circumstances warrant.

e. The museum will maintain file copies of the MOU signed by the supporting organization and the command and the MOU signed by the supporting organization, the CMH, and the museum.

f. Private organizations may not develop or implement any separate museum agenda, programs, or activities without prior written approval from the museum director. Formal changes to the MOU must be approved by the CMH.

g. A museum director is an ex-officio member of the PO's executive board or committee.

h. Unless prohibited by the state or locality in which they operate, museum foundations and other private organizations may use donation boxes. When used, they should be visible to visitors to the Army museum and clearly marked with the name of the sponsoring organization and the intended use of the donations. Visitors presume that all contributions made to donations boxes will be used for direct museum support. If all donations are not used for direct museum support, a sign will explain in detail what percentage is used for what purpose.

i. Copies of audits will be maintained on file.

j. Cooperation between Army museums and private organizations, affiliated organizations, or foundations is authorized but not required.

3-12. Volunteer programs

a. Use of volunteers in Army museums as governed by section 1588, title 10, United States Code (10 USC 1588) is authorized and will be coordinated with the installation volunteer program.

b. If a volunteer program is established, the museum director will appoint a museum staff member to act as the volunteer program coordinator. Private organizations may not recruit or employ volunteers without the approval of the museum director.

c. The volunteer coordinator will develop position descriptions for the duties to be performed by the volunteers working in the museum.

d. The volunteer coordinator will develop a training program to be completed by each new volunteer before he or she is allowed to assume duties in the museum.

e. Records will be kept on volunteer hours.

f. Volunteers are protected by the Federal Tort Claims Act and workmen's compensation.

g. No reimbursement of any kind will be provided to volunteers.

h. A volunteer recognition program will be established.

i. Volunteers may be used as tour guides, historical interpreters, gift shop personnel, and clerical aides at the discretion of the museum director.

j. Volunteers may not prepare exhibits, perform conservation duties, catalog artifacts, or otherwise work with historical artifacts without the written approval of the CMH. Requests for exception must include justification, character references, and documentation of the individual's qualifications and training.

3-13. Gift shops

a. As Refer to AR 215-1, paragraph 4-4, and AR 210-1, paragraph 4-2, gift shops may be operated in Army museums with sales authorized to all museum visitors.

b. The items sold in the gift shop must be related to the area of the museum's interest or to military history, heraldry, and organizations. The museum director will approve all items offered for sale in the gift shop. Such items typically include, but are not limited to, the following:

(1) Souvenirs related to the post, military units that are or have been stationed at the post, or military history in general.

(2) Scale models of military vehicles, weapons, and equipment.

(3) Printed matter dealing with the military, such as historical pamphlets, books, technical manuals, maps, and prints.

(4) Reproductions of paintings and items that illustrate aspects of military heritage (such as reproduction military equipment, sabers, and early firearms).

c. Items that may not be sold in Army museum gift shops include, but are not limited to, the following:

(1) Objects that are actual historical artifacts (and which may typically be found in a museum collection), such as obsolete equipment, weapons, uniforms, insignia, and medals.

(2) Any object, the sale of which could be considered in poor taste or is considered publicly offensive.

d. At least 25 percent of the net profits (gross income less fixed expenses) from a PO gift shop must be for the support of the museum's programs without conditions.

e. Copies of audits will be maintained on file for 5 years.

3-14. Mission, scope, and story line

a. A museum will have its mission statement approved and, in some cases, assigned by the CMH. Included with this mission statement will be the parameters of the historical period covered and the definitions of subject matter and its relationship to the missions of other museums with parallel subject areas.

b. Secondary missions of appropriate subject matter may also be assigned. The mission of all Army museums will form an integrated system to encompass the extent of the Army's heritage and material culture.

c. Each museum will prepare a scope-of-collections statement, based upon its mission statement. This document will outline the type and amount of artifacts and art that the museum is seeking to carry out its mission, and prevent nonmission objects from being acquired. The scope of collections statement must be approved by the CMH.

d. Based upon its scope of collections statement, each museum will prepare a collection content or artifact requirement statement. The statement will list artifacts needed to fill specific gaps in the museum's collection and to fill specific exhibit needs. At a minimum, the artifact requirement statement will be updated and forwarded to the CMH with the biennial inventory. However, changes and updates may be submitted as they occur. The CMH will subsequently update the Army Museum System's collection plan based upon these reports.

e. The museum director is responsible for preparing a detailed story line by which the subject area of the museum will be presented. It will include a comprehensive survey of the topics to be covered, the approach and its objective, and the main references and authorities from which the story line was prepared.

f. The mission statement and the above accompanying documents will serve to assist the CMH in ensuring that appropriate artifacts and other resources are directed to the proper museum and that the full history of the U.S. Army is presented.

g. The CMH is responsible for the disposition of all Army historical artifacts and works of art and is the final authority in any controversy concerning the appropriateness of an artifact or art work to any museum, museum activity, historical collection, or other location.

3-15. Exhibits

a. The exhibition of a portion of the collection of a museum or historical collection is the visual means by which the interpretation of Army history is accomplished. It is the method by which the majority of the institution's audience is reached; therefore, Army museums and museum activities will have exhibit galleries.

b. Museum exhibits encompass permanent, temporary, traveling, or remote.

c. Exhibits will follow an approved story line (except in the case of temporary or special exhibits) and present the topics in a logical manner for a wide range of audiences.

(1) Exhibits will be effective, demonstrating good design, color, effective lighting, form, and so forth.

(2) Labels and text will be effective, incorporated into the exhibit design, and visually accessible to the visitor (for example, appropriate type size and style).

(3) Ensure good space utilization and effective traffic flow exists in the exhibit gallery.

d. Historical accuracy, both implied and implicit, will be scrupulously maintained, and misrepresentations will be avoided both in content and in presentation. Artifacts will be accurately identified, accurately displayed, and appropriate to the exhibit in which they appear.

e. Museum standards for the preservation/conservation of historical artifacts will be maintained and will not be compromised for the sake of display.

(1) The environment in the exhibition area will be monitored and maintained at museum standard levels of 68 degree Fahrenheit and 50 percent relative humidity (Rh) plus or minus 5 percent.

(2) Exhibit cases, fixtures, and object supports will be chemically and physically museum safe for objects on exhibit. Furniture and mounts for artifacts must provide adequate support. Inert barrier materials will be used to prevent contact between hostile surfaces.

(3) Museum staff whose duties include working with artifacts must be adequately trained in basic care and handling of objects.

(4) Maintenance of exhibits must be programmed during the planning phases of the exhibit.

(5) A walk-through inspection of exhibit areas will be conducted at least once each duty day to identify potential security/preservation/conservation problems.

(6) Whenever possible, artifacts should be displayed in an enclosed exhibit case or frame.

(7) Only a portion of the collection will be exhibited at any one time. Artifacts will be rotated in and out of exhibits on a regular basis to prevent deterioration. The rotation schedule will be based on the sensitivity of the artifacts in question on a case-by-case basis. Objects that are "highly sensitive" or "sensitive" to light will be rotated on/off exhibit more frequently than other objects. Care should be taken to have artifacts available in the collection that can be rotated into an exhibit without the need for extensive refabrication and without changing the exhibit meaning.

(8) No mount or exhibit support will damage, stress, or in any way alter the artifact being displayed.

f. Exhibit cases and units will be well constructed of quality materials to avoid deterioration. Exhibit cases and units will be constructed to conform to physical security requirements (see AR 190-51).

g. Fire-proof or flame-retardant materials (Class A flame spread, under 25) will be used in construction of exhibit cases, units, panels, and exhibit props. Any exceptions authorized by the Fire Marshal must be documented.

h. Items that are not easily moved, such as vehicles, aircraft, and heavy equipment may remain on long-term exhibition, provided care is taken to ensure the preservation of all original materials. In the interest of public safety and for protection of the object, artifacts may be welded and/or padlocked in a manner that will not detract from public display or destroy the historical integrity.

(1) All items on outdoor exhibition will be regularly and properly maintained to retard deterioration.

(2) All equipment and vehicles with wood, rubber, nylon, or fiberglass-based tires, skids, or platforms will be mounted off the ground so that they are stable and secure. Vehicles and other oversized artifacts will rest on inert supports or pads and will be kept from coming into direct contact with the ground.

(3) Efforts will be made to exhibit large items indoors or under protective cover.

i. Items on outdoor exhibit will not be painted or polished for purely cosmetic reasons.

j. Items on exhibit will be painted in correct colors and will be appropriately marked in accordance with documented research.

k. Signs will notify visitors not to climb on exhibits or damage historical and nonhistorical property.

3-16. Security and public safety

a. Twenty-four hour physical security of museums and historical collections will be provided in accordance with the security standards prescribed in AR 190-51 , AR 190-11 , and this regulation. A physical security plan or standard operating procedures (SOP) will be developed that outlines the following:

(1) Response roster in event of a security or fire alarm.

(2) Key control, codes, and combination rotation procedures.

(3) Security checklist for routine staff inspections of museum gallery and other areas as applicable.

(4) Backup security arrangements in the event of a natural disaster, fire, loss of electricity, or other situations, when the museum is both open and closed.

(5) Coordination procedures and familiarization program for installation security and fire personnel regarding the special needs of the museum and historical collections.

b. The following minimum security levels or systems will be provided:

(1) Security of gallery areas during hours of operation.

(2) Fire suppression and smoke detection systems in the museum, the museum workshop, and museum storage areas, even if located in separate facilities, with a central alarm to the installation fire department or fire alarm control center (all fire suppression and detection systems will be regularly inspected per TM 5-695).

(a) Existing Halon 1301 fire suppression systems will be removed and replaced with automatic sprinklers (where adequate water supplies are available) by the year 2003 per ASA(IL&E) directive and AR 420-90 .

(b) Any existing Halon 1301 fire system will be removed where there is agent loss below operable levels. Disconnect halon cylinders from distribution piping, and seal to prevent loss of agent.

(c) Halon 1301 cylinders will not be refilled when system activates. Where feasible, provide an automated sprinkler system to augment smoke detection system.

(d) Halon 1211 hand-portable fire extinguishers will be removed when agent loss is below operable levels or when servicing requires agent discharge. Replace with ten-pound, multi purpose, ABC (ordinary combustible, flammable liquids, and electrical equipment), dry chemical, portable extinguishers.

(e) Send all excess Halon 1211 and 1301 agent to the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), Defense General Supply Center (DGSC), Richmond, VA, for deposit in the Army's reserve for critical uses. Refer to MILSTRIP Regulation DOD 4000.25-1-M , chapter 9, and AR 755-1, chapter 4, for instructions to return halon using DD Form 1348-1A .

(f) Do not service either Halon 1301 fire suppression systems or Halon 1211 portable extinguishers when procedures may cause discharge.

(3) Any exceptions to this requirement will be authorized by the CMH for a specific facility upon written certification by the Fire Marshal that the emergency response time to the facility is 5 minutes or less.

(4) Fire drills and evacuation procedures will be established and reviewed regularly.

(5) Intrusion detection systems will be installed in the museum, museum workshops, arms room, and museum storage areas, even if located in separate facilities, with a central alarm in the installation security office. Equipment will be inspected regularly in accordance with OSHA and Army regulations and guidelines.

(6) Emergency battery-powered lighting systems will be installed in public and other appropriate areas. Equipment will be tested regularly in accordance with OSHA and Army regulations and guidelines.

c. Any exceptions to the above security requirements will be approved in writing by the CMH.

d. Security measures will not alter or harm the integrity of any historical artifacts.

e. Hazardous materials will be stored away from the artifact areas. The handling and storage of hazardous materials will be done in accordance with all applicable Army, installation, and other applicable regulations.

f. A data sheet will accompany any containers of hazardous material.

g. Appropriate equipment (such as fume hoods, eye protection, gloves, aprons, safety shoes, and so forth.) must be available in workshop areas.

h. The museum will comply with safety office requirements.

i. The museum will have a fully stocked first-aid kit on hand.

j. The museum will have on file the results of the last installation safety inspection.

3-17. Reference materials

a. All staff members of museums must be acquainted with and have access to the literature of the museum profession. Museums will maintain a basic library of standard museum and military material culture reference works appropriate to the museum's collections. This should include, but not be limited to, the following:

(1) Required Department of the Army and DOD publications with current changes.

(2) Field, technical, and operator's manuals.

(3) Catalogs, dictionaries, and directories.

(4) Histories.

(5) Reference books on material culture including clothing, accouterments, weapons, equipment, art, or other mission-related material.

(6) Reference books on museum operation including museum law, registration methods, preservation/conservation, exhibits and interpretation, or other related material.

(7) Technical magazines or publications relating to the above.

(8) Federal publications, including copies of the pertinent statutes, laws, and regulations.

(9) Copies of any NRC licenses for radioactive commodities in CMH custody.

b. A shelf list system, either manual or automated, containing bibliographic data such as the title, author, publisher, and date, will provide accountability for all museum books.

c. Museum library collections will not compete with other military libraries located on the installation. Museum libraries will be highly selective in content, as indicated above, and staff will depend on other libraries for more general and noncollection-related materials.

d. Museum archival holdings (documents, photographs, films, audio and videotapes, and records) maintained for research and reference purposes will be administered in accordance with AR 25-1 or DA Pam 25-400-2. Classified documents will be safeguarded in compliance with AR 380-5 .

(1) Museum archival holdings, (documents, photographs, films, audio and video tapes, and records) must be readily located by use of finding aids.

(2) Finding aids, either manual or automated, will be used to provide accountability for archival materials.

(3) Archival holdings will not be marked in any way so as to deface the items.

e. Archival items, if they are original, have strong historical association with an individual or event, or are primarily to be used for exhibition may be designated as historical artifacts. Questions on designation or exhibition of such items may be referred to the CMH.

f. Archival holdings in Army museums or historical holdings will be limited to those materials relating directly to the museum's mission statement and necessary for implementing that mission.

(1) Any original record copies of official government documents will be retired to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA).

(2) Any primary unofficial Army materials will be sent to the U.S. Army Military History Institute (MHI).

g. Copies (photocopies, fiche, videotape, etc.) of rare archival holdings will be made for research purposes. Researchers will not handle rare or fragile archival material.

h. An area separate from artifact storage areas will be used for archival holdings with adequate space, furniture, and equipment to accommodate researchers. Access to this area will be strictly controlled and environmental conditions will be maintained at appropriate levels for preservation of the materials.

i. Archival materials will be kept in appropriate museum safe (made of acid-free or acid-buffer material) envelopes, folders, or containers.

(1) Large unframed prints, sketches, documents, manuscripts, and other printed materials will be stored flat and in acid free archival folders, Mylar sleeves, or some other appropriate method.

(2) Matted items will be mounted with inert material and museum-safe reversible adhesives.

3-18. Preservation and conservation

a. Laws 16 USC 431 through 433, and 470, as amended require the preservation of objects of historical significance to the U.S. Army and to the American people. Extreme care must be taken to prevent the loss, damage, or destruction of historical artifacts or artwork.

b. The deterioration of historical artifacts and works of art will be minimized through the use of good preservation and conservation practices according to prescribed museum standards. Conservation encompasses that which preserve or prolong the life of museum objects. Preservation or preventive conservation prevents further deterioration by stabilizing the environment and controlling the causes of deterioration.

c. The CMH will be the final ruling authority for any disputes or controversies resulting from improper care of historical artifacts.

d. Historical artifacts and works of art must be maintained in a stable environment.

(1) Temperature will be maintained at 68 degree Fahrenheit (within a range of plus or minus 5 degrees).

(2) The Rh will be maintained at 50 percent (within a range of plus or minus 5 percent).

(3) Temperature and Rh should be maintained within the acceptable range on a 24-hour basis, with no more than a 5 degree and a 5 percent variation. The environment in which artifacts are maintained should be free from repeated daily and seasonal fluctuations of the exterior weather conditions. Temperature and Rh will be monitored and recorded. Maintain records for at least 2 years to verify stability of environment.

e. The maximum acceptable visible light levels for objects on display are 50 lux (5-foot candles) for highly sensitive objects (silk, watercolors, and paper artifacts); 150 lux (15-foot candles) for sensitive objects (oil paintings; leather; horn; wood that is painted, stained or varnished; plastics; and metals that are painted or varnished); 300 lux (30-foot candles) for insensitive objects (metal, glass, and ceramics).

(1) Historical objects and works of art on exhibit will be illuminated according to the sensitivity of the materials from which they are made.

(2) The acceptable ultraviolet light level for historical artifacts and works of art on display will be less than 75 microwatts per lumen. Filters will be used to control UV radiation.

(3) Historical artifacts and works of art will be stored in total darkness as far as practical.

f. Historical artifacts and works of art will be maintained in a pest (insect and animal) free environment. The environment will also be free from microorganisms (mold and fungus) and other similar agents of deterioration. The environment will also be free from plants and other pest attracting agents.

(1) All incoming artifacts and art will be inspected for infestation before storage or exhibition.

(2) If an infestation is discovered, isolate all affected items. Monitor the exhibition and collection areas for further infestations. Implement pest/microorganism/mold control procedures as needed in compliance with appropriate safety requirements. Record infestations and methods of control on artifact records and on condition reports.

g. Collection storage and exhibition areas will be maintained free of dust and particulate matter and other gas pollutants.

h. All materials/supplies and equipment used to exhibit, store, house, or pack historical artifacts and works of art will be constructed of materials that are deemed museum safe, thus limiting the potential for deterioration by gas pollutants.

i. All-historical artifacts and works of art will be handled in such a way as to preclude mechanical damage of any type.

(1) Historical artifacts, no matter how sound their condition appears, will no longer serve their original function and will suffer fair wear and tear through consumptive use. Therefore, historical clothing will not be worn, historical aircraft will not be flown, historical vehicles will not be operated, and historical weapons will not be fired.

(2) Historical integrity of an artifact is essential to the preservation of the material culture of the Army. This integrity will not be compromised by alteration in any form to include demilitarization.

(3) An exception to policy on the consumptive use or the alteration of an artifact may be requested of the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, Washington, DC 20319-5058. Requests will be submitted in writing with clear justification for the action.

j. All conservation and restoration of historical artifacts and works of art undertaken must have the written consent of the CMH.

(1) The museum will produce or obtain a summary of the proposed treatment.

(2) Photographs will be taken before any conservation or restoration work.

(3) Conservation and restorations will be accomplished only by personnel qualified to do the work.

(4) A record will be maintained of work performed and any parts added to the object. Original parts removed will be retained and marked with the catalog number of the source artifact. Provide a conservation treatment report after the treatment is completed.

(5) The restored artifact will be authentic in color, markings, and finish.

(6) Photographs will be taken after the conservation or restoration work to document the completed work.

(7) Photographs, reports, and documentation will be permanently retained in the item's property jacket.

k. Preservation and conservation standard operating procedures.

(1) Custodians of historical artifacts and works of art will develop local preservation and conservation SOP.

(2) At a minimum, the SOP will address the following:

(a) An environmental strategy for the control of temperature, relative humidity, light, pests, biological infestation, and gas and particulate pollution.

(b) Methods for controlling the environment.

(c) Procedures for monitoring and recording the environment with appropriate equipment and calibrating the equipment as needed.

(d) Procedures for collecting and analyzing the recorded data.

(e) Procedures for implementing any corrective actions needed to preserve and maintain the artifacts.

(f) Establishment of a log to document corrective actions taken to improve environmental conditions.

(g) Establishment of good housekeeping practices.

(h) Procedures for proper handling of historical artifacts and works of art.

(i) Procedures for making routine conservation assessments of historical artifacts and works of art in the collection.

(j) Establishment of annual training of staff on current, standard preventive conservation practices.

3-19. Programs

a. Army museums will maintain educational materials to support the training function of its local command.

b. The museum will perform its training mission through programs and activities in addition to its exhibits and group tours. This may include classes, lectures, audio-visual presentations, or other training support to military schools, Active Army units, Reserve Component units, and Reserve Officer Training Corps organizations supported by the local installation.

c. The museum will perform its educational mission through outreach programs and activities such as lectures, guest speakers, school presentations, multimedia presentations, and living history programs.

d. The museum will be actively involved through the Public Affairs Office (PAO) in informing the local military and civilian communities of its programs.

3-20. Certification

a. The CMH will periodically evaluate and inspect Army museums and museum activities and will advise commanders on acceptable levels of professional standards for the museums.

b. A museum that meets the standards established by this regulation (see app C ), will be certified as an official Army museum and will receive an appropriate Department of the Army Certificate.

c. The certification process will include:

(1) An in-depth questionnaire accredited by the commander on the status of the museum.

(2) An on-site inspection of the museum based on the requirements of this regulation by a CMH-appointed certification team.

(3) A written report of the findings by the certification team submitted for review by a certification panel comprised of at least six recognized museum authorities. The panel will make a recommendation, based upon the report, to the Chief Curator.

(4) The Chief Curator must submit a final recommendation, based upon the input of the panel, to the Chief of Military History, who will approve or disapprove certified status of the museum in question.

(5) If approved, the Secretary of the Army will grant certification to the museum.

d. After the initial certification, the museum will be reevaluated every 5 years as outlined above; however, a museum may receive an earlier reevaluation if its level of professional performance or ability to care for its collection has substantially changed.

e. A museum that does not meet the established standards as confirmed by the procedures outlined above will be informed of the specific shortcomings and allowed 18 months to make corrections. If, following a certification reinspection, the defects have been found to have been corrected, the museum will be certified as an official Army museum.

f. If the shortcomings have not been corrected after reinspection, the CMH may:

(1) Approve an additional 180 days maximum for the museum to complete corrections, if so warranted by the work in progress.

(2) Withdraw the museum's status as an official Army museum and redesignate it either as a museum activity or a historical collection.

(3) Close the facility.

3-21. Closing of a museum or museum activity

a. The closing of an Army museum for more than 10 days will be reported to the CMH through command channels at least 60 days in advance. Notification will include:

(1) Reason for temporary closure.

(2) Estimate of time the museum will remain closed.

(3) Description of the location of the collection during the inactive period and a statement as to adequacy of the location in meeting the requirements for security and protection of the collection.

b. In some cases, the CMH will require temporary closing of a museum to correct deficiencies.

c. A museum may be closed as a result of base realignment and closure action or after consistently failing to meet minimum professional standards. Procedures for the permanent closing of a museum or historical collection are as follows:

(1) The decision to close an Army museum, museum activity, or historical collection will be made far enough in advance to allow the installation or command time to budget for the inventory, packing, shipment, and transportation of the collection. The installation will bear all expenses for closure, including the joint inventory, packing, shipment, transportation, storage, and so forth.

(2) The intended closure will be reported through command channels to the CMH as soon as possible, but not less than 6 months in advance, and the following information will be provided:

(a) Name of the individual in charge of the closure project.

(b) Date of the intended closure.

(c) Reasons and justification for closure.

(d) Statement that sufficient funding is available to cover the cost of inventory, packing, shipment, and transportation of artifacts in such a way that no loss or harm will result.

(3) Registration and cataloging will be brought up to date during this 6-month period in accordance with this regulation. All loans will be returned and any Reports of Survey instituted will be completed before closure.

(4) A joint inventory will be conducted by the ARO and a CMH museum closure team at the time of the official closure. Any property accountability issues will be resolved at this time. The CMH museum closure team will be appointed in writing by the Army's Chief Curator.

(5) The CMH provides instructions for the disposition of all-historical artifacts. Recommendations and suggestions for disposition may be forwarded to the CMH for consideration. However, because law prohibits the loan or donation of certain artifacts to nonFederal organizations or agencies, no disposition will be made until the ARO receives instructions from CMH.

Chapter 4
Center of Military History

Section I
Museum Division Range of Duties

4-1. Army art central collection

a. The CMH oversees and administers the acquisition, preservation, maintenance, use, inventory, security, and management of all works of art in the Army Art Central Collection.

b. The CMH schedules and conducts a 5 percent monthly inventory of the Army Art Central Collection. Results of the inventory will be recorded and a memorandum summarizing the result of the inventory will be submitted to the CMH at the end of each odd-numbered year. Discrepancies will be resolved as they are found, and, if necessary, a DA Form 4697 (Department of Army Report of Survey) will be completed for any lost, damaged, or destroyed items.

c. Army art on loan from the Army Art Central Collection will be inventoried per the requirements of the loan agreement or, if not otherwise stated, in November of each year, and a report of the inventory will be submitted directly to the CMH. Works of art held by Army museums or historical collections will be inventoried biennially. Reports of the loss, destruction, or damage of Army art loaned from the Army Art Central Collection to agencies other than federal government agencies will be made in accordance with the provision of the loan agreement ( DA Form 5575-R ) and as prescribed by this regulation.

d. Selected works of art in the Army Art Central Collection are for use in packaged or special exhibits as prescribed by AR 700-131 and paragraph 2-9 of this regulation. On loans to nonfederal organizations and institutions such as colleges and universities, community centers, civic organizations, art galleries, and libraries the following additional conditions will apply:

(1) The proposed use is in the public interest and is advantageous to the Army.

(2) The Army retains the right to immediate possession.

(3) The Army retains custody and control of the property (for example, retention of property accountability and a reasonable degree of supervision).

(4) The exhibition is open to the general public without admission charge.

(5) Physical security of items in the exhibition is assured. All loan of Army property must comply with this condition.

(6) A surety bond in such amount as the CMH may require, indemnifying the government against theft, loss, damage, destruction, and return of the borrowed art, is required at the borrower's expense.

(7) The borrower is responsible for all costs involved in both the loan and the return of the exhibit, including packing, crating, transporting locally, and shipping. Funding of commercial transportation within the continental United States will be in accordance with AR 37-7 . Art will not be shipped outside the United States except those special exhibits authorized by the Chief of Military History.

(8) To ensure maximum availability of works for packaged or special exhibits, works for long-term display are limited to the immediate office area of lieutenant generals or the civilian equivalent and higher. Immediate office area does not include adjacent offices or space usually, but not limited to, used by the secretary, aide, or driver.

(a) No art will be loaned to individuals for private use.

(b) The use of reproductions for display in government offices is strongly encouraged.

(9) Requests for the loan of original items should specify the size and, when known, the subject matter and media desired (oil, watercolor, acrylic, or pen and ink).

(a) If available, art tentatively selected by a borrower will be withdrawn from storage within ten days of selection so that the items can be evaluated for size, media, condition, and subject matter.

(b) Borrowing agencies are responsible for all costs involved in both the loan and return of the art, including local transportation.

(c) DOD or Army activities located in the Pentagon will coordinate transportation requirements with the Center of Military History.

(10) Artwork will be loaned for a period not to exceed two years. Requests for exceptions should be sent directly to Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, D.C. 20319-5058, with written justification for withholding such works from packaged or special exhibits.

(a) If a holding organization no longer desires or is unable to house items from the Army Art Central Collection, the Chief of Military History will be notified. The items in question will be returned to the Center of Military History.

(b) Artwork on loan to any agency for the purpose of exhibition will not be removed from exhibition for more than two weeks without the agency's first notifying the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, D.C. 20319-5058, in writing. Artwork removed from exhibition will not be stored under conditions that could cause physical or environmental damage to the item or lead to its loss.

(c) No artwork on loan to an organization will be moved or otherwise transferred within that organization without prior authorization from the CMH.

e. The disposition of material from the Army Art Central Collection is the responsibility of the CMH and will be handled per the provisions of this regulation.

f. The Chief Curator is responsible for establishing criteria for acceptance of artwork into the Army Art Central Collection.

4-2. The Army Artist Program

a. The Army Artist Program is sponsored by the CMH in coordination with Army arts and crafts directors. Specific functions for the accomplishment of this program are as follows:

(1) The CMH establishes criteria and standards for artwork production; provide fund support for travel expenses, per diem, and art supplies; select soldier-artists to participate in the program; arrange overseas transportation of soldiers; monitor the program; and assume custody of the finished artwork.

(2) Army artists may be attached singularly or in groups to Military History Detachments (MHDs) for field exercises, military operations other than war, and combat operations. Detachment commanders will provide administrative guidance to art program teams on required historical coverage. The detachment will be responsible for arranging billeting, transportation, clearances, and local assignments, etc., for the artists. Soldier-artists will be under the Uniform Code of Military Justice ( UCMJ) authority of the MHD commander and will receive efficiency reports for the period of their attachment in accordance with applicable Army regulations.

(3) The Commander, USACFSC coordinates the operation of the Army Artist Program. The USACFSC must publicize the program, assist with recruitment and selection, and process applications. This service may include guidance and assistance to units, field operating agencies, and other activities stationed within the geographical limits of their area.

(4) Post arts and crafts directors, under the general supervision of the Community Recreation Branch provides guidance to the Army Art Program at the installation level, including publicity and assistance to participants. They will also assist in obtaining, evaluating, and recommending prospective soldier applicants and advise on submission of applications.

(5) The Chief of DA Public Affairs and public affairs officers at commands and installations shall provide appropriate support to the Army Artist Program. Members and alternates for artist teams will be selected by the CMH from applications submitted by qualified military personnel who are recommended and eligible for release to this special assignment. A selection committee will select team members. Alternates will also be selected in case artists are not able to complete their assignments.

.

4-3. U.S. Army Historical Clearinghouse

a. The U.S. Army Historical Clearinghouse provides long-term storage of Army historical artifacts, to include organizational historical property for which an Army requirement exists.

b. The responsibility for the storage, care, and accountability for historical and retired U.S. flags, distinguishing flags, streamers, companion-size, U.S. flags, organizational colors, guidons, and associated materials is delegated to the CMH in compliance with Section 4565, 10 United States Code (10 U.S.C. 4565).

c. The Army Historical Clearinghouse will store historical artifacts, U.S. Flags, distinguishing flags, streamers, companion-sized U.S. flags, organizational colors, guidons, and associated materials being retired or from inactivating MTOE units.

d. In cooperation, the AMC and the CMH are responsible for:

(1) Determining the integrity of all shipments received for placement into storage.

(2) Identifying any in-transit shortages, damage, and discrepancies immediately on receipt and taking appropriate action.

(3) Ensuring that all shipments received have the appropriate authorizing document number and packing lists.

(4) Screening all items received for dormant storage per established procedures, taking care that all appropriate actions are taken to protect, preserve, locate, and account for items appropriate for retention for the Army historical effort.

(5) On receipt of a shipping request with authorizing document number from the CMH, the Clearinghouse must locate and verify the item(s) requested and prepare them for shipment.

(6) Direct coordination is authorized with the recipient for funding, and other shipping or transportation arrangements.

e. The Clearinghouse must forward a monthly activities report to the Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MD, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, D.C. 20319-5058.

4-4. War and military operations other than war (MOOTW)

a. The CMH assembles and deploys in a timely fashion military and/or civilian personnel (to include contractor personnel) for artifact recovery during each combat operation and military operations other than war, including joint and multinational operations in which the Army is a part.

b. Personnel may be attached to Army headquarters, history teams, joint history teams, MHDs, logistical support groups, or other appropriate organizations. Local commanders will be responsible for providing force protection and support services which may include but are not limited to non-routine medical/dental care; mess; quarters; clearances, special clothing, equipment, weapons or training mandated by the applicable commander; mail; and emergency notification. All personnel including contractors will be required to comply with all applicable U.S. and/or international laws. During a declared war, civilian members of the team may be subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Jurisdiction will be determined by applicable Army regulations. Team members will receive evaluations for the period of their attachment in accordance with applicable Army regulations.

c. The number and type of personnel required will vary depending upon the size and scope of the operation, however, at a minimum there will be a senior historical property coordinator at theater staff level and one or more two-person processing teams as required. Team members are authorized to participate in joint artifact recovery teams and will cooperate with multinational and allied recovery efforts.

d. Team personnel should have military background and experience and have multiple skills in areas such as supply, transportation, small-arms repair, explosive ordnance, reconnaissance, security, and so on. They should also have knowledge of the Army Museum System and artifact registration methods.

e. The mission of the recovery teams will be:

(1) To systematically collect, identify, register, and return to the United States, significant historical artifacts relating to the U.S. Army, its allies, and its enemies, to provide a balanced, documented, historical collection for long-term preservation, available for research and analysis. The exact nature of the artifacts recovered will vary depending on the nature of the operation, international law, and agreements in effect.

(2) To prevent the destruction or demilitarization of historically significant artifacts, and to make them available for distribution to the Army, DOD, federal, nonfederal and foreign museums, agencies, and institutions.

(3) To acquire artifacts, including historically significant U.S. materiel, otherwise unobtainable in the United States.

(4) To provide technical assistance to both official and unofficial research efforts and publications.

(5) To assist the Department of Defense in fulfilling the requirements of section 2579, 10 United States Code (10 U.S.C. 2579), Procedures for Handling and Retaining Battlefield Objects.

(a) Materiel acquired pursuant to The Spoils of War Act of 1994 (50 USC 2201, et. seq.) by the Army on the battlefield or through service during combat or MOOTW, and retained for use as part of the Army Historical Collection, is not subject to the provisions of 10 USC 2579.

(b) War trophies are personal souvenirs acquired by individual soldiers and should not be confused with Army historical artifacts acquired through service or combat.

f. The mission of the senior historical property coordinator will be:

(1) To provide coordination and technical assistance to the Army and Joint commanders, staff, historians, and logistics and intelligence agencies in property identification and recovery efforts.

(2) To provide coordination and technical assistance to the Army Intelligence foreign materiel exploitation specialists, and to ensure that the established intelligence priorities are maintained.

(3) To preselect significant materiel for shipment back to the United States, to prevent nonessential materiel from being returned at needless expense.

(4) To assist in the recovery effort commanders are authorized to establish holding areas, provide supply, shipping, and transportation support as required.

Section II
The Army Exchange Program

4-5. General

a. The SA has authority under Title 10 U.S.C. 2572(b) to exchange "books, manuscripts, works of art, historical artifacts, drawings, plans, models, and condemned or obsolete combat materiel, that are not needed by the armed forces, if such items or services directly benefit" the Army Historical Collection. The SA has delegated approval authority for these transactions to the DAS. The items for which the Army may conduct exchange transactions include:

(1) Similar items held by any individual, organization, institution, agency, or nation.

(2) Conservation supplies, equipment, facilities, or systems. Note: If lease, purchase, or other acquisition of real property (as a conservation facility) is being considered under the exchange process of 10 USC 2572(b), coordination with the Army Corps of Engineers is required prior to any such acquisition.

(3) Search, salvage, or transportation services.

(4) Restoration, conservation, or preservation services.

(5) Educational programs.

b. The CMH is the only Army agency authorized to conduct an exchange transaction under Title 10 U.S.C. 2572, in support of the Army Historical Collection.

c. An exchange may be conducted with any eligible individual, organization, institution, agency, or nation. Entities of a foreign government are authorized to participate in exchange transactions provided they are an official entity of that nation's government and approved by the State Department.

d. An exchange may not be made if the value of the property received is less than the value of the property provided by the Army. This provision may be waived by the Secretary of the Army if the property received will significantly enhance the Army Historical Collection.

e. The CMH publishes a Museum Acquisition Plan every two years and update it internally on an annual basis. The plan is a list of items, services, and facilities required by the Army Museum System. The required items are identified by Army museums in the field and by members of the Army curatorial staff, reviewed by the Museum Acquisition Panel, and approved by the Chief Curator of the Army. Justification will be provided and exchanges will not be made for items, services, or facilities not required by the Army Museum System. The plan will be published for public dissemination and at a minimum, will include:

(1) Goals for the expansion, conservation, and long term-care of the Army Historical Collection.

(2) Projected requirements of obsolete or condemned equipment by type, quantity, and estimated fair market value to support the exchange transactions.

f. Demilitarization of exchange materiel will comply with demilitarization policies defined in DOD 4160.21-M Defense Reutilization and Disposal Manual, and DOD 4160.21-M-1, Defense Demilitarization Manual, unless waived or modified by the appropriate official.

g. Exchanges will be unconditional.

h. Property received by the CMH as a result of an exchange becomes part of the Army Historical Collection and will be accounted for in accordance with this regulation and all other applicable Army regulations.

i. An exchange transaction begins with an offer made by a prospective exchange recipient. (See Figures 4-1 and 4-2 for process flowcharts.)

(1) An offer is valid if:

(a) The proposed recipient of Army assets is the owner of the item(s) being offered to the Army.

(b) The item to be acquired is included in the Collection Plan. Items of historical significance not included in the plan must be proposed and approved as an addition to the plan.

(c) The individual making the offer is not requesting operational items prohibited from release in accordance with 4160.21-M. Demilitarization codes must be verified by the AMC.

(2) An individual making an offer is considered an acceptable recipient if:

(a) The Chief Curator, CMH, must decide to proceed based on OTJAG's legal opinion. He/she will produce an MFR documenting his/her decision. If he/she decides to proceed, the discrepancies, legal opinion, and MFR must be included in the proposal presented to the Transaction Review Committee (see below) and the agreement presented to the DAS or SA for approval.

(b) Approval of the State Department is required for any transaction with a foreign government or foreign national.

(3) On acceptance of the offeror, CMH and the offeror will negotiate the initial terms of the proposed exchange. These negotiations will--

(a) Identify who will bear the cost of any necessary demilitarization to be applied to an Army asset.

(b) Identify if any requests for waivers of demilitarization instructions must be submitted and approved before valuation is conducted. Requests for waivers will be forwarded through the Army DCSLOG and the DAS for approval by the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Production and Logistics). State Department approval is also required for exchanges with foreign nations.

(c) Address any other issues pertinent to the proposed exchange.

(4) When Munitions List Items (MLI) (Demil. code B, C, D, E, or F) or Commerce Control List Items (CCLI) (Demil. Code Q) are identified for exchange, the CMH must obtain an end-use certificate from the offeror. The TACOM, ATTN: AMSTA-IM-OER, will provide MLI/CCLI determination for historical items where the Demil. code is unknown. Upon receipt of the end-use certificate, CMH is responsible for:

(a) Notifying the gaining organization or person that demilitarization code Q items may require export approval by the Department of Commerce.

(b) Forwarding the end-use certificate and a copy of the CID report to the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), DLSC-LC, 8725 John J. Kingman Road, Suite 3539, Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6221, for end-use and end user checks. These checks are conducted in accordance with DOD Directive 2030.8 to verify the destination, end-user, and subsequent end-use of controlled DOD property conforms to that stated in the export license or end-use certificate. DLA will provide CMH a report approving or disapproving the offer for the property requested.

(c) Informing the offeror that further transfer of the exchanged property requires submission of another end-use certificate by the new owner to the DLA for approval prior to transfer of the property. Failure to submit the end-use certificate to DLA may result in criminal or civil penalties.

(5) Generating a draft proposal identifying the Army assets desired and artifacts or services offered. The Chief Curator will then publish a memorandum authorizing the expenditure of appropriated funds for conducting required valuations.

(6) Determining the availability of the excess obsolete or condemned equipment or the artifact requested. If the item(s) requested are not available, the CMH will notify the offeror of what assets are available and renegotiate the draft proposal.

(7) Valuation.

(a) A qualified government, Army, or independent valuator must meet the following criteria. Appropriated funds may be used to pay the cost of conducting an appraisal. These costs will not be included in the negotiated exchange proposal.

(1) He/she has an education and/or training background in the subject area and is considered an expert in the area of the valuation.

(2) He/she has no personal vested interest in the transaction. (An Army curator, conservator, or museum technician is not considered to have a vested interest in the acquisition of an artifact for the Army collection if the artifact is not intended for their museum or collection and/or they are not directly involved in the exchange process.

(3) He/she must be technically proficient to value the services being offered. Technical familiarity or expertise determines technical proficiency with the equipment being serviced or familiarity with the process that the service is rendered.

(b) Excess obsolete or condemned Army equipment identified for use in an exchange will be valued using the following criteria in preferential order. Submit a written report describing the criteria used for the appraisal to the CMH for use in preparing the formal proposal. Valuation should reflect the projected value of the item(s) after any applicable demilitarization instructions are applied.

(1) Standard commercial valuation documentation such as a blue book where available (that is, Kelley Blue Book or Helivalues Helicopter Blue Book).

(2) Comparison to similar items for sale in trade publications.

(3) Recent sales prices of similar items by the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS), adjusted for differences in condition, quantity, and inflation.

(4) Evaluation determined in accordance with Table 37-2, of DFAS-IN 37-1 .

(5) Evaluations provided by the Item/Program Manager.

(6) An independent appraisal of value by a third party in the business of providing such valuation assessments.

(c) CMH artifacts identified for use in an exchange will be valued using the following criteria in preferential order. Submit a written report describing the criteria used for the appraisal to CMH for use in preparing the formal proposal. Valuation should reflect the projected value of the item(s) after any applicable demilitarization instructions are applied.

(1) Comparison to similar items for sale in trade publications

(2) Evaluations by Army Curator.

(3) Evaluations by government Curator.

(4) Independent appraisal.

(d) Artifacts offered to the CMH in an exchange will be valued using the following criteria in preferential order. A written report describing the criteria used for the appraisal will be submitted to CMH for use in preparing the formal proposal. Documentation such as market prices, photographs, and historical references that support the condition, and authenticity of the artifacts should be included.

(1) Evaluations by a qualified government valuator if the perceived value of each item is less than $5,000 and the perceived total is less than $50,000.

(2) Evaluations by a qualified Army valuator if the perceived value of each item is less than $5,000 and the perceived total is less than $50,000.

(3) Independent appraisal. This is required if the perceived value of any one item is greater than $5,000 or the perceived total is greater than $50,000.

(e) Services offered to the CMH in an exchange will be valued using all of the following criteria. Submit a written report describing the analysis of the value of the services rendered to the CMH for use in preparing the formal proposal.

(1) The offeror's estimate of the service to be rendered;

(2) Subject matter expert (SME) analysis of the offeror's estimate and a determination of the value of the services to be rendered.

(f) Valuations conducted must be documented in a report signed by the appraiser or SME and submitted to the CMH. This report must be maintained in the permanent exchange file. The valuation report will--

(1) Describe and/or explain the methodology used by the appraiser or SME, for example, comparisons used, and so forth, to determine the final estimate of value;

(2) Provide the final estimate of value;

(3) Identify any limiting conditions to the appraisal or analysis of services;

(4) Describe each of the items, artifacts, or services that were appraised or valued.

(8) A formal proposal is written by the CMH after all necessary valuations are completed. The proposal should be in balance, the value of the item(s) or service(s) to be received by the Army being equal to the value of the Army property being exchanged. Proposals may be out of balance if in favor of the Army or if the item(s) to be received by the Army will significantly enhance the historical collection of the Army. Out-of-balance proposals in favor of the offeror must be approved by the SA. The DAS approves in-balance and out-of-balance proposals in favor of the Army.

(9) The Transaction Review Committee (TRC) is responsible for reviewing the formal proposal. The TRC consists of, but is not limited to, the CMH Chief Curator, an Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics (ODCSLOG) representative, an Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations (ODCSOPS) representative, and an AMC representative. Copies of any discrepancies noted in the CID background check, the legal opinion on the discrepancies, and the Chief Curator's MFR on the decision to proceed with the transaction will be attached to the proposal for TRC consideration. The TRC must:

(a) Verify that appropriate methods were employed and efforts made to obtain the valuations reflected in the formal exchange proposal.

(b) Provide a recommendation for approval to the DAS or SA. Proposals not recommended for approval will be returned to CMH for revision.

(c) Provide an overall objective assessment of the transaction.

(10) Each proposal recommended for approval will be reviewed by the OTJAG. Proposals not within legal criteria are returned to CMH for revision. The revised proposal must then be reviewed by the TRC.

(11) The exchange proposal is then presented to the offeror for approval. The offeror can request reconsideration if the offeror is dissatisfied with the proposal. The reconsideration request is sent to the CMH for possible revision of the proposal. The revised proposal must then be reviewed by the TRC.

(12) The CMH must then prepare an agreement and obtain the offeror's signature for offeror-approved proposals. The agreement will be reviewed and approved by OTJAG.

(13) The Chief of Military History must review the OTJAG-approved agreement for endorsement. Agreements not endorsed will be considered for revision. The TRC will review any revised proposal.

(14) Prior to forwarding a CMH endorsed agreement to the DAS or SA for approval, all Army assets involved in the proposed exchange must appear on the CMH historical property book. Any assets not previously owned by the CMH must be transferred to the CMH historical property book.

(15) The CMH then forwards the agreement for approval when all Army assets involved in the exchange appear on the CMH historical property book. The DAS is the approval authority for all in-balance and out-of-balance exchanges in favor of the Army. The SA is the approval authority for all out-of-balance exchanges in favor of the offeror. Copies of discrepancies noted in the CID background check, the legal opinion on the discrepancies, and the Chief Curator's MFR noting the decision to proceed with the transaction will be attached to the agreement for consideration by the approving official.

(16) On approval of the agreement, applicable demilitarization will be accomplished in accordance with the appropriate instructions.

(a) The AMC provides demilitarization instructions.

(b) The CMH arranges for demilitarization, either through the appropriate item manager or with a qualified demiller.

(c) Completed demilitarization must be inspected and certified by two DOD officials competent on that type of equipment. The individuals will sign the demilitarization memorandum and provide it to CMH.

(d) The CMH must retain the demilitarization memorandum in the permanent exchange file and provide a copy to the AMC.

(17) Deliveries of the offered item(s) or services and the Army assets are arranged after demilitarization is accomplished and certified.

(a) Services provided by the offeror must be completed and verified prior to delivery of Army assets in payment. The CMH makes payment per the schedule in the agreement

(b) Joint safety inspection(s) (for example, Flight Safety Critical Aviation Parts FSCAP, hazardous material HAZMAT, radioactive materials, and so on.) are conducted on all Army assets prior to release.

(c) Army assets will be released when the joint safety inspection(s) are completed and the items being acquired by the Army are shipped.

(d) Items being acquired by the Army in the exchange are shipped to the receiving organization. The CMH will track the offered item(s) throughout shipping until arrival at the shipping address. The accessioning museum will notify CMH upon receipt of the item(s).

(18) Property accountability records are updated after receipt of offered item(s) and delivery of Army assets.

(a) The item(s) received through the exchange are added to the inventory of the receiving museum and the CMH historical property book.

(b) The items given by the Army through the exchange transaction are dropped from the CMH historical property book.

(c) The exchange file is completed and filed in the permanent records. A complete copy of the file will be provided to the AMC. These records must be maintained to ensure a proper audit trail exists for each Army asset used in an exchange transaction.

j. Duties.

(1) The CMH is responsible for:

(a) Publishing the Museum Acquisition Plan every two years for public dissemination and update the plan annually for internal use.

(b) Initiating background checks by the Criminal Investigation Division (CID) on each exchange offeror.

(1) Obtain an OTJAG opinion for any discrepancies identified in the CID report.

(2) Obtain an MFR signed by the Chief Curator noting the decision to proceed with the exchange transaction.

(c) Obtain Department of State approval when exchanges involve parties outside the United States or when the exchanged materiel is intended for export.

(d) Negotiating or renegotiate the terms of the proposed exchange with the offeror.

(e) Obtaining a signed end-use certificate from the offeror and request DLA conduct end-use and end user checks prior to proceeding with the transaction. Providing DLA with a copy of the CID report for use in the checks.

(f) Preparing the draft proposal and produce a memorandum, signed by the Chief Curator, authorizing the expenditure of appropriated funds for required valuations.

(g) Identifying the availability of requested artifact(s) or excess obsolete or condemned equipment by contacting AMC.

(h) Ensuring qualified competent individuals conduct proper valuations.

(i) Preparing the formal proposal after all valuations are complete and forward it to the TRC for review.

(j) Forwarding TRC approved exchange proposals to OTJAG for legal review.

(k) Presenting the formal proposal to the offeror and prepare the agreement that is signed by both the offeror and the CMH.

(l) Forwarding the signed agreement to OTJAG for legal review.

(m) Taking possession of any Army assets not already listed on the CMH property books.

(n) Forwarding the legally reviewed agreement to the DAS or SA for approval after taking possession of all Army assets involved in the exchange.

(o) Arranging for appropriate demilitarization to be accomplished in accordance with instructions received from the AMC.

(p) Ensuring no classified materiel is exchanged.

(q) Verifying completion of services prior to release of Army assets in payment of exchanges.

(r) Arranging payment for services rendered in an exchange according to the payment schedule included in the final agreement.

(s) Tracking item(s) shipped to the Army throughout transport.

(t) Arranging delivery of Army assets to the offeror.

(u) Establishing accountability of items received and drop accountability of those items lost to the Army through the exchange.

(v) Maintaining permanent records, to include demilitarization memorandums, of all exchange transactions to ensure a proper audit trail and a central record are maintained for all Army assets used in exchanges.

(2) The AMC is responsible for:

(a) Assisting the CMH in determining the availability of requested Army excess condemned or obsolete equipment for use in an exchange transaction. If the requested item(s) are not available, provide CMH with a list of equipment that could be used in an exchange transaction.

(b) Assisting the CMH with the valuation of excess condemned or obsolete equipment identified for use in a proposed exchange transaction.

(c) Providing, as required, an AMC representative to the TRC to review all proposed exchange transactions.

(d) Transferring any AMC-owned excess condemned or obsolete equipment identified for use in a TRC-approved and Chief of Military History-endorsed exchange to the CMH.

(e) Ensuring that all excess condemned or obsolete equipment issued to the CMH for an exchange transaction has the appropriate flight data, log books, maintenance records, and other appropriate records that are still maintained at the time of transfer.

(f) Providing demilitarization instructions and assist the CMH, when necessary, to accomplish demilitarization.

(g) Ensuring no classified materiel is exchanged.

(3) The Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) and other appropriate government agencies will provide the CMH, upon request, information regarding the auction and sale prices of like materiel to assist CMH in estimating the fair market value of proposed exchange materiel.

(4) The ODCSOPS, as needed, must provide a representative to the TRC to review all proposed exchange transactions.

(5) The ODCSLOG, as needed, must provide a representative to the TRC to review all proposed exchange transactions.

(6) The OTJAG is responsible for reviewing all TRC approved proposals and all offeror-approved agreements for legal sufficiency.



Figure 4-1. Exchange: Officer Validation and Valuation





Figure 4-2. Exchange: Approval and -Execution


4-6. (Paragraph not used.)

Appendix A
References

The Official Army Publications Web Sites.

Publication Section I
Required Publications

This section contains no entries.

Publication Section II
Related Publications

A related publication is merely a source of additional information. The user does not have to read it to understand this regulation.

AR 1-33. Memorial Programs  

AR 1-100. Gifts and Donations  

AR 1-101. Gifts for Distribution to Individuals  

AR 1-211. Attendance of Military and/or Civilian Personnel at Private Organization Meetings  

AR 25-1. Records Management Program  

AR 25-50. Preparing Correspondence  

AR 25-96. Army Library System  

AR 25-400-2. Modern Army Record keeping System (MARKS)  

AR 37-7. Funding for First and Second Destination Transportation Under the Appropriated Operation and Maintenance, Army  

AR 190-11. Physical Security of Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives  

AR 190-51. Security of Army Property at Unit and Installation Level  

AR 200-1. Environmental Protection and Enhancement  

AR 200-2. Environmental Effects of Army Actions  

AR 210-1. Private Organizations on Department of the Army Installations and Official Participation in Private Organizations.  

AR 210-20. Master Planning at Army Installations  

AR 215-1. Nonappropriated Fund Instrumentality's and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Activities  

AR 215-3. Nonappropriated Funds Personnel Policies and Procedures  

AR 215-5. Nonappropriated Funds Accounting Policy and Reporting Procedures  

AR 220-10. Preparation of Overseas Movement (POM) of Units  

AR 310-50. Authorized Abbreviation, Brevity Codes  

AR 360-5. Public Information  

AR 360-61. Community Relations  

AR 380-5. Department of the Army Information Security Program  

AR 385-10. Army Safety Program  

AR 405-70. Utilization of Real Property  

AR 405-80. Granting Use of Real Estate  

AR 415-15. Military Construction Army (MCA) Program Development  

AR 415-35. Minor Construction  

AR 420-40. Historic Preservation  

AR 420-81. Custodial Services  

AR 420-90. Fire and Emergency Services  

AR 440-20. Packaging of Materiel  

AR 570-4. Manpower Management  

AR 680-4. War Trophies  

AR 700-15. Packaging of Materiel  

AR 700-131. Loan or Lease of Army property  

AR 700-64. Radioactive Commodities in the DoD Supply System  

AR 710-2. Supply Policy Below the Wholesale Level  

AR 710-3. Assets and Transaction Reporting System  

AR 735-5. Basic Policies and Procedures for Property Accounting  

AR 735-17. Accounting for Library Books  

AR 746-1. Packing of Army Materiel for Shipment and Storage  

AR 840-1. Department of the Army Seal and Department of the Army Plaque  

AR 840-10. Flags, Guidons, Streamers, Tabards, and Automobile and Aircraft Plates  

AR 870-5. Military History: Responsibilities, Policies, and Procedures  

CTA 50-909. Field and Garrison Furnishings and Equipment  

CTA 50-970. Expendable/Durable Items  

DA Pam 25-400-2. Maintenance and Disposition of Records for TOE and Certain Other Units of the Army  

DA Pam 415-15. Army Military Construction Program Development and Execution  

DA Pam 570-4. Manpower Procedures Handbook  

DA Pam 570-551. Staffing Guide for U.S. Army Service School  

DA Pam 710-2-1. Using Unit Supply System (Manual Procedures)  

DA Pam 740-1. Instructor's Guide for Basic Military Preservation and Packing  

DoD 4160-21-M. Defense Reutilization and Disposal Manual  

DoD 4160-21-M-1. Defense Demilitarization Manual  

DoD 4270.1-M. Construction Criteria Manual  

DoD 5100.76-M. Physical Security of Sensitive Conventional Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives  

DoD 5500.7-R. Joint Ethics Regulations  

FM 14-3. Surveying Officers Guide  

FM 19-30. Physical Security  

TM 5-695. Maintenance of Fire Protection Systems  

TM 5-800-1. Construction Criteria for Army Facilities  

TM 38-230. Preservation, Packaging, and Packing of Military Supplies and Equipment  

Publication Section III
Prescribed Forms

DA Form 2609. Historical Property Catalog   (Cited in para 2-8c ).

DA Form 5572-R. Gift Agreement   (Cited in paras 2-2c and 2-5a ).

DA Form 5573-R. Loan Agreement   (Cited in para 2-5a ).

DA Form 5574-R. Assurance of Compliance   (Cited in para 2-10d(7) ).

DA Form 5575-R. Loan Agreement (Outgoing)   (Cited in paras 2-10a(4) and 2-10d(7) ).

Publication Section IV
Referenced Forms

DA Form 1687. Notice of Delegation of Authority - Receipt for Supplies  

DA Form 2062. Hand Receipt/Annex Number  

DA Form 2064. Document Register for Supply Actions  

DA Form 3161. Request for Issue or Turn-in  

DA Form 4697. Department of Army Report of Survey  

DA Form 4755. Employee Report of Alleged Unsafe or Unhealthful Working Conditions  

DA Form 4881-R. Agreement for the Loan of U.S. Army Materiel  

DD Form 1348-1A. Issue Release/Receipt Document  

OGE Form 450. Executive Branch Confidential Financial Disclosure Report  

Appendix B
Selected Bibliography on Museum Operations

B-1. Introduction to Museums

Alexander, Edward P. Museums in Motion. 7th printing, Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1989.

America's Museums: The Belmont Report. Washington, D.C.: American Association of Museums, 1968.

Burcaw, G. Ellis. Introduction to Museum Work. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1979.

George, Gerald, and Sherrell-Leo, Cindy. Starting Right, A Basic Guide To Museum Planning, Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1989.

MacBeath,George, and Gooding, S. James, editors. Basic Museum Management. 3rd printing, Ottawa: Canadian Museums Association, 1977.

Schlereth, Thomas J., editor. Material Culture Studies in America. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1984.

B-2. Museum Law and Ethics

Malaro, Marie C. A Legal Primer on Managing Museum Collections, Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1985.

Messenger, Phyllis M., editor. The Ethics of Collecting Cultural Property, Whose Culture, Whose Property. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1990.

Museum Ethics. Washington, D.C.: American Association of Museums, 1988.

Phelan, Marilyn. Museums and the Law, Nashville: The American Association for State and Local History, 1982.

B-3. Museum Conservation

Appelbaum, Barbara. Guide to Environmental Protection of Collections. Madison, Wisc.: Soundview Press, 1991.

Harris, Karyn J. Costume Display Techniques. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1977.

Kane, Lucille M. A Guide to the Care and Administration of Manuscripts. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1966.

Keck, Caroline K. Safeguarding Your Collection in Travel. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1970.

Lewis, Ralph H. Manual for Museums. Washington, D.C.: National Park Service, 1976.

MacLeish, A. Bruce. The Care of Antiques and Historical Collections. 2nd edition. Nashville, American Association for State and Local History, 1985.

NPS Museum Handbook. Washington, D.C.: National Park Service, 1990.

Ritzenthaler, Mary Lynn. Archives and Manuscripts: Conservation. A Manual on Physical Care and Management. Chicago: Society of American Archivists, 1983.

Weinstein, Robert A. and Booth, Larry. Collection, Use, and Care of Historical Photographs, Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1977.

B-4. Basics of Exhibit Design

Neal, Arminta. Exhibits for the Small Museum. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1983.

Serrell, Beverly Making Exhibit Labels. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1988.

Single Case Exhibit. Computer Based Instruction, Washington, D.C.: U.S. Army Center of Military History, 1994.

B-5. Educational Programs and Outreach

Anderson, Jay. Time Machine, the World of Living History. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1984.

Collins, Zipporah W. editor. Museums Adults and the Humanities, A Guide for Educational Programming. Washington, D.C.: American Association of Museums, 1984.

Groff, Gerda with Gardner, Laura. What Museum Guides Need to Know, Access for Blind and Visually Impaired Visitors. New York: American Foundation for the Blind, 1990.

Kenny, Alice B. Access to the Past, Museum Programs and Handicapped Visitors. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1970.

Melton, Arthur, Feldman, Nita Goldberg, and Mason, Charles. Experimental Studies of the Education of Children in a Museum of Science. Reprint. Washington, D.C.: American Association of Museums, 1936, 1988.

B-6. Collections Management

Caring For Collections, Strategies for Conservation, Maintenance and Documentation, A Report. Washington, D.C.: American Association of Museums, 1984.

Chenhall, Robert G. Museum Cataloging in the Computer Age. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1975.

Dudley, Dorothy H., Wilkinson, Irma Bezold, and others. Museum Registration Methods. Third Edition. Washington, D.C.: American Association of Museums, 1979.

Reibel, Daniel B. Registration Methods for the Small Museum. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1978.

Williams, David W. A Guide to Museum Computing. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1987.

B-7. Artifact Identification

All You Gotta Do is Follow the Clues: A Lesson in Research Methodology. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Army Center of Military History, 1993.

Blackaby, James R., Greeno, Patricia, and committee. The Revised Nomenclature for Museum Cataloging. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1988.

Chartrand, Rene. Uniforms and Equipment of the United States Forces in the War of 1812. Niagara Falls: Old Fort Niagara Association, 1992.

Ketcher, Philip, and Embleton, G. A. The Mexican American War, 1846-1848. London: Osprey, 1992.

Neumann, George C. and Kravic, Frank J. Collector's Illustrated Encyclopedia of the American Revolution. Harrisburg: Stackpole, 1975.

Peterson, Harold L. Book of the Continental Soldier. Harrisburg: Stackpole, 1968.

Todd, Frederick P. American Military Equipage. vol. I. Providence: The Company of Military Historians, 1977.

Todd, Frederick P. American Military Equipage. vol. II. Providence: The Company of Military Historians, 1977.

Todd, Frederick P. American Military Equipage. vol. III. Providence: The Company of Military Historians, 1977.

Todd, Frederick P. American Military Equipage: State Forces. New York: Chatham Square Press, 1983.U.S. Army Uniforms and Equipment, 1889. Reprint. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1986.

Stanton, Shelby. U.S. Army Uniforms of World War II. Harrisburg: Stackpole Books, 1991.

Stanton, Shelby. U.S. Army Uniforms of the Korean War. Harrisburg: Stackpole Books, 1992.

Stanton, Shelby. U.S. Army Uniforms of the Vietnam War. Harrisburg: Stackpole Books, 1989.

Appendix C
Sample Format for a Museum Certification Checklist

C-1. General

a. All Army museums are required to receive a certification inspection at least once every five years to ensure that they comply with the requisite standards of this regulation ( para 3-18 ). In the inspection the quality of the work will receive as much emphasis as compliance. The CMH will appoint inspection teams as required to conduct these certification inspections.

b. The information contained in this appendix intended to provide basic guidance for museums in preparing for certification and to assist the certification inspection team. The results of the certification inspection are for the use of the CMH and the command to which the museum/activity is assigned.

c. The standards for artifact security, accountability, preservation, and conservation apply to all Army organizations having custody of historical artifacts, regardless of status.

C-2. Administration (para 3-7)

Does the museum have the following written administrative documents/records on hand:

a. Museum Master Plan, to include:

(1) An approved mission statement.

(2) Documentary evidence of the museum as an activity of the installation, its organizational placement, and its official recognition by the U.S. Army (see para 3-5 ).

(3) Delegation-of-authority-to-collect memorandum from CMH.

(4) Story line.

(5) Scope-of-collections statement.

(6) Collection content plan.

(7) Conservation/preservation plan and schedule.

(8) Exhibit plan.

(9) Five-year museum development plan.

(10) Table of distribution and allowances (TDA).

(11) Job descriptions.

(12) Vitae of each staff member.

(13) Staff development plan.

b. Master Plan Annexes, to include but not limited to:

(1) The museum's last manpower assessment.

(2) Budget (both previous and current).

(3) Disaster plan.

(4) Educational programs.

(5) Volunteer program.

(6) Any other appropriate documents.

c. Physical security records, including:

(1) Weapons inventories (quarterly and semiannual).

(2) Results of last physical security inspection.

(3) Physical security plan.

(4) Artifact inventories.

(5) Document register or appropriate equivalent with supporting files (five-year history).

d. Are copies of CMH museum memos and policy letters with evidence of review by all museum staff members on hand?

e. Are all outstanding Engineer work orders available for review?

(1) Is there a log of Engineer work-order actions taken?

(2) Are status reports of outstanding work orders available?

f. Are visitation records, based upon a turnstile, electronic counter, or some other accurate counting means, on file?

C-3. Staffing (para 3-9)

a. Is the staffing of the museum in accordance with Department of the Army personnel utilization policies?

b. Are manpower requirements substantiated in accordance with current manpower management policies established in AR 570-4?

c. Has the Civilian Personnel Office reviewed the positions every two years?

d. Has the installation commander provided civilian personnel positions for the museum sufficient to meet mission requirements, which include but are not limited to administration, accountability of the artifacts, physical security, protection of the artifacts, exhibit production, and training, education, and outreach programs?

e. Do all curatorial positions meet the requirements of the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) standards, and are they filled with trained professionals?

f. Have civilian positions been evaluated in accordance with the Army Civilian Training, Education, and Development System (ACTEDS) Plan?

g. Is the museum staffed at not less than 75 percent of the recognized required strength for professional ( GS-1015, GS-1016 and GS-1010) positions? (Note: Military personnel may not be used in place of professional civilian positions.)

h. Does the museum director have direct and ready access to the military or civilian person designated by the command to provide staff supervision of the museum?

i. Does the museum director have direct and ready access to the president of the museum association, foundation, council, or similar type organization, if such exists?

j. Has the director planned museum activities to support accomplishment of the commander's mission?

k. Is the director included in all pertinent discussions of museum matters within the command and consulted on all matters relating to the professional operation of the museum, including recommendations on matters of museum policy?

l. Is the museum director and the other members of the museum staff afforded reasonable opportunity to advance their professional career development through membership and participation in appropriate professional organizations and attendance at professional conferences, seminars, workshops, and museum/historical training courses?

m. Has the staff received some type of professional training since the last certification inspection?

n. Are staff members knowledgeable of Army material culture history, particularly for materiel relevant to their collection?

C-4. Volunteer Program (para 3-12)

Use of volunteers in Army museums as governed by section 1588, Title 10 United States Code (10 U.S.C. 1588), is authorized and will be coordinated with the installation volunteer program. If the museum utilizes volunteers, the following will apply:

a. Has the museum director appointed a museum staff member to act as the volunteer program coordinator?

b. Have position descriptions for the duties to be performed by the volunteers been developed?

c. Has a training program been developed that each new volunteer will complete before they are allowed to assume their duties in the museum?

d. Are records kept on volunteer hours?

e. Has a volunteer recognition program been established?

f. Are volunteers normally used as tour guides, historical interpreters, gift shop personnel, and clerical aides?

g. Are volunteers being used to prepare exhibits, perform conservation duties, catalog artifacts, or otherwise work with historical artifacts without the written approval of the CMH?

C-5. Reference materials (para 3-19)

Are all staff members of the museum acquainted with and do they have access to the literature of the museum profession?

a. Does the museum maintain a basic library of standard museum and military material culture reference works appropriate to the museum's collections?

b. Are reference and research materials current? Do they include, but are not limited to, the following:

(1) Required Department of the Army and Department of Defense publications with current changes?

(2) Field, technical, and operators' manuals?

(3) Catalogs, dictionaries, and directories?

(4) Histories?

(5) Reference books on clothing, accouterments, weapons, equipment, art, or other mission-related materials?

(6) Reference books on museum law?

(7) Reference books on museum registration methods?

(8) Reference books on preservation/conservation?

(9) Reference books on exhibits and interpretation?

(10) Technical magazines or publications relating to the above?

b. Is a catalog listing available, either manual or automated, containing bibliographic data such as the title, author, publisher, and date, been provided to account for all museum books?

c. Does the museum's library collection compete with other military libraries located on the installation?

d. Is the museum's archival holdings (documents, photographs, films, audio and video tapes, and records) maintained for research and reference purposes and administered in accordance with AR 25-1, or DA Pam 25-400-2?

e. Are classified documents safeguarded in compliance with AR 380-5?

f. Are original, historically significant, mission-related items cataloged?

g. Are the museum's archival holdings (documents, photographs, films, audio and videotapes, and records) readily located by use of finding aids?

h. Are finding aids, either manual or automated, used to provide accountability for archival materials?

i. Are archival holdings marked in any way so as not to deface the items?

j. Are archival holdings of the museum limited to those materials relating directly to the museum's mission statement and necessary for implementing that mission?

k. Are original record copies of official government documents retired to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)?

l. Are all primary unofficial Army materials not directly related to the museum's mission reported to the CMH for disposition instructions?

m. Are copies (photocopies, fiche, videotape, etc.) of rare archival holdings made available for research purposes? (Note: researchers will not handle rare or fragile archival material.)

n. Is an area, separate from artifact storage areas, used for archival holdings with adequate space, furniture, and equipment to accommodate serious researchers?

o. Is access to this area strictly controlled, and are environmental conditions maintained at appropriate levels for preservation of the materials?

p. Are archival materials kept in appropriate museum-safe envelopes, folders, sleeves or containers?

q. Are large unframed prints, sketches, documents, manuscripts, and other printed materials stored flat and in an acid-free archival folder, Mylar sleeve, or other appropriate material?

r. Are matted items mounted with inert material and museum-safe reversible adhesives?

C-6. Museum support (para 3-10)

a. Are buildings neat, attractive, and in good repair?

b. Are the grounds neat, attractive and well maintained?

c. Have utilities and telephone service (including Defense Switching Network DSN, Class A voice, and data transmission dedicated lines), been provided?

d. Are the public rest rooms clean and in working order?

e. Are there display or exhibit cases, panels, museum furniture, special lighting, and similar items as required?

f. Has adequate support for construction of exhibits (including support from Training Aids Support Centers) been provided?

g. Are there adequate signs that identify the museum and direct visitors to the facility?

h. Have photographic services and photographic or digital imaging equipment been provided?

i. Are public affairs/information services to local military and civilian communities available to the museum?

j. Has security of grounds, buildings, and historical collections been provided?

k. Is printing support including, but not limited to, color brochures, newsletters, historical information, exhibit support materials, and other materials provided as required?

l. Are institutional memberships and participation in professional development and training provided?

m. Is travel in conjunction with museum activities, professional development, and training provided?

n. Is transportation and shipping of historical artifacts and museum-related supplies and equipment provided as required?

o. Have expendable and non-expendable supplies and equipment been provided?

p. Are postal, clerical, and secretarial services available?

q. Are custodial services provided?

r. Is there adequate public parking?

s. Has specialized equipment, including museum storage cabinets, dehumidifiers, weapon racks, tools, and equipment required for conservation/preservation, tools and equipment required for fabrication of exhibits, exhibit furniture, and mannequins (See CTA 50-909), been provided as required?

t. Has disabled access been provided in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1992?

u. Are there funds available to cover the cost of professional and technical training for museum personnel?

C-7. Funding (para 3-11)

a. Are appropriated funds used to support the museum?

b. Does the museum have documentation showing the current budget and the budgets for the previous two fiscal years?

c. Is the funding adequate to carry out the museum's mission?

d. Has a supplemental mission Nonappropriated Fund Instrument (NAFI) been established for the purpose of supporting the museum? (supplemental mission NAFI is optional).

C-8. Private organizations (para 3-12)

Private organizations (POs) may be established to support Army museums but are not required.

a. Does a PO support the museum? If yes, please answer the following:

(1) Have offers by private associations to construct or provide financial support to the museum or otherwise contribute to museum activities only been accepted with the concurrence by the CMH and the Installation Commander?

(2) Have offers of conditional donations of money or real property or personnel from private organizations been submitted in writing through command channels including the CMH and the Commander, U.S. Army Community and Family Support Center, to the Secretary of the Army for approval?

(3) Has the museum accepted historical artifacts or works of art from private organizations on a permanent loan basis?

(4) Does the private organization collect historical artifacts or works of art in competition with the museum?

(5) Have PO donations made to the museum been documented on a DA Form 5572-R (Gift Agreement)?

(6) Does the museum have a copy of each of the following memorandums of understanding (MOUs) on hand:

(a) Between the private organization and the Installation Commander to establish official recognition of the PO on post?

(b) Between the private organization and the Army museum defining the agreed-upon support?

(7) Have these MOUs been reviewed and approved in writing by the CMH?

(8) Has the private organization developed or implemented any separate museum agenda, programs, or activities without prior written approval from the museum director?

(9) Have the MOUs been reviewed on a periodic basis by the command and the museum director?

(10) Have all formal changes to the museum MOU been approved by the CMH?

b. Does the museum have a donation box?

c. Is the donation box visible to visitors to the Army museum, and is it clearly marked with the name of the sponsoring organization and the intended use of the donations?

d. If all donations are not used for direct museum support, is there a sign that explains in detail what percentage is used for what purpose?

C-9. Gift shops (para 3-14)

A gift shop may be operated in an Army museum in accordance with appropriate authorization (by a NAFI or a PO) but is not required. Sales are authorized to be made to all museum visitors. Does the museum have a gift shop? If yes, please answer the following:

a. Are the items sold in the gift shop related to the museum's interest or to military history, heraldry, and organizations?

b. Has the museum director approved all of the items offered for sale in the gift shop?

c. Are the souvenirs offered for sale in the gift shop related to the post or to military units that are or have been stationed at the post?

d. Are actual historical artifacts such as obsolete equipment, weapons, uniforms, insignia, and medals sold or displayed?

e. Are objects that could be considered in poor taste or publicly offensive being sold?

f. Has at least 25 percent of the net profits (gross income less fixed expenses) from the PO or gift shop been designated for the support of the museum's programs, without conditions?

g. Have copies of audits been maintained on file for five years?

C-10. Security and safety (para 3-18)

a. Has twenty-four hour physical security of museums and historical collections been provided in accordance with security standards prescribed in AR 190-51, AR 190-11, and AR 870-20?

b. Has a physical security plan or SOP been developed that outlines the following:

(1) A response roster in the event of a security or fire alarm?

(2) Key control, access roster, codes, and combination rotation procedures?

(3) A security checklist for routine staff inspections of museum gallery and other areas as applicable to ensure that objects on exhibit and in storage are protected from theft and damage?

(4) Backup security arrangements in the event of a natural disaster, fire, loss of electricity, or other situations, for when the museum is both open and closed?

(5) Coordination procedures and familiarization program for installation security and fire personnel in regard to the special needs of the museum and historical collections?

c. Have the following minimum-security levels or systems been provided:

(1) Security of gallery areas during hours of operation?

(2) Fire suppression and smoke detection systems in the museum, the museum workshop, and museum storage areas, even if located in separate facilities, with a central alarm to the installation fire department or fire alarm control center?

(3) Have all fire suppression and detection systems been inspected per TM 5-695, Maintenance of Fire Protection Systems?

(4) Has any exemption of these requirements been authorized by the CMH for a specific facility upon written certification by the fire marshal that the emergency response time to the facility is five minutes or less?

(5) Have fire drills and evacuation procedures been established and reviewed regularly?

(6) Have intrusion detection systems been installed in the museum, museum workshops, arms room, and museum storage areas, even if located in separate facilities, with a central alarm in the installation security office?

(7) Has the equipment been inspected regularly?

(8) Have emergency, battery powered, lighting systems been installed in public and other appropriate areas?

(9) Is the equipment tested regularly?

(10) Is the security of weapons both in storage and on display checked regularly?

(11) Have any exceptions to the above security requirements been approved in writing by the CMH and the local physical security office?

(12) Have any security measures altered or harmed the integrity of any historical artifacts?

(13) Are hazardous materials stored away from the artifact areas?

(14) Does a data sheet accompany any containers of hazardous material on hand?

(15) Is there appropriate equipment (such as fume hoods, eye protection, gloves, aprons, safety shoes, and so on.) available in workshop areas?

(16) Is the museum in compliance with safety office requirements?

(17) Does the museum have a fully stocked first-aid kit on hand?

c. Are the results of the museum's last safety inspection on file?

C-11. Acquisition of artifacts (para 2-5)

a. Does the museum acquire artifacts commensurate with its mission and scope-of-collection statements?

b. Are exceptions approved in writing by the CMH?

c. Can the museum document U.S. Army ownership and the status of items loaned outside of museum control?

d. Has a DA Form 5572-R (Gift Agreement) been used for all unconditional donations to the museum or historical collection with a copy in each appropriate property jacket?

e. Have any conditional gifts of money or property, including historical artifacts, been accepted only in accordance with AR 1-100?

f. Have any donations been accepted under conditions likely to hinder the museum in the accomplishment of its mission?

g. Have all offers of conditional gifts been forwarded through command channels and the CMH to the Commander, U.S. Army Community and Family Support Center (USACFSC), for written approval of the Secretary of the Army?

h. Has the purchase of historical artifacts with a single item value in excess of $5,000 been approved in writing by the CMH?

i. Has a DA Form 5572-R been used to record the donation transactions of all artifacts obtained by Nonappropriated or private organization funds with a copy in each appropriate property jacket?

j. Has a DA Form 3161, DD Form 1348-1A, or other appropriate documentation been used to document the receipt of artifacts from appropriated-fund sources with a copy in each appropriate property jacket?

k. Are all archaeological materials and specimens held by the museum registered in the Universal Site Artifact Management System (USAMS)?

l. Are archaeological materials and specimens held by the museum mission-related, or retained as a special collection with CMH approval?

m. Are all items thus retained accounted for and preserved in accordance with AR 870-20?

n. Have all recovered materials that fall under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act been handled in accordance with the law?

o. As required by Congress, has a dollar value been applied to all historical artifacts and art in the custody of the museum?

p. Does the dollar value reflect fair market value?

q. Has the value been updated within the past five years?

C-12. Registration and cataloging (AMIS) (para 2-7)

a. Does the museum use USAMS?

b. Is access to USAMS limited by password control?

c. In order to establish initial accountability, has a registration number been assigned to each historical artifacts and work of art within twenty-four hours of receipt?

d. Is there a bound register used to record all assigned local registration numbers with a brief description of each historical artifact or work of art?

e. Are all receipt documents filed in the item's jacket file?

f. Has a copy of the receipt document been filed in the supporting document file as well as a record of the transaction to the appropriate document register?

g. Have all items been fully registered in USAMS within five working days of receipt in accordance para 2-3e?

h. Have all items received as gifts from a nongovernment source been registered in accordance with para 2-3 ?

i. Have any exceptions or extensions to the above requirements been approved in writing by the CMH?

j. Have all historical artifacts or works of art retained been cataloged in USAMS within thirty days of receipt?

k. Has the USAMS record been transmitted electronically or by disk to the Central Site Artifact Management System (CSAMS) at the CMH?

l. Is the USAMS record accurate, consistent, and thorough?

m. Has the CMH approved, in writing, any exceptions or extensions to the above requirements?

n. Does the museum have evidence of CMH approval in writing on a case-by-case basis for the acquisition of any historical artifacts received by the museum while in a non-certified status?

o. Is the museum able to demonstrate the procedures for the receipt, assessment, registration, cataloging, marking and storage of historical artifacts?

p. Does the museum have an area for segregating noncataloged artifacts and sufficient materials on hand for proper marking and storage?

q. Is each artifact and work of numbered separately?

r. Has care been exercised in marking the objects to avoid damage?

s. Is a historical property jacket maintained for each artifact, as appropriate?

t. Is all of the supporting documentation included in the property jacket, including copies of title, catalog and transfer documents, correspondence, photographs, and research material as appropriate?

u. Is there a photograph, photocopy, or digital image of each historical artifacts on file?

(1) Are the photographic prints stored in the property jacket?

(2) Are color slides or digital images appropriately stored and accessible?

(3) Are photographic negatives stored separately and the negative number recorded in the catalog portion of USAMS?

v. Are all property transactions including outgoing loans and transfers properly recorded and approved?

w. Has the museum maintained as a permanent record the source of acquisition file that it used prior to the implementation of USAMS?

x. Has the museum maintained as a permanent record the DA Form 2609 catalog record cards that it used prior to the implementation of USAMS?

y. Have the DA Forms 2609 been arranged in such a manner that individual catalog cards can be easily retrieved?

C-13. Incoming loans (para 2-6)

a. Has DA Form 5573-R (Loan Agreement) been used to document all incoming loan transactions?

b. Has the CMH been informed of all loans for periods of less than one year?

c. Has the CMH approved in writing all loans for periods of more than one year?

d. Does the museum have any outstanding loans that extend beyond a period of five years?

e. Does the museum have any indefinite loans?

f. Have all incoming loans to uncertified Army museums and historical collections, no matter what the length, been approved in writing by CMH?

g. Does the museum have any historical artifacts on loan from the private organization or association whose primary purpose is to support the museum?

h. Have copies of all loan documentation been sent to the CMH?

C-14. Preservation and conservation (para 3-17)

a. Has the museum met all the environmental standards for historical artifacts and works of art?

b. Are historical artifacts and works of art maintained in a stable environment and inspected regularly for signs of deterioration?

(1) Temperature and relative humidity:

(a) Is the temperature maintained at 68: F (plus or minus five degrees)?

(b) Is the relative humidity maintained at 50 percent (plus or minus 5 percent)?

(c) Is the temperature and relative humidity set within the acceptable range and maintained on a 24-hour basis, with not more than a 5-degree and/or a 5 percent variation from the established norm?

(d) Are the temperature and humidity monitored and recorded?

(2) Light:

(a) Are historical artifacts and works of art stored in total darkness as far as practical?

(b) Are the maximum acceptable visible light levels for objects on display set at 50 lux (5 foot candles) for highly sensitive objects (silk, watercolors, and paper artifacts); 150 lux (15 foot candles) for sensitive objects (oil paintings: leather: horn: wood that is painted, stained or varnished: plastics: or metals that are painted or varnished); 300 lux (30 foot candles) for insensitive objects (metal, glass, or ceramics)?

(c) Are historical objects and works of art on exhibit illuminated according to the sensitivity of the materials of which they are made?

(d) Is the ultraviolet light level for historical artifacts and works of art on display less than 75 microwatts per lumen?

(e) Are filters used to control U-V radiation?

(3) A pest-free environment:

(a) Are historical artifacts and works of art maintained in an environment free of pests (insects and animals) as far as practical?

(b) Is the environment free from microorganisms (mold and fungus) and other similar agents of deterioration as far as practical?

(c) Is the environment free from plants?

(d) Are all incoming artifacts and art inspected for infestation prior to storage or exhibit?

(e) Are procedures established for handling artifacts if an infestation is discovered, including segregation, and pest/microorganism/mold control procedures and records?

(4) Pollution-free environment:

(a) Are the collection storage and exhibition areas maintained free of dust and particulate matter and other gas pollutants as far as practical?

(b) Are all materials/supplies and equipment used to exhibit, store, house, or pack historical artifacts and works of art constructed of materials that are deemed museum-safe?

(5) Preventing mechanical damage:

(a) Are all historical artifacts and works of art handled in such a way as to preclude damage?

(b) Are any historical artifacts, no matter how sound their condition appears, serving in their original function or suffering fair wear and tear through consumptive use?

(c) Has the historical integrity of any artifact been compromised by alteration in any form including demilitarization?

(d) Have exceptions to policy on the consumptive use or the alteration of an artifact been granted in writing by the CMH on a case-by-case basis?

(6) Have all conservation and restoration projects undertaken received the written consent of the CMH?

(a) Prior to the performance of any detailed conservation work, has the museum produced or obtained a summary of the proposed treatment from the conservator or restorer?

(b) Have photographs been taken prior to any conservation or restoration work?

(c) Have only personnel qualified to do the work accomplished conservation and restoration?

(d) Has a record been maintained to document work performed and any parts added to the object?

(e) Have original parts removed been retained and marked with the catalog number of the source artifact?

(f) Is the restored artifact authentic to include its color, markings and finish?

(g) Have photographs been taken after the conservation or restoration to document the completed work?

(h) Did the conservator, upon completion of the treatment, provide a conservation treatment report?

(i) Are the photographs and reports permanently retained in the item's property jacket?

b. Has the museum developed local preservation and conservation SOP that addresses the following:

(1) An environmental strategy for the control of temperature, relative humidity, light, pests, biological infestation, gas, and particulate pollution?

(2) Methods for controlling the environment?

(3) Procedures for monitoring and recording the environment with appropriate equipment and calibrating the equipment as needed?

(4) Procedures for collecting and analyzing the recorded data?

(5) Procedures for responding to the analyzed data as required in order to implement any corrective actions to preserve and maintain the artifacts?

(6) Establishment of a log to document corrective actions taken to improve environmental conditions?

(7) Establishment of good housekeeping practices?

(8) Procedures for proper handling of historical artifacts and works of art?

(9) Procedures for making routine conservation assessments of historical artifacts and works of art in the collection?

(10) Establishment of annual training of staff on current, standard preventive conservation practices?

c. Have all historical artifacts and works of art been cleaned of chemical or radiological contamination?

d. Have any historical objects or works of art found to be contaminated been segregated?

e. Have objects having these types of contaminants as part of their original configuration (i.e., some domestic and foreign mortar sights have a radiological substance in the leveling fluid) been identified?

Note. Items having hazardous parts must be identified as such when seeking approval from the CMH Chief Curator to transfer to another museum or the Clearinghouse. Notify your local safety offices and hazardous materials offices if you have any questions regarding the safe handling of these types of objects.

C-15. Storage (para 2-12)

a. Are the museum artifact storage areas used only to store historical artifacts?

b. Are non-cataloged and contaminated artifacts stored separately from the regular artifact storage areas?

c. Are all items inspected for infestation before being placed in storage?

d. Is unaccompanied access to artifact storage areas limited to authorized personnel?

e. Is there on hand a current access roster for all authorized personnel?

f. Are the artifact storage areas large enough to permit storage without crowding objects not on exhibit?

g. Are the artifact storage areas large enough to permit growth of the collection and return of material from loan or exhibit?

h. Are there enough museum-quality cabinets, racks, shelves, and so on, available to store the artifacts?

Note. Museums needing this type of support equipment should notify the CMH for possible acquisition of excess identified by other museums or the Clearinghouse.

i. Are the artifact storage areas large enough to permit easy access to cabinets, racks, and shelves, with aisles wide enough for easy maneuvering of artifacts and storage units?

j. Are all historical artifacts logically stored in accordance with good conservation practice and to facilitate retrieval and research?

(1) Are the storage areas regularly cleaned without the use of materials or techniques that would harm the artifacts?

(2) Are artifacts stored in individual containers of inert or acid-free material, or in such a way as to prevent them from touching each other?

(3) Are artifacts stored in such a way as to prevent damage from abrasion or movement?

(4) Are large two-dimensional textiles, such as flags or tents, stored flat or properly rolled on cylindrical supports of museum-safe material and suspended horizontally?

(5) Are garments hung on padded hangers of a museum safe material or laid flat with proper support padding as appropriate for their age or condition?

(6) Are all weapons stored in racks or in containers of correct size, with padding and support to prevent damage?

(7) Are weapons easily accessible for inventory and removal?

(8) Are shelving and cabinets' elevated to minimize damage in the event of flooding?

(9) Are boxes containing artifacts overcrowded?

(10) Are items in boxes padded with inert material to prevent damage through mishandling?

(11) Are boxes shelved so that their contents are supported and the boxes will not be crushed?

C-16. Exhibits (para 3-16)

a. Does the museum exhibit only a portion its collection at any given time?

b. Do the exhibits follow the approved story line (except in the case of temporary or special exhibits) and present the topics in a logical manner for a wide range of audiences?

(1) Are exhibits effective, demonstrating good design, color, effective lighting, form, and so forth?

(2) Are labels and text effective, incorporated into the exhibit design, and visually accessible to the visitor (that is, appropriate type size and style)?

(3) Is there good space utilization and effective traffic flow in the exhibit gallery?

c. Has historical accuracy, both implied and explicit, been scrupulously preserved, and misrepresentations avoided both in content and in presentation?

d. Have artifacts been accurately identified, and are they appropriate to the exhibit in which they appear? (For example, is the cap on the mannequin appropriate for the uniform, and does it fit correctly? Is the equipment and weapon correct and properly arranged according to regulation or other documentation?)

e. Have museum standards for the preservation/conservation of historical artifacts been maintained and not compromised for the sake of the display?

(1) Is the environment in the exhibition area monitored and maintained at museum standard levels?

(2) Are exhibition cases, fixtures, and object supports chemically and physically safe for the artifacts they contain?

(3) Do the furniture and mounts for artifacts on exhibit provide adequate support?

(4) Are inert barrier materials properly placed to prevent contact between hostile surfaces?

(5) Has the museum staff whose duties include working with artifacts been adequately trained in basic care and handling of objects?

(6) Is the maintenance of exhibits programmed as a part of the planning phases of the exhibit?

(7) Has a walk-through inspection of exhibit areas been conducted at least once a day to identify potential security/preservation/conservation problems?

(8) Whenever possible, are original artifacts displayed in an enclosed exhibit case or frame?

(9) Are artifacts rotated in and out of exhibits on a regularly scheduled basis to prevent deterioration?

(10) Is the rotation schedule based on the sensitivity of the artifact in question on a case-by-case basis?

(11) Are objects that are "highly sensitive" or "sensitive" to light rotated on and off exhibit more frequently than other objects?

Note. Care should be taken to have artifacts available that can be rotated into an exhibit without the need for extensive refabrication and without changing the exhibit meaning.

(12) Has care been taken to ensure the preservation of all original items that are not easily moved, such as vehicles, aircraft, and heavy equipment?

(13) Have artifacts with original paint or finish been repainted, polished, or otherwise altered without the written consent of the CMH?

(14) Have mounts or exhibit supports damaged, stressed, or in any way altered the artifacts being displayed?

e. Are exhibit cases and units well constructed of quality materials?

f. Are exhibit cases and units constructed to conform to the physical security requirements of AR 190-51?

g. Have fire-proof or flame-retardant materials (Class A flame spread, under 25) been used in construction of exhibit cases, units, panels, and exhibit props?

h. Have exceptions authorized by the fire marshal been documented in writing?

i. Are all items on outdoor exhibit regularly and properly maintained to retard deterioration?

j. Have efforts been made to exhibit large items indoors or under protective cover?

k. Have any items on outdoor exhibit been painted or polished for purely cosmetic reasons?

l. Are items on outdoor exhibition painted in correct colors and appropriately marked in accordance with documented research?

m. Do vehicles and other oversize artifacts rest on inert supports or pads that keep them from coming into direct contact with the ground?

n. Do signs notify visitors not to climb on exhibits or damage historical and nonhistorical property?

C-17. Museum support articles (para 3-8)

a. Do reproductions accurately portray the objects they represent, utilizing materials and construction techniques that approximate the original?

(1) Are reproductions marked indelibly with the words "REPRO and U.S. Government Property," followed by the date of manufacture?

(2) Are the markings placed so as not to diminish the exhibit value of the item?

(3) Are reproductions used in exhibits identified as such in the label?

b. Are original artifacts being used as "museum props" or as support articles?

C-18. Programs (para 3-20)

a. Has the museum developed and maintained educational materials to support the training function of its local command?

b. Does the museum perform its training mission through exhibits, group tours, special programs, publications, and other activities?

c. Does the museum provide or participate in training classes, lectures, audio-visual presentations, or other training support to military schools, Active Army units, Reserve Component units, and Reserve Officer Training Corps organizations supported by the local installation?

d. Does the museum perform its educational mission through outreach programs and activities such as lectures, guest speakers, school presentations, multimedia presentations, and living history programs?

e. Is the museum actively involved, through the Public Affairs Office and other means, in informing the local military and civilian communities of its programs?

Appendix D
Classification System for Registering Artifacts

D-1. Function

The Classification System provides for a systematic division of artifact in categories for entry into the Universal Site Artifact Management System (USAMS).

D-2. Purpose

The primary purpose of this classification system is to speed the processing time of the computer. Augmentation of this system is authorized for historical collections that are not equipped with USAMS.

D-3. General

a. Based on a comparison of classifications systems and a review of the definitions of various class categories, the following classifications are based on the premise that all artifacts fall broadly into three categories:

(1) Those items relating to an individual;

(2) Those items relating to an organization;

(3) Those items relating to surroundings (the work and living environment).

b. The primary purpose of this classification system is to speed the processing time of the computer. Augmentation of this system is authorized for historical collections that are not equipped with USAMS.

c. Classification is not a part of the nomenclature of an object.

D-4. Classification

a. There are 11 classes of objects, the 12th being an unknown or unclassifiable entry.

b. By category, these classes are--

(1) CLOTHING--Garment, attire or raiment used to cover, protect, or adorn the human body.

(a) Headgear--Any covering or ornament for the head to include caps, hats, hoods, turbans, shakos, helmets, and so on.

(b) Garments--Articles of clothing, or adornments to include undergarments, outer wear, sleepwear, and protective clothing.

(c) Footwear--Any item worn on the feet to include socks, shoes, boots, moccasins, rubbers, overshoes, and so on.

(d) Accessories--Any article worn to complete a clothing outfit to include scarves, ties, belts, gloves, purse, leggings, spurs, and so on.

(2) INSIGNIA--A badge, device, or distinguishing mark; a visible symbol of rank, organization, qualification, or identification worn by an individual.

(a) Grade--A badge, ornament, or devise that indicates the rank, grade, or duties of the wearer.

(b) Organizational--A badge, ornament, or device that indicates the agency, service, branch, or unit of the wearer.

(c) National--A badge, ornament, or device that indicates the nation with which the individual is identified.

(d) State--A badge, ornament, or device that indicates the State with which the individual is identified.

(e) Qualification--A badge, ornament, or device awarded to an individual for the successful completion of a special criterion or schooling.

(f) Decoration--A badge, ribbon, medal, or device awarded for valor or honorable service.

(g) Identifying--A badge, ornament, or device which identifies the individual, such as ID tags, nametag, and so on.

(h) Designating--A badge, ornament, or device used to place or identify an individual within a larger group, such as leadership tabs, tactical marks, class marks, and so on.

(3) SUBSISTENCE--Items which support the means of living, including food and packaging, money, and items of creature comfort.

(a) Rations--Any substance originally intended to be eaten for nourishment, along with containers, wrappers, boxes, or packing material in which food or ration items were originally contained and any accessory packs or similar items received with the ration.

(b) Personal effects--Items not provided by issue but authorized for use by an individual for hygiene, creature comfort, or personal use.

(c) Currency--Items used as accepted means of exchange to include bank notes, coins, script, tokens, and so on.

(d) Medicines--Items originally intended for curing the ill, along with containers, wrappings, boxes, or packaging materials for drugs, herbs, pills, ointments, powders, and so on.

(4) EQUIPAGE--Any implement, tool, device, accouterment, set, or outfit used to equip an individual, organization, or animal to accomplish its purpose, excluding ordnance and transport items.

(a) Accouterments--All items and accessories that make up the gear of the individual soldier, including the equipment belt, cartridge boxes, harness, straps, carrier, scabbards, appendages, and accessories.

(b) Equipment--All containers, carrying mechanisms, straps, holders, furnishings, saddles, harness, appendages, and accessories used by an organization or on animals.

(c) Implements--All tools, musical, medical and scientific instruments, data-processing equipment, machines, sets, kits, outfits and all serial-numbered items not otherwise accounted for.

(d) Communications-electronics--All radios, radar, telephone, telegraph, electrical and electronic devices, and components.

(e) Medical--All medical sets, kits, instruments, accessories and components, not including accouterment items such as the first-aid packet carried by individual (nonmedical) personnel.

(5) ORDNANCE--All weapons and ammunition used for warfare and their accessories or parts, including all self-propelled guns, artillery, mortars, tanks, vessels, and aircraft whose primary purpose was destroying the enemy.

(a) Launchers--Any device used to hold a rocket or missile in position for firing, to include bows, catapults, tube launchers, or structural devices.

(b) Edged weapons--Any type of cut, slash, or thrust device designed for combat, to include knives, daggers, pole arms, swords, sabers, bayonets, and the like.

(c) Small arms--All individual and small-caliber crew-served weapons generally less than 20 mm, not part of another weapon system, including pistols, shotguns, muskets, rifles, sub-machine guns and machine guns.

(d) Artillery--Generally, all gunpowder firing weapons 20mm and above, including mortars, mobile artillery, and fixed artillery, as well as air defense and antitank weapons.

(e) Systems--All complex weapons systems and components required for operation, including tanks, self-propelled guns, aircraft, and vessels.

(f) Missiles--Any objects that are propelled at a target. Term includes rocks, arrows, depth charges, bombs, rockets, and complex ballistic missiles.

(g) Explosives--Any substance that when ignited or detonated chemically reacts in a violent manner, such as mines, grenades, and charges. This also includes inert or nonfunctioning copies or training examples and their packaging.

(h) Pyrotechnic ammunition--Substances that by burning are used as signaling devices, concealment, or as a weapon simulators. Includes smoke grenades, flares, booby trap simulators, grenade and ground burst simulators, and so on.

(i) Artillery ammunition--Fixed, semifixed, and separate loading ammunition, including projectiles, fuses, casings, and charges fired from all types and caliber of artillery, 20 mm and above.

(j) Small-arms ammunition--Projectiles, casings, and complete cartridges used in all types of small arms less than 20 mm, including linked and belted ammunition.

(6) TRANSPORT--Any means of conveyance for passenger or cargo, including accessories and parts. Would also include any passenger or cargo-type vehicle modified for combat but not originally designed for such. Excludes tanks, combat aircraft, and so on.

(a) Land--Any type of land vehicle, pushed, pulled, or self-propelled, including sleds, carts, wagons, coaches, automobiles, busses, and so on.

(b) Air--Aircraft of any type, fixed wing, rotary wing or glider, but not used as a weapons system or platform.

(c) Marine (water)--Any form of watercraft not used as a weapons system or platform to include boats, barges, and ships.

(d) Space--Any spacecraft, capsule, rocket, or parts thereof used for space work, exploration, or travel.

(7) EMBLEM--A sign or representative device; a visible symbol of a nation, State, organization, or personage of note. Includes flags, vehicle plates, heraldic items (not worn on the person), and tactical markings.

(a) National--A device used as the symbol of a national government, such as the coat of arms, flags, banners, and so on.

(b) State--A symbol of a State, including the State flag, coat of arms, etc.

(c) Organizational--A device used to symbolize any agency, military unit, paramilitary groups, police, political parties, schools, clubs, and so on. Colors and standards would be included in this category.

(d) Designating--A device used to identify a group within a larger group. Items would include tactical signs, designating flags, recognition panels, and so on.

(e) Identifying--A device used to identify a commander, leader, or individual of note. May include flags, automobile plates, coats of arms, and so forth.

(8) DOCUMENTS--Written, printed, or electronically recorded information or reference material, including books, papers, forms, publications, maps, and sound recordings. Excludes photographs, posters, motion pictures, and the like.

(a) Papers--Personnel or official letters, journals, diaries, reports, forms, requisitions, vouchers, and so forth.

(b) Publications--Any item published for wider distribution such as orders, books, pamphlets, manuals, regulations, and circulars.

(c) Cartographic--Any map, chart, terrain sketch (not artwork), either hand drawn or in printed form.

(d) Recordings--Sound, voice, or music recordings, tapes, cylinders, and so on.

(9) ARTWORK--Creative work; a representation, depiction, or design, including paintings, graphic arts, sculpture (three-dimensional art), textile art, miniatures, and photographic and electronic imagery.

(a) Fine Art--Works of art, such as paintings done in a medium of oil, acrylic, or watercolor on a textile, paper, or ridged support; drawings done in graphite, charcoal, crayon, pastels, or ink, generally on a paper or cardboard; sculpture accomplished through carving, modeling, statuary, or ceramics; or textile art such as painted, dyed, embroidered, or appliqued fabric.

(b) Graphics--Artwork produced or reproduced by printing or impression, including aquatint, steelplate, copperplate, half-tone plate, wood cut, lithography, chromolithography, or polylithography.

(c) Photo imagery--A representation or image on a sensitized surface by the chemical action of light. Includes still photography, motion-picture photography and electronic video.

(10) FURNISHINGS--All moveable objects in a room that equip it for use--living, work, and so on. Includes furniture, utensils, lighting devices, toys, and office supplies. Excludes artwork, organizational equipment, personal effects, and trophies.

(a) Camp--Items used as temporary furnishings for a civilian or military camp. Includes cots, field desks, folding stools, camp chests, and so on.

(b) Household--Items used to furnish a house or an abode such as curtains, furniture, lighting devices, toys, utensils, and appliances.

(c) Office--All items used to furnish an office, place of work, school, or church, to include chairs, office desks, office furnishings, and office supplies.

(d) Garrison--All items used to furnish a barracks, headquarters, orderly room, fortification, and so on.

(e) Hospital--All items used to furnish a hospital, clinic, or aid station, such as beds, china, linens, blankets, and so on.

(f) Structural Findings--Any structures, structural items, or architectural appointments contained within the museum and no longer used for their original purpose. May include doors, windows, stained glass, flooring, walls, paneling, brick, and so forth.

(11) TROPHIES--Any memento, prize, or memorial acquired through travel, service, athletics, testimonials, and so on.

(a) Mementos--Any item retained as a keepsake or souvenir.

(b) Awards--A plaque, trophy, or certificate received as the result of winning or placing in an athletic event or contest.

(c) Memorials--An item received as a testimonial for service or support provided to a nation, organization, or person of note. Excludes medals, emblems, presentation swords, or other presentation weapons.

(12) OTHER--Unclassifiable, contact the CMH for assistance.

Appendix E
Nomenclature Guide

E-1. Function

Nomenclature is a system or set of terms used for identification of artifacts for entry into USAMS.

E-2. Purpose

The primary purpose of nomenclature is to provide for uniform rules of entry and to assist in a systematic approach to identifying artifacts.

E-3. General

Nomenclature is an important part of the Army Museum Information System for two reasons:

a. Historical artifacts are unique and cannot be grouped under a stock number system.

b. The Army Historical Collection contains items from many nations and many time periods that do not have official nomenclature available.

E-4. Nomenclature construction

a. Considering the amount of resources and difficulties it would require to put together a comprehensive list of official nomenclature, another method had to be found to accommodate the Army Museum Information System. As developed, AMIS nomenclature is a hierarchical system that describes an object based on its function or material description with limited data fields and strict rules of entry. While classification is used in ordering the system, class and subclass are not a part of the nomenclature.

b. There are a finite number of fields used to establish the nomenclature of an object, however, not all fields are used for every object. In each case there are some common fields to which are added some specific fields based on the object. Generally, there are two groupings of elements--

(1) Fields required for three-dimensional objects.

(2) A few specialized fields for artwork and documents.

c. Rules of entry--

(1) Use only one or two words for object name.

(2) Use as few words as possible for modifiers.

(3) Do not repeat words.

(4) Be consistent.

(5) Provide only the information requested in each element. For example, don't put the color in a modifier element; put the color in the color element.

(6) Do not use classification terms as object names. For example, the term "insignia" is used to describe a class. Terms such as "badge" or "device" should be used as the object name rather than insignia. Therefore, "Insignia, Distinctive Unit, 23d Infantry," should be "Badge, Distinctive Unit, 23d Infantry."

(7) While using official nomenclature is not required, use of official terms is required. Therefore "leggings" are not "spats," "Breeches" are not Jodhpurs," and a "Carrier" is not a "Bag." In regards to modern military objects remember--look at the tag!

E-5. Nomenclature fields

a. There are a limited number of essential fields that, if completed accurately, are all that is needed to identify an object.

b. Not all of the elements are needed for all objects, and, in the case of artwork and documents, some specialized elements are required.

c. The basic fields in the following sequence are those that make up the nomenclature for objects. The alternate fields required for artwork and documents are also listed.

(1) Object Name         Object Name

(2) Modifier (Attribute)       Medium

(3) Modifier (Qualifier)        Medium Support

(4) Civilian (Clothing)         Artist

(5) Officer/Enlisted         Title

(6) Gender (Clothing)        Subject

(7) Affiliation

(8) Primary Material(s)

(9) Color/Finish

(10) Model/Pattern

(11) Model Name

(12) Serial Number

(13) Size         Dimension (H x W x D)

(14) Country         Country

(15) Year of Manufacture (Circa or Exact)        Year of Manufacture

d. The fields are defined as follows:

(1) Object Name: A descriptive noun by which an object is designated; the entry should be one word such as "Coat," "Rifle," "Cup," etc. The exceptions are words like "Cartridge Box," or "Rifle-Musket." For example, a "Cartridge Box" is an accouterment used by the soldier to carry his cartridges, however a "Box, Cartridge," is a cardboard container in which the cartridges are shipped from the factory.

(2) Modifier 1: words that more closely define the attributes of the object name; or Medium: used only for works of art, medium is the primary material or technique used in the production of the work in question. For example, oils, watercolor, acrylics, pencil, pen and ink, bronze, plaster, or cross-stitch, to name a few.

(3) Modifier 2: defines a quality, character, or characteristic of an object or invests a property in the object. example, Object Name: Coat; Modifier 1: Combat; Modifier 2: Tropical; or Medium Support: used only for works of art, medium support is the material upon which the medium is applied, including canvas, paper, cloth, wood, and so on.

(4) Civilian: use if the item is civilian, otherwise military is assumed; orArtist/Author: the name of the person who created the work.

(5) Officer/Enlisted: distinguishes between style or quality and shows that a military item was intended for and used by one or the other categories. As with everything, there is an exception. If an enlisted soldier wore an officer's shirt, this fact would be reflected in the modifier. For example: Shirt, Coat Style, Officer Quality, Enlisted; orTitle: The name of the book or artwork.

(6) Gender: shows if the item were intended for use by a male or female. This is important for clothing only; or Subject: a brief description of what the artwork or document is about.

(7) Affiliation: the connection with a group or organization in a generic sense, even though the object may never have been used by that group or organization. For example, an Eagle, Globe, and Anchor Cap Badge is affiliated with the U.S. Marine Corps because it is their symbol, even though a marine may never have used the badge.

(8) Primary material(s): broadly speaking, the substances from which the item was made. If the item is 40 percent steel and 60 percent wood, then the primary materials would be "wood and steel." Note: if you really know what the substance is, then list it. For example, if you know the item is made of iron, then enter "Iron." However, if you cannot tell if it is iron or steel, then list the material as "Metal." Remember, look for label information!

(9) Color/Finish: indicate only the major color or finish of the object. Anything more than three or four major colors would be indicated as "multicolored." Color may be natural to the item or applied. Finishes might include "bright" or "matte." A rifle, for example, might be "bright," "browned," or "blued."

(10) Model/Pattern: used to distinguish a specific type of object within a series of like objects. Other terms which are used for this purpose include, but are not limited to,"Type," "Mark," "Number," etc. These terms may be combined with a year, letter, Arabic numeral or Roman numeral, or combination thereof.

(11) Model Name: an official name applied generally to a weapon, weapon system, vehicle or aircraft. For example, Gun, Self-Propelled, 40 mm, M42, "Duster," or Tank, Full Tracked, 75 mm, "Sherman."

(12) Size: generally, a series of graduated measurements applied to manufactured articles that help define the item. This should not be confused with dimension. Examples of size include--Small, Medium, Large, Extra Large, Size 12, Size 16 1/2 x 33, Size 42 Long, 12 pdr, 3-inch, Cal.30, etc.; orDimension: the space occupied by or the magnitude of an object, that is, Height X Width X Length (or Depth).

(13) Serial Number: a series of numbers or a letter-number combination applied by the manufacturer to uniquely identify an object such as a vehicle, weapon, or other items of sensitive equipment.

(14) Country: Country where the item was used or intended for. For example, a Spanish Mauser Rifle was produced in Germany for the Spanish Army, the country would be Spain.

(15) Year of Manufacture: the year that an object was manufactured or rebuilt. The date is either exact or circa. The circa designation indicates that the actual date is not known but falls within plus or minus five years of the date given.

e. Examples of nomenclature:

(1) Coat, service, four-pocket, military, officer, man's, U.S. Army, wool, olive drab, P.1942, 42L, U.S., C.1943.

(2) Rifle, magazine, semiautomatic, U.S. Army, M1, Garand, Caliber .30, U.S., 1944.

(3) Painting, Watercolor, on paper, Charles Johnson Post, We Leave the Trenches, Soldiers of the 71st NY, USV in Cuba in 1898, 22 X 34 inches, U.S., 1936.

Appendix F
Museum Standards of Conduct and Professionalism Guidelines

F-1. Function

The Museum Standards of Conduct and Professionalism Guidelines augment the primary sources of authority for ethics and the standards of conduct specifically in regards to museum operations.

F-2. Purpose

The primary purpose of the Standards of Conduct and Professionalism Guidelines is to provide museum specific ethical guidance to professional staff members of Army museums.

F-3. General

Staff members owe primary loyalty to the Army, their museum and the Center of Military History. Activities that conflict with this loyalty or cause the staff to favor outside or personal interests over those of their institution must be avoided. Critical areas where staff members must avoid conflicts of interest are: personal collecting, dealing, receiving gifts, and outside activities. In all such areas, open and frank disclosure by the staff member is essential. Section 2635, title 5, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Standards of Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch, 3 February 1993, Office of Government Ethics (OGE) Rules, and the Joint Ethics Regulation (JER) DOD 5500.7-R, are the primary sources of guidance for ethics and the standards of conduct. The guidance, which follows, outlines specific circumstances in the management of collections, personal dealings, and professional development as applied under these rules.

F-4. Personal collecting

The United States Army neither encourages nor discourages museum personnel from having collections within their area of specialty. Museum staff members should, however, follow the personal collecting guidelines below to comply with the restrictions of OGE rules.

a. Collections acquired before employment, family inheritances, and collection outside the museum's field of interest are not covered by the OGE rules.

b. Pursuant to 5 CFR 2635.802(b), chapter 2, at any time during Federal employment staff members who collect should inform their supervisor in writing as to the nature and theme of their collecting. At a minimum, if the staff member is required to file a financial disclosure report, and if the market value of the collection exceeds $1,000, the staff member will report the collection in Part 1 of the OGE Form 450 (Executive Branch Confidential Financial Disclosure Report).

c. Staff members must never compete with the Army Historical Collection for an object. The staff member should give the Army the first option to acquire an object before obtaining it themselves for their personal collection. See 5 CFR 2645.802(b), JER, chapter 2.

d. Staff members must not use the resources of the Museum Division to store or conserve personal collection items. See 5 CFR 2635.704; JER, chapter 2.

e. Staff members may lend objects to the Army for an exhibit or research purposes under the following conditions:

(1) The objects will be loaned anonymously;

(2) Similarly, loaned items used for illustrations in publications will be credited anonymously;

(3) The museum director will approve all such loans before they are made. Loans made by the museum director must be approved by the Army Chief Curator. All loans will be fully documented in accordance with this regulation.

f. If a museum staff member decides to divest himself or herself of part or all of a personal collection, it would reflect a high degree of professionalism and commendable loyalty to the Army to offer the item or collection to the Army Museum System first. However, by law, such an offer is not required, and no adverse action will be taken against individuals who do not give the Army right of first refusal in the sale of personal collections.

F-5. Dealing

a. As defined in 5 CFR 2635.502, JER, chapter 2, commercial dealing in collectibles and antiquities would predictably require museum staff members to disqualify themselves from matters so central or critical to the performance of their official duties that their ability to perform their official duties would be materially impaired. Accordingly, pursuant to 5 CFR 2635.802(b), JER, chapter 2, staff members shall not become involved in commercial dealings of collectibles and antiquities that fall within the scope of their individual responsibilities in maintaining the Army Historical Collection. In this context, a staff member must not act as a dealer, be employed by such a dealer, or have financial interest in such a dealership. (Note: This prohibition does not apply to occasional sales to upgrade a personal collection.)

b. Pursuant to 18 USC 208(a) and 5 CFR 2635.402, 2635.502, and 2635.702, JER, chapter 2, a museum staff member shall not use his or her position within an Army museum to gain favorable consideration in a private transaction from any dealer with whom the staff member also has business on behalf of his or her museum. Under conflict of interest laws and regulations, the interests of a spouse, dependent children, and other family members in the immediate household are the same as those of the Federal employee. Actions of the immediate family members are accountable to the employee for conflict of interest purpose.

c. Neither family members nor friends are entitled to represent or use the authority of the museum staff member, the museum director, the Chief Curator, the Chief of Military History, the Center of Military History, or the U.S. Army in their personal dealings.

F-6. Professionalism

It is vital for museum staff members to obtain the respect and trust of colleagues, both within the museum and within the Army Museum System as a whole. To do so, one must display the qualities of a professional. These qualities are specialized knowledge, technical expertise, and adherence to ethical standards. This means that museum staff members must be knowledgeable about objects, about museum practices, about the U.S. Army, and about the Army's standards of conduct. Therefore, museum staff members will--

a. Continue to pursue knowledge of material culture and to develop their technical expertise, especially in regard to the collection with which they are working. This pursuit should not be limited to the confines of the office or the regular workday.

b. Strive for excellence within their areas of specialty and understand their professional role within the total context of their museum.

c. Cheerfully carry out their duties according to established regulations, policies, and guidelines and under the direction of their supervisors.

d. Wholeheartedly and constructively cooperate with their colleagues in the furtherance of the goals and purpose of their museum and the Army Museum System.

Appendix G
Organizational Historical Property Turn-In from Inactivated and Redesignated Units

G-1. Function

This appendix for a systematic approach for the turn-in of organizational historical artifacts from units that are inactivating or have been redesignated.

G-2. Purpose

The primary purpose is to inform commanders and action officers on the procedures to follow in the event of a unit inactivation or redesignation.

G-3. Instructions

Within 10 working days of receipt of inactivation or redesignation orders, TOE units will request disposition instructions for historical property in their possession from the U.S. Army Center of Military History, ATTN: DAMH-MDC, 103 Third Avenue, Fort McNair, D.C. 20319-5058.

a. The Center of Military History will respond with a letter of instruction (LOI) containing specific disposition instructions and an authorizing document number, which is the unit's authority to store this material. (See fig. G-1 ) No material may be sent to storage prior to receipt of the document number. Historical property and colors will be retired in a timely manner, so there is sufficient time for the unit to complete all paperwork and shipping prior to personnel departure.

b. The LOI will include specific packing requirements. Shipping costs are at the expense of the unit. All property will be transferred using DA Form 3161 (Request for Issue or Turn-In), and DD Form 1348-1A.

c. Within 30 days of receiving disposition instructions, all colors and historical property will be inventoried, and a copy of this inventory, preferably on DA Form 3161, will be submitted to DAMH-MDC. This will serve as a planning document for allocation of storage space. The inventory, if on DA Form 3161, may also serve as the transfer document.

d. Per 10 USC 4565, AR 840-10, and this regulation, the retention of any organizational colors or unit guidons by individuals, or the disposal of this material to locations other than that ordered by the LOI, is unauthorized.

e. All historical weapons must be registered with the DOD Small Arms Serialization Program (DODSASP) prior to shipment, and those weapons must then be formally transferred on DODSASP account to the CMH storage facility. Procedures for accomplishing this requirement will be included in disposition instructions.

f. Unit fund property is private property, held collectively by unit members, and will not be stored. Unit fund custodians must determine disposition of this material locally, in accordance with AR 215-1.

g. Items of unit fund property that are considered to be of historical significance must be formally transferred by the unit fund custodian to the Government to be accepted for storage. Items not formally transferred will be screened for disposal. Transfer of title may be accomplished using DA Form 5572-R (Gift Agreement), or by memorandum for record from the unit fund custodian. Items must be catalogued on DA Form 2609 prior to shipment, with copies of all paperwork included in the shipment.

h. Unit records, lineage and honors certificates, unit history files, photographs and other archival items will be retired in accordance with disposition instructions.

i. Separate disposition instructions must be requested for displayed combat vehicles or other large items held by units.




Figure G-1. Sample Disposition Instruction-continued





Figure G-1. Sample Disposition Instruction


Appendix H
Command Supply Discipline Program

H-1. Function

Command Supply Discipline Minimum Requirements Listing is to ensure that evaluations of historical material management are conducted by all museums, museum activities, and the Army Historical Clearinghouse.

H-2. Purpose

The purpose of this program is a review of supply responsibilities by the command immediately superior to the unit or activity being inspected to determine regulatory compliance.

H-3. Instructions

The following questions provide minimal requirements for developing local CSDP checklists by custodians of Army historical artifacts.

a. Do you have all the applicable regulations on hand to assist you in maintaining formal accountability for all historical and nonhistorical property?

b. Do you register each item within 5 days? Do you record all the essential information in a bound log?

c. Are you using USAMS to record all property to the CSAMS?

d. Do you have jacket file for each item of your collection?

e. Are all loaned items documented and approved?

f. Have you completed all required inventories this review period?

g. Have all new items been calaloged and entered in the USAMS within thirty days?

h. Do you maintain a supporting document file?

i. Do you report all changes to the DODSASP for all weapons in your collection?

j. What is your DODSASP compatibility rate?

k. Do you have any open transactions that exceed 30 days?

Appendix I
Management Control Evaluation Checklist

I-1. Function

This checklist covers the administration of historical artifacts and museums in the Army.

I-2. Purpose

The purpose of this checklist is to assist assessable unit managers and Management Control Administrators (MCAs) in evaluating the key management controls outlined below. It is not intended to cover all controls.

I-3. Instructions

Answers must be based upon the actual testing of key management controls for example, document analysis, direct observation, sampling, simulation, etc.). Answers that indicate deficiencies must be explained and corrective action indicated in supporting documentation. These key management controls must be formally evaluated at least once every 5 years. Certification that this evaluation has been conducted must be accomplished on DA Form 11-2-R (Management Control Evaluation Certification Statement).

I-4. Test questions

a. Is there a master plan with the appropriate written administrative documents/records on hand? ( para 3-7 )

b. Are there physical security records, including weapons inventories (quarterly and semiannual), results of last physical security inspection, and a physical security plan? ( para 3-18 )

c. Are there personnel positions sufficient to meet mission requirements, including administration, accountability of property, and physical security, and protection of the artifacts? ( para 3-9 )

d. Are staff members knowledgeable of Army material culture history, particularly materiel relevant to their collection? (para 3-9)

e. Has fire suppression and smoke detection systems been provided in both public galleries and artifact storage areas? (para 3-18)

f. Have intrusion detection systems been provided in both public galleries and in artifact storage areas? (para 3-18)

g. Is the security of weapons in both storage and on display checked regularly? ( para 2-13 )

h. Does the museum acquire artifacts commensurate with its mission and scope-of-collection statements? ( para 2-5 )

i. Can the museum document U.S. Army ownership and the status all artifacts on hand and on loan? (para 2-5)

j. Has a dollar value been applied to all historical artifacts and art in the custody of the museum as required by Congress? (para 2-5)

k. Have all historical artifacts and art been recorded within 24 hours of receipt? ( para 2-7 )

l. Is there a bound register used to record all assigned local registration numbers with a brief description of the historical artifact or work of art? (para 2-7)

m. Have all items been fully registered in USAMS within 5 working days of receipt? (para 2-7)

n. Have all retained historical artifacts or works of art been cataloged in USAMS within 30 days? (para 2-7)

o. Have copies of the receipt document been filed in the supporting document file, as well as a record of the transaction to the appropriate document register? (para 2-7)

p. Is a historical property jacket maintained for each artifact, as appropriate? ( para 2-7 )

q. Has the USAMS record been transmitted electronically or by disk to the CSAMS at the CMH? (para 2-7)

r. Has a DA Form 5573-R (Loan Agreement) been used to document all incoming loan transactions? ( para 2-6 )

s. Does the museum have any indefinite loans? (para 2-6)

t. Are historical artifacts and works of art maintained in a stable environment and inspected regularly for signs of deterioration? ( para 3-17 )

u. Are historical objects and works of art on exhibit illuminated according to the sensitivity of the materials from which they are made? (para 3-17)

v. Has a local preservation and conservation standing operating procedures (SOP) been developed? (para 3-17)

Glossary

Abbreviations

AMC

Army Materiel Command

AMIS

Army Museum Information System

AAO

Artifact Accountable Officer

ARO

Artifact Responsible Officer

ASA (IL&E)

Assistant Secretary of the Army, Installation Logistics and Environment

CCN

Central Control Number

CFR

Code of Federal Regulation

CMH

Center of Military History

CMH

Chief of Military History

CONUS

continental United States

CSAMS

Central Site Artifact Management System

CTA

common table of allowances

DA

Department of the Army

DAS

Director of the Army Staff

DoD

Department of Defense

DODSASP

Department of Defense Small Arms Serialization Program

DPTMS

Director of Plans, Training, Mobilization, and Security

DSN

Defense Switched Network

fax

facsimile

FOA

field operating agency

HAZMAT

Hazardous Materials

HM

Hazardous Materials

HQDA

Headquarters, Department of the Army

ICP

inventory control point

JER

Joint Ethics Regulation

MACOM

major Army command

MOA

Memorandum of Agreement

MOU

Memorandum of Understanding

MTOE

modification table of organization and equipment

MWR

morale, welfare, and recreation

NAFI

Nonappropriated fund instrumentality

NARA

National Archives and Records Administration

NRC

Nuclear Regulatory Commission

OGE

Office of Government Ethics

OPM

Office of Personnel Management

OSHA

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

PAO

public affairs office

PO

Private Organization

REPRO

Reproduction

SA

Secretary of the Army

SOP

standing operating procedure

TDA

table of distribution and allowances

TOE

table of organization and equipment

USACFSC

United States Army Community and Family Support Center

USAMS

Universal Site Artifact Management System

USARS

United States Army Regimental System

USC

United States Code

Terms

Accession (See Registration.)

The permanent addition of historical property to the Army Historical Collection.

Accountability

Obligation to keep records of property, documents, or funds, such as identification data, gains, losses, dues in, dues out, and balances on hand or in use.

Antique Firearm

Any firearm with a matchlock, flintlock, percussion cap (or similar type of ignition system) manufactured in or before 1898; and any replica of any firearm described above, if such replica is not designed or redesigned for using rimfire or conventional centerfire fixed ammunition that is no longer manufactured in the United States and which is not readily available in the normal channels of commercial trade.

Artifact Accountable Officer (AAO)

The person officially appointed in writing by the Chief of Military History to maintain a formal set of accounting records for the Army Historical Collection. This person may or may not have physical possession of the artifacts.

Artifact Responsible Officer (ARO)

The person officially appointed in writing, by the artifact accountable officer (AAO), to ensure that for historical property and funds entrusted to his or her possession, command, or supervision, that proper custody and safekeeping are provided.

Army Historical Collection

The entire collection of Army historical property under the control of the Chief of Military History, to include historical artifacts in the custody of certified Army museums, museum activities, historical collections, and the Clearinghouse, installations, units, or agencies.

Army Historical Clearinghouse

A repository for all Army historical artifacts not in the custody of museums, museum activities, historical collections, and installations, units, or agencies.

Army Museum System

All of the recognized museums and historical collections of the U.S. Army (including the Reserve Components) as designated by the CMH and under the staff supervision of the CMH.

Army Property

All property legally belonging to the U.S. Army, which was acquired by expenditure of appropriated funds, received as a donation, or otherwise generated in the course of daily functioning, as determined by law. All Army historical property is Army property.

Art

Cultural property that has been accessioned into the Army Historical Collection or Army Art Central Collection. All art, upon designation, becomes the responsibility of the CMH.

Artifact

See historical artifact.

Artifact Conservation/ Preservation Plan

The document outlining the overall conservation strategy, including the recurring schedule of assessment for the items in the collection, regularly scheduled maintenance, and actions required for the accomplishment of collection preservation and conservation.

Associated Items

When used in regards to flags or colors, refers to poles, silver rings, streamers, finials and so on, needed for a complete, displayable item.

Central Catalog of Historical Property

The Army Museum Information System--a consolidated catalog maintained by the CMH for recording all historical property in the U.S. Army.

Central Control Number

A centrally assigned catalog number applied to all historical property accessioned into the Army Historical Collection.

Certification

Received from the Department of the Army, certification shows that a museum meets or exceeds the minimum professional standards for Army museums as prescribed in this regulation.

Certified Army Museum

An appropriated fund entity that is a permanent historical activity possessing a historical collection housed in a building or a part thereof, specially designed for the exclusive use of the museum, which is open to the military and civilian visitor at regularly scheduled hours and is in the care of a professional staff that performs curatorial functions, training, education, and related historical duties full-time, and meets the requirements of this regulation.

Collection

The assortment of historical property in the custody of a particular organization, installation, agency, museum, or museum activity.

Collection Content Plan

The document by which the museum's collection is analyzed to see what essential items are needed to meet mission needs and complete collection requirements. For example, a rifle in the collection that requires a proper bayonet and sling. This document becomes the basis for submitting a requirement list to the CMH.

Colors

Set of National and Organizational Colors as carried by a specified color bearing organization.

Color

The term "Color" when used alone refers to the National or United States Color as carried by a specified color-bearing organization.

Condemned Combat Materiel

Individual items of military equipment, cited on the U.S. Munitions List (22 CFR 121), utilized in a primary combat role, but no longer usable for its original intended purpose due to the deterioration of its physical condition by use, age, or design. Similar items may still be in use in the active operational inventory, but specific items may be condemned due to circumstances such as damage or wear and tear.

Condition code

A two-digit code consisting of an alpha supply condition code in the first digit and a numeric or alpha disposal condition code in the second digit. A combination of the supply condition code and the disposal condition code, which most accurately describes the material's physical condition, constitutes the Federal condition code for reutilization program screening and review purposes.

a. Supply condition codes are used to classify materiel in terms of readiness for issue and use or to identify action underway to change the status of materiel. These codes are assigned by the Military Services/Defense Agencies.

b. Disposal condition codes are assigned by the DRMO based upon inspection of materiel at time of receipt.

Confiscated Property

Property confiscated by U.S. Customs, or other competent U.S. Government authority, primarily related to military-type equipment, except ammunition and dangerous property, may be turned in to the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) for processing. This property shall be processed by the DRMO in the same manner as Military Service/Defense Agency excess.

Conservation

Actions devoted to protecting objects to minimize chemical and physical deterioration (preservation); also actions devoted to saving objects for the future by examination and documentation of the object's contents.

Conservation supplies, equipment, facilities, or systems (See Conservation)

Examples are acid-free tissue and boxes, examination booths, and fumigation chambers. Does not include supplies, equipment, facilities, or systems that have only as an indirect or secondary purpose the conservation of historical objects and their contents, such as information technology that is used for general office and business functions, even though it may sometimes be used for conservation activities. Note: If lease, purchase, or other acquisition of real property (as a conservation facility) is being considered under the exchange process of 10 USC 2572(b), (see para 4-5 of this regulation), coordination with the Army Corps of Engineers is required prior to any such acquisition.

Conservation, restoration, and preservation services

(See conservation, restoration, and preservation.) Includes treatment of historic books and documents, metal and wooden artifacts to reduce deterioration, and the examination and documentation of an object's contents; for example, mounting a flag, fumigation, or climate control (conservation and preservation) and filling a hole in a vase or replacing a missing spoke on a wheel (restoration). Restoration, conservation, and preservation services relate directly to curatorial functions. They do not include activities that are not performed directly for the benefit of historical objects, such as services that are part of an overall office or business function, for example, accounting or secretarial services.

Custodian

The individual having direct responsibility for the protection and accountability of Army historical property on a temporary basis.

De-accession

The disposal or loss of an object from the Army Historical Collection.

Demilitarization (DEMIL or demil.)

The act of destroying the military offensive or defensive advantages inherent in certain types of equipment or materiel. The term includes mutilation, dumping at sea, scrapping, melting, burning, or alteration designed to prevent the further use of this equipment and materiel for its originally intended military or lethal purpose and applies equally to materiel in unserviceable or serviceable condition that has been screened through an inventory control point and declared excess or foreign excess.

Demilitarization Certification

A certificate signed by a technically qualified U.S. Government representative and countersigned by a technically qualified U.S. Government representative (American citizen) who actually witnessed the demilitarization of the material and or inspected the residue.

Demilitarization Code

A single character alpha code assigned by the item manager identifying the degree of demilitarization necessary prior to accomplishing final disposition of the item.

Director/Curator

The individual in charge of the Army museum, activity, collection and clearinghouse and responsible for all phases of the museum operation. The director/curator is normally the artifact responsible officer (ARO) for the historical items and associated items, and supervises one or more other staff members of lesser grade. (The AMC facility manager is the ARO at the Clearinghouse.)

Disaster Plan

The document providing specific actions to be taken by an Army museum staff and installation in the event of fire, flood, theft, mobilization, or civil unrest.

Disposal

The process of redistributing, transferring, donating, selling, abandoning, destroying or other disposition of DoD personal property.

Disposition

The authority to move Army historical property from a museum, historical holding or agency under Army control to another location that may or may not be under Army control.

Documentation

The recording, in a permanent format, of information about an object, including administrative, historical and conservation.

Donation

A gift or a free contribution.

Educational Programs

Programs, other than gallery exhibits and tours, that are used to instruct or provide information to members of the museum's constituency such as, lectures, slide presentations, classroom instruction or living history. For purposes of 10 USC 2572(b) exchanges: Only programs that provide education in the areas of curatorial functions and Military History. Education in areas not unique to museum work or Military History are not included.

End-use certificate

This document indicates the intended destination and disposition of sensitive, controlled items released from DoD control in accordance with the Export Administration Act. For transfers under the Foreign Assistance Act or Arms Export Control Act, see DoD 5105.38-M. As applied to all sales of Munitions List Items/Strategic List Items by DoD, the certificate is to be included in the sale solicitation executed by all bidders of such property and submitted with their bid. The certificate, when properly completed, becomes a part of the bid and ultimately part of the sale contract. Execution of the certificate may be a requirement in other instances (such as sale of aircraft, or hazardous property) when considered necessary by the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Logistics), DLA, or Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service.

End-use check

An inquiry made by the U.S. Diplomatic Mission or other U.S. Agency to verify that the final destination and ultimate use of DoD surplus personal property and DoD Foreign Excess Personal Property conforms to the destination and use stated in the End-Use certificate and approved by the U.S. Government.

Examination

The investigation of the structure, materials, and condition of objects including the identification of the extent and causes of alteration and deterioration.

Exhibit Plan

The document that provides both written and graphic plans for the development of an Army museum's exhibits. This plan includes all permanent, temporary, traveling, and outdoor exhibits.

Firearms

a. Any weapon (including a starter gun) that will, is designed to, or may readily be converted to expel a projectile by the action of an explosive.

b. The frame or receiver of any such weapon, any firearm muffler, firearm silencer, or any destructive device. The term does not include an antique firearm .

c. Category I includes revolvers, pistols, rifles, carbines, fully automatic rifles, submachine guns, machine pistols and machine guns to caliber .50, inclusive. It includes combat shotguns. It excludes other shotguns with barrels 18 inches or longer, BB, pellet and muzzle loading (black powder) firearms .

d. A "rifle" is a shoulder firearm that can discharge a bullet through a rifled barrel 16 inches or longer.

e. A "carbine" is a lightweight shoulder firearm with a barrel under 16 inches in length.

f. A "pistol" is a hand-operated firearm having a chamber integral with or permanently aligned with the bore.

g. A "revolver" is a hand-operated firearm with a revolving cylinder containing chambers for individual cartridges.

h. A "submachine gun," "machine pistol" or "machine gun" is a firearm originally designed to fire, or capable or being fired, fully automatically by a single pull of the trigger.

Fire Suppression System

An automatic system consisting of devices that apply various extinguishing agents (water, foam, dry and wet chemicals, gas) on a fire without action on the part of people and usually arranged to transmit an alarm to a fire communications center.

Flag

A piece of fabric of distinctive design used as a symbol or signaling device.

Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Part (FSCAP)

Any aircraft part, assembly, or installation containing a critical characteristic whose failure, malfunction, or absence could cause a catastrophic failure resulting in loss or serious damage to the aircraft or an uncommanded engine shutdown resulting in an unsafe condition.

Guidon

A unit identification marker authorized for companies, batteries, troops, special units, detachments and special platoons.

Halons

Halon 1211 is a streaming agent (with a higher boiling temperature than Halon 1301) used in portable hand extinguishers for electronic equipment areas and large wheeled extinguishers at airfields refueling sites. Some Aircraft, Rescue, Fire Fighting (ARRF) vehicles use Halon 1211 as a secondary fire-fighting agent. Halon 1301 is a gaseous agent primarily used in command, control, communications, and computer facilities.

Hazardous Materials

Any material deemed hazardous as defined in 29 CFR 1910.1200 or 49 CFR 172.101.

Historical Artifact

Any object that has been designated by appropriate authority as being historically significant because of its association with a person, organization, event, or place, or because it is a representative example of military equipment that has been accessioned into the Army Historical Collection. Artifacts will cease to perform their original function.

Historical Collection

A collection of historical property under Army control displayed in a regimental room, trophy room, visitor's center, hall of fame, exhibit area, or other type of display not recognized by the Department of the Army as a museum or museum activity, including a former Army museum.

a. A collection of historical artifacts secured, accounted for and stored at an installation or facility.

b. A collection of historical artifacts in an officer's club, noncommissioned officers club, community club, chapel, lobbies, or headquarters building.

c. A collection of artifacts such as tanks, artillery, vehicles, or other items displayed in front of buildings, on the parade ground, at the airfield, in parks, or at other locations around the installation on Federal property.

Historical Holding

Obsolete term previously used to define a noncertified museum or a collection of artifacts. Museum activity or historical collection has replaced this term.

Historical Property

Army property, current, excess, obsolete, or condemned, and any war trophy that has been designated historical by appropriate authority. Also any object and that may not have been so designated but, because of its age or obvious significance, is inherently historical. All historical artifacts are the responsibility of the CMH and will be registered and cataloged into the central catalog.

a. Reproductions, models, dioramas, books, and archival material may be designated as historical property, but are not normally considered so.

b. Athletic trophies, plaques, awards, and other items of transitory significance and not pertinent to the history of an organization, installation, or the U.S. Army, its enemies or allies, are not generally considered to have historical significance within the meaning of this regulation.

c. Excess, condemned, or obsolete equipment and materiel.

Historical Property Jacket File

A file folder that contains documentation of any kind pertaining to a cataloged object.

Incoming Loan

The temporary use by the U.S. Army of a historical item received from any source outside of Army control.

International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR)

Regulations implementing the authority granted the President to control the export and import of defense articles and defense services. The Director of the Office Munitions Control, U.S. Department of State, primarily administers these regulations.

Inventory value

The dollar value at which materiel is carried on inventory records for monetary accounting purposes. It is established on the basis of standard prices, or actual or estimated acquisition cost of items when standard prices are not used. This is applicable to all property regardless of condition, except for unidentifiable scrap and privately owned abandoned personal property.

Lethal Material

Material, which because of its design, intended use, or composition, is capable of causing injury, death, or destruction. Lethal material consists of, but is not limited to, arms; ammunition; bombs; grenades; explosive rockets; squibs; solid fuels (JATO); poisonous and caustic acids, whether gaseous, liquid or solid; toxic biological agents; spring-loaded devices, such as recoil mechanisms and equilibrators: etc. For example all small-arms spare parts except stocks, slings, and common hardware items are designated as lethal. Aircraft, shipboard, and vehicular parts associated primarily with flyability and mobility are not designated as lethal.

Loan

To grant temporary use of an object outside of Army control.

Macro Artifact

Large objects such as, but not limited to, tanks, armored vehicles, aircraft, vehicles, locomotives, and rail cars, which are difficult to display indoors under normal museum conditions and may therefore be left exposed to the elements.

MAC Facility

A facility with a controlled environment of sufficient size to house, work on, and protect macro artifacts on a long-term basis.

Material Culture

The physical evidence produced by or for a culture or nation or its people from which an understanding of that culture, nation, or people can be derived.

Material Safety Data Sheet

Written or printed material prepared IAW 29 CFR 1910.1200 (g), concerning a hazardous chemical.

Military Item

An item of equipment designed primarily for military offensive or defensive operations.

Mission Statement

The document that defines the primary and secondary subject areas or themes to be interpreted by an Army museum.

Munitions List Item (MLI)

Any item contained in the U.S. Munitions List 22 CFR 121.

Mutilation

The act of making material unfit for its intended purpose by cutting, tearing, scratching, crushing, breaking, punching, shearing, burning, neutralizing, etc. A form of demilitarization.

Museum

See Certified Army Museum.

Museum Activity (formerly known as a Historical Holding)

An appropriated-fund entity that is a permanent historical activity possessing a historical collection housed in a building or a part thereof, specially designed for the exclusive use of the museum, which is open to the military and civilian visitor at regularly scheduled hours and is in the care of a professional staff that performs curatorial functions, training, education, and related historical duties full-time, but has failed to meet all of the Army museum certification requirements of this regulation.

Museum Master Plan

The basic document for developing resources, activities, and continuity between successive command and museum staff changes.

Museum Safe

Material that is inert or relatively free from hostile substances that might cause harm to an artifact.

Museum Support Articles

Nonstandard items found in Army museums and historical holdings, such as dioramas, models, reproductions, and special nonstandard display furniture that are neither historical property nor standard Army equipment as specified in Army equipment requirements and authorization documents.

Nomenclature

The act or process of naming or identifying something; a system or set of terms used in a discipline for identification (such as military equipment).

Nonappropriated Fund Property

Property that does not belong to the U.S. Army but that belongs to a unit, agency, or nonappropriated fund instrumentality. Historical objects acquired for historical purposes with nonappropriated funds must be legally donated to be maintained by the Army.

Obsolete Combat Materiel

Military equipment, utilized in a primarily combat role, that has been phased out of operational use; if replaced, the replacement items are of a more current design or capability.

Organizational Color

A piece of fabric of distinctive design used as a symbol of a specific color bearing organization.

Organizational Historical Artifacts

Historical objects relating to and in the custody of a particular Army organization and subject to the requirements of this regulation.

Outgoing Loan

The temporary use of a historical object belonging to the U.S. Army by a museum, institution, or agency not under Army control.

Preservation

The protection of objects through activities that minimize chemical and physical deterioration and damage and that prevent loss of informational context. The primary goal is to prolong the existence of the item.

Preventive Care

The mitigation of deterioration and damage to objects through the formulation and implementation of policies and procedures for the following: appropriate environmental conditions; handling and maintenance procedures for storage, exhibition, packing, transport, and use; integrated pest control management; emergency preparedness and response; and reformatting/duplication.

Private Organization/Museum

Refer to paragraph 3-10 in this regulation for details.

Provisional Army Museum

A newly established Army museum that has 2 years to reach certification status.

Radioactive Materials

Any material that emits, by spontaneous nuclear disintegration, corpuscular or electromagnetic emanations.

Recertification

The process by which an Army museum is periodically reevaluated by the CMH to ensure that the museum continues to meet the standards of this regulation as a certified Army museum.

Relics and Trophies

Mementos, souvenirs, and obsolete or condemned Army property, may be designated as historical property by appropriate authority. Relics and trophies suitable for museum purposes, including ships' bells and nameplates and captured enemy equipment, shall be reported to the applicable military service museum or curator and disposed of in accordance with instructions received from the museum or curator.

Registration

The recording of information concerning the receipt of one or more objects from one source on one date to establish accountability. The process is the same for items being permanently added to the Army Historical Collection and those that are only temporary.

Registration Number

The number applied to a registration transaction that links the artifacts to the source and the date. Commonly called an accession number.

Responsibility

The obligation of an individual to ensure for Government property and funds entrusted to his or her possession, command, or supervision and that proper custody and safekeeping are provided. There are four types of responsibility as defined in AR 735- 5, para. 13-30a(2)-(5); command responsibility, direct responsibility, supervisory responsibility, and personal responsibility.

Restoration

Treatment procedures intended to return an object to a known or assumed state, often through the addition of nonoriginal material. A repair or rebuilding process.

Salvage

The recovery of a historical object(s) from a remote location, including archeological sites or from locations not normally accessible to the U.S. Army.

Scope-of-Collection Statement

The document specifying the origin, period, and subject of the historically significant items that a museum collects.

Search

The process of locating historical objects that were not previously known or whose location was not confirmed.

Significant Military Equipment

Those articles for which special export controls are warranted because of their capacity for substantial military utility or capability. Items listed in DoD 4160.21-M-1, appendix 1, which are preceded by an asterisk are significant military equipment. Section 47(6) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 USC 2794(6) (note) provides a definition of "major defense equipment on the U.S. Munitions List." The terms "significant military equipment" and "significant combat equipment" are considered to be equivalent for purposes of that section of the Arms Export Control Act and the DoD 4160.21-M-1. Items designated as significant military equipment require worldwide demilitarization as prescribed in DoD 4160.21-M-1, appendix 4.

Small Arms

Hand guns; shoulder fired-weapons; light automatic weapons up to and including .50-caliber machine guns; recoilless rifles up to and including 106 mm; mortars up to and including 81 mm; rocket launchers, man portable; grenade launchers, rifle and shoulder fired; and individually operated weapons that are portable and or can be fixed without special mounts or firing devices, have potential use in civil disturbances, and are vulnerable to theft. (NOTE: This includes all weapons meeting this criteria regardless of origin, including foreign, commercial and nonappropriated funds weapons as well as antique firearms and weapons seized by DoD law enforcement or investigative organizations and forfeited under the provisions of 10 USC 924, regardless of whether or not the weapons have a national stock number, but not including air guns.)

Stabilization

Treatment procedures intended to maintain the integrity of an object and to minimize deterioration.

Standard

Obsolete term that referred to an Organizational Color for a mounted unit.

Story Line

The document providing written researched documentation as to the subject areas or themes with main references and authorities cited. This document is the in-depth development of the museum's mission statement.

Temporary Transfer

The temporary use of a historical object belonging to the Army Historical Collection by a museum, museum activity, historical collection, the Clearinghouse, or other agency under Army control. This term is used to avoid confusion with loans being made outside of Army control and which are based on different legal authority.

Title Document

A document such as a letter of donation, gift agreement, or form which shows transfer of title to or ownership of an item by the U.S. Army.

Transfer

The movement of a historical object belonging to the Army Historical Collection from one museum, museum activity, historical collection, the Clearinghouse, or other agency under Army control to another under Army control. The object remains a part of the Army Historical Collection.

Treatment

The deliberate alteration of the chemical and/or physical aspects of an object, aimed primarily at prolonging its existence. Treatment may consist of stabilization and or restoration.

Veterans' Organization

An organization composed of honorably discharged soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines, which is recognized as a veterans' organization by the Veterans Administration.

War Trophy

Personal souvenirs acquired by individual soldiers, which may include military weapons or objects acquired from the enemy. War trophies do not include U.S. or allied property, equipment name plates, live ammunition or explosives, weapons defined as"firearms" by the National Firearms Act, electronic equipment, flammable materials, nonpersonal government issue materials such as vehicles, aircraft, or tools, household items such as furnishings, art, and cultural property, items required for intelligence purposes, items protected by law or treaty, and items designated as Army historical artifacts. Refer to AR 680-4 for further details.

Weapons system

All complex weapons systems and components required for operation, including tanks, self-propelled guns, aircraft, and vessels.

Special Terms

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